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1.
Intensive Care Med ; 48(6): 667-678, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1800369

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Severely ill patients affected by coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) develop circulatory failure. We aimed to report patterns of left and right ventricular dysfunction in the first echocardiography following admission to intensive care unit (ICU). METHODS: Retrospective, descriptive study that collected echocardiographic and clinical information from severely ill COVID-19 patients admitted to 14 ICUs in 8 countries. Patients admitted to ICU who received at least one echocardiography between 1st February 2020 and 30th June 2021 were included. Clinical and echocardiographic data were uploaded using a secured web-based electronic database (REDCap). RESULTS: Six hundred and seventy-seven patients were included and the first echo was performed 2 [1, 4] days after ICU admission. The median age was 65 [56, 73] years, and 71% were male. Left ventricle (LV) and/or right ventricle (RV) systolic dysfunction were found in 234 (34.5%) patients. 149 (22%) patients had LV systolic dysfunction (with or without RV dysfunction) without LV dilatation and no elevation in filling pressure. 152 (22.5%) had RV systolic dysfunction. In 517 patients with information on both paradoxical septal motion and quantitative RV size, 90 (17.4%) had acute cor pulmonale (ACP). ACP was associated with mechanical ventilation (OR > 4), pulmonary embolism (OR > 5) and increased PaCO2. Exploratory analyses showed that patients with ACP and older age were more likely to die in hospital (including ICU). CONCLUSION: Almost one-third of this cohort of critically ill COVID-19 patients exhibited abnormal LV and/or RV systolic function in their first echocardiography assessment. While LV systolic dysfunction appears similar to septic cardiomyopathy, RV systolic dysfunction was related to pressure overload due to positive pressure ventilation, hypercapnia and pulmonary embolism. ACP and age seemed to be associated with mortality in this cohort.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heart Failure , Hypertension, Pulmonary , Pulmonary Embolism , Ventricular Dysfunction, Left , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right , Aged , Echocardiography , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Retrospective Studies , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/diagnostic imaging
2.
Kardiologiia ; 62(3): 16-20, 2022 Mar 31.
Article in English, English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1789752

ABSTRACT

Aim      To study the relationship of echocardiographic right ventricular (RV) structural and functional parameters and indexes of pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) in patients 3 months after COVID-19 pneumonia.Material and methods  This cross-sectional, observational study included 96 patients aged 46.7±15.2 years. The inclusion criteria were documented diagnosis of COVID-19-associated pneumonia and patient's willing to participate in the observation. Patients were examined upon hospitalization and during the control visit (at 3 months after discharge from the hospital). Images and video loops were processed, including the assessment of myocardial longitudinal strain (LS) by speckle tracking, according to the effective guidelines. The equation [tricuspid regurgitation velocity/ time-velocity integral of the RV outflow tract × 10 + 0.16] was used to determine PRV. Patients were divided into group 1 (n=31) with increased PRV ≥1.5 Wood units and group 2 (n=65) with PRV <1.5 Wood units.Results At baseline, groups did not differ in main clinical functional characteristics, including severity of lung damage by computed tomography (32.7±22.1 and 36.5±20.4 %, respectively. р=0.418). Echocardiographic linear, planimetric and volumetric parameters did not significantly differ between the groups. In group 1 at the control visit, endocardial LS of the RV free wall (FW) (-19.3 [-17.9; -25.8] %) was significantly lower (р=0.048) than in group 2 (-23.4 [-19.8; -27.8] %), and systolic pulmonary artery pressure (sPAP) according to C. Otto (32.0 [26.0; 35.0] mm Hg and 23.0 [20.0; 28.0] mm Hg) was significantly higher than in group 2 (р<0.001). According to the logistic regression, only endocardial RV FW LS (odds ratio, OR, 0.859; 95 % confidence interval, CI, 0.746-0.989; р=0.034) and sPAP (OR, 1.248; 95 % CI, 1.108-1405; р<0.001) were independently related with the increase in PVR. Spearman correlation analysis detected a moderate relationship between PVR and mean PAP according to G. Mahan (r=0.516; p=0.003) and between PVR and the index of right heart chamber functional coupling with the PA system (r=-0.509; p=0.007) in group 1 at the control visit.Conclusion      In patients 3 months after COVID-19 pneumonia, hidden RV systolic dysfunction defined as depressed endocardial RV FW LS to -19.3% is associated with increased PVR ≥1.5 Wood units.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiomyopathies , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right , COVID-19/complications , Cross-Sectional Studies , Echocardiography/methods , Heart Ventricles/diagnostic imaging , Humans , Vascular Resistance , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/diagnostic imaging , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/etiology
4.
Echocardiography ; 39(4): 584-591, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1741372

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Acute right ventricular (RV) failure is common in patients hospitalized with COVID-19. Compared to the conventional echocardiographic parameters, right ventricular longitudinal strain (RVLS) is more sensitive and accurate for the diagnosis of RV systolic dysfunction. OBJECTIVE: Our purpose was to investigate the sustained RV dysfunction echo-quantified by RVLS in patients recovered from severe COVID-19. Furthermore, we aimed to assess whether disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) has a key role to predict the impaired RV strain. METHODS: Of 198 consecutive COVID-19 patients hospitalized from March 1, 2020, to April 15, 2020, 45 selected patients who survived from severe COVID-19 were enrolled in the study and referred to our echo-lab for transthoracic echocardiography 6-months after discharge. RVLS was calculated as the mean of the strain values of RV free wall. DIC was defined with a validated scoring system: DIC score equal to or more than 5 is compatible with overt-DIC. Categories of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) were defined based on PaO2 /FiO2 ratio. RESULTS: A total 26 of 45 patients showed impaired RVLS at 6-months' follow-up. DIC score was significantly higher in patients with worse RVLS than in those with better RVLS (4.8 ± .5 vs. 3.6 ± .6, p =.03). Stages of ARDS did not modulate this relationship. Finally, overt-DIC results the only independent predictor of sustained RV dysfunction (OR 1.233, 95% CI 1.041-1.934, p =.043). CONCLUSIONS: Sustained RV impairment frequently occurs in patients recovered from severe COVID-19. DIC plays a key role, resulting in an independent predictor of sustained RV dysfunction.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation , Heart Failure , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right , COVID-19/complications , Dacarbazine , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/complications , Humans , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/complications , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/diagnostic imaging , Ventricular Function, Right
5.
J Am Heart Assoc ; 11(4): e023220, 2022 02 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1685779

ABSTRACT

Background The COVID-19-related pulmonary effects may negatively impact pulmonary hemodynamics and right ventricular function. We examined the prognostic relevance of right ventricular function and right ventricular-to-pulmonary circulation coupling assessed by bedside echocardiography in patients hospitalized with COVID-19 pneumonia and a large spectrum of disease independently of indices of pneumonia severity and left ventricular function. Methods and Results Consecutive COVID-19 subjects who underwent full cardiac echocardiographic evaluation along with gas analyses and computed tomography scans were included in the study. Measurements were performed offline, and quantitative analyses were obtained by an operator blinded to the clinical data. We analyzed 133 patients (mean age 69±12 years, 57% men). During a mean hospital stay of 26±16 days, 35 patients (26%) died. The mean tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion/pulmonary artery systolic pressure (TAPSE/PASP) ratio was 0.48±0.18 mm/Hg in nonsurvivors and 0.72±0.32 mm/Hg in survivors (P=0.002). For each 0.1 mm/mm Hg increase in TAPSE/PASP, there was a 27% lower risk of in-hospital death (hazard ratio [HR], 0.73 [95% CI, 0.59-0.89]; P=0.003). At multivariable analysis, TAPSE/PASP ratio remained a predictor of in-hospital death after adjustments for age, oxygen partial pressure at arterial gas analysis/fraction of inspired oxygen, left ventricular ejection fraction, and computed tomography lung score. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to identify the cutoff value of the TAPSE/PASP ratio, which best specified high-risk from lower-risk patients. The best cutoff for predicting in-hospital mortality was TAPSE/PASP <0.57 mm/mm Hg (75% sensitivity and 70% specificity) and was associated with a >4-fold increased risk of in-hospital death (HR, 4.8 [95% CI, 1.7-13.1]; P=0.007). Conclusions In patients hospitalized with COVID-19 pneumonia, the assessment of right ventricular to pulmonary circulation coupling appears central to disease evolution and prediction of events. TAPSE/PASP ratio plays a mainstay role as prognostic determinant beyond markers of lung injury.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pulmonary Circulation , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/therapy , Echocardiography, Doppler , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Pulmonary Circulation/physiology , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/diagnostic imaging , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/mortality , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/physiopathology
6.
Int J Cardiovasc Imaging ; 37(12): 3499-3512, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525551

ABSTRACT

Cardiac involvement has been frequently reported in COVID-19 as responsible of increased morbidity and mortality. Given the importance of right heart function in acute and chronic respiratory diseases, its assessment in SARS-CoV-2 infected patients may add prognostic accuracy. Transthoracic echocardiography has been proposed to early predict myocardial injury and risk of death in hospitalized patients. This systematic review presents the up-to-date sum of literature regarding right ventricle ultrasound assessment. We evaluated commonly used echocardiographic parameters to assess RV function and discussed their relationship with pathophysiological mechanisms involved in COVID-19. We searched Medline and Embase for studies that used transthoracic echocardiography for right ventricle assessment in patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right , Echocardiography , Heart Ventricles/diagnostic imaging , Humans , Predictive Value of Tests , SARS-CoV-2 , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/diagnostic imaging , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/etiology
7.
Int J Cardiovasc Imaging ; 37(12): 3451-3457, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525549

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a newly recognized infectious disease that has spread rapidly. COVID-19 has been associated with a number of cardiovascular involvements, including ventricular functions. The aim of our study was to evaluate the right ventricular functions of mild severity COVID-19 patients 3 months after, and compare them to the right ventricular functions of healthy volunteers. For this single-center study, data from 105 patients who were treated for mild severity COVID-19 between September 15, 2020 and December 31, 2020 were collected. 105 age and sex matched healthy subjects were included in the study. Right ventricular (RV) functions were evaluated using conventional two-dimensional (2D) echocardiography and 2D speckle-tracking echocardiography (STE) for all patients. 2D-E parameters indicating RV functions were compared between the two groups. RV diamaters, systolic pulmonary artery pressure (sPAP) and RV myocardial performance index (RV MPI) were significantly higher in the COVID-19 patients compared to control group (p < 0.05). Tricuspid annular plane systolic motion (TAPSE), right ventricular fractional area change (RVFAC) and RV S' were significantly lower in the COVID-19 group compared to control group (p < 0.05). RV global longitudinal strain (RV-GLS) (- 19.6 ± 5.2 vs. - 15.1 ± 3.4, p < 0.001) and RV free wall longitudinal strain RV-FWLS (- 19.6 ± 5.2 vs. - 17.2 ± 4.4, p < 0.001) values were significantly lower in the COVID-19 group than the control group. There was a significant negative correlation between RV-FWLS, RV-GLS and C-reactive protein (CRP), neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR), d-dimer, ferritin, platelet to lymphocyte ratio (PLR) in patients with mild severity COVID-19. This results suggested that RV-GLS and RV-FWLS decreased in the long term (third month) follow-up of patients treated for mild severity COVID-19 disease. Subclinical RV dysfunction may be observed in patients after mild severity COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right , Humans , Predictive Value of Tests , SARS-CoV-2 , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/diagnostic imaging , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/etiology , Ventricular Function, Right
8.
Clin Cardiol ; 44(10): 1360-1370, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1490731

ABSTRACT

There is limited evidence about the prognostic utility of right ventricular dysfunction (RVD) in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). We assessed the association between RVD and mortality in COVID-19 patients. We searched electronic databases from inception to February 15, 2021. RVD was defined based on the following echocardiographic variables: tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE), tricuspid S' peak systolic velocity, fractional area change (FAC), and right ventricular free wall longitudinal strain (RVFWLS). All meta-analyses were performed using a random-effects model. Nineteen cohort studies involving 2307 patients were included. The mean age ranged from 59 to 72 years and 65% of patients were male. TAPSE (mean difference [MD], -3.13 mm; 95% confidence interval [CI], -4.08--2.19), tricuspid S' peak systolic velocity (MD, -0.88 cm/s; 95% CI, -1.68 to -0.08), FAC (MD, -3.47%; 95% CI, -6.21 to -0.72), and RVFWLS (MD, -5.83%; 95% CI, -7.47--4.20) were significantly lower in nonsurvivors compared to survivors. Each 1 mm decrease in TAPSE (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 1.22; 95% CI, 1.08-1.37), 1% decrease in FAC (aHR, 1.09; 95% CI, 1.04-1.14), and 1% increase in RVFWLS (aHR, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.19-1.48) were independently associated with higher mortality. RVD was significantly associated with higher mortality using unadjusted risk ratio (2.05; 95% CI, 1.27-3.31), unadjusted hazard ratio (3.37; 95% CI, 1.72-6.62), and adjusted hazard ratio (aHR, 2.75; 95% CI, 1.52-4.96). Our study shows that echocardiographic parameters of RVD were associated with an increased risk of mortality in COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right , Aged , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Systole , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/diagnostic imaging , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/etiology , Ventricular Function, Right
9.
J Clin Ultrasound ; 50(1): 7-13, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1487480

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Echocardiography is generally used in our daily practice to detect cardiovascular complications in COVID-19 patients and for etiological research in the case of worsened clinical status. Many echocardiographic parameters have been the subject of investigation in previous studies on COVID-19. Recently, the right ventricle early inflow-outflow (RVEIO) index has been identified as a possible and indirect marker of the severity of tricuspid regurgitation and right ventricular dysfunction in pulmonary embolism. In this study, we aimed to investigate the relationship between the severity of pneumonia in COVID-19 patients and the RVEIO index. METHODS: A total of 54 patients diagnosed with COVID-19 pneumonia were enrolled in this study. Our study population was separated into two groups as severe pneumonia and nonsevere pneumonia based on computed tomography imaging. RESULTS: Saturation O2 , C-reactive protein, D-dimer, deceleration time, tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion, tricuspid lateral annular systolic velocity, and RVEIO index values were found to be significantly different between severe and nonsevere pneumonia groups. The result of the multivariate logistic regression test revealed that saturation O2, D-dimer, Sm, and RVEIO index were the independent predictive parameters for severe pneumonia. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis demonstrated that RVEIO index >4.2 predicted severe pneumonia with 77% sensitivity and 79% specificity. CONCLUSION: The RVEIO index can be used as a bedside, noninvasive, easily accessible, and useful marker to identify the COVID-19 patient group with widespread pneumonia and, therefore high risk of complications, morbidity, and mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right , Echocardiography , Heart Ventricles/diagnostic imaging , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/diagnostic imaging , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/etiology , Ventricular Function, Right
12.
Heart ; 108(1): 46-53, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455729

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To determine the contribution of comorbidities on the reported widespread myocardial abnormalities in patients with recent COVID-19. METHODS: In a prospective two-centre observational study, patients hospitalised with confirmed COVID-19 underwent gadolinium and manganese-enhanced MRI and CT coronary angiography (CTCA). They were compared with healthy and comorbidity-matched volunteers after blinded analysis. RESULTS: In 52 patients (median age: 54 (IQR 51-57) years, 39 males) who recovered from COVID-19, one-third (n=15, 29%) were admitted to intensive care and a fifth (n=11, 21%) were ventilated. Twenty-three patients underwent CTCA, with one-third having underlying coronary artery disease (n=8, 35%). Compared with younger healthy volunteers (n=10), patients demonstrated reduced left (ejection fraction (EF): 57.4±11.1 (95% CI 54.0 to 60.1) versus 66.3±5 (95 CI 62.4 to 69.8)%; p=0.02) and right (EF: 51.7±9.1 (95% CI 53.9 to 60.1) vs 60.5±4.9 (95% CI 57.1 to 63.2)%; p≤0.0001) ventricular systolic function with elevated native T1 values (1225±46 (95% CI 1205 to 1240) vs 1197±30 (95% CI 1178 to 1216) ms;p=0.04) and extracellular volume fraction (ECV) (31±4 (95% CI 29.6 to 32.1) vs 24±3 (95% CI 22.4 to 26.4)%; p<0.0003) but reduced myocardial manganese uptake (6.9±0.9 (95% CI 6.5 to 7.3) vs 7.9±1.2 (95% CI 7.4 to 8.5) mL/100 g/min; p=0.01). Compared with comorbidity-matched volunteers (n=26), patients had preserved left ventricular function but reduced right ventricular systolic function (EF: 51.7±9.1 (95% CI 53.9 to 60.1) vs 59.3±4.9 (95% CI 51.0 to 66.5)%; p=0.0005) with comparable native T1 values (1225±46 (95% CI 1205 to 1240) vs 1227±51 (95% CI 1208 to 1246) ms; p=0.99), ECV (31±4 (95% CI 29.6 to 32.1) vs 29±5 (95% CI 27.0 to 31.2)%; p=0.35), presence of late gadolinium enhancement and manganese uptake. These findings remained irrespective of COVID-19 disease severity, presence of myocardial injury or ongoing symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Patients demonstrate right but not left ventricular dysfunction. Previous reports of left ventricular myocardial abnormalities following COVID-19 may reflect pre-existing comorbidities. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT04625075.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/diagnostic imaging , Adult , Computed Tomography Angiography , Contrast Media , Coronary Angiography , Female , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Cine , Male , Manganese/metabolism , Matched-Pair Analysis , Middle Aged , Myocardium/metabolism , Prospective Studies , Survivors , Systole/physiology , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/physiopathology
13.
Eur Heart J Cardiovasc Imaging ; 22(11): 1241-1254, 2021 10 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1376291

ABSTRACT

AIMS: Cardiovascular involvement is common in COVID-19. We sought to describe the haemodynamic profiles of hospitalized COVID-19 patients and determine their association with mortality. METHODS AND RESULTS: Consecutive hospitalized patients diagnosed with COVID-19 infection underwent clinical evaluation using the Modified Early Warning Score (MEWS) and a full non-invasive echocardiographic haemodynamic evaluation, irrespective of clinical indication, as part of a prospective predefined protocol. Patients were stratified based on filling pressure and output into four groups. Multivariable Cox-Hazard analyses determined the association between haemodynamic parameters with mortality. Among 531 consecutive patients, 44% of patients had normal left ventricular (LV) and right ventricular (RV) haemodynamic status. In contrast to LV haemodynamic parameters, RV parameters worsened with higher MEWS stage. While RV parameters did not have incremental risk prediction value above MEWS, LV stroke volume index, E/e' ratio, and LV stroke work index were all independent predictors of outcome, particularly in severe disease. Patients with LV or RV with high filling pressure and low output had the worse outcome, and patients with normal haemodynamics had the best (P < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: In hospitalized patients with COVID-19, almost half have normal left and right haemodynamics at presentation. RV but not LV haemodynamics are related to easily obtainable clinical parameters. LV but not RV haemodynamics are independent predictors of mortality, mostly in patients with severe disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right , Hemodynamics , Humans , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke Volume , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/diagnostic imaging , Ventricular Function, Left , Ventricular Function, Right
14.
Echocardiography ; 38(9): 1579-1585, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1345951

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The evaluation of the tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE) is recommended to assess the right ventricular (RV) systolic function. We performed an updated meta-analysis of the association between TAPSE and short-term mortality in COVID-19 patients. METHODS: MEDLINE and Scopus databases were searched to locate all the articles published up to May 1, 2021, reporting data on TAPSE among COVID-19 survivors and non-survivors. The difference of TAPSE between the two groups was expressed as mean difference (MD) with the corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI) using the Mantel-Haenszel random effects model. Both Q value and I2 statistics were used to assess heterogeneity across studies. Sensitivity analysis, meta-regression, and evaluation of bias were performed. RESULTS: Twelve studies, enrolling 1272 COVID-19 patients (778 males, mean age 69.3 years), met the inclusion criteria and were included in the final analysis. Non-survivors had a lower TAPSE compared to survivors (MD =  -3.089 mm, 95% CI =  -4.087 to -2.091, p < 0.0001, I2  = 79.0%). Both the visual inspection of the funnel plot and the Egger's tests (t = 1.195, p = 0.259) revealed no evidence of publication bias. Sensitivity analysis confirmed yielded results. Meta-regression analysis evidenced that the difference in TAPSE between the two groups was only influenced by pre-existing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, p = 0.02). CONCLUSION: COVID-19 non-survivors have a lower TAPSE when compared to survivors, especially in COPD subjects. Current data suggest that the TAPSE assessment may provide useful information regarding the short-term prognosis of COVID-19 patients during the infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right , Aged , Echocardiography , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/diagnostic imaging , Ventricular Function, Right
15.
Int J Cardiovasc Imaging ; 37(12): 3499-3512, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1320106

ABSTRACT

Cardiac involvement has been frequently reported in COVID-19 as responsible of increased morbidity and mortality. Given the importance of right heart function in acute and chronic respiratory diseases, its assessment in SARS-CoV-2 infected patients may add prognostic accuracy. Transthoracic echocardiography has been proposed to early predict myocardial injury and risk of death in hospitalized patients. This systematic review presents the up-to-date sum of literature regarding right ventricle ultrasound assessment. We evaluated commonly used echocardiographic parameters to assess RV function and discussed their relationship with pathophysiological mechanisms involved in COVID-19. We searched Medline and Embase for studies that used transthoracic echocardiography for right ventricle assessment in patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right , Echocardiography , Heart Ventricles/diagnostic imaging , Humans , Predictive Value of Tests , SARS-CoV-2 , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/diagnostic imaging , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/etiology
16.
Echocardiography ; 38(8): 1345-1351, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1316883

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) frequently involves cardiovascular manifestations such as right ventricular (RV) dysfunction and alterations in pulmonary hemodynamics. We evaluated the application of the critical care ultrasonography ORACLE protocol to identify the most frequent alterations and their influence on adverse outcomes, especially those involving the RV (dilatation and dysfunction). METHODS: This cross-sectional study included 204 adult patients with confirmed COVID-19 admitted at three centers. Echocardiography and lung ultrasound images were acquired on admission using the ORACLE ultrasonography algorithm. RESULTS: Two-hundred and four consecutive patients were evaluated: 22 (11.9%) demonstrated a fractional shortening of < 35%; 33 (17.1%) a tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE) of < 17 mm; 26 (13.5%) a tricuspid peak systolic S wave tissue Doppler velocity of < 9.5 cm/sec; 69 (37.5%) a RV basal diameter of > 41 mm; 119 (58.3%) a pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) of > 35 mm Hg; and 14 (11%) a TAPSE/PASP ratio of < .31. The in-hospital mortality rate was 37.6% (n = 71). Multiple logistic regression modeling showed that PASP > 35 mm Hg, RV FS of < 35%, TAPSE < 17 mm, RV S wave < 9.5, and TAPSE/PASP ratio < .31 mm/mm Hg were associated with this outcome. PASP and the TAPSE/PASP ratio had the lowest feasibility of being obtained among the investigators (62.2%). CONCLUSION: The presence of RV dysfunction, pulmonary hypertension, and alteration of the RV-arterial coupling conveys an increased risk of in-hospital mortality in patients presenting with COVID-19 upon admission; therefore, searching for these alterations should be routine. These parameters can be obtained quickly and safely with the ORACLE protocol.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Echocardiography, Doppler , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Pulmonary Artery/diagnostic imaging , SARS-CoV-2 , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/diagnostic imaging , Ventricular Function, Right
17.
Int J Cardiovasc Imaging ; 37(12): 3451-3457, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1305161

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a newly recognized infectious disease that has spread rapidly. COVID-19 has been associated with a number of cardiovascular involvements, including ventricular functions. The aim of our study was to evaluate the right ventricular functions of mild severity COVID-19 patients 3 months after, and compare them to the right ventricular functions of healthy volunteers. For this single-center study, data from 105 patients who were treated for mild severity COVID-19 between September 15, 2020 and December 31, 2020 were collected. 105 age and sex matched healthy subjects were included in the study. Right ventricular (RV) functions were evaluated using conventional two-dimensional (2D) echocardiography and 2D speckle-tracking echocardiography (STE) for all patients. 2D-E parameters indicating RV functions were compared between the two groups. RV diamaters, systolic pulmonary artery pressure (sPAP) and RV myocardial performance index (RV MPI) were significantly higher in the COVID-19 patients compared to control group (p < 0.05). Tricuspid annular plane systolic motion (TAPSE), right ventricular fractional area change (RVFAC) and RV S' were significantly lower in the COVID-19 group compared to control group (p < 0.05). RV global longitudinal strain (RV-GLS) (- 19.6 ± 5.2 vs. - 15.1 ± 3.4, p < 0.001) and RV free wall longitudinal strain RV-FWLS (- 19.6 ± 5.2 vs. - 17.2 ± 4.4, p < 0.001) values were significantly lower in the COVID-19 group than the control group. There was a significant negative correlation between RV-FWLS, RV-GLS and C-reactive protein (CRP), neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR), d-dimer, ferritin, platelet to lymphocyte ratio (PLR) in patients with mild severity COVID-19. This results suggested that RV-GLS and RV-FWLS decreased in the long term (third month) follow-up of patients treated for mild severity COVID-19 disease. Subclinical RV dysfunction may be observed in patients after mild severity COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right , Humans , Predictive Value of Tests , SARS-CoV-2 , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/diagnostic imaging , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/etiology , Ventricular Function, Right
18.
BMJ Open ; 11(5): e049866, 2021 05 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1242207

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Emerging evidence has shown that COVID-19 infection may result in right ventricular (RV) disturbance and be associated with adverse clinical outcomes. The aim of this meta-analysis is to summarise the incidence, risk factors and the prognostic effect of imaging RV involvement in adult patients with COVID-19. METHODS: A systematical search will be performed in PubMed, EMBase, ISI Knowledge via Web of Science and preprint databases (MedRxiv and BioRxiv) (until October 2021) to identify all cohort studies in adult patients with COVID-19. The primary outcome will be the incidence of RV involvement (dysfunction and/or dilation) assessed by echocardiography, CT or MRI. Secondary outcomes will include the risk factors for RV involvement and their association with all-cause mortality during hospitalisation. Additional outcomes will include the RV global or free wall longitudinal strain (RV-GLS or RV-FWLS), tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE), fractional area change (FAC) and RV diameter. Univariable or multivariable meta-regression and subgroup analyses will be performed for the study design and patient characteristics (especially acute or chronic pulmonary embolism and pulmonary hypertension). Sensitivity analyses will be used to assess the robustness of our results by removing each included study at one time to obtain and evaluate the remaining overall estimates of RV involvement incidence and related risk factors, association with all-cause mortality, and other RV parameters (RV-GLS or RV-FWLS, TAPSE, S', FAC and RV diameter). Both linear and cubic spline regression models will be used to explore the dose-response relationship between different categories (>2) of RV involvement and the risk of mortality (OR or HR). ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: There was no need for ethics approval for the systematic review protocol according to the Institutional Review Board/Independent Ethics Committee of Fuwai Hospital. This meta-analysis will be disseminated through a peer-reviewed journal for publication. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42021231689.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Prognosis , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right , Adult , Humans , Incidence , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Systematic Reviews as Topic , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/diagnostic imaging , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/epidemiology , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/etiology
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