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2.
Hosp Pract (1995) ; 50(1): 68-74, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1625868

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The first known COVID-19 patient in the United States was reported on 1/20/2020. Since then, we noted increased thromboembolic events among our THA/TKA patients. Therefore, we sought to determine: (1) monthly incidences of pulmonary embolism (PE)/deep vein thrombosis (DVT) before and after January/2020 and (2) thromboembolic event rates for primary and revision patients. METHODS: We retrospectively obtained from our electronic-medical-records the total monthly number of patients (December/2018-March/2021) who underwent primary or revision THA/TKA, and among them, those who had PE/DVT during each month. Monthly rates of thromboembolic events were calculated and figures were created showing rates throughout time. The cutoff month to define before and after COVID-19 was January/2020. RESULTS: During the study period, 1.6% of patients (312/19068) had PE/DVT [PE (n = 102), DVT (n = 242), both (n = 32)]. Overall rate of PE/DVT before January/2020 was 1.2% (119/9545) and it was 2.0% (193/9523) after that month. Incidences of PE/DVT on April/June/July of 2020 were 3.4%, 3%, 3.4%, respectively. A major increase, when compared to 2019 (1.3%, 1%, 1%, respectively). An unusually high rate of PE was observed on April/2020 (3.4%), more than three times the one observed in any other month. After January/2020, there was an overall major increase of PE/DVT rates, but particularly among revision patients: 6% in five different months including 11.5% on November/2020. CONCLUSION: There was a major increase of thromboembolic events among THA/TKA patients during the COVID-19 pandemic, predominantly in revision patients. Patients need counseling about this increased risk. It remains uncertain whether more aggressive thromboprophylactic regimes should be followed.


Subject(s)
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee , COVID-19 , Venous Thrombosis , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip/adverse effects , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee/adverse effects , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , United States , Venous Thrombosis/epidemiology , Venous Thrombosis/etiology , Venous Thrombosis/prevention & control
3.
J Vasc Surg Venous Lymphat Disord ; 9(3): 605-614.e2, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1510080

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Early reports suggest that patients with novel coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) infection carry a significant risk of altered coagulation with an increased risk for venous thromboembolic events. This report investigates the relationship of significant COVID-19 infection and deep venous thrombosis (DVT) as reflected in the patient clinical and laboratory characteristics. METHODS: We reviewed the demographics, clinical presentation, laboratory and radiologic evaluations, results of venous duplex imaging and mortality of COVID-19-positive patients (18-89 years) admitted to the Indiana University Academic Health Center. Using oxygen saturation, radiologic findings, and need for advanced respiratory therapies, patients were classified into mild, moderate, or severe categories of COVID-19 infection. A descriptive analysis was performed using univariate and bivariate Fisher's exact and Wilcoxon rank-sum tests to examine the distribution of patient characteristics and compare the DVT outcomes. A multivariable logistic regression model was used to estimate the adjusted odds ratio of experiencing DVT and a receiver operating curve analysis to identify the optimal cutoff for d-dimer to predict DVT in this COVID-19 cohort. Time to the diagnosis of DVT from admission was analyzed using log-rank test and Kaplan-Meier plots. RESULTS: Our study included 71 unique COVID-19-positive patients (mean age, 61 years) categorized as having 3% mild, 14% moderate, and 83% severe infection and evaluated with 107 venous duplex studies. DVT was identified in 47.8% of patients (37% of examinations) at an average of 5.9 days after admission. Patients with DVT were predominantly male (67%; P = .032) with proximal venous involvement (29% upper and 39% in the lower extremities with 55% of the latter demonstrating bilateral involvement). Patients with DVT had a significantly higher mean d-dimer of 5447 ± 7032 ng/mL (P = .0101), and alkaline phosphatase of 110 IU/L (P = .0095) than those without DVT. On multivariable analysis, elevated d-dimer (P = .038) and alkaline phosphatase (P = .021) were associated with risk for DVT, whereas age, sex, elevated C-reactive protein, and ferritin levels were not. A receiver operating curve analysis suggests an optimal d-dimer value of 2450 ng/mL cutoff with 70% sensitivity, 59.5% specificity, and 61% positive predictive value, and 68.8% negative predictive value. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that males with severe COVID-19 infection requiring hospitalization are at highest risk for developing DVT. Elevated d-dimers and alkaline phosphatase along with our multivariable model can alert the clinician to the increased risk of DVT requiring early evaluation and aggressive treatment.


Subject(s)
Alkaline Phosphatase/blood , COVID-19 , Extremities , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , Risk Assessment/methods , Ultrasonography, Doppler, Duplex , Venous Thrombosis , Anticoagulants/administration & dosage , Biomarkers/blood , Blood Coagulation , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Early Diagnosis , Extremities/blood supply , Extremities/diagnostic imaging , Female , Humans , Indiana/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Predictive Value of Tests , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Time-to-Treatment/statistics & numerical data , Ultrasonography, Doppler, Duplex/methods , Ultrasonography, Doppler, Duplex/statistics & numerical data , Venous Thrombosis/diagnosis , Venous Thrombosis/drug therapy , Venous Thrombosis/etiology , Venous Thrombosis/prevention & control
4.
Clin Appl Thromb Hemost ; 27: 10760296211039288, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1448131

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a systemic disease that can be life-threatening involving immune and inflammatory responses, and that can result in potentially lethal complications, including venous thrombo-embolism (VTE). Forming an integrative approach to thrombo-prophylaxis and coagulation treatment for COVID-19 patients ensues. We aim at reviewing the literature for anticoagulation in the setting of COVID-19 infection to provide a summary on anticoagulation for this patient population. COVID-19 infection is associated with a state of continuous inflammation, which results in macrophage activation syndrome and an increased rate of thrombosis. Risk assessment models to predict the risk of thrombosis in critically ill patients have not yet been validated. Currently published guidelines suggest the use of prophylactic intensity over intermediate intensity or therapeutic intensity anticoagulant for patients with critical illness or acute illness related to COVID-19 infection. Critically ill COVID-19 patients who are diagnosed with acute VTE are considered to have a provoking factor, and, therefore, treatment duration should be at least 3 months. Patients with proximal deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism should receive parenteral over oral anticoagulants with low-molecular-weight heparin or fondaparinux preferred over unfractionated heparin. In patients with impending hemodynamic compromise due to PE, and who are not at increased risk for bleeding, reperfusion may be necessary. Internists should remain updated on new emerging evidence regarding anticoagulation for COVID-19 patients. Awaiting these findings, we invite internists to perform individualized decisions that are unique for every patient and to base them on clinical judgment for risk assessment.


Subject(s)
Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombophilia/drug therapy , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Anticoagulants/administration & dosage , Anticoagulants/adverse effects , Consensus , Critical Illness , Disease Management , Factor Xa Inhibitors/administration & dosage , Factor Xa Inhibitors/adverse effects , Factor Xa Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Female , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , Fondaparinux/adverse effects , Fondaparinux/therapeutic use , Hemorrhage/chemically induced , Heparin/adverse effects , Heparin/therapeutic use , Heparin, Low-Molecular-Weight/administration & dosage , Heparin, Low-Molecular-Weight/adverse effects , Heparin, Low-Molecular-Weight/therapeutic use , Humans , Inpatients , Male , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Hematologic/prevention & control , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/blood , Pulmonary Embolism/drug therapy , Pulmonary Embolism/etiology , Pulmonary Embolism/prevention & control , Risk , Thrombophilia/etiology , Venous Thromboembolism/drug therapy , Venous Thromboembolism/etiology , Venous Thromboembolism/prevention & control , Venous Thrombosis/drug therapy , Venous Thrombosis/etiology , Venous Thrombosis/prevention & control
5.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(38): e27216, 2021 Sep 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1437853

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is associated with high mortality in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) but there remains uncertainty about the benefit of anti-coagulation prophylaxis and how to decide when ultrasound screening is indicated. We aimed to determine parameters predicting which COVID-19 patients are at risk of DVT and to assess the benefit of prophylactic anti-coagulation.Adult hospitalized patients with positive severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) undergoing venous duplex ultrasound for DVT assessment (n = 451) were retrospectively reviewed. Clinical and laboratory data within 72 hours of ultrasound were collected. Using split sampling and a 10-fold cross-validation, a random forest model was developed to find the most important variables for predicting DVT. Different d-dimer cutoffs were examined for classification of DVT. We also compared the rate of DVT between the patients going and not going under thromboprophylaxis.DVT was found in 65 (14%) of 451 reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction positive patients. The random forest model, trained and cross-validated on 2/3 of the original sample (n = 301), had area under the receiver operating characteristic curve = 0.91 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.85-0.97) for prediction of DVT in the test set (n = 150), with sensitivity = 93% (95%CI: 68%-99%) and specificity = 82% (95%CI: 75%-88%). The following variables had the highest importance: d-dimer, thromboprophylaxis, systolic blood pressure, admission to ultrasound interval, and platelets. Thromboprophylaxis reduced DVT risk 4-fold from 26% to 6% (P < .001), while anti-coagulation therapy led to hemorrhagic complications in 14 (22%) of 65 patients with DVT including 2 fatal intra-cranial hemorrhages. D-dimer was the most important predictor with area under curve = 0.79 (95%CI: 0.73-0.86) by itself, and a 5000 ng/mL threshold at 7 days postCOVID-19 symptom onset had 75% (95%CI: 53%-90%) sensitivity and 81% (95%CI: 72%-88%) specificity. In comparison with d-dimer alone, the random forest model showed 68% versus 32% specificity at 95% sensitivity, and 44% versus 23% sensitivity at 95% specificity.D-dimer >5000 ng/mL predicts DVT with high accuracy suggesting regular monitoring with d-dimer in the early stages of COVID-19 may be useful. A random forest model improved the prediction of DVT. Thromboprophylaxis reduced DVT in COVID-19 patients and should be considered in all patients. Full anti-coagulation therapy has a risk of life-threatening hemorrhage.


Subject(s)
Anticoagulants/adverse effects , COVID-19/complications , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , Ultrasonography, Doppler, Duplex/standards , Venous Thrombosis/etiology , Venous Thrombosis/prevention & control , Acute Disease , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing/methods , Case-Control Studies , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Predictive Value of Tests , Prevalence , ROC Curve , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Sensitivity and Specificity , Ultrasonography, Doppler, Duplex/methods , Venous Thrombosis/epidemiology , Venous Thrombosis/mortality
6.
Am Heart J ; 242: 115-122, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1392113

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The devastating Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic is associated with a high prothrombotic state. It is unclear if the coagulation abnormalities occur because of the direct effect of SARS-CoV-2 or indirectly by the cytokine storm and endothelial damage or by a combination of mechanisms. There is a clear indication of in-hospital pharmacological thromboprophylaxis for every patient with COVID-19 after bleed risk assessment. However, there is much debate regarding the best dosage regimen, and there is no consensus on the role of extended thromboprophylaxis. DESIGN: This study aims to evaluate the safety and efficacy of rivaroxaban 10 mg once daily for 35 ± 4 days versus no intervention after hospital discharge in COVID-19 patients who were at increased risk for VTE and have received standard parenteral VTE prophylaxis during hospitalization. The composite efficacy endpoint is a combination of symptomatic VTE, VTE-related death, VTE detected by bilateral lower limbs venous duplex scan and computed tomography pulmonary angiogram on day 35 ± 4 posthospital discharge and symptomatic arterial thromboembolism (myocardial infarction, nonhemorrhagic stroke, major adverse limb events, and cardiovascular death) up to day 35 ± 4 posthospital discharge. The key safety outcome is the incidence of major bleeding according to ISTH criteria. SUMMARY: The MICHELLE trial is expected to provide high-quality evidence around the role of extended thromboprophylaxis in COVID-19 and will help guide medical decisions in clinical practice.1.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Factor Xa Inhibitors/administration & dosage , Rivaroxaban/administration & dosage , Thrombosis/prevention & control , Adult , Brazil , Drug Administration Schedule , Factor Xa Inhibitors/adverse effects , Female , Hemorrhage/chemically induced , Humans , Male , Prospective Studies , Pulmonary Embolism/etiology , Pulmonary Embolism/prevention & control , Rivaroxaban/adverse effects , Thromboembolism/etiology , Thromboembolism/prevention & control , Thrombosis/etiology , Venous Thrombosis/etiology , Venous Thrombosis/prevention & control
7.
Scand J Immunol ; 94(5): e13097, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1388398

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is a global pandemic with a daily increasing number of affected individuals. Thrombosis is a severe complication of COVID-19 that leads to a worse clinical course with higher rates of mortality. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that hyperinflammation plays a crucial role in disease progression. This review compiles clinical data of COVID-19 patients who developed thrombotic complications to investigate the possible role of hyperinflammation in inducing hypercoagulation. A systematic literature search was performed using PubMed, Embase, Medline and Scopus to identify relevant clinical studies that investigated thrombotic manifestations and reported inflammatory and coagulation biomarkers in COVID-19 patients. Only 54 studies met our inclusion criteria, the majority of which demonstrated significantly elevated inflammatory markers. In the cohort studies with control, D-dimer was significantly higher in COVID-19 patients with thrombosis as compared to the control. Pulmonary embolism, deep vein thrombosis and strokes were frequently reported which could be attributed to the hyperinflammatory response associated with COVID-19 and/or to the direct viral activation of platelets and endothelial cells, two mechanisms that are discussed in this review. It is recommended that all admitted COVID-19 patients should be assessed for hypercoagulation. Furthermore, several studies have suggested that anticoagulation may be beneficial, especially in hospitalized non-ICU patients. Although vaccines against SARS-CoV-2 have been approved and distributed in several countries, research should continue in the field of prevention and treatment of COVID-19 and its severe complications including thrombosis due to the emergence of new variants against which the efficacy of the vaccines is not yet clear.


Subject(s)
Arteries/pathology , Blood Platelets/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Endothelium, Vascular/immunology , Inflammation/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Venous Thrombosis/immunology , Animals , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Blood Platelets/virology , COVID-19/complications , Endothelium, Vascular/virology , Humans , Inflammation/complications , Phenotype , Thrombosis , Venous Thrombosis/etiology , Venous Thrombosis/prevention & control
8.
Cardiol J ; 28(6): 941-953, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1346686

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) (coronavirus disease 2019 [COVID-19]) pandemic has presently stunted the growth of the airline industry. Despite the setbacks, pre-COVID-19 passenger numbers are forecasted to return by as early as 2024. As the industry recovers, the number of long-distance flights will surely continue to increase like it did before the pandemic. The incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) following air travel is also likely to increase. Although not common, the unique environment of air travel exposes individuals with particular health conditions to an elevated risk of acquiring VTEs. Numerous factors increasing the risk of developing VTE related to air travel have been identified, including inherited and acquired flight-related aspects. Non-pharmacological approaches to reduce air travel-related VTEs involve simple foot movements, compression socks and stockings, intermittent pneumatic compression devices, a novel modified airline seat, and foot exercisers. Pharmacological methods include heparins and direct oral anticoagulants. More than 30 reliable articles were evaluated to present the current knowledge regarding air travel-related VTEs, their risk factors, and prophylactic methods. Issues in research methodologies found in the literature were identified and discussed. Further research involving international collaboration projects is recommended. The authors' perspectives regarding long flights in previously infected COVID-19 individuals are also included.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Venous Thrombosis , Humans , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Travel , Travel-Related Illness , Venous Thrombosis/epidemiology , Venous Thrombosis/prevention & control
11.
J Thromb Haemost ; 18(7): 1743-1746, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1317987

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coagulopathy is a common abnormality in patients with COVID-19. However, the exact incidence of venous thromboembolic event is unknown in anticoagulated, severe COVID-19 patients. OBJECTIVES: Systematic assessment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) using complete duplex ultrasound (CDU) in anticoagulated COVID-19 patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We performed a retrospective study in 2 French intensive care units (ICU) where CDU is performed as a standard of care. A CDU from thigh to ankle at selected sites with Doppler waveforms and images was performed early during ICU stay in patients admitted with COVID-19. Anticoagulation dose was left to the discretion of the treating physician based on the individual risk of thrombosis. Patients were classified as treated with prophylactic anticoagulation or therapeutic anticoagulation. Pulmonary embolism was systematically searched in patients with persistent hypoxemia or secondary deterioration. RESULTS: From March 19 to April 11, 2020, 26 consecutive patients with severe COVID-19 were screened for VTE. Eight patients (31%) were treated with prophylactic anticoagulation, whereas 18 patients (69%) were treated with therapeutic anticoagulation. The overall rate of VTE in patients was 69%. The proportion of VTE was significantly higher in patients treated with prophylactic anticoagulation when compared with the other group (100% vs 56%, respectively, P = .03). Surprisingly, we found a high rate of thromboembolic events in COVID-19 patients treated with therapeutic anticoagulation, with 56% of VTE and 6 pulmonary embolisms. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest considering both systematic screening of VTE and early therapeutic anticoagulation in severe ICU COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Blood Coagulation/drug effects , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pulmonary Embolism/prevention & control , Venous Thromboembolism/prevention & control , Venous Thrombosis/prevention & control , Aged , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , France/epidemiology , Host-Parasite Interactions , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Pulmonary Embolism/blood , Pulmonary Embolism/epidemiology , Pulmonary Embolism/virology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Treatment Outcome , Venous Thromboembolism/blood , Venous Thromboembolism/epidemiology , Venous Thromboembolism/virology , Venous Thrombosis/blood , Venous Thrombosis/epidemiology , Venous Thrombosis/virology
12.
Rev Cardiovasc Med ; 22(2): 277-286, 2021 06 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1310348

ABSTRACT

Emerging evidences prove that the ongoing pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is strictly linked to coagulopathy even if pneumonia appears as the major clinical manifestation. The exact incidence of thromboembolic events is largely unknown, so that a relative significant number of studies have been performed in order to explore thrombotic risk in COVID-19 patients. Cytokine storm, mediated by pro-inflammatory interleukins, tumor necrosis factor α and elevated acute phase reactants, is primarily responsible for COVID-19-associated hypercoagulopathy. Also comorbidities, promoting endothelial dysfunction, contribute to a higher thromboembolic risk. In this review we aim to investigate epidemiology and clarify the pathophysiological pathways underlying hypercoagulability in COVID-19 patients, providing indications on the prevention of thromboembolic events in COVID-19. Furthermore we aim to reassume the pathophysiological paths involved in COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
Blood Coagulation , COVID-19/blood , Pulmonary Embolism/blood , Venous Thromboembolism/blood , Venous Thrombosis/blood , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Blood Coagulation/drug effects , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Prognosis , Pulmonary Embolism/epidemiology , Pulmonary Embolism/prevention & control , Pulmonary Embolism/virology , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Venous Thromboembolism/epidemiology , Venous Thromboembolism/prevention & control , Venous Thromboembolism/virology , Venous Thrombosis/epidemiology , Venous Thrombosis/prevention & control , Venous Thrombosis/virology
13.
Vascul Pharmacol ; 139: 106883, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1253732

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of 2019 novel coronavirus disease (Covid-19) has deeply challenged the world population, but also our medical knowledge. Special attention has been paid early to an activation of coagulation, then to an elevated rate of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients hospitalized with severe COVID-19. These data suggested that anticoagulant drugs should be evaluated in the treatment of patients with COVID-19. The publication of unexpected high rates of VTE in patients hospitalized with COVID-19, despite receiving thromboprophylaxis, open the way to dedicated trials, evaluating modified regimens of thromboprophylaxis. Moreover, the further improvement in our comprehension of the disease, particularly the pulmonary endothelial dysfunction increased the hope that anticoagulant drugs may also protect patients from pulmonary thrombosis. In this comprehensive review, we cover the different situations where thromboprophylaxis standard may be modified (medically-ill inpatients, ICU inpatients, outpatients), and describe some of the current randomized controls trials evaluating new regimens of thromboprophylaxis in patients with COVID-19, including the preliminary available results. We also discuss the potential of anticoagulant drugs to target the thromboinflammation described in patients with severe COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Pulmonary Embolism/prevention & control , Venous Thromboembolism/prevention & control , Venous Thrombosis/prevention & control , Anticoagulants/adverse effects , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , Humans , Pulmonary Embolism/blood , Pulmonary Embolism/diagnosis , Pulmonary Embolism/mortality , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Treatment Outcome , Venous Thromboembolism/blood , Venous Thromboembolism/diagnosis , Venous Thromboembolism/mortality , Venous Thrombosis/blood , Venous Thrombosis/diagnosis , Venous Thrombosis/mortality
14.
Semin Thromb Hemost ; 47(4): 362-371, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1203471

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a frequent complication of COVID-19, so that the importance of adequate in-hospital thromboprophylaxis in patients hospitalized with COVID-19 is well established. However, the incidence of VTE after discharge and whether postdischarge thromboprophylaxis is beneficial and safe are unclear. In this prospective observational single-center study, we report the incidence of VTE 6 weeks after hospitalization and the use of postdischarge thromboprophylaxis. METHODS: Patients hospitalized with confirmed COVID-19 were invited to a multidisciplinary follow-up clinic 6 weeks after discharge. D-dimer and C-reactive protein were measured, and all patients were screened for deep vein thrombosis with venous duplex-ultrasound. Additionally, selected high-risk patients received computed tomography pulmonary angiogram or ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) scan to screen for incidental pulmonary embolism. RESULTS: Of 485 consecutive patients hospitalized from March through June 2020, 146 patients were analyzed, of which 39% had been admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). Postdischarge thromboprophylaxis was prescribed in 28% of patients, but was used more frequently after ICU stay (61%) and in patients with higher maximal D-dimer and C-reactive protein levels during hospitalization. Six weeks after discharge, elevated D-dimer values were present in 32% of ward and 42% of ICU patients. Only one asymptomatic deep vein thrombosis (0.7%) and one symptomatic pulmonary embolism (0.7%) were diagnosed with systematic screening. No bleedings were reported. CONCLUSION: In patients who had been hospitalized with COVID-19, systematic screening for VTE 6 weeks after discharge revealed a low incidence of VTE. A strategy of selectively providing postdischarge thromboprophylaxis in high-risk patients seems safe and potentially effective.


Subject(s)
C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , COVID-19 , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Patient Discharge , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Venous Thromboembolism , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Pulmonary Embolism/blood , Pulmonary Embolism/etiology , Pulmonary Embolism/mortality , Pulmonary Embolism/prevention & control , Venous Thromboembolism/blood , Venous Thromboembolism/etiology , Venous Thromboembolism/mortality , Venous Thromboembolism/prevention & control , Venous Thrombosis/blood , Venous Thrombosis/etiology , Venous Thrombosis/mortality , Venous Thrombosis/prevention & control
17.
Thromb Res ; 201: 151-153, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1174509

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 induces a hypercoagulable state with early case reports of death from undetected venous thromboembolism. Various protocols and consensus statements have been proposed to address the optimal prophylaxis strategy for hospitalized patients. We offer our single institution experience with a d-dimer driven prophylaxis model with no deep vein thrombosis identified on discharge lower extremity ultrasounds.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Venous Thrombosis , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Venous Thrombosis/prevention & control
18.
Nat Rev Immunol ; 21(5): 319-329, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1171402

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a clinical syndrome caused by infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Patients with severe disease show hyperactivation of the immune system, which can affect multiple organs besides the lungs. Here, we propose that SARS-CoV-2 infection induces a process known as immunothrombosis, in which activated neutrophils and monocytes interact with platelets and the coagulation cascade, leading to intravascular clot formation in small and larger vessels. Microthrombotic complications may contribute to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and other organ dysfunctions. Therapeutic strategies aimed at reducing immunothrombosis may therefore be useful. Several antithrombotic and immunomodulating drugs have been proposed as candidates to treat patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection. The growing understanding of SARS-CoV-2 infection pathogenesis and how it contributes to critical illness and its complications may help to improve risk stratification and develop targeted therapies to reduce the acute and long-term consequences of this disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/pathology , Venous Thrombosis/immunology , Venous Thrombosis/pathology , Blood Coagulation/immunology , Blood Platelets/immunology , Critical Illness/therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Endothelium, Vascular/pathology , Fibrinolytic Agents/therapeutic use , Humans , Immunity, Innate/immunology , Lung/blood supply , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Monocytes/immunology , Neutrophils/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Venous Thrombosis/prevention & control
19.
AJR Am J Roentgenol ; 216(3): 563-569, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1133848

ABSTRACT

Despite inferior vena cava (IVC) filter practice spanning over 50 years, interventionalists face many controversies in proper utilization and management. This article reviews recent literature and offers opinions on filter practices. IVC filtration is most likely to benefit patients at high risk of iatrogenic pulmonary embolus during endovenous intervention. Filters should be used selectively in patients with acute trauma or who are undergoing bariatric surgery. Retrieval should be attempted for perforating filter and fractured filter fragments when imaging suggests feasibility and favorable risk-to-benefit ratio. Antibiotic prophylaxis should be considered when removing filters with confirmed gastrointestinal penetration. Anticoagulation solely because of filter presence is not recommended except in patients with active malignancy. Anticoagulation while filters remain in place may decrease long-term filter complications in these patients. Patients with a filter and symptomatic IVC occlusion should be offered filter removal and IVC reconstruction. Physicians implanting filters may maximize retrieval by maintaining physician-patient relationships and scheduling follow-up at time of placement. Annual follow-up allows continued evaluation for removal or replacement as appropriate. Advanced retrieval techniques increase retrieval rates but require caution. Certain cases may require referral to experienced centers with additional retrieval resources. The views expressed should help guide clinical practice, future innovation, and research.


Subject(s)
Device Removal/methods , Prosthesis Implantation/methods , Pulmonary Embolism/prevention & control , Vena Cava Filters , Vena Cava, Inferior , Venous Thrombosis/prevention & control , Antibiotic Prophylaxis , Anticoagulants/administration & dosage , Bariatric Surgery , COVID-19/complications , Device Removal/instrumentation , Endovascular Procedures , Humans , Neoplasms/complications , Physician-Patient Relations , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Prosthesis Design , Recurrence , Risk Assessment , Vena Cava Filters/adverse effects , Venous Thrombosis/etiology , Wounds and Injuries/complications
20.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 25(4): 2123-2130, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1116633

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Diffuse thrombosis represents one of the most predominant causes of death by COVID-19 and SARS-CoV-2 infection seems to increase the risk of developing venous thromboembolic diseases (VTE). Aim of this study is to analyze the relationship between validated predictive scores for VTE such as IMPROVE and IMPROVEDD and: (1) Intensification of Care (IoC, admission to Pulmonology Department or Intensive Care Unit) (2) in-hospital mortality rate 3) 30-days mortality rate. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We retrospectively evaluated 51 adult patients with laboratory diagnosis of SARS-CoV-2 infection and calculated IMPROVE and IMPROVEDD scores. All patients underwent venous color-Doppler ultrasound of the lower limbs to assess the presence of superficial vein thrombosis (SVT) and/or deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Patients with normal values of D-dimer did not receive heparin therapy (LMWH); patients with ≥ 4 ULN values of D-dimer or with a diagnosis of DVT were treated with therapeutic LMWH dosage, while the remaining patients were treated with prophylactic LMWH dosages. RESULTS: We found strong relations between IMPROVE score and the need for IoC and with the in-hospital mortality rate and between the IMPROVEDD score and the need for IoC. We defined that an IMPROVE score greater than 4 points was significantly associated to in-hospital mortality rate (p = 0.05), while an IMPROVEDD score greater than 3 points was associated with the need for IoC (p = 0.04). Multivariate logistic analysis showed how IMPROVE score was significantly associated to in-hospital and 30-days mortality rates. CONCLUSIONS: IMPROVE score can be considered an independent predictor of in-hospital and 30-days mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Fibrinolytic Agents/therapeutic use , Heparin, Low-Molecular-Weight/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Venous Thrombosis/prevention & control , Adult , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/mortality , Critical Care/statistics & numerical data , Disease-Free Survival , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , Fibrinolytic Agents/administration & dosage , Heparin, Low-Molecular-Weight/administration & dosage , Humans , Italy , Logistic Models , Lower Extremity/diagnostic imaging , Multivariate Analysis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Ultrasonography, Doppler, Duplex , Venous Thrombosis/diagnostic imaging , Venous Thrombosis/etiology , Venous Thrombosis/mortality
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