Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 92
Filter
1.
BMC Infect Dis ; 22(1): 277, 2022 Mar 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1759707

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although the RECOVERY trial showed that dexamethasone was efficacious for the treatment of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), its impact on the risk of pulmonary embolism (PE) and other serious procoagulant events was not assessed. CASE PRESENTATION: Here we report the case of a previously healthy 83-year-old woman with COVID-19, without any genetic predisposition to thrombosis. She developed moderate respiratory distress 12 days after symptom onset and a 10-day course of dexamethasone therapy was initiated. Her clinical condition and imaging findings improved initially; however, they deteriorated after the completion of dexamethasone therapy, despite the improvement in her pneumonia and viral clearance. Laboratory tests showed markedly raised serum D-dimer, ferritin, and sIL-2R levels, and contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in the left iliac vein and PE of the right pulmonary artery. The DVT and PE were successfully treated using intravenous heparin administration. CONCLUSIONS: This case illustrates the potential risk of rebound inflammation and procoagulant events following dexamethasone withdrawal. We believe that COVID-19-induced DVT and PE can be affected by dexamethasone therapy. Although dexamethasone reduces procoagulant factors, increases anticoagulant factors, and modulates cytokines, which can suppress/delay thrombus formation during treatment, it confers the risk for rebound cytokine production after treatment completion, triggering cytokine and coagulation cascades that can lead to thromboembolic diseases. In this critical clinical period, the patient's deteriorating condition may be overlooked because of the masking effects of dexamethasone treatment on fever and other clinical conditions and laboratory changes. Clinicians should follow-up coagulation markers carefully and contrast-enhanced computed tomography is useful for detecting coagulation; and, if PE occurs, therapeutic heparin administration is essential because emboli can also generate cytokines.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pulmonary Embolism , Venous Thrombosis , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , Dexamethasone/adverse effects , Female , Humans , Pulmonary Embolism/diagnosis , Pulmonary Embolism/drug therapy , Pulmonary Embolism/etiology , Venous Thrombosis/diagnosis , Venous Thrombosis/drug therapy , Venous Thrombosis/etiology
2.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 26(2): 686-694, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1675567

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: COVID-19 is associated with an increased prevalence of deep venous thrombosis (DVT), mainly in the lower limbs. However, the characteristics and rheological conditions, which contribute to facilitating DVT occurrence have been poorly investigated. We aimed to report DVT characteristics, vein diameters and peak blood flow velocities (PBFV) in the common femoral veins (CFVs) of critically ill COVID-19 patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We conducted a prospective single-center cohort study in March-October 2020 including all consecutive mechanically ventilated COVID-19 adults. Doppler ultrasound of the lower limbs was performed systematically during the first week of hospitalization. In DVT-free patients, a second Doppler ultrasound was performed seven days later. Data are expressed as medians (interquartile ranges) or percentages. Comparisons were performed using Mann-Whiney and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests or Fischer's exact tests, as appropriate. RESULTS: Fifty-five patients [age, 63 years (56-74); female/male ratio, 0.62; body-mass index, 29 kg/m2 (26-33); hypertension, 47%; diabetes, 38%; ischemic heart disease, 11%] were included. DVT was diagnosed in 19 patients (35%) including in 5 femoral (9%), 2 popliteal (4%) and 12 below-the-knee sites (22%). CFV diameter was increased to 12.0 mm (11.0-15.0) (normal range, 9.1-12) and PBFV reduced to 11.9 cm/s (8.8-15.8) (normal range, 21.3-49.2) [right-side values]. In four patients who had ultrasound before intubation, CFV diameter increased from 12.5 mm (11.8-13.3) before to 14 mm (13.6-15.3) after intubation (p = 0.008). CONCLUSIONS: DVT in the CFV occurred in 9% of the critically ill COVID-19 patients with an overall 35%-DVT prevalence. Venous return difficulty evidenced by larger than normal CFV diameters and lower than normal PBFVs may have facilitated proximal DVT occurrence.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Ultrasonography, Doppler , Venous Thrombosis/diagnosis , Aged , Blood Flow Velocity , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/virology , Cohort Studies , Comorbidity , Critical Illness , Female , Femoral Artery/diagnostic imaging , Femoral Artery/physiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Respiration, Artificial , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Survival Analysis , Venous Thrombosis/complications
3.
J Cardiovasc Surg (Torino) ; 62(6): 548-557, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1635301

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: We aimed to review the prevalence, the risk factors and the outcomes of venous thrombosis (VT) in patients hospitalized for COronaVirus Disease 19 (COVID-19). EVIDENCE ACQUISITION: Electronic bibliographic databases were searched using the words "COVID venous thrombosis". The review was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement standards. EVIDENCE SYNTHESIS: The search of the literature retrieved 877 results. After assessment of full texts, 69 papers were included in the qualitative analysis and 23 of them in the quantitative evaluation. The analyzed studies included a total of 106,838 patients hospitalized for COVID-19 from January to December 2020. The pooled reported prevalence rate of VT was in median 16.7% (IQR 5.8-30%), being higher in ICU patients (60.8-85.4%). VT events were reported in about 75% of cases in the popliteal and calf veins. Signs and symptoms were present in 6.1% of cases. At quantitative evaluation, older age, D-dimer and obesity increased the odds to experience a VT (OR=3.54, 95% CI 0.65-6.43, P=0.01; OR=956.86, 95% CI 225.67-1668.05, P=0.01; OR=1.42, 95% CI 1.01-1.99, P=0.03 respectively). Female sex seemed to be protective against the odds of VT (OR=0.77, 95% CI 0.63-0.93, P=0.007). CONCLUSIONS: Among patients hospitalized for COVID-19, VT is a relatively common finding, with higher prevalence rates in ICU patients. VT occurs mostly in the distal regions of the lower limb and is asymptomatic in most cases. Older age, obesity and higher D-dimer values on admission increased the odds of VT, while female sex was protective against the odds of VT.


Subject(s)
Blood Coagulation , COVID-19/epidemiology , Venous Thrombosis/epidemiology , Age Factors , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Biomarkers/blood , Blood Coagulation/drug effects , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Hospitalization , Humans , Obesity/epidemiology , Prevalence , Prognosis , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Sex Factors , Venous Thrombosis/blood , Venous Thrombosis/diagnosis , Venous Thrombosis/drug therapy
4.
J Gen Intern Med ; 36(11): 3478-3486, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525606

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Venous thrombotic events (VTE) are frequent in COVID-19, and elevated plasma D-dimer (pDd) and dyspnea are common in both entities. OBJECTIVE: To determine the admission pDd cut-off value associated with in-hospital VTE in patients with COVID-19. METHODS: Multicenter, retrospective study analyzing the at-admission pDd cut-off value to predict VTE and anticoagulation intensity along hospitalization due to COVID-19. RESULTS: Among 9386 patients, 2.2% had VTE: 1.6% pulmonary embolism (PE), 0.4% deep vein thrombosis (DVT), and 0.2% both. Those with VTE had a higher prevalence of tachypnea (42.9% vs. 31.1%; p = 0.0005), basal O2 saturation <93% (45.4% vs. 33.1%; p = 0.0003), higher at admission pDd (median [IQR]: 1.4 [0.6-5.5] vs. 0.6 [0.4-1.2] µg/ml; p < 0.0001) and platelet count (median [IQR]: 208 [158-289] vs. 189 [148-245] platelets × 109/L; p = 0.0013). A pDd cut-off of 1.1 µg/ml showed specificity 72%, sensitivity 49%, positive predictive value (PPV) 4%, and negative predictive value (NPV) 99% for in-hospital VTE. A cut-off value of 4.7 µg/ml showed specificity of 95%, sensitivity of 27%, PPV of 9%, and NPV of 98%. Overall mortality was proportional to pDd value, with the lowest incidence for each pDd category depending on anticoagulation intensity: 26.3% for those with pDd >1.0 µg/ml treated with prophylactic dose (p < 0.0001), 28.8% for pDd for patients with pDd >2.0 µg/ml treated with intermediate dose (p = 0.0001), and 31.3% for those with pDd >3.0 µg/ml and full anticoagulation (p = 0.0183). CONCLUSIONS: In hospitalized patients with COVID-19, a pDd value greater than 3.0 µg/ml can be considered to screen VTE and to consider full-dose anticoagulation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Venous Thromboembolism , Venous Thrombosis , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products , Hospitalization , Humans , Registries , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Venous Thromboembolism/diagnosis , Venous Thromboembolism/epidemiology , Venous Thrombosis/diagnosis , Venous Thrombosis/epidemiology
5.
J Vasc Surg Venous Lymphat Disord ; 9(3): 605-614.e2, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1510080

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Early reports suggest that patients with novel coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) infection carry a significant risk of altered coagulation with an increased risk for venous thromboembolic events. This report investigates the relationship of significant COVID-19 infection and deep venous thrombosis (DVT) as reflected in the patient clinical and laboratory characteristics. METHODS: We reviewed the demographics, clinical presentation, laboratory and radiologic evaluations, results of venous duplex imaging and mortality of COVID-19-positive patients (18-89 years) admitted to the Indiana University Academic Health Center. Using oxygen saturation, radiologic findings, and need for advanced respiratory therapies, patients were classified into mild, moderate, or severe categories of COVID-19 infection. A descriptive analysis was performed using univariate and bivariate Fisher's exact and Wilcoxon rank-sum tests to examine the distribution of patient characteristics and compare the DVT outcomes. A multivariable logistic regression model was used to estimate the adjusted odds ratio of experiencing DVT and a receiver operating curve analysis to identify the optimal cutoff for d-dimer to predict DVT in this COVID-19 cohort. Time to the diagnosis of DVT from admission was analyzed using log-rank test and Kaplan-Meier plots. RESULTS: Our study included 71 unique COVID-19-positive patients (mean age, 61 years) categorized as having 3% mild, 14% moderate, and 83% severe infection and evaluated with 107 venous duplex studies. DVT was identified in 47.8% of patients (37% of examinations) at an average of 5.9 days after admission. Patients with DVT were predominantly male (67%; P = .032) with proximal venous involvement (29% upper and 39% in the lower extremities with 55% of the latter demonstrating bilateral involvement). Patients with DVT had a significantly higher mean d-dimer of 5447 ± 7032 ng/mL (P = .0101), and alkaline phosphatase of 110 IU/L (P = .0095) than those without DVT. On multivariable analysis, elevated d-dimer (P = .038) and alkaline phosphatase (P = .021) were associated with risk for DVT, whereas age, sex, elevated C-reactive protein, and ferritin levels were not. A receiver operating curve analysis suggests an optimal d-dimer value of 2450 ng/mL cutoff with 70% sensitivity, 59.5% specificity, and 61% positive predictive value, and 68.8% negative predictive value. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that males with severe COVID-19 infection requiring hospitalization are at highest risk for developing DVT. Elevated d-dimers and alkaline phosphatase along with our multivariable model can alert the clinician to the increased risk of DVT requiring early evaluation and aggressive treatment.


Subject(s)
Alkaline Phosphatase/blood , COVID-19 , Extremities , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , Risk Assessment/methods , Ultrasonography, Doppler, Duplex , Venous Thrombosis , Anticoagulants/administration & dosage , Biomarkers/blood , Blood Coagulation , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Early Diagnosis , Extremities/blood supply , Extremities/diagnostic imaging , Female , Humans , Indiana/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Predictive Value of Tests , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Time-to-Treatment/statistics & numerical data , Ultrasonography, Doppler, Duplex/methods , Ultrasonography, Doppler, Duplex/statistics & numerical data , Venous Thrombosis/diagnosis , Venous Thrombosis/drug therapy , Venous Thrombosis/etiology , Venous Thrombosis/prevention & control
6.
Clin Appl Thromb Hemost ; 27: 10760296211051712, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1495925

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since the beginning of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV2) pandemic, there have been many reports of increased incidence of venous thromboembolism and arterial events as a complication. OBJECTIVE: To determine the incidence of symptomatic thrombotic events (TEs) in patients hospitalized for SARS-CoV2 disease (coronavirus 19 [Covid-19]). METHODS: A retrospective single-center cohort study with adult patients with a positive reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (rt-PCR) for SARS-CoV2, included from the date of diagnosis of Covid-19 and followed for 90 days or until death. RESULTS: A total of 1621 patients were included in this study. The median age was 73 years (interquartile range25th-75th [IQR] 53-87 years) and 57% (913) were female. Overall mortality was 21.6% (348). The overall incidence of symptomatic TEs within 90 days of diagnosis was 1.8% (30 of 1621) occurring in 28 patients, including an incidence of pulmonary embolism of 0.9% (15, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.60%-1.6%), deep venous thrombosis of 0.61% (10, 95% CI 0.2%-1%), ischemic stroke of 0.25% (4, 95% CI 0.09%-0.65%), and ischemic arterial events of 0.06% (1, 95% CI 0.008%-0.43%). No acute coronary syndrome events were recorded. The incidence of symptomatic TEs was significantly lower in the general ward than in intensive care units (1.2% vs 5.7%; p < .001). The median time since positive rt-PCR for SARS-CoV2 to symptomatic TE was 22.5 days (IQR 19-43 days). There was no significant difference in the proportion of patients receiving (53.6%) and not receiving thromboprophylaxis (66.5%) and the development of TEs. CONCLUSION: The overall incidence of symptomatic TEs among these patients was lower than the incidence previously reported.


Subject(s)
Arterial Occlusive Diseases/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pulmonary Embolism/epidemiology , Thromboembolism/epidemiology , Venous Thrombosis/epidemiology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Argentina/epidemiology , Arterial Occlusive Diseases/blood , Arterial Occlusive Diseases/diagnosis , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , Female , Humans , Incidence , Ischemic Stroke/blood , Ischemic Stroke/diagnosis , Ischemic Stroke/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Admission , Pulmonary Embolism/blood , Pulmonary Embolism/diagnosis , Retrospective Studies , Thromboembolism/blood , Thromboembolism/diagnosis , Time Factors , Venous Thrombosis/blood , Venous Thrombosis/diagnosis
7.
Pan Afr Med J ; 39: 273, 2021.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1472500

ABSTRACT

Acute mesenteric ischemia (AMI) is due to a sudden decrease or interruption of mesenteric blood flow resulting in inadequate blood supply to the gastrointestinal tract. This causes ischemic and inflammatory lesions often progressing to necrosis in the absence of appropriate treatment. Vascular insufficiency may arise as a result of embolism or arterial thrombosis or venous thrombosis. We here report a rare case of mesenteric venous ischemia caused by coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in a 33-year-old man in whom diagnosis was based on ultrasound and, in particular, on computed tomography (CT).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Intestines/blood supply , Mesenteric Ischemia/etiology , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods , Venous Thrombosis/complications , Abdominal Pain/etiology , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , Humans , Male , Mesenteric Ischemia/diagnostic imaging , Mesentery/blood supply , Portal Vein/diagnostic imaging , SARS-CoV-2 , Venous Thrombosis/diagnosis
8.
Hamostaseologie ; 41(5): 397-399, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1428942

ABSTRACT

Paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria (PNH) is a rare, acquired clonal haematological disease characterized by complement-mediated haemolysis, bone marrow failure and venous thrombosis. Anticomplement therapy eculizumab improves survival and reduces complications. Severe acute respiratory distress syndrome corona virus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) disease 2019 (COVID-19) is associated with high incidence of both venous and arterial thrombosis in hospitalized patients with pneumonia. Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) as the presenting symptom of COVID-19 is a rare event. We describe a well-controlled PNH patient on eculizumab for more than 5 years who presented with DVT, while on warfarin, as the first sign of COVID-19. To our knowledge, this is the first described case of DVT in a PNH patient with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , Hemoglobinuria, Paroxysmal/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Venous Thrombosis/complications , Adult , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Complement Inactivating Agents/therapeutic use , Hemoglobinuria, Paroxysmal/drug therapy , Humans , Male , Venous Thrombosis/diagnosis , Warfarin/therapeutic use
9.
J Cardiovasc Surg (Torino) ; 62(6): 548-557, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1406908

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: We aimed to review the prevalence, the risk factors and the outcomes of venous thrombosis (VT) in patients hospitalized for COronaVirus Disease 19 (COVID-19). EVIDENCE ACQUISITION: Electronic bibliographic databases were searched using the words "COVID venous thrombosis". The review was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement standards. EVIDENCE SYNTHESIS: The search of the literature retrieved 877 results. After assessment of full texts, 69 papers were included in the qualitative analysis and 23 of them in the quantitative evaluation. The analyzed studies included a total of 106,838 patients hospitalized for COVID-19 from January to December 2020. The pooled reported prevalence rate of VT was in median 16.7% (IQR 5.8-30%), being higher in ICU patients (60.8-85.4%). VT events were reported in about 75% of cases in the popliteal and calf veins. Signs and symptoms were present in 6.1% of cases. At quantitative evaluation, older age, D-dimer and obesity increased the odds to experience a VT (OR=3.54, 95% CI 0.65-6.43, P=0.01; OR=956.86, 95% CI 225.67-1668.05, P=0.01; OR=1.42, 95% CI 1.01-1.99, P=0.03 respectively). Female sex seemed to be protective against the odds of VT (OR=0.77, 95% CI 0.63-0.93, P=0.007). CONCLUSIONS: Among patients hospitalized for COVID-19, VT is a relatively common finding, with higher prevalence rates in ICU patients. VT occurs mostly in the distal regions of the lower limb and is asymptomatic in most cases. Older age, obesity and higher D-dimer values on admission increased the odds of VT, while female sex was protective against the odds of VT.


Subject(s)
Blood Coagulation , COVID-19/epidemiology , Venous Thrombosis/epidemiology , Age Factors , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Biomarkers/blood , Blood Coagulation/drug effects , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Hospitalization , Humans , Obesity/epidemiology , Prevalence , Prognosis , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Sex Factors , Venous Thrombosis/blood , Venous Thrombosis/diagnosis , Venous Thrombosis/drug therapy
11.
Ultrasound Q ; 37(3): 254-260, 2021 Sep 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1393538

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: This retrospective study shares our departmental experience of screening of ultrasound (US) requests, triaging of studies, and abbreviated US protocols implemented during the COVID-19 pandemic. For US studies requested in April and May 2020, the following data were collected: type of study, indication, COVID-19 status (positive or patient under investigation [PUI]), decision to perform study, US findings, and location of patient. A total of 196 US studies in 150 patients were included. The median age of patients was 60 years (female: 46.7% [70/150]). At the time of study request, 83 patients (55.3%) were COVID-19-positive and 67 (44.7%) were PUI, of which 8 (11.9%) tested positive after waiting for test result. The most frequently requested study was venous extremity Doppler (51%), followed by right upper quadrant (20.4%), renal (11.7%), and liver duplex (6.6%). After radiologist screening and triage of US requests, 156 studies were performed (79.6%), 15 were postponed until COVID test result (7.6%), and 40 were not performed after discussion with ordering provider (20.4%). Notably, 40.1% of studies performed on COVID-19-positive patients yielded pathological findings, most frequently deep venous thrombosis (18.1%), medical renal disease (7.6%), and gall bladder sludge (5.7%). Abbreviated US protocols were used in 29.4% of studies. In conclusion, US study screening and triage played an important role to optimize care of COVID-19 patients and PUIs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Tertiary Care Centers/statistics & numerical data , Ultrasonography, Doppler, Duplex/methods , Venous Thrombosis/diagnosis , Adult , COVID-19/complications , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Venous Thrombosis/etiology
13.
Ann Vasc Surg ; 77: 79-82, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1356137

ABSTRACT

A rare case of aortic thrombosis in a young COVID-19 positive patient is presented in this case report. Arterial thrombosis developed despite the administration of anticoagulants for treating DVT and PE. The patient underwent axillobifemoral bypass surgery. Limited surgical surveillance, administered steroids and critical health status resulted in wound site infection and consequent graft removal. Aortic endarterectomy and autovenous-patch plasty were performed after the patient's condition improved. Etiopathogenesis of arterial events in the setting of COVID-19 is not entirely understood. It has been suggested that SARS-CoV-2 infection strongly affects vascular endothelial glycocalyx (VEGLX), causes systemic inflammation - reactive microvascular endotheliosis (SIRME), and consequently results in arterial thrombosis.


Subject(s)
Aorta, Thoracic , Aortic Diseases/etiology , COVID-19/complications , Pulmonary Embolism/complications , Rare Diseases , Thrombosis/etiology , Venous Thrombosis/complications , Aortic Diseases/diagnosis , Aortic Diseases/surgery , Computed Tomography Angiography , Endarterectomy/methods , Endovascular Procedures/methods , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pulmonary Embolism/diagnosis , Pulmonary Embolism/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombosis/diagnosis , Venous Thrombosis/diagnosis , Venous Thrombosis/drug therapy
16.
J Gen Intern Med ; 36(11): 3478-3486, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1318799

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Venous thrombotic events (VTE) are frequent in COVID-19, and elevated plasma D-dimer (pDd) and dyspnea are common in both entities. OBJECTIVE: To determine the admission pDd cut-off value associated with in-hospital VTE in patients with COVID-19. METHODS: Multicenter, retrospective study analyzing the at-admission pDd cut-off value to predict VTE and anticoagulation intensity along hospitalization due to COVID-19. RESULTS: Among 9386 patients, 2.2% had VTE: 1.6% pulmonary embolism (PE), 0.4% deep vein thrombosis (DVT), and 0.2% both. Those with VTE had a higher prevalence of tachypnea (42.9% vs. 31.1%; p = 0.0005), basal O2 saturation <93% (45.4% vs. 33.1%; p = 0.0003), higher at admission pDd (median [IQR]: 1.4 [0.6-5.5] vs. 0.6 [0.4-1.2] µg/ml; p < 0.0001) and platelet count (median [IQR]: 208 [158-289] vs. 189 [148-245] platelets × 109/L; p = 0.0013). A pDd cut-off of 1.1 µg/ml showed specificity 72%, sensitivity 49%, positive predictive value (PPV) 4%, and negative predictive value (NPV) 99% for in-hospital VTE. A cut-off value of 4.7 µg/ml showed specificity of 95%, sensitivity of 27%, PPV of 9%, and NPV of 98%. Overall mortality was proportional to pDd value, with the lowest incidence for each pDd category depending on anticoagulation intensity: 26.3% for those with pDd >1.0 µg/ml treated with prophylactic dose (p < 0.0001), 28.8% for pDd for patients with pDd >2.0 µg/ml treated with intermediate dose (p = 0.0001), and 31.3% for those with pDd >3.0 µg/ml and full anticoagulation (p = 0.0183). CONCLUSIONS: In hospitalized patients with COVID-19, a pDd value greater than 3.0 µg/ml can be considered to screen VTE and to consider full-dose anticoagulation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Venous Thromboembolism , Venous Thrombosis , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products , Hospitalization , Humans , Registries , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Venous Thromboembolism/diagnosis , Venous Thromboembolism/epidemiology , Venous Thrombosis/diagnosis , Venous Thrombosis/epidemiology
17.
Orthopedics ; 44(4): 223-228, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1320604

ABSTRACT

Geriatric hip fractures benefit from timely surgery. At the onset of the corona-virus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, shelter-in-place (SIP) orders were mandated in high-risk cities. The authors hypothesized that geriatric patients with hip fractures were more likely to present to the hospital greater than 24 hours after injury during SIP orders. They retrospectively reviewed patients 65 years or older who presented with hip fractures between March 20, 2020, and May 24, 2020 (SIP group), and between March 20, 2019, and May 24, 2019 (historical group). Primary outcomes were incidence of presentation greater than 24 hours after injury and mean number of days between injury and presentation. Secondary outcomes were incidence of preoperative deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and 30- and 90-day mortality rates. Thirty-three patients comprised the SIP group, and 50 patients comprised the historical group. There were no significant differences in their demographics or medical comorbidities. The SIP group was more likely to present greater than 24 hours after injury (P=.05) and presented a greater number of days after injury (P=.02). There was a significant difference in the incidence of preoperative DVT (P=.03). There were no significant differences in 30- and 90-day mortality rates. Geriatric patients who sustained hip fractures during SIP restrictions for COVID-19 were more likely to present greater than 24 hours after injury, have a greater number of days between injury and presentation, and be diagnosed with a preoperative DVT. [Orthopedics. 2021;44(4):223-228.].


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hip Fractures , Venous Thrombosis , Aged , Delayed Diagnosis , Hip Fractures/surgery , Humans , Quarantine , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Venous Thrombosis/diagnosis
18.
Phlebology ; 36(10): 835-840, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1295343

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of our study was to analyze the specificity, accuracy and sensitivity of a simple, easy to calculate, prognostic score for hospitalized COVID19 patients developing deep vein thrombosis. METHODS: From March 1st to April 28th, 942 COVID-19 patients with severe symptoms were admitted to the hospital San Matteo of Pavia-Italy. Thirty two patients (3.4%) developed deep vein thrombosis during hospitalization. In all patients hemostatic and inflammatory parameters were abnormal. A simple prognostic score was developed based on the presence of specific co morbidities and D-dimers levels (quick San Matthew Score-quick SMS). RESULTS: Nine patients died in a condition of multiple organ failure, 23 patients (71.9%) survived and left the hospital in good general conditions. The developed score was based simply on two parameters: 1) presence of four specific co morbidities and 2)systemic levels of D-Dimers. The quick San Matthew Score resulted in a sensitivity, specificity and overall accuracy of more than 90% (94%, 92%,93% respectively) and compared favorably with other scores. The score was prospectively validated in 100 COVID19 patients who developed deep vein thrombosis collected from the literature and prospectively confirmed in our hospital. CONCLUSIONS: The findings of our study underline the importance of an immediate aggressive therapeutic approach for moderate and high-risk patients with COVID19 infection. The quick SMS score may help to identify patients at high risk for mortality and to follow the clinical outcome of the patient. A simple, easy to calculate prognostic score may also facilitate communication among health workers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Venous Thrombosis , Hospitalization , Humans , Prognosis , SARS-CoV-2 , Venous Thrombosis/diagnosis , Venous Thrombosis/epidemiology , Venous Thrombosis/therapy
19.
BMJ Case Rep ; 14(6)2021 Jun 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1280404

ABSTRACT

Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) is a rare inflammatory disorder affecting just over one in a million people. Due to its rarity, understanding of its pathophysiology and the spectrum of its clinical associations are limited. Improved case identification and creation of patient registries have begun to reveal sporadic reports of deep venous thromboses associated with AOSD. Herein, we report the first case of recurrent deep venous thrombosis in a patient with AOSD despite treatment with therapeutic dose anticoagulant medication. This case points for a judicious approach to the selection of an anticoagulation strategy for deep venous thromboses in the setting of active AOSD. This case is of contemporary interest in its clinical similarity with COVID-19 symptoms and pathophysiology for which a careful diagnostic approach with a broad differential should be considered given the limitations of SARS-CoV-2 testing and the risk associated with treatment in the event of misdiagnosis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Still's Disease, Adult-Onset , Venous Thrombosis , Adult , COVID-19 Testing , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Still's Disease, Adult-Onset/complications , Still's Disease, Adult-Onset/diagnosis , Still's Disease, Adult-Onset/drug therapy , Venous Thrombosis/diagnosis , Venous Thrombosis/drug therapy , Venous Thrombosis/etiology
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL