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1.
BMJ Case Rep ; 15(10)2022 Oct 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2097946

ABSTRACT

Transverse myelitis and cerebral venous thrombosis represent some of the described neurological complications of coronavirus disease. A woman in her early 30s presented with headache, left-sided sensory symptoms and voiding difficulty. The patient also reported dry cough, fever, nasal congestion, anosmia and ageusia 2 weeks before presentation. The clinical examination showed sensory disturbances on the left side of the body, starting from the lower abdomen and extending to the left leg, which was consistent with transverse myelitis. The laboratory assessment confirmed a previous infection with coronavirus disease and excluded autoimmune entities. Radiological investigations revealed left transverse sinus thrombosis with no spinal cord abnormalities. The treatment was started with therapeutic anticoagulation and intravenous high-dose steroids. The patient showed significant improvement, and the neurological deficits resolved after 3 months. This is the first documented case of imaging-negative myelitis associated with cerebral venous thrombosis after coronavirus disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Intracranial Thrombosis , Myelitis, Transverse , Venous Thrombosis , Female , Humans , COVID-19/complications , Myelitis, Transverse/diagnostic imaging , Myelitis, Transverse/drug therapy , Intracranial Thrombosis/diagnostic imaging , Intracranial Thrombosis/drug therapy , Intracranial Thrombosis/etiology , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Venous Thrombosis/diagnostic imaging , Venous Thrombosis/drug therapy , Venous Thrombosis/etiology
2.
Croat Med J ; 63(5): 448-452, 2022 Oct 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2092960

ABSTRACT

AIM: To assess the differences in clinical and laboratory parameters of non-hospitalized patients with deep venous thrombosis (DVT) according to the SARS-CoV-2 status. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed demographic, clinical, laboratory, and ultrasound data of adult patients admitted to the Emergency Department of University Hospital Split between March 2020 and January 2021. Patients were classified into three groups: recent COVID-19 (<1 month), non-recent COVID-19 (1 to 12 months), and non-COVID-19. RESULTS: Fifty (47.2%) of 106 patients had a history of SARS-CoV-2 infection (23 patients in the recent COVID-19 and 27 in non-recent COVID-19 group). The three groups did not significantly differ in demographic and clinical parameters, including the location of deep venous thrombosis. The recent COVID-19 group had significantly higher neutrophils and CRP levels, and significantly lower prothrombin than the other two groups. CONCLUSION: Our results confirm the role of elevated inflammatory and coagulation response in DVT development in the first month after the infection, but not in non-recent COVID-19 or non-COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Venous Thrombosis , Adult , Humans , COVID-19/complications , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Venous Thrombosis/diagnostic imaging , Venous Thrombosis/etiology , Risk Factors
3.
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova ; 122(9): 128-131, 2022.
Article in Russian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2056581

ABSTRACT

The literature reports that cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) develops in 1-1.5% of patients with COVID-19. Recently, a new syndrome named vaccine-induced immune thrombotic thrombocytopenia (VITT) has been described. VITT is a rare side-effect of COVID-19 vaccination that also causes CVT. The article presents an overview of the above problem and a clinical case of a patient with CVT that developed within a month after the first component of the Sputnik V vaccination and COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Intracranial Thrombosis , Thrombosis , Venous Thrombosis , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , Intracranial Thrombosis/diagnostic imaging , Intracranial Thrombosis/etiology , Thrombosis/complications , Venous Thrombosis/diagnostic imaging , Venous Thrombosis/drug therapy
5.
J Vasc Surg Venous Lymphat Disord ; 10(4): 811-817, 2022 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1757625

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The incidence of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is increased in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and its presence is associated with worse outcomes. Ultrasound examination of patients with COVID-19 with a suspected DVT is challenging owing to concerns with disease transmission; the timely initiation of therapeutic anticoagulation is essential. This study aimed to identify patient factors associated with positive thrombus findings at ultrasound examination in patients with COVID-19 who underwent imaging for suspected DVT. METHODS: Patients who did not require intensive care unit treatment and who underwent ultrasound imaging for suspected DVT between March and December 2020 were included retrospectively. Patient demographics, comorbidities, modified Well's score, and d-dimer results on the day of ultrasound examination were recorded. Parameters for a higher likelihood of a positive DVT result were determined by comparing patients with confirmed DVT on ultrasound examination and patients with negative ultrasound findings. To determine a cut-off for d-dimer levels, a receiver operating characteristic curve was constructed. The sensitivity and specificity of the determined high-risk factors in the prediction of positive ultrasound results were calculated. RESULTS: A positive history for DVT (25% vs 4%; P < .001), thrombophilia (9% vs 2%; P = .048), immobilization (53% vs 23%; P = .001), and a Well's score ≥ 2 (50% vs 21%; P = .001) were more frequent in patients with DVT. The mean d-dimer levels were higher in patients with DVT (3871 ± 1805 vs 2075 ± 1543; P < .001). The presence of either thrombophilia or a d-dimer level of >2020 had a sensitivity of 93% and a specificity of 64%. The presence of either thrombophilia, a d-dimer level of >2020, or a Well's score of ≥2 had a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 51%. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with COVID-19 with a d-dimer of >2020, a positive history for thrombophilia, and a Well's score of ≥2 should undergo a timely ultrasound examination. The high risk of DVT should be remembered for all hospitalized patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Thrombophilia , Thrombosis , Venous Thrombosis , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , Humans , Retrospective Studies , Thrombophilia/complications , Ultrasonography , Venous Thrombosis/diagnostic imaging , Venous Thrombosis/etiology
6.
Wien Klin Wochenschr ; 133(23-24): 1281-1288, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1756809

ABSTRACT

High incidence of venous thromboembolic (VTE) events in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients has been reported despite pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis. We performed prospective bilateral lower extremity ultrasound evaluation of prolonged hospitalized COVID-19 ward patients from our institution without clinical suspicion of deep vein thrombosis (DVT).A total of 102 patient were included in the study. All patients were receiving pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis, the majority in intermediate or therapeutic doses. Asymptomatic DVT was detected in 26/102 (25.5%) patients: 22 had distal and four had proximal DVT, six had bilateral leg involvement. Pulmonary embolism was highly prevalent (17/70, 24.3%) but similarly grouped among patients with and without asymptomatic DVT. In total 37.2% of patients included in the study were recognized as having VTE.Asymptomatic DVT events were more common in intensive care unit (ICU) survivors (60% in postmechanically ventilated ICU survivors, 21.2% in ward patients, 22% in high-flow oxygen treated patients; P = 0.031), in patients with higher modified International Medical Prevention Registry on Venous Thromboembolism (IMPROVE) VTE risk-score (median 3 vs. 2 points with and without DVT; P = 0.021) and higher body temperature on admission (median 38.7 °C vs. 37.7 °C with and without DVT; P = 0.001). No clear associations with Padua VTE risk score, demographic and other clinical characteristics, intensity of thromboprophylaxis, severity of other COVID-19 symptoms, degree of systemic inflammation or D­dimers on admission were found (P > 0.05 for all analyses).Systematic ultrasound assessment in prolonged hospitalized severe COVID-19 patients prior to hospital discharge is needed, especially in ICU survivors, to timely recognize and appropriately treat patients with asymptomatic DVT.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Venous Thromboembolism , Venous Thrombosis , Anticoagulants , Humans , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Venous Thrombosis/diagnostic imaging , Venous Thrombosis/epidemiology
8.
Neurol Sci ; 43(5): 2951-2956, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1712255

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus pandemic became the hard challenge for the modern global health system. To date, vaccination is the best strategy against Sars-Cov-2-related illness. About 3 billions of people received at least one of the approved vaccines. The related adverse events were reported during the various experimental phases, but newer and less common side effects are emerging post-marketing. Vaccine-induced thrombocytopenia with thrombosis (VITT) is one of these insidious adverse reactions and it is considered responsible of venous thrombosis, in both the splanchnic and the cerebral circulation. Although its mechanism has been presumably established, resembling that observed in heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, some venous thromboses seem not to recognize this etiology and their pathogenesis remains unknown. Here we described a case of cerebral venous thrombosis after administration of the Ad26.COV2.S, presenting without thrombocytopenia, paving the way for possible novel causes of this vaccine-induced pathological condition. CASE PRESENTATION: A 45-year-old woman came to our observation for bilateral periorbital headache associated with retro-orbital pain started 8 days after administration of COVID vaccine Jannsen. Ophthalmologic exam showing a bilateral papilledema raised the suspicion of intracranial hypertension. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging revealed signal alteration with T1-positive contrast enhancement in the right temporal and insular lobes suggestive of cerebral venous thrombosis. The absence of thrombocytopenia and platelet factor 4 (PF-4) antibodies led the clinicians to rule out VITT. The patient was treated successfully with warfarin. CONCLUSION: Venous thrombosis occurring after COVID-19 vaccination represents an adverse event of special interest. Patients with thrombosis and thrombocytopenia appear to be affected by a general thrombophilic state, sustained by an autoimmune mechanism, and show a higher mortality. Thrombosis without thrombocytopenia's pathogenesis has not yet been clarified, but laboratory data and good response to vitamin K antagonists help clinicians in the differential diagnosis with VITT. Future research will allow us to discover other possible mechanisms and maybe identify a subgroup of patients with a higher risk of developing this medical complication.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Intracranial Thrombosis , Thrombocytopenia , Thrombosis , Vaccines , Venous Thrombosis , Ad26COVS1 , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Female , Headache/complications , Humans , Intracranial Thrombosis/chemically induced , Intracranial Thrombosis/diagnostic imaging , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombocytopenia/chemically induced , Thrombocytopenia/diagnosis , Thrombosis/complications , Vaccines/adverse effects , Venous Thrombosis/diagnostic imaging , Venous Thrombosis/drug therapy , Venous Thrombosis/etiology
10.
J Vasc Surg Venous Lymphat Disord ; 10(4): 826-831.e1, 2022 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1665242

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Great interest exists in standardizing the anticoagulant choice for patients requiring treatment of distal deep vein thrombosis (DDVT). In the present multicenter, retrospective cohort study, we evaluated the outcomes of patients with DDVT who had been treated with warfarin vs direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs; ie, rivaroxaban, apixaban, edoxaban, dabigatran). METHODS: Queries were built for the TriNetX database (TriNetX LLC, Cambridge, Mass), a federated network of healthcare organizations across the United States that provides de-identified patient data through aggregated counts and statistical summaries. International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision, diagnostic codes were used to identify eligible patients. Data from January 1, 2013 to January 1, 2020 were reviewed. Statistical analyses, including propensity matching, were performed using TriNetX's internal software. The inclusion criterion was treatment with either warfarin or a DOAC started within the first 24 hours of diagnosis of an isolated thrombosis of the following veins: anterior tibial, posterior tibial, peroneal, or calf muscular veins. The exclusion criteria were a history of an adverse reaction to anticoagulant agents, SARS-CoV-2 (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2) infection, thrombophilia, mechanical heart valve, chronic proximal DVT (PDVT) and/or DDVT, and 6-month history of the following: acute PDVT, pulmonary embolism (PE), or anticoagulant usage. The outcomes measured included the incidence of mortality, PE, PDVT, stroke, myocardial infarction, and major bleeding within 6 months after initiating anticoagulation therapy. RESULTS: In a cohort of 6509 patients, 1570 were treated with warfarin and 4939 were treated with a DOAC drug. After propensity matching for age, sex, ethnicity, and comorbidities, the DOAC cohort had a significantly lower incidence of PE (1.795% vs 3.590%; P = .0020) and major bleeding (7.949% vs 10.513%; P = .0134). Differences in the incidence of mortality, PDVT, myocardial infarction, and stroke were not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS: Before the present study, no strong evidence was available to suggest an optimal treatment modality for DDVT requiring anticoagulation therapy. The data from the present study suggest that patients receiving DOACs for the treatment of DDVT will have significantly lower rates of progression to PE and a lower incidence of major bleeding compared with patients receiving warfarin. This suggests that DOACs are superior to warfarin for treatment of DDVT.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Myocardial Infarction , Pulmonary Embolism , Stroke , Venous Thrombosis , Administration, Oral , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Hemorrhage/chemically induced , Hemorrhage/epidemiology , Humans , Myocardial Infarction/chemically induced , Pulmonary Embolism/diagnostic imaging , Pulmonary Embolism/drug therapy , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke/chemically induced , United States/epidemiology , Venous Thrombosis/diagnostic imaging , Venous Thrombosis/drug therapy , Warfarin/adverse effects
11.
J Crit Care ; 69: 153992, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1661863

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Critically ill COVID-19 patients have an increased risk of developing pulmonary embolism (PE). Diagnosis of PE by point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) might reduce the need for computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA), while decreasing time-to-diagnosis. MATERIALS & METHODS: This prospective, observational study included adult ICU patients with COVID-19. Multi-organ (lungs, deep vein, cardiac) POCUS was performed within 24 h of CTPA, looking for subpleural consolidations, deep venous thrombosis (DVT), and right ventricular strain (RVS). We reported the scan time, and calculated diagnostic accuracy measures for these signs separately and in combination. RESULTS: 70 consecutive patients were included. 23 patients (32.8%) had a PE. Median scan time was 14 min (IQR 11-17). Subpleural consolidations' diagnostic accuracy was: 42.9% (95%CI [34.1-52.0]). DVT's and RVS' diagnostic accuracy was: 75.6% (95%CI [67.1-82.9]) and 74.4% (95%CI [65.8-81.8]). Their sensitivity was: 24.0% (95%CI [9.4-45.1]), and 40.0% (95%CI [21.3-61.3]), while their specificity was: 88.8% (95%CI [80.8-94.3]), and: 83.0% (95%CI [74.2-89.8]), respectively. Multi-organ POCUS sensitivity was: 87.5% (95%CI [67.6-97.3]), and specificity was: 25% (95%CI [16.9-34.7]). CONCLUSIONS: Multi-organ rather than single-organ POCUS can be of aid in ruling out PE in critically ill COVID-19 and help select patients for CTPA. In addition, finding RVS can make PE more likely, while a DVT would preclude the need for a CTPA. REGISTRATION: www.trialregister.nl: NL8540.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pulmonary Embolism , Venous Thrombosis , Adult , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Critical Illness , Humans , Point-of-Care Systems , Prospective Studies , Pulmonary Embolism/diagnostic imaging , Pulmonary Embolism/etiology , Venous Thrombosis/diagnostic imaging
12.
BMJ Case Rep ; 15(1)2022 Jan 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1636265

ABSTRACT

Vaccine-induced immune thrombotic thrombocytopenia (VITT) rarely develops after many COVID-19 vaccines. A 51-year-old woman re-presented to hospital with a 4 day history of headache, vomiting, diarrhoea and left calf pain, 11 days after her first dose of ChAdOx1nCoV-19 (AstraZenica) vaccine. Her neurological examination was normal. Blood tests demonstrated a low platelet count, raised D-dimer and CRP, and a positive heparin/anti-PF4 antibody assay. CT venogram demonstrated widespread cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. She was commenced on fondaparinux and intravenous immunoglobulins. The following day she developed an asymmetric quadriplegia and aphasia. CT angiogram demonstrated new bilateral cervical internal carotid artery (ICA) thrombi. She underwent stent-retriever mechanical thrombectomy of bilateral ICA and cerebral venous sinuses. Next day she had right hemiparesis and expressive dysphasia, which are improving. Thromboses due to VITT can progress rapidly to involve cerebral arteries and venous sinuses, and may warrant urgent arterial and venous thrombectomy to reduce morbidity and mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Thrombocytopenia , Thrombosis , Venous Thrombosis , COVID-19 Vaccines , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Venous Thrombosis/diagnostic imaging , Venous Thrombosis/drug therapy , Venous Thrombosis/etiology
13.
BMC Infect Dis ; 21(1): 1275, 2021 Dec 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1635338

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To investigate the association of primary acute cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) with COVID-19 vaccination through complete ascertainment of all diagnosed CVT in the population of Scotland. METHODS: Case-crossover study comparing cases of CVT recently exposed to vaccination (1-14 days after vaccination) with cases less recently exposed. Cases in Scotland from 1 December 2020 were ascertained through neuroimaging studies up to 17 May 2021 and diagnostic coding of hospital discharges up to 28 April 2021, linked to national vaccination records. The main outcome measure was primary acute CVT. RESULTS: Of 50 primary acute CVT cases, 29 were ascertained only from neuroimaging studies, 2 were ascertained only from hospital discharges, and 19 were ascertained from both sources. Of these 50 cases, 14 had received the Astra-Zeneca ChAdOx1 vaccine and 3 the Pfizer BNT162b2 vaccine. The incidence of CVT per million doses in the first 14 days after vaccination was 2.2 (95% credible interval 0.9 to 4.1) for ChAdOx1 and 1 (95% credible interval 0.1 to 2.9) for BNT162b2. The rate ratio for CVT associated with exposure to ChAdOx1 in the first 14 days compared with exposure 15-84 days after vaccination was 3.2 (95% credible interval 1.1 to 9.5). CONCLUSIONS: These findings support a causal association between CVT and the AstraZeneca vaccine. The absolute risk of post-vaccination CVT in this population-wide study in Scotland was lower than has been reported for populations in Scandinavia and Germany; the explanation for this is not clear.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Venous Thrombosis , COVID-19 Vaccines , Cross-Over Studies , Humans , Neuroimaging , SARS-CoV-2 , Scotland/epidemiology , Vaccination , Venous Thrombosis/diagnostic imaging , Venous Thrombosis/epidemiology
15.
J Ultrasound ; 25(3): 571-577, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1616312

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To evaluate the usefulness of compressive ultrasound (CUS) for the diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in patients with SARS-CoV-2-related infection. METHODS: 112 hospitalized patients with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection were retrospectively enrolled. CUS was performed within 2 days of admission and consisted in the assessment of the proximal and distal deep venous systems. Lack of compressibility, or direct identification of an endoluminal thrombus, were the criteria used for the diagnosis of DVT. Pulmonary embolism (PE) events were investigated at computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) within 5 days of follow-up. Logistic binary regression was computed to determine which clinical and radiological parameters were independently associated with PE onset. RESULTS: Overall, the incidence of DVT in our cohort was about 43%. The most common district involved was the left lower limb (68.7%) in comparison with the right one (58.3%) while the upper limbs were less frequently involved (4.2% the right one and 2.1% the left one, respectively). On both sides, the distal tract of the popliteal vein was the most common involved (50% right side and 45.8% left side). The presence of DVT in the distal tract of the right popliteal vein (OR = 2.444 95%CIs 1.084-16.624, p = 0.038), in the distal tract of the left popliteal vein (OR = 4.201 95%CIs 1.484-11.885, p = 0.007), and D-dimer values (OR = 2.122 95%CIs 1.030-5.495, p = 0.003) were independently associated with the onset on PE within 5 days. CONCLUSIONS: CUS should be considered a useful tool to discriminate which category of patients can develop PE within 5 days from admission.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pulmonary Embolism , Venous Thrombosis , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Humans , Pulmonary Embolism/diagnostic imaging , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Venous Thrombosis/complications , Venous Thrombosis/diagnostic imaging
16.
Vasc Endovascular Surg ; 56(3): 258-262, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1582580

ABSTRACT

IntroductionPublished evidence of venous thrombotic complications of COVID-19 is lacking from India. This case series consists of twenty-nine adult patients who were COVID -19 positive and treated for Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) during the second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, in India. The study was aimed at analyzing patient demographics of patients with DVT and the outcome of Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis (CDT) in COVID positive patients. Material and Methods: Patients who developed DVT while or after being COVID positive were managed between February and April 2021 at the institution of the first two authors and were included in this retrospective study. Demographic, clinical data, laboratory data, and treatment given were analyzed. All patients were followed up for 3 months with a Villalta score. Results: There were a total of 29 patients (12 male and 17 female) included in the study with a mean age of 47 ± 17 years. The average time of presentation from being COVID positive was 17.8 ± 3.6 days and one patient developed DVT after becoming Covid negative. All but one patient had lower limb involvement, with 42.8% having proximal and 57.2% distal DVT. All patients with Iliofemoral and two with Femoropopliteal DVT were treated with catheter-di thrombolysis and the other 15 patients were managed with anticoagulation alone. No re-thrombosis was observed in the thrombolysis group. Overall average Villalta score at 3 months was 10.7 ± 2.1 with a score of 10.58 ± 2.1 in the anticoagulation-only group and 10.85 ± 2.3 in the CDT group. Conclusion: COVID-19 seems to be an additional risk factor in the development of DVT. The outcome of such patients, treated by thrombolysis appears to be similar to non-COVID patients. In this, observational experience of the authors suggests that CDT could be offered to COVID positive patients with symptomatic Iliofemoral DVT with good outcomes and an acceptable post-intervention Villalta score.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Venous Thrombosis , Adult , COVID-19/complications , Catheters , Female , Humans , Iliac Vein , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombolytic Therapy/adverse effects , Treatment Outcome , Venous Thrombosis/diagnostic imaging , Venous Thrombosis/drug therapy , Venous Thrombosis/etiology
17.
J Ultrasound Med ; 41(6): 1475-1481, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1568223

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Determine the rate of positive extremity ultrasound exams for DVT in patients with COVID-19 and assess for differences in laboratory values in patients with and without DVT, which could be used as a surrogate to decide the need for further evaluation with ultrasound. METHODS: Retrospective case control study with 1:2 matching of cases (COVID-19+ patients) to controls (COVID-19- patients) based on age, gender, and race. Laboratory values assessed were serum D-dimer, fibrinogen, prothrombin time, international normalized ratio, and C-reactive protein. Demographic variables, comorbidities, and clinical variables including final disposition were also evaluated. P-values for categorical variables were calculated with the chi-square test or Fisher's exact test. P-values for continuous variables were compared with the use of a two-tailed unpaired t-test. RESULTS: The rate of extremity ultrasound exams positive for DVT were similar in patients with (14.7%) and without (19.3%) COVID-19 (P = .423). No significant difference was observed in laboratory values including the D-dimer level in COVID-19 patients without (mean 9523.9 ng/mL (range 339 to >60,000)) or with DVT (mean 13,663.7 ng/mL (range 1193->60,000)) (P = .475). No differences were found in demographic variabilities or co-morbidities among COVID-19 patients with and without extremity DVT. CONCLUSIONS: We found no statistically significant difference in rate of positive DVT studies between COVID-19+ and COVID-19- patients. D-dimer levels are elevated, in some cases markedly, in COVID-19 patients with and without DVTs and therefore these data do not support their use as a surrogate when assessing the need for ultrasound evaluation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Venous Thrombosis , COVID-19/complications , Case-Control Studies , Extremities/diagnostic imaging , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products , Humans , Retrospective Studies , Venous Thrombosis/complications , Venous Thrombosis/diagnostic imaging
19.
Dis Markers ; 2021: 4361844, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1523091

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is an enveloped RNA virus first identified in December 2019 in Wuhan, China, and responsible for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic is impacting healthcare worldwide. Patients who develop coagulopathy have worse outcomes. The pathophysiology of COVID-19 suggests a strong interplay between hemostasis and immune cells, especially neutrophils. Our purpose was to assess neutrophil fluorescence as a potential biomarker of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in patients with COVID-acute respiratory distress syndrome (COVID-ARDS). Sixty-one patients with COVID-ARDS admitted to the four intensive care units (ICUs) of a French general hospital were included in this prospective study. Neutrophil activation was assessed by measuring neutrophil fluorescence (NEUT-Side Fluorescence Light, NEUT-SFL) with a specific fluorescent dye staining analyzed by a routine automated flow cytometer Sysmex XN-3000™ (Sysmex, Kobe, Japan). DVT was diagnosed by complete duplex ultrasound (CDU). We found that NEUT-SFL was elevated on admission in patients with COVID-ARDS (49.76 AU, reference value 46.40 AU, p < 0.001), but did not differ between patients with DVT (49.99 AU) and those without (49.52 AU, p = 0.555). NEUT-SFL is elevated in patients with COVID-ARDS, reflecting neutrophil activation, but cannot be used as a marker of thrombosis. Because neutrophils are at interface between immune response and hemostasis through release of neutrophil extracellular traps, monitoring their activation could be an interesting approach to improve our management of coagulopathy during COVID-ARDS. Further research is needed to better understand the pathophysiology of COVID-19 and identify high-performance biomarkers.


Subject(s)
Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/complications , Neutrophils/chemistry , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/complications , Venous Thrombosis/blood , Aged , COVID-19/blood , Female , Flow Cytometry/methods , Fluorescence , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Leukocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/virology , Ultrasonography, Doppler, Duplex , Venous Thrombosis/diagnostic imaging , Venous Thrombosis/drug therapy , Venous Thrombosis/virology
20.
BMJ Case Rep ; 14(11)2021 Nov 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1522934

ABSTRACT

Renal arteriovenous malformation is a primarily congenital renal vascular abnormality. It is usually diagnosed incidentally on imaging, and the most common subtype is 'cirsoid', consisting of multiple, enlarged arterial feeders interconnecting with draining veins. We present a 74-year-old woman with an incidental finding of what was at first considered a hypervascularised kidney tumour but turned out to be a left intrarenal arteriovenous malformation associated with a left renal vein thrombosis. Selective endovascular embolisation was performed. The cause-consequence relationship between the arteriovenous malformation and the thrombosis is unique. To our knowledge, no such case has ever been reported.


Subject(s)
Arteriovenous Malformations , Kidney Neoplasms , Urologic Diseases , Venous Thrombosis , Aged , Arteriovenous Malformations/complications , Arteriovenous Malformations/diagnostic imaging , Female , Humans , Kidney Neoplasms/diagnosis , Kidney Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging , Renal Veins/diagnostic imaging , Venous Thrombosis/diagnostic imaging , Venous Thrombosis/etiology
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