Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 371
Filter
1.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(10)2022 May 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1875646

ABSTRACT

In the present decade, we are seeing a rapid increase in available genetics and multiomics information on blood and vascular components of the human and mammalian circulation, involved in haemostasis, athero- and venous thrombosis, and thrombo-inflammation [...].


Subject(s)
Thrombosis , Venous Thrombosis , Animals , Hemostasis/genetics , Humans , Inflammation/genetics , Mammals , Thrombosis/genetics
2.
Blood ; 139(17): 2581-2583, 2022 04 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1874990
3.
Curr Neurol Neurosci Rep ; 21(10): 59, 2021 10 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1866682

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The present review discusses in-depth about neurological complications following acute venous thromboembolism (VTE). RECENT FINDINGS: Intracranial hemorrhage, acute ischemic cerebrovascular events, and VTE in brain tumors are described as central nervous system (CNS) complications of PE, while peripheral neuropathy and neuropathic pain are reported as peripheral nervous system (PNS) sequelae of PE. Syncope and seizure are illustrated as atypical neurological presentations of PE. Mounting evidence suggests higher risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients with neurological diseases, but data on reverse, i.e., neurological sequelae following VTE, is underexplored. The present review is an attempt to explore some of the latter issues categorized into CNS, PNS, and atypical complications following VTE.


Subject(s)
Brain Neoplasms , Pulmonary Embolism , Venous Thromboembolism , Venous Thrombosis , Anticoagulants , Humans , Pulmonary Embolism/complications , Pulmonary Embolism/epidemiology , Risk Factors , Venous Thromboembolism/epidemiology , Venous Thromboembolism/etiology
4.
Can J Gastroenterol Hepatol ; 2022: 5900468, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1854483

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Several studies have demonstrated that thromboembolic events increased in patients with coronavirus infection, usually occurring in elderly patients with severe illness, associated with comorbid diseases such as diabetes and hypertension. Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is a rare venous thromboembolic disease occurring typically in patients with an underlying disease such as decompensated cirrhosis with or without hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Aim: To evaluate incidence of occurrence of acute PVT in cirrhotic patients infected with 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19). Methods: This cross-sectional, observational study involved 70 patients of the liver cirrhosis: (group A) 28 patients with liver cirrhosis infected with COVID-19, and 42 patients with liver cirrhosis as the control group matched for age and sex (group B). All patients were subjected to thorough medical history, routine investigations (complete blood count, liver, and renal function tests), imaging in the form of abdominal and Doppler ultrasonography to assess the presence of acute PVT, serum ferritin, D-dimer, C-reactive protein, and PCR of COVID-19 for group A only. Results: There was a significant difference between the two groups regarding Doppler ultrasound findings as 3 of the patients in group A had PVT (10.7%), 2 of them had HCC diagnosed by triphasic CT abdomen, and only 1 patient in group B had PVT (2.3%) (p < 0.05). Conclusion: In cirrhotic patients infected with COVID-19, portal vein thrombosis may be a potential complication even in the absence of hepatocellular carcinoma; further prospective studies with longer follow-up may be needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular , Liver Neoplasms , Venous Thrombosis , Aged , COVID-19/complications , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/complications , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Liver Cirrhosis/complications , Portal Vein , Prospective Studies , Venous Thrombosis/epidemiology , Venous Thrombosis/etiology
5.
J Ayub Med Coll Abbottabad ; 34(2): 369-374, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1848218

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 infection has spread rampantly, attaining pandemic status within three months of its first appearance. It has been classically associated with respiratory signs and symptoms. However, unusual presentations have also been reported in multiple literatures. We are reporting a case of acute heart failure in a pregnant patient diagnosed with Covid-19 infection. Her hospital course has been complicated by pneumonia and venous thrombosis during the postpartum period. Her laboratory investigations showed evidence of myocardial injury, acute heart failure, and COVID-19 infection in second PCR sample taken during postpartum period. Echocardiography exhibited features of severe left ventricle systolic dysfunction. She had successful delivery through caesarean-section, nevertheless, her postpartum period was complicated by pneumonia and right femoral venous thrombosis. CT scan of the chest and pulmonary arteries revealed infiltrations in the left lower lobe and right middle lobe, suggestive of consolidation, with no evidence of pulmonary embolism. Cardiac MRI displayed severe global LV and RV systolic dysfunction, but no evidence of myocardial infarction, myocardial infiltration, or abnormal myocardial delayed enhancement. Her condition improved and she was discharged on heart failure medications. During follow-up at the heart failure clinic, her symptoms continued to ameliorate, except the LV and RV systolic dysfunction which persisted. Multiple unusual presentations of Covid-19 infection have been reported in various literatures and screening of the COVID-19 infection should be practiced on regular basis especially among high-risk patients. Prompt identification of COVID-19 infection will lead to proper isolation and mitigation of infection spread among hospitalized patients and health care workers. Covid-19 PCR should be repeated in cases having clinical indication and negative first sample. A proper history and cardiac MRI can differentiate between different aetiologies of heart failure during pregnancy and peripartum COVID-19 infection. Adequate anticoagulation should be considered in COVID-19 patients due to the high risk of thromboembolism. Among patients with COVID-19 infection, CT chest helps demonstrate the extent of pulmonary involvement.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiomyopathies , Heart Failure , Venous Thrombosis , COVID-19/complications , Cardiomyopathies/complications , Echocardiography/adverse effects , Female , Heart Failure/etiology , Humans , Pandemics , Pregnancy
6.
BMC Infect Dis ; 22(1): 462, 2022 May 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1846799

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients with COVID-19 infection are commonly reported to have an increased risk of venous thrombosis. The choice of anti-thrombotic agents and doses are currently being studied in randomized controlled trials and retrospective studies. There exists a need for individualized risk stratification of venous thromboembolism (VTE) to assist clinicians in decision-making on anticoagulation. We sought to identify the risk factors of VTE in COVID-19 patients, which could help physicians in the prevention, early identification, and management of VTE in hospitalized COVID-19 patients and improve clinical outcomes in these patients. METHOD: This is a multicenter, retrospective database of four main health systems in Southeast Michigan, United States. We compiled comprehensive data for adult COVID-19 patients who were admitted between 1st March 2020 and 31st December 2020. Four models, including the random forest, multiple logistic regression, multilinear regression, and decision trees, were built on the primary outcome of in-hospital acute deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) and tested for performance. The study also reported hospital length of stay (LOS) and intensive care unit (ICU) LOS in the VTE and the non-VTE patients. Four models were assessed using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve and confusion matrix. RESULTS: The cohort included 3531 admissions, 3526 had discharge diagnoses, and 6.68% of patients developed acute VTE (N = 236). VTE group had a longer hospital and ICU LOS than the non-VTE group (hospital LOS 12.2 days vs. 8.8 days, p < 0.001; ICU LOS 3.8 days vs. 1.9 days, p < 0.001). 9.8% of patients in the VTE group required more advanced oxygen support, compared to 2.7% of patients in the non-VTE group (p < 0.001). Among all four models, the random forest model had the best performance. The model suggested that blood pressure, electrolytes, renal function, hepatic enzymes, and inflammatory markers were predictors for in-hospital VTE in COVID-19 patients. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with COVID-19 have a high risk for VTE, and patients who developed VTE had a prolonged hospital and ICU stay. This random forest prediction model for VTE in COVID-19 patients identifies predictors which could aid physicians in making a clinical judgment on empirical dosages of anticoagulation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pulmonary Embolism , Venous Thromboembolism , Venous Thrombosis , Adult , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , Cohort Studies , Humans , Pulmonary Embolism/diagnosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Venous Thromboembolism/drug therapy , Venous Thromboembolism/epidemiology , Venous Thromboembolism/etiology , Venous Thrombosis/diagnosis
7.
Neurol India ; 70(2): 652-659, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1835061

ABSTRACT

Background: COVID-19 causes a hypercoagulable state leading to thrombosis. Many of these thrombotic complications occur in those with severe disease and late in the disease course. COVID-19 has recently been associated with cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT). Objective: To study the onset of CVT in relation to COVID-19 and compare their characteristics and outcomes with non-COVID CVT patients admitted during the same period. Materials and Methods: This multicentric, retrospective study conducted between April 4 and October 15, 2020, included adult patients with CVT who were positive for the SARS-CoV-2 virus and compared them with CVT patients who were negative for the SARS-CoV-2 virus hospitalized during the same period. We studied their clinical profile, risk factors for CVT, and markers of COVID coagulopathy, imaging characteristics, and factors influencing their outcomes. Results: We included 18 COVID-19-infected patients and compared them with 43 non-COVID-19 CVT patients. Fourteen patients in the COVID-19 group presented with CVT without the other typical features of COVID-19. Thirteen patients had non-severe COVID-19 disease. Twelve patients had a good outcome (mRS ≤2). Mortality and disability outcomes were not significantly different between the two groups. Conclusion: Our study suggests a possible association between COVID-19 and CVT. CVT can be the presenting manifestation of an underlying COVID-19, occurring early in the course of COVID-19 and even in those with mild disease. Patients with worse GCS on admission, abnormal HRCT chest, severe COVID-19, and need for invasive ventilation had a poor outcome.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Intracranial Thrombosis , Venous Thrombosis , Adult , COVID-19/complications , Humans , Intracranial Thrombosis/complications , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Venous Thrombosis/etiology
8.
J Thromb Haemost ; 20(5): 1056-1066, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1822054

ABSTRACT

Venous thromboembolism is a very common and costly health problem worldwide. Anticoagulant treatment for VTE is imperfect: all have the potential for significant bleeding, and none prevent the development of post thrombotic syndrome after deep vein thrombosis or chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension after pulmonary embolism. For these reasons, alternate forms of therapy with improved efficacy and decreased bleeding are needed. Selectins are a family (P-selectin, E-selectin, L-selectin) of glycoproteins that facilitate and augment thrombosis, modulating neutrophil, monocyte, and platelet activity. P- and E-selectin have been investigated as potential biomarkers for thrombosis. Inhibition of P-selectin and E-selectin decrease thrombosis and vein wall fibrosis, with no increase in bleeding. Selectin inhibition is a promising avenue of future study as either a stand-alone treatment for VTE or as an adjunct to standard anticoagulation therapies.


Subject(s)
Pulmonary Embolism , Thrombosis , Venous Thromboembolism , Venous Thrombosis , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , E-Selectin , Hemorrhage , Humans , Pulmonary Embolism/drug therapy , Selectins , Venous Thromboembolism/drug therapy , Venous Thrombosis/prevention & control
9.
Int J Infect Dis ; 119: 130-139, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1814522

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To meta-analyse the clinical manifestations, diagnosis, treatment, and mortality of vaccine-induced immune thrombotic thrombocytopenia (VITT) after adenoviral vector vaccination. METHODS: Eighteen studies of VITT after ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 or Ad26.COV2.S vaccine administration were reviewed from PubMed, Scopus, Embase, and Web of Science. The meta-analysis estimated the summary effects and between-study heterogeneity regarding the incidence, manifestations, sites of thrombosis, diagnostic findings, and clinical outcomes. RESULTS: The incidence of total venous thrombosis after ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 vaccination was 28 (95% CI 12-52, I2=100%) per 100,000 doses administered. Of 664 patients included in the quantitative analysis (10 studies), the mean age of patients with VITT was 45.6 years (95% CI 43.8-47.4, I2=57%), with a female predominance (70%). Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT), deep vein thrombosis (DVT)/pulmonary thromboembolism (PE), and splanchnic vein thrombosis occurred in 54%, 36%, and 19% of patients with VITT, respectively. The pooled incidence rate of CVT after ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 vaccination (23 per 100,000 person-years) was higher than that reported in the pre-pandemic general population (0.9 per 100,000 person-years). Intracranial haemorrhage and extracranial thrombosis accompanied 47% and 33% of all patients with CVT, respectively. The antiplatelet factor 4 antibody positivity rate was 91% (95% CI 88-94, I2=0%) and the overall mortality was 32% (95% CI 24-41, I2=69%), and no significant difference was observed between heparin- and non-heparin-based anticoagulation treatments (risk ratio 0.84, 95% CI 0.47-1.50, I2=0%). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with VITT after SARS-CoV-2 vaccination most frequently presented with CVT following DVT/PE and splanchnic vein thrombosis, and about one-third of patients had a fatal outcome. This meta-analysis should provide a better understanding of VITT and assist clinicians in identifying VITT early to improve outcomes and optimise management.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic , Thrombocytopenia , Thrombosis , Vaccines , Venous Thrombosis , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/epidemiology , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/etiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombocytopenia/etiology , Thrombosis/epidemiology , Thrombosis/etiology , Venous Thrombosis/chemically induced , Venous Thrombosis/etiology
10.
Front Immunol ; 13: 833490, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1809392

ABSTRACT

Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a rare form of cerebrovascular disease that impairs people's wellbeing and quality of life. Inflammation is considered to play an important role in CVT initiation and progression. Several studies have reported the important role of leukocytes, proinflammatory cytokines, and adherence molecules in the CVT-related inflammatory process. Moreover, inflammatory factors exacerbate CVT-induced brain tissue injury leading to poor prognosis. Based on clinical observations, emerging evidence shows that peripheral blood inflammatory biomarkers-especially neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and lymphocyte count-are correlated with CVT [mean difference (MD) (95%CI), 0.74 (0.11, 1.38), p = 0.02 and -0.29 (-0.51, -0.06), p = 0.01, respectively]. Moreover, increased NLR and systemic immune-inflammation index (SII) portend poor patient outcomes. Evidence accumulated since the outbreak of coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) indicates that COVID-19 infection and COVID-19 vaccine can induce CVT through inflammatory reactions. Given the poor understanding of the association between inflammation and CVT, many conundrums remain unsolved. Further investigations are needed to elucidate the exact relationship between inflammation and CVT in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Intracranial Thrombosis , Venous Thrombosis , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , Inflammation , Intracranial Thrombosis/epidemiology , Intracranial Thrombosis/etiology , Quality of Life , Venous Thrombosis/etiology
11.
Clin Neurol Neurosurg ; 217: 107256, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1797054

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To describe the clinical characteristics and outcomes of CVT in patients with history of recent COVID-19 infection or vaccination. METHODS: We reviewed demographic, clinical, and radiographic characteristics of non-pyrogenic, non-traumatic CVT cases at our multi-center institution between March 2020 and December 2021. Patients were grouped according to their history of recent COVID-19 infection or vaccination into group-I (+COVID-19 association) and group-II (-COVID-19 association). RESULTS: Fifty-one patients with CVT were included, of which 14 (27.4%) had a positive COVID-19 association: 10 with infection and 4 with mRNA-COVID-vaccine. Nine patients in group-I had COVID-19 infection or vaccine within 30 days of CVT diagnosis, including 3 patients with active infection at the time of CVT diagnosis. Half of the patients in group-I (n = 7,50.0%) and 32.4% (n = 12) of group-II were male, and mean age was 52.6 years in group-I and 51.4 years in group-II. Fever at presentation was noted in one patient who had active COVID infection (I=1 (7.1%), II= 0 (0%)). Higher rates of comorbidities were observed in group-II: hypertension (I= 2 (14.3%), II= 13 (35.1%)), deep venous thrombosis(I=1(7.1%), II= 10 (27.0%)), pulmonary emboli (I=1(7.1%), II= 8(21.6%)), or stroke(I=0(0%), II= 6(16.4%)). Three patients had thrombocytopenia at the time of CVT diagnosis (5.4%) and most patients (n = 37, 72.5%) were treated medically with anticoagulation. Complication rate during hospitalization was 17.6% (n = 6), and no mortality was noted. CONCLUSION: Twenty-seven percent of CVT patients were associated with COVID-19 infection or vaccination, and the majority presented within 30 days of infection/vaccination.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Intracranial Thrombosis , Vaccines , Venous Thrombosis , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Intracranial Thrombosis/etiology , Male , Middle Aged , Multicenter Studies as Topic , Pandemics , Venous Thrombosis/epidemiology , Venous Thrombosis/etiology
13.
BMJ ; 377: e069590, 2022 04 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1779333

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To quantify the risk of deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and bleeding after covid-19. DESIGN: Self-controlled case series and matched cohort study. SETTING: National registries in Sweden. PARTICIPANTS: 1 057 174 people who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 between 1 February 2020 and 25 May 2021 in Sweden, matched on age, sex, and county of residence to 4 076 342 control participants. MAIN OUTCOMES MEASURES: Self-controlled case series and conditional Poisson regression were used to determine the incidence rate ratio and risk ratio with corresponding 95% confidence intervals for a first deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, or bleeding event. In the self-controlled case series, the incidence rate ratios for first time outcomes after covid-19 were determined using set time intervals and the spline model. The risk ratios for first time and all events were determined during days 1-30 after covid-19 or index date using the matched cohort study, and adjusting for potential confounders (comorbidities, cancer, surgery, long term anticoagulation treatment, previous venous thromboembolism, or previous bleeding event). RESULTS: Compared with the control period, incidence rate ratios were significantly increased 70 days after covid-19 for deep vein thrombosis, 110 days for pulmonary embolism, and 60 days for bleeding. In particular, incidence rate ratios for a first pulmonary embolism were 36.17 (95% confidence interval 31.55 to 41.47) during the first week after covid-19 and 46.40 (40.61 to 53.02) during the second week. Incidence rate ratios during days 1-30 after covid-19 were 5.90 (5.12 to 6.80) for deep vein thrombosis, 31.59 (27.99 to 35.63) for pulmonary embolism, and 2.48 (2.30 to 2.68) for bleeding. Similarly, the risk ratios during days 1-30 after covid-19 were 4.98 (4.96 to 5.01) for deep vein thrombosis, 33.05 (32.8 to 33.3) for pulmonary embolism, and 1.88 (1.71 to 2.07) for bleeding, after adjusting for the effect of potential confounders. The rate ratios were highest in patients with critical covid-19 and highest during the first pandemic wave in Sweden compared with the second and third waves. In the same period, the absolute risk among patients with covid-19 was 0.039% (401 events) for deep vein thrombosis, 0.17% (1761 events) for pulmonary embolism, and 0.101% (1002 events) for bleeding. CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this study suggest that covid-19 is a risk factor for deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and bleeding. These results could impact recommendations on diagnostic and prophylactic strategies against venous thromboembolism after covid-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pulmonary Embolism , Venous Thromboembolism , Venous Thrombosis , Anticoagulants/adverse effects , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Hemorrhage/chemically induced , Hemorrhage/etiology , Humans , Pulmonary Embolism/epidemiology , Pulmonary Embolism/etiology , Pulmonary Embolism/prevention & control , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Venous Thromboembolism/chemically induced , Venous Thrombosis/chemically induced , Venous Thrombosis/etiology
14.
BMJ Case Rep ; 15(4)2022 Apr 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1779331

ABSTRACT

A 49-year-old woman presented with severe abdominal pain and per rectal bleed, 13 days after receiving the first dose of the AstraZeneca vaccine. Blood tests showed remarkably low platelet count, unmeasurable D-dimer levels and low fibrinogen levels, consistent with a diagnosis of vaccine-induced thrombotic thrombocytopaenia and disseminated intravascular coagulation. CT mesenteric angiogram revealed massive portosplenic mesenteric vein thrombosis. CT head also noted non-occlusive thrombosis at several sites. She was treated with intravenous immunoglobulins, plasma exchange, anticoagulants and transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt procedure. Following a prolonged inpatient stay, she was discharged with subsequent short bowel syndrome and long-term parenteral nutrition. This particular clinical scenario aims to highlight the importance for clinicians to remain vigilant for rare complications associated with the AstraZeneca vaccine and the subsequent management involved, at a time where it is vital to vaccinate globally in order to control the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Thrombocytopenia , Thrombosis , Vaccines , Venous Thrombosis , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Edema , Female , Humans , Ischemia , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombocytopenia/chemically induced , Thrombocytopenia/diagnosis , Vaccines/adverse effects , Venous Thrombosis/etiology
16.
BMC Infect Dis ; 22(1): 277, 2022 Mar 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1759707

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although the RECOVERY trial showed that dexamethasone was efficacious for the treatment of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), its impact on the risk of pulmonary embolism (PE) and other serious procoagulant events was not assessed. CASE PRESENTATION: Here we report the case of a previously healthy 83-year-old woman with COVID-19, without any genetic predisposition to thrombosis. She developed moderate respiratory distress 12 days after symptom onset and a 10-day course of dexamethasone therapy was initiated. Her clinical condition and imaging findings improved initially; however, they deteriorated after the completion of dexamethasone therapy, despite the improvement in her pneumonia and viral clearance. Laboratory tests showed markedly raised serum D-dimer, ferritin, and sIL-2R levels, and contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in the left iliac vein and PE of the right pulmonary artery. The DVT and PE were successfully treated using intravenous heparin administration. CONCLUSIONS: This case illustrates the potential risk of rebound inflammation and procoagulant events following dexamethasone withdrawal. We believe that COVID-19-induced DVT and PE can be affected by dexamethasone therapy. Although dexamethasone reduces procoagulant factors, increases anticoagulant factors, and modulates cytokines, which can suppress/delay thrombus formation during treatment, it confers the risk for rebound cytokine production after treatment completion, triggering cytokine and coagulation cascades that can lead to thromboembolic diseases. In this critical clinical period, the patient's deteriorating condition may be overlooked because of the masking effects of dexamethasone treatment on fever and other clinical conditions and laboratory changes. Clinicians should follow-up coagulation markers carefully and contrast-enhanced computed tomography is useful for detecting coagulation; and, if PE occurs, therapeutic heparin administration is essential because emboli can also generate cytokines.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pulmonary Embolism , Venous Thrombosis , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , Dexamethasone/adverse effects , Female , Humans , Pulmonary Embolism/diagnosis , Pulmonary Embolism/drug therapy , Pulmonary Embolism/etiology , Venous Thrombosis/diagnosis , Venous Thrombosis/drug therapy , Venous Thrombosis/etiology
17.
J Vasc Surg Venous Lymphat Disord ; 10(4): 811-817, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1757625

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The incidence of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is increased in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and its presence is associated with worse outcomes. Ultrasound examination of patients with COVID-19 with a suspected DVT is challenging owing to concerns with disease transmission; the timely initiation of therapeutic anticoagulation is essential. This study aimed to identify patient factors associated with positive thrombus findings at ultrasound examination in patients with COVID-19 who underwent imaging for suspected DVT. METHODS: Patients who did not require intensive care unit treatment and who underwent ultrasound imaging for suspected DVT between March and December 2020 were included retrospectively. Patient demographics, comorbidities, modified Well's score, and d-dimer results on the day of ultrasound examination were recorded. Parameters for a higher likelihood of a positive DVT result were determined by comparing patients with confirmed DVT on ultrasound examination and patients with negative ultrasound findings. To determine a cut-off for d-dimer levels, a receiver operating characteristic curve was constructed. The sensitivity and specificity of the determined high-risk factors in the prediction of positive ultrasound results were calculated. RESULTS: A positive history for DVT (25% vs 4%; P < .001), thrombophilia (9% vs 2%; P = .048), immobilization (53% vs 23%; P = .001), and a Well's score ≥ 2 (50% vs 21%; P = .001) were more frequent in patients with DVT. The mean d-dimer levels were higher in patients with DVT (3871 ± 1805 vs 2075 ± 1543; P < .001). The presence of either thrombophilia or a d-dimer level of >2020 had a sensitivity of 93% and a specificity of 64%. The presence of either thrombophilia, a d-dimer level of >2020, or a Well's score of ≥2 had a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 51%. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with COVID-19 with a d-dimer of >2020, a positive history for thrombophilia, and a Well's score of ≥2 should undergo a timely ultrasound examination. The high risk of DVT should be remembered for all hospitalized patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Thrombophilia , Thrombosis , Venous Thrombosis , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , Humans , Retrospective Studies , Thrombophilia/complications , Ultrasonography , Venous Thrombosis/diagnostic imaging , Venous Thrombosis/etiology
18.
Wien Klin Wochenschr ; 133(23-24): 1281-1288, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1756809

ABSTRACT

High incidence of venous thromboembolic (VTE) events in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients has been reported despite pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis. We performed prospective bilateral lower extremity ultrasound evaluation of prolonged hospitalized COVID-19 ward patients from our institution without clinical suspicion of deep vein thrombosis (DVT).A total of 102 patient were included in the study. All patients were receiving pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis, the majority in intermediate or therapeutic doses. Asymptomatic DVT was detected in 26/102 (25.5%) patients: 22 had distal and four had proximal DVT, six had bilateral leg involvement. Pulmonary embolism was highly prevalent (17/70, 24.3%) but similarly grouped among patients with and without asymptomatic DVT. In total 37.2% of patients included in the study were recognized as having VTE.Asymptomatic DVT events were more common in intensive care unit (ICU) survivors (60% in postmechanically ventilated ICU survivors, 21.2% in ward patients, 22% in high-flow oxygen treated patients; P = 0.031), in patients with higher modified International Medical Prevention Registry on Venous Thromboembolism (IMPROVE) VTE risk-score (median 3 vs. 2 points with and without DVT; P = 0.021) and higher body temperature on admission (median 38.7 °C vs. 37.7 °C with and without DVT; P = 0.001). No clear associations with Padua VTE risk score, demographic and other clinical characteristics, intensity of thromboprophylaxis, severity of other COVID-19 symptoms, degree of systemic inflammation or D­dimers on admission were found (P > 0.05 for all analyses).Systematic ultrasound assessment in prolonged hospitalized severe COVID-19 patients prior to hospital discharge is needed, especially in ICU survivors, to timely recognize and appropriately treat patients with asymptomatic DVT.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Venous Thromboembolism , Venous Thrombosis , Anticoagulants , Humans , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Venous Thrombosis/diagnostic imaging , Venous Thrombosis/epidemiology
19.
J Investig Med High Impact Case Rep ; 10: 23247096221084513, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1753092

ABSTRACT

The 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) can present with a wide variety of clinical manifestations, including a hypercoagulable state leading to both arterial and venous thrombosis. Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) in the setting of COVID-19 has rarely been reported in the medical literature. Pylephlebitis with concomitant liver abscess is a rare complication of intra-abdominal infection. Here, we present the case of a 49-year-old man who initially presented with intermittent fevers and generalized weakness of 1-month duration and was subsequently found to have COVID-19 infection, PVT, and Bacteroides fragilis bacteremia with associated pyogenic liver abscess. The patient was treated with intravenous antibiotics and oral anticoagulation with plan to follow up outpatient with gastroenterology in 3 months to ensure resolution of PVT and liver abscess.


Subject(s)
Bacteremia , COVID-19 , Liver Abscess, Pyogenic , Venous Thrombosis , Bacteremia/complications , Bacteremia/drug therapy , Bacteroides , COVID-19/complications , Humans , Liver Abscess, Pyogenic/complications , Liver Abscess, Pyogenic/diagnosis , Liver Abscess, Pyogenic/drug therapy , Male , Middle Aged , Portal Vein , Venous Thrombosis/complications , Venous Thrombosis/drug therapy
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL