Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 95
Filter
2.
Comput Math Methods Med ; 2022: 6161015, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1938097

ABSTRACT

This research was aimed at exploring the changes in right ventricular function in patients after the recovery of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) under echocardiography and providing a reference for the rehabilitation and treatment of COVID-19 patients. Three echocardiographic follow-up examinations were performed on 40 recovered COVID-19 patients and 40 healthy people. Right ventricular function between patients after COVID-19 rehabilitation and healthy people was compared. The mean values of right ventricular fractional area change (RVFAC), tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE), right ventricular ejection fraction (RVEF), right myocardial performance index (RMPI), and tricuspid annular plane systolic speed (S') were compared between patients after COVID-19 rehabilitation and healthy subjects. The technical parameters of two-dimensional speckle tracking were compared. The results showed that the differences in RVFAC, TAPSE, RVEF, and RMPI between COVID-19 patients and healthy controls were not significant during the three follow-up periods (P > 0.05). At the first follow-up, the S' was 12.78 cm/s in COVID-19 patients and 13.18 cm/s in healthy subjects. At the second follow-up, the S' was 11.98 cm/s in COVID-19 patients and 12.77 cm/s in healthy subjects. At the third follow-up, the S' was 12.79 cm/s in COVID-19 patients and 13.12 cm/s in healthy subjects. There was no significant difference between the two groups (P > 0.05). In addition, there was no significant difference in right ventricular function between COVID-19 patients and healthy controls, and there was no significant difference in cardiovascular symptoms (P > 0.05). In summary, COVID-19 had no substantial effect on right ventricular function and better recovery in patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Echocardiography , Humans , Stroke Volume , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/diagnostic imaging , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/etiology , Ventricular Function, Right
4.
Curr Atheroscler Rep ; 24(7): 563-570, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1906513

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: COVID-19 is now a global pandemic and the illness affects multiple organ systems, including the cardiovascular system. Long-term cardiovascular consequences of COVID-19 are not yet fully characterized. This review seeks to consolidate available data on long-term cardiovascular complications of COVID-19 infection. RECENT FINDINGS: Acute cardiovascular complications of COVID-19 infection include myocarditis, pericarditis, acute coronary syndrome, heart failure, pulmonary hypertension, right ventricular dysfunction, and arrhythmia. Long-term follow-up shows increased incidence of arrhythmia, heart failure, acute coronary syndrome, right ventricular dysfunction, myocardial fibrosis, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus. There is increased mortality in COVID-19 patients after hospital discharge, and initial myocardial injury is associated with increased mortality. Emerging data demonstrates increased incidence of cardiovascular illness and structural changes in recovered COVID-19 patients. Future research will be important in understanding the clinical significance of these structural abnormalities, and to determine the effect of vaccines on preventing long-term cardiovascular complications.


Subject(s)
Acute Coronary Syndrome , COVID-19 , Heart Failure , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right , Arrhythmias, Cardiac , COVID-19/complications , Heart , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Intensive Care Med ; 48(6): 667-678, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1899121

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Severely ill patients affected by coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) develop circulatory failure. We aimed to report patterns of left and right ventricular dysfunction in the first echocardiography following admission to intensive care unit (ICU). METHODS: Retrospective, descriptive study that collected echocardiographic and clinical information from severely ill COVID-19 patients admitted to 14 ICUs in 8 countries. Patients admitted to ICU who received at least one echocardiography between 1st February 2020 and 30th June 2021 were included. Clinical and echocardiographic data were uploaded using a secured web-based electronic database (REDCap). RESULTS: Six hundred and seventy-seven patients were included and the first echo was performed 2 [1, 4] days after ICU admission. The median age was 65 [56, 73] years, and 71% were male. Left ventricle (LV) and/or right ventricle (RV) systolic dysfunction were found in 234 (34.5%) patients. 149 (22%) patients had LV systolic dysfunction (with or without RV dysfunction) without LV dilatation and no elevation in filling pressure. 152 (22.5%) had RV systolic dysfunction. In 517 patients with information on both paradoxical septal motion and quantitative RV size, 90 (17.4%) had acute cor pulmonale (ACP). ACP was associated with mechanical ventilation (OR > 4), pulmonary embolism (OR > 5) and increased PaCO2. Exploratory analyses showed that patients with ACP and older age were more likely to die in hospital (including ICU). CONCLUSION: Almost one-third of this cohort of critically ill COVID-19 patients exhibited abnormal LV and/or RV systolic function in their first echocardiography assessment. While LV systolic dysfunction appears similar to septic cardiomyopathy, RV systolic dysfunction was related to pressure overload due to positive pressure ventilation, hypercapnia and pulmonary embolism. ACP and age seemed to be associated with mortality in this cohort.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heart Failure , Hypertension, Pulmonary , Pulmonary Embolism , Ventricular Dysfunction, Left , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right , Aged , Echocardiography , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Retrospective Studies , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/diagnostic imaging
7.
ASAIO J ; 68(6): 772-778, 2022 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1874039

ABSTRACT

Respiratory failure caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) is associated with mortality. Patients unresponsive to conventional therapy may benefit from temporary venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VV-ECMO). We investigated clinical and echocardiographic characteristics, particularly, right ventricular dysfunction, with survival in patients with respiratory failure caused by SARS-CoV-2. We performed a single-center retrospective cohort study of patients requiring VV-ECMO for respiratory failure from COVID-19 infection between January 2020 and December 2020. Demographics, comorbidities, laboratory parameters, and echocardiographic features of left and right ventricular (LV/RV) function were compared between patients who survived and those who could not be weaned from VV-ECMO. In addition, we evaluated outcomes in a separate population managed with venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA-ECMO). In total, 10/17 patients failed to wean from VV-ECMO and died in the hospital on average 41.5 ± 10.9 days post admission. Seven were decannulated (41%) and survived to hospital discharge. There were no significant differences in demographics, comorbidities, and laboratory parameters between groups. Moderate to severe RV dysfunction was significantly more in those who died (8/10, 80%) compared to survivors (0/7, 0%) (p = 0.002). Patients supported with VA-ECMO had superior survival with 5/9 patients (56%) decannulated and discharged. Moderate to severe RV dysfunction is associated with increased mortality in patients with respiratory failure requiring VV-ECMO for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation , Respiratory Insufficiency , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Death , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/adverse effects , Humans , Respiratory Insufficiency/etiology , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/complications , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/therapy
8.
Anaesthesia ; 77(7): 772-784, 2022 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1861190

ABSTRACT

Cardiovascular complications due to COVID-19, such as right ventricular dysfunction, are common. The combination of acute respiratory distress syndrome, invasive mechanical ventilation, thromboembolic disease and direct myocardial injury creates conditions where right ventricular dysfunction is likely to occur. We undertook a prospective, multicentre cohort study in 10 Scottish intensive care units of patients with COVID-19 pneumonitis whose lungs were mechanically ventilated. Right ventricular dysfunction was defined as the presence of severe right ventricular dilation and interventricular septal flattening. To explore the role of myocardial injury, high-sensitivity troponin and N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide plasma levels were measured in all patients. We recruited 121 patients and 118 (98%) underwent imaging. It was possible to determine the primary outcome in 112 (91%). Severe right ventricular dilation was present in 31 (28%), with interventricular septal flattening present in nine (8%). Right ventricular dysfunction (the combination of these two parameters) was present in seven (6%, 95%CI 3-13%). Thirty-day mortality was 86% in those with right ventricular dysfunction as compared with 45% in those without (p = 0.051). Patients with right ventricular dysfunction were more likely to have: pulmonary thromboembolism (p < 0.001); higher plateau airway pressure (p = 0.048); lower dynamic compliance (p = 0.031); higher plasma N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide levels (p = 0.006); and raised plasma troponin levels (p = 0.048). Our results demonstrate a prevalence of right ventricular dysfunction of 6%, which was associated with increased mortality (86%). Associations were also observed between right ventricular dysfunction and aetiological domains of: acute respiratory distress syndrome; ventilation; thromboembolic disease; and direct myocardial injury, implying a complex multifactorial pathophysiology.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right , COVID-19/complications , Cohort Studies , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Natriuretic Peptide, Brain , Prospective Studies , Respiration, Artificial/adverse effects , Troponin , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/complications , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/etiology
9.
Kardiologiia ; 62(3): 16-20, 2022 Mar 31.
Article in English, English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1789752

ABSTRACT

Aim      To study the relationship of echocardiographic right ventricular (RV) structural and functional parameters and indexes of pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) in patients 3 months after COVID-19 pneumonia.Material and methods  This cross-sectional, observational study included 96 patients aged 46.7±15.2 years. The inclusion criteria were documented diagnosis of COVID-19-associated pneumonia and patient's willing to participate in the observation. Patients were examined upon hospitalization and during the control visit (at 3 months after discharge from the hospital). Images and video loops were processed, including the assessment of myocardial longitudinal strain (LS) by speckle tracking, according to the effective guidelines. The equation [tricuspid regurgitation velocity/ time-velocity integral of the RV outflow tract × 10 + 0.16] was used to determine PRV. Patients were divided into group 1 (n=31) with increased PRV ≥1.5 Wood units and group 2 (n=65) with PRV <1.5 Wood units.Results At baseline, groups did not differ in main clinical functional characteristics, including severity of lung damage by computed tomography (32.7±22.1 and 36.5±20.4 %, respectively. р=0.418). Echocardiographic linear, planimetric and volumetric parameters did not significantly differ between the groups. In group 1 at the control visit, endocardial LS of the RV free wall (FW) (-19.3 [-17.9; -25.8] %) was significantly lower (р=0.048) than in group 2 (-23.4 [-19.8; -27.8] %), and systolic pulmonary artery pressure (sPAP) according to C. Otto (32.0 [26.0; 35.0] mm Hg and 23.0 [20.0; 28.0] mm Hg) was significantly higher than in group 2 (р<0.001). According to the logistic regression, only endocardial RV FW LS (odds ratio, OR, 0.859; 95 % confidence interval, CI, 0.746-0.989; р=0.034) and sPAP (OR, 1.248; 95 % CI, 1.108-1405; р<0.001) were independently related with the increase in PVR. Spearman correlation analysis detected a moderate relationship between PVR and mean PAP according to G. Mahan (r=0.516; p=0.003) and between PVR and the index of right heart chamber functional coupling with the PA system (r=-0.509; p=0.007) in group 1 at the control visit.Conclusion      In patients 3 months after COVID-19 pneumonia, hidden RV systolic dysfunction defined as depressed endocardial RV FW LS to -19.3% is associated with increased PVR ≥1.5 Wood units.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiomyopathies , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right , COVID-19/complications , Cross-Sectional Studies , Echocardiography/methods , Heart Ventricles/diagnostic imaging , Humans , Vascular Resistance , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/diagnostic imaging , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/etiology
11.
Echocardiography ; 39(4): 584-591, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1741372

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Acute right ventricular (RV) failure is common in patients hospitalized with COVID-19. Compared to the conventional echocardiographic parameters, right ventricular longitudinal strain (RVLS) is more sensitive and accurate for the diagnosis of RV systolic dysfunction. OBJECTIVE: Our purpose was to investigate the sustained RV dysfunction echo-quantified by RVLS in patients recovered from severe COVID-19. Furthermore, we aimed to assess whether disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) has a key role to predict the impaired RV strain. METHODS: Of 198 consecutive COVID-19 patients hospitalized from March 1, 2020, to April 15, 2020, 45 selected patients who survived from severe COVID-19 were enrolled in the study and referred to our echo-lab for transthoracic echocardiography 6-months after discharge. RVLS was calculated as the mean of the strain values of RV free wall. DIC was defined with a validated scoring system: DIC score equal to or more than 5 is compatible with overt-DIC. Categories of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) were defined based on PaO2 /FiO2 ratio. RESULTS: A total 26 of 45 patients showed impaired RVLS at 6-months' follow-up. DIC score was significantly higher in patients with worse RVLS than in those with better RVLS (4.8 ± .5 vs. 3.6 ± .6, p =.03). Stages of ARDS did not modulate this relationship. Finally, overt-DIC results the only independent predictor of sustained RV dysfunction (OR 1.233, 95% CI 1.041-1.934, p =.043). CONCLUSIONS: Sustained RV impairment frequently occurs in patients recovered from severe COVID-19. DIC plays a key role, resulting in an independent predictor of sustained RV dysfunction.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation , Heart Failure , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right , COVID-19/complications , Dacarbazine , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/complications , Humans , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/complications , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/diagnostic imaging , Ventricular Function, Right
12.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 101(8): e28971, 2022 Feb 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1713783

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Background: This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to assess whether tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE) could be used as a prognostic tool in patients with coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19). METHODS: Studies on the relationship between TAPSE and COVID-19 since February 2021. Standardized mean difference (SMD) and 95% confidence intervals were used to assess the effect size. The potential for publication bias was assessed using a contour-enhanced funnel plot and Egger test. A meta-regression was performed to assess if the difference in TAPSE between survivors and nonsurvivors was affected by age, sex, hypertension or diabetes. RESULTS: Sixteen studies comprising 1579 patients were included in this meta-analysis. TAPSE was lower in nonsurvivors (SMD -3.24 (-4.23, -2.26), P < .00001; I2 = 71%), and a subgroup analysis indicated that TAPSE was also lower in critically ill patients (SMD -3.85 (-5.31, -2.38,), P < .00001; I2 = 46%). Heterogeneity was also significantly reduced, I2 < 50%. Pooled results showed that patients who developed right ventricular dysfunction had lower TAPSE (SMD -5.87 (-7.81, -3.92), P = .004; I2 = 82%). There was no statistically significant difference in the TAPSE of patients who sustained a cardiac injury vs those who did not (SMD -1.36 (-3.98, 1.26), P = .31; I2 = 88%). No significant publication bias was detected (P = .8147) but the heterogeneity of the included studies was significant. A meta-regression showed that heterogeneity was significantly greater when the incidence of hypertension was <50% (I2 = 91%) and that of diabetes was <30% (I2 = 85%). CONCLUSION: Low TAPSE levels are associated with poor COVID-19 disease outcomes. TAPSE levels are modulated by disease severity, and their prognostic utility may be skewed by pre-existing patient comorbidities. TRIAL RETROSPECTIVELY REGISTERED FEBRUARY ,: PROSPERO CRD42021236731.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Echocardiography/methods , Tricuspid Valve/diagnostic imaging , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right , Humans , Hypertension/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Tricuspid Valve/physiopathology , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/etiology , Ventricular Function, Right/physiology
15.
J Am Heart Assoc ; 11(4): e023220, 2022 02 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1685779

ABSTRACT

Background The COVID-19-related pulmonary effects may negatively impact pulmonary hemodynamics and right ventricular function. We examined the prognostic relevance of right ventricular function and right ventricular-to-pulmonary circulation coupling assessed by bedside echocardiography in patients hospitalized with COVID-19 pneumonia and a large spectrum of disease independently of indices of pneumonia severity and left ventricular function. Methods and Results Consecutive COVID-19 subjects who underwent full cardiac echocardiographic evaluation along with gas analyses and computed tomography scans were included in the study. Measurements were performed offline, and quantitative analyses were obtained by an operator blinded to the clinical data. We analyzed 133 patients (mean age 69±12 years, 57% men). During a mean hospital stay of 26±16 days, 35 patients (26%) died. The mean tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion/pulmonary artery systolic pressure (TAPSE/PASP) ratio was 0.48±0.18 mm/Hg in nonsurvivors and 0.72±0.32 mm/Hg in survivors (P=0.002). For each 0.1 mm/mm Hg increase in TAPSE/PASP, there was a 27% lower risk of in-hospital death (hazard ratio [HR], 0.73 [95% CI, 0.59-0.89]; P=0.003). At multivariable analysis, TAPSE/PASP ratio remained a predictor of in-hospital death after adjustments for age, oxygen partial pressure at arterial gas analysis/fraction of inspired oxygen, left ventricular ejection fraction, and computed tomography lung score. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to identify the cutoff value of the TAPSE/PASP ratio, which best specified high-risk from lower-risk patients. The best cutoff for predicting in-hospital mortality was TAPSE/PASP <0.57 mm/mm Hg (75% sensitivity and 70% specificity) and was associated with a >4-fold increased risk of in-hospital death (HR, 4.8 [95% CI, 1.7-13.1]; P=0.007). Conclusions In patients hospitalized with COVID-19 pneumonia, the assessment of right ventricular to pulmonary circulation coupling appears central to disease evolution and prediction of events. TAPSE/PASP ratio plays a mainstay role as prognostic determinant beyond markers of lung injury.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pulmonary Circulation , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/therapy , Echocardiography, Doppler , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Pulmonary Circulation/physiology , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/diagnostic imaging , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/mortality , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/physiopathology
16.
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand ; 66(5): 606-614, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1672923

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The prevalence and importance of cardiac dysfunction in critically ill patients with COVID-19 in Sweden is not yet established. The aim of the study was to assess the prevalence of cardiac dysfunction and elevated pulmonary artery pressure (PAP), and its influence on mortality in patients with COVID-19 in intensive care in Sweden. METHODS: This was a multicentre observational study performed in five intensive care units (ICUs) in Sweden. Patients admitted to participating ICU with COVID-19 were examined with echocardiography within 72 h from admission and again after 4 to 7 days. Cardiac dysfunction was defined as left ventricular (LV) dysfunction (ejection fraction <50% and/or regional hypokinesia) or right ventricular (RV) dysfunction (defined as TAPSE <17 mm or visually assessed moderate/severe RV dysfunction). RESULTS: We included 132 patients, of whom 127 (96%) were intubated. Cardiac dysfunction was found in 42 (32%) patients. Most patients had cardiac dysfunction at the first assessment (n = 35) while a few developed cardiac dysfunction later (n = 7) and some changed type of dysfunction (n = 3). LV dysfunction was found in 21 and RV dysfunction in 19 patients, while 5 patients had combined dysfunction. Elevated PAP was found in 34 patients (26%) and was more common in patients with RV dysfunction. RV dysfunction and elevated PAP were independently associated with an increased risk of death (OR 3.98, p = .013 and OR 3.88, p = .007, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Cardiac dysfunction occurs commonly in critically ill patients with COVID-19 in Sweden. RV dysfunction and elevated PAP are associated with an increased risk of death.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heart Diseases , Ventricular Dysfunction, Left , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right , COVID-19/complications , Critical Illness , Heart Diseases/complications , Humans , Sweden/epidemiology
19.
Heart Lung ; 52: 123-129, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587702

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease COVID-19 produces a predominantly pulmonary affection, being cardiac involvement an important component of the multiorganic dysfunction. At the moment there are few reports about the behavior of echocardiographic images in the patients who have the severe forms of the disease. OBJECTIVE: Identify the echocardiographic prognostic markers for death within 60 days in patients hospitalized in intensive care. METHODS: A single-center prospective cohort was made with patients hospitalized in intensive care for COVID-19 confirmed via polymerase chain reaction who got an echocardiogram between May and October 2020. A Cox multivariate model was plotted reporting the HR and confidence intervals with their respective p values for clinical and echocardiographic variables. RESULTS: Out of the 326 patients included, 153 patients got an echocardiogram performed on average 6.8 days after admission. The average age was 60.7, 47 patients (30.7%) were females and 67 (44.7%) registered positive troponin. 91 patients (59.5%) died. The univariate analysis identified TAPSE, LVEF, pulmonary artery systolic pressure, acute cor pulmonale, right ventricle diastolic dysfunction, and right ventricular dilatation as variables associated with mortality. The multivariate model identified that the acute cor pulmonale with HR= 4.05 (CI 95% 1.09 - 15.02, p 0.037), the right ventricular dilatation with HR= 3.33 (CI 95% 1.29 - 8.61, p 0.013), and LVEF with HR= 0.94 (CI 95% 0.89 - 0.99, p 0.020) were associated with mortality within 60 days. CONCLUSIONS: In patients hospitalized in the intensive care unit for COVID-19, the LVEF, acute cor pulmonale and right ventricular dilatation are prognostic echocardiographic markers associated with death within 60 days.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right , Critical Care , Echocardiography , Female , Humans , Prospective Studies , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/complications
20.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(1)2021 Dec 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580702

ABSTRACT

Right ventricular (RV) and left ventricular (LV) dysfunction is common in a significant number of hospitalized coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients. This study was conducted to assess whether the improved mitochondrial bioenergetics by cardiometabolic drug meldonium can attenuate the development of ventricular dysfunction in experimental RV and LV dysfunction models, which resemble ventricular dysfunction in COVID-19 patients. Effects of meldonium were assessed in rats with pulmonary hypertension-induced RV failure and in mice with inflammation-induced LV dysfunction. Rats with RV failure showed decreased RV fractional area change (RVFAC) and hypertrophy. Treatment with meldonium attenuated the development of RV hypertrophy and increased RVFAC by 50%. Mice with inflammation-induced LV dysfunction had decreased LV ejection fraction (LVEF) by 30%. Treatment with meldonium prevented the decrease in LVEF. A decrease in the mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation with a concomitant increase in pyruvate metabolism was noted in the cardiac fibers of the rats and mice with RV and LV failure, respectively. Meldonium treatment in both models restored mitochondrial bioenergetics. The results show that meldonium treatment prevents the development of RV and LV systolic dysfunction by enhancing mitochondrial function in experimental models of ventricular dysfunction that resembles cardiovascular complications in COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Cardiotonic Agents/pharmacology , Methylhydrazines/pharmacology , Animals , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , Cardiotonic Agents/therapeutic use , Cardiotoxicity/drug therapy , Disease Models, Animal , Endothelium/drug effects , Heart Failure/drug therapy , Heart Failure/metabolism , Heart Ventricles/drug effects , Hydrogen Peroxide/metabolism , Lung/drug effects , Male , Methylhydrazines/therapeutic use , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mitochondria/drug effects , Rats, Sprague-Dawley , Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism , Reperfusion Injury/drug therapy , Stroke Volume/drug effects , Ventricular Dysfunction, Left/drug therapy , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/drug therapy
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL