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1.
Kardiologiia ; 62(3): 16-20, 2022 Mar 31.
Article in English, English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1789752

ABSTRACT

Aim      To study the relationship of echocardiographic right ventricular (RV) structural and functional parameters and indexes of pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) in patients 3 months after COVID-19 pneumonia.Material and methods  This cross-sectional, observational study included 96 patients aged 46.7±15.2 years. The inclusion criteria were documented diagnosis of COVID-19-associated pneumonia and patient's willing to participate in the observation. Patients were examined upon hospitalization and during the control visit (at 3 months after discharge from the hospital). Images and video loops were processed, including the assessment of myocardial longitudinal strain (LS) by speckle tracking, according to the effective guidelines. The equation [tricuspid regurgitation velocity/ time-velocity integral of the RV outflow tract × 10 + 0.16] was used to determine PRV. Patients were divided into group 1 (n=31) with increased PRV ≥1.5 Wood units and group 2 (n=65) with PRV <1.5 Wood units.Results At baseline, groups did not differ in main clinical functional characteristics, including severity of lung damage by computed tomography (32.7±22.1 and 36.5±20.4 %, respectively. р=0.418). Echocardiographic linear, planimetric and volumetric parameters did not significantly differ between the groups. In group 1 at the control visit, endocardial LS of the RV free wall (FW) (-19.3 [-17.9; -25.8] %) was significantly lower (р=0.048) than in group 2 (-23.4 [-19.8; -27.8] %), and systolic pulmonary artery pressure (sPAP) according to C. Otto (32.0 [26.0; 35.0] mm Hg and 23.0 [20.0; 28.0] mm Hg) was significantly higher than in group 2 (р<0.001). According to the logistic regression, only endocardial RV FW LS (odds ratio, OR, 0.859; 95 % confidence interval, CI, 0.746-0.989; р=0.034) and sPAP (OR, 1.248; 95 % CI, 1.108-1405; р<0.001) were independently related with the increase in PVR. Spearman correlation analysis detected a moderate relationship between PVR and mean PAP according to G. Mahan (r=0.516; p=0.003) and between PVR and the index of right heart chamber functional coupling with the PA system (r=-0.509; p=0.007) in group 1 at the control visit.Conclusion      In patients 3 months after COVID-19 pneumonia, hidden RV systolic dysfunction defined as depressed endocardial RV FW LS to -19.3% is associated with increased PVR ≥1.5 Wood units.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiomyopathies , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right , COVID-19/complications , Cross-Sectional Studies , Echocardiography/methods , Heart Ventricles/diagnostic imaging , Humans , Vascular Resistance , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/diagnostic imaging , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/etiology
3.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 101(8): e28971, 2022 Feb 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1713783

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Background: This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to assess whether tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE) could be used as a prognostic tool in patients with coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19). METHODS: Studies on the relationship between TAPSE and COVID-19 since February 2021. Standardized mean difference (SMD) and 95% confidence intervals were used to assess the effect size. The potential for publication bias was assessed using a contour-enhanced funnel plot and Egger test. A meta-regression was performed to assess if the difference in TAPSE between survivors and nonsurvivors was affected by age, sex, hypertension or diabetes. RESULTS: Sixteen studies comprising 1579 patients were included in this meta-analysis. TAPSE was lower in nonsurvivors (SMD -3.24 (-4.23, -2.26), P < .00001; I2 = 71%), and a subgroup analysis indicated that TAPSE was also lower in critically ill patients (SMD -3.85 (-5.31, -2.38,), P < .00001; I2 = 46%). Heterogeneity was also significantly reduced, I2 < 50%. Pooled results showed that patients who developed right ventricular dysfunction had lower TAPSE (SMD -5.87 (-7.81, -3.92), P = .004; I2 = 82%). There was no statistically significant difference in the TAPSE of patients who sustained a cardiac injury vs those who did not (SMD -1.36 (-3.98, 1.26), P = .31; I2 = 88%). No significant publication bias was detected (P = .8147) but the heterogeneity of the included studies was significant. A meta-regression showed that heterogeneity was significantly greater when the incidence of hypertension was <50% (I2 = 91%) and that of diabetes was <30% (I2 = 85%). CONCLUSION: Low TAPSE levels are associated with poor COVID-19 disease outcomes. TAPSE levels are modulated by disease severity, and their prognostic utility may be skewed by pre-existing patient comorbidities. TRIAL RETROSPECTIVELY REGISTERED FEBRUARY ,: PROSPERO CRD42021236731.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Echocardiography/methods , Tricuspid Valve/diagnostic imaging , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right , Humans , Hypertension/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Tricuspid Valve/physiopathology , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/etiology , Ventricular Function, Right/physiology
5.
Int J Cardiovasc Imaging ; 37(12): 3499-3512, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525551

ABSTRACT

Cardiac involvement has been frequently reported in COVID-19 as responsible of increased morbidity and mortality. Given the importance of right heart function in acute and chronic respiratory diseases, its assessment in SARS-CoV-2 infected patients may add prognostic accuracy. Transthoracic echocardiography has been proposed to early predict myocardial injury and risk of death in hospitalized patients. This systematic review presents the up-to-date sum of literature regarding right ventricle ultrasound assessment. We evaluated commonly used echocardiographic parameters to assess RV function and discussed their relationship with pathophysiological mechanisms involved in COVID-19. We searched Medline and Embase for studies that used transthoracic echocardiography for right ventricle assessment in patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right , Echocardiography , Heart Ventricles/diagnostic imaging , Humans , Predictive Value of Tests , SARS-CoV-2 , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/diagnostic imaging , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/etiology
6.
Int J Cardiovasc Imaging ; 37(12): 3451-3457, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525549

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a newly recognized infectious disease that has spread rapidly. COVID-19 has been associated with a number of cardiovascular involvements, including ventricular functions. The aim of our study was to evaluate the right ventricular functions of mild severity COVID-19 patients 3 months after, and compare them to the right ventricular functions of healthy volunteers. For this single-center study, data from 105 patients who were treated for mild severity COVID-19 between September 15, 2020 and December 31, 2020 were collected. 105 age and sex matched healthy subjects were included in the study. Right ventricular (RV) functions were evaluated using conventional two-dimensional (2D) echocardiography and 2D speckle-tracking echocardiography (STE) for all patients. 2D-E parameters indicating RV functions were compared between the two groups. RV diamaters, systolic pulmonary artery pressure (sPAP) and RV myocardial performance index (RV MPI) were significantly higher in the COVID-19 patients compared to control group (p < 0.05). Tricuspid annular plane systolic motion (TAPSE), right ventricular fractional area change (RVFAC) and RV S' were significantly lower in the COVID-19 group compared to control group (p < 0.05). RV global longitudinal strain (RV-GLS) (- 19.6 ± 5.2 vs. - 15.1 ± 3.4, p < 0.001) and RV free wall longitudinal strain RV-FWLS (- 19.6 ± 5.2 vs. - 17.2 ± 4.4, p < 0.001) values were significantly lower in the COVID-19 group than the control group. There was a significant negative correlation between RV-FWLS, RV-GLS and C-reactive protein (CRP), neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR), d-dimer, ferritin, platelet to lymphocyte ratio (PLR) in patients with mild severity COVID-19. This results suggested that RV-GLS and RV-FWLS decreased in the long term (third month) follow-up of patients treated for mild severity COVID-19 disease. Subclinical RV dysfunction may be observed in patients after mild severity COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right , Humans , Predictive Value of Tests , SARS-CoV-2 , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/diagnostic imaging , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/etiology , Ventricular Function, Right
7.
Clin Cardiol ; 44(10): 1360-1370, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1490731

ABSTRACT

There is limited evidence about the prognostic utility of right ventricular dysfunction (RVD) in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). We assessed the association between RVD and mortality in COVID-19 patients. We searched electronic databases from inception to February 15, 2021. RVD was defined based on the following echocardiographic variables: tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE), tricuspid S' peak systolic velocity, fractional area change (FAC), and right ventricular free wall longitudinal strain (RVFWLS). All meta-analyses were performed using a random-effects model. Nineteen cohort studies involving 2307 patients were included. The mean age ranged from 59 to 72 years and 65% of patients were male. TAPSE (mean difference [MD], -3.13 mm; 95% confidence interval [CI], -4.08--2.19), tricuspid S' peak systolic velocity (MD, -0.88 cm/s; 95% CI, -1.68 to -0.08), FAC (MD, -3.47%; 95% CI, -6.21 to -0.72), and RVFWLS (MD, -5.83%; 95% CI, -7.47--4.20) were significantly lower in nonsurvivors compared to survivors. Each 1 mm decrease in TAPSE (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 1.22; 95% CI, 1.08-1.37), 1% decrease in FAC (aHR, 1.09; 95% CI, 1.04-1.14), and 1% increase in RVFWLS (aHR, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.19-1.48) were independently associated with higher mortality. RVD was significantly associated with higher mortality using unadjusted risk ratio (2.05; 95% CI, 1.27-3.31), unadjusted hazard ratio (3.37; 95% CI, 1.72-6.62), and adjusted hazard ratio (aHR, 2.75; 95% CI, 1.52-4.96). Our study shows that echocardiographic parameters of RVD were associated with an increased risk of mortality in COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right , Aged , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Systole , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/diagnostic imaging , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/etiology , Ventricular Function, Right
8.
J Clin Ultrasound ; 50(1): 7-13, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1487480

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Echocardiography is generally used in our daily practice to detect cardiovascular complications in COVID-19 patients and for etiological research in the case of worsened clinical status. Many echocardiographic parameters have been the subject of investigation in previous studies on COVID-19. Recently, the right ventricle early inflow-outflow (RVEIO) index has been identified as a possible and indirect marker of the severity of tricuspid regurgitation and right ventricular dysfunction in pulmonary embolism. In this study, we aimed to investigate the relationship between the severity of pneumonia in COVID-19 patients and the RVEIO index. METHODS: A total of 54 patients diagnosed with COVID-19 pneumonia were enrolled in this study. Our study population was separated into two groups as severe pneumonia and nonsevere pneumonia based on computed tomography imaging. RESULTS: Saturation O2 , C-reactive protein, D-dimer, deceleration time, tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion, tricuspid lateral annular systolic velocity, and RVEIO index values were found to be significantly different between severe and nonsevere pneumonia groups. The result of the multivariate logistic regression test revealed that saturation O2, D-dimer, Sm, and RVEIO index were the independent predictive parameters for severe pneumonia. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis demonstrated that RVEIO index >4.2 predicted severe pneumonia with 77% sensitivity and 79% specificity. CONCLUSION: The RVEIO index can be used as a bedside, noninvasive, easily accessible, and useful marker to identify the COVID-19 patient group with widespread pneumonia and, therefore high risk of complications, morbidity, and mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right , Echocardiography , Heart Ventricles/diagnostic imaging , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/diagnostic imaging , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/etiology , Ventricular Function, Right
10.
J Emerg Med ; 61(5): e103-e107, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1392400

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Acute respiratory compromise caused by complications of COVID-19, such as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) or thromboembolic disease, is a complex syndrome with unique challenges in treatment. Management often requires time and intensive care through a multiprofessional, multispecialty approach. Initial management is particularly challenging within the limited-resource environment of the emergency department (ED). The emergency physician's toolbox of treatments with reasonably rapid onset remains limited to respiratory support, prone positioning, steroids, and anticoagulation. CASE REPORT: We present a case of a patient with COVID-19 complicated by ARDS and bilateral pulmonary emboli with severe right ventricular dysfunction and systemic hypotension treated with nebulized nitroglycerin and systemic thrombolytic therapy in the ED. Serial evaluation of right ventricular function using point of care ultrasound over the next 2 h showed improvement of function with both agents as well as improvement in the patient's respiratory rate and work of breathing. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: This case describes a novel use of a widely available medication for patients with COVID-19-induced right ventricular dysfunction. Nebulized nitroglycerin may be an option to improve right ventricular function when other inhaled pulmonary vasodilators are not available in the initial ED setting. © 2021 Elsevier Inc.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pulmonary Embolism , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right , Humans , Nitroglycerin/therapeutic use , Pulmonary Embolism/complications , Pulmonary Embolism/drug therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombolytic Therapy , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/drug therapy , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/etiology
11.
Anatol J Cardiol ; 25(8): 555-564, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1341860

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Cytokine storm with elevated levels of multiple proinflammatory cytokines and inflammatory system activation underlie the pathogenesis of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). In this study, we aimed to investigate whether increased interleukin (IL)-6 levels can predict right ventricular (RV) systolic impairment in patients hospitalized with COVID-19. METHODS: This prospective, observational study included 100 consecutive patients hospitalized with mild and moderate COVID-19. All the patients underwent chest computerized tomography, detailed laboratory tests including IL-6, and two dimensional (2D) transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) with assessment of 2D conventional and Doppler echocardiography parameters and RV systolic functions. RESULTS: After the elimination of six patients with exclusion criteria, the remaining patients were classified into two groups, namely normal RV systolic functions (n=60) and impaired RV systolic functions (n=34). IL-6 levels were significantly higher in patients with impaired RV systolic functions than in those with normal RV systolic functions (20.3, 4.6, p<0.001, respectively). Tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion and RV derived tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) S' measurements were similar between the two groups. RV fractional area change was significantly lower, and RV TDI derived index of myocardial performance was significantly higher in patients with impaired RV systolic functions. In multivariate analysis, IL-6 levels independently predicted deterioration in RV systolic function at a significant level (odds ratio: 1.12, 95% confidence interval: 1.04-1.20, p=0.003). CONCLUSION: IL-6 is an independent predictor of RV systolic impairment in patients hospitalized with mild and moderate COVID-19 suggesting a possible pathogenetic mechanism. IL-6 levels can be used to predict RV systolic impairment in patients suffering from this infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Interleukin-6/metabolism , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/etiology , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/immunology , Adult , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/physiopathology , Echocardiography , Echocardiography, Doppler , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
12.
Int J Cardiovasc Imaging ; 37(12): 3499-3512, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1320106

ABSTRACT

Cardiac involvement has been frequently reported in COVID-19 as responsible of increased morbidity and mortality. Given the importance of right heart function in acute and chronic respiratory diseases, its assessment in SARS-CoV-2 infected patients may add prognostic accuracy. Transthoracic echocardiography has been proposed to early predict myocardial injury and risk of death in hospitalized patients. This systematic review presents the up-to-date sum of literature regarding right ventricle ultrasound assessment. We evaluated commonly used echocardiographic parameters to assess RV function and discussed their relationship with pathophysiological mechanisms involved in COVID-19. We searched Medline and Embase for studies that used transthoracic echocardiography for right ventricle assessment in patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right , Echocardiography , Heart Ventricles/diagnostic imaging , Humans , Predictive Value of Tests , SARS-CoV-2 , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/diagnostic imaging , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/etiology
13.
Int J Cardiovasc Imaging ; 37(12): 3451-3457, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1305161

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a newly recognized infectious disease that has spread rapidly. COVID-19 has been associated with a number of cardiovascular involvements, including ventricular functions. The aim of our study was to evaluate the right ventricular functions of mild severity COVID-19 patients 3 months after, and compare them to the right ventricular functions of healthy volunteers. For this single-center study, data from 105 patients who were treated for mild severity COVID-19 between September 15, 2020 and December 31, 2020 were collected. 105 age and sex matched healthy subjects were included in the study. Right ventricular (RV) functions were evaluated using conventional two-dimensional (2D) echocardiography and 2D speckle-tracking echocardiography (STE) for all patients. 2D-E parameters indicating RV functions were compared between the two groups. RV diamaters, systolic pulmonary artery pressure (sPAP) and RV myocardial performance index (RV MPI) were significantly higher in the COVID-19 patients compared to control group (p < 0.05). Tricuspid annular plane systolic motion (TAPSE), right ventricular fractional area change (RVFAC) and RV S' were significantly lower in the COVID-19 group compared to control group (p < 0.05). RV global longitudinal strain (RV-GLS) (- 19.6 ± 5.2 vs. - 15.1 ± 3.4, p < 0.001) and RV free wall longitudinal strain RV-FWLS (- 19.6 ± 5.2 vs. - 17.2 ± 4.4, p < 0.001) values were significantly lower in the COVID-19 group than the control group. There was a significant negative correlation between RV-FWLS, RV-GLS and C-reactive protein (CRP), neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR), d-dimer, ferritin, platelet to lymphocyte ratio (PLR) in patients with mild severity COVID-19. This results suggested that RV-GLS and RV-FWLS decreased in the long term (third month) follow-up of patients treated for mild severity COVID-19 disease. Subclinical RV dysfunction may be observed in patients after mild severity COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right , Humans , Predictive Value of Tests , SARS-CoV-2 , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/diagnostic imaging , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/etiology , Ventricular Function, Right
14.
BMJ Open ; 11(5): e049866, 2021 05 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1242207

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Emerging evidence has shown that COVID-19 infection may result in right ventricular (RV) disturbance and be associated with adverse clinical outcomes. The aim of this meta-analysis is to summarise the incidence, risk factors and the prognostic effect of imaging RV involvement in adult patients with COVID-19. METHODS: A systematical search will be performed in PubMed, EMBase, ISI Knowledge via Web of Science and preprint databases (MedRxiv and BioRxiv) (until October 2021) to identify all cohort studies in adult patients with COVID-19. The primary outcome will be the incidence of RV involvement (dysfunction and/or dilation) assessed by echocardiography, CT or MRI. Secondary outcomes will include the risk factors for RV involvement and their association with all-cause mortality during hospitalisation. Additional outcomes will include the RV global or free wall longitudinal strain (RV-GLS or RV-FWLS), tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE), fractional area change (FAC) and RV diameter. Univariable or multivariable meta-regression and subgroup analyses will be performed for the study design and patient characteristics (especially acute or chronic pulmonary embolism and pulmonary hypertension). Sensitivity analyses will be used to assess the robustness of our results by removing each included study at one time to obtain and evaluate the remaining overall estimates of RV involvement incidence and related risk factors, association with all-cause mortality, and other RV parameters (RV-GLS or RV-FWLS, TAPSE, S', FAC and RV diameter). Both linear and cubic spline regression models will be used to explore the dose-response relationship between different categories (>2) of RV involvement and the risk of mortality (OR or HR). ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: There was no need for ethics approval for the systematic review protocol according to the Institutional Review Board/Independent Ethics Committee of Fuwai Hospital. This meta-analysis will be disseminated through a peer-reviewed journal for publication. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42021231689.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Prognosis , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right , Adult , Humans , Incidence , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Systematic Reviews as Topic , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/diagnostic imaging , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/epidemiology , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/etiology
16.
J Surg Res ; 264: 81-89, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1164149

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Right ventricular failure is an underrecognized consequence of COVID-19 pneumonia. Those with severe disease are treated with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) but with poor outcomes. Concomitant right ventricular assist device (RVAD) may be beneficial. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of intensive care unit patients admitted with COVID-19 ARDS (Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome) was performed. Nonintubated patients, those with acute kidney injury, and age > 75 were excluded. Patients who underwent RVAD/ECMO support were compared with those managed via invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV) alone. The primary outcome was in-hospital mortality. Secondary outcomes included 30-d mortality, acute kidney injury, length of ICU stay, and duration of mechanical ventilation. RESULTS: A total of 145 patients were admitted to the ICU with COVID-19. Thirty-nine patients met inclusion criteria. Of these, 21 received IMV, and 18 received RVAD/ECMO. In-hospital (52.4 versus 11.1%, P = 0.008) and 30-d mortality (42.9 versus 5.6%, P= 0.011) were significantly lower in patients treated with RVAD/ECMO. Acute kidney injury occurred in 15 (71.4%) patients in the IMV group and zero RVAD/ECMO patients (P< 0.001). ICU (11.5 versus 21 d, P= 0.067) and hospital (14 versus 25.5 d, P = 0.054) length of stay were not significantly different. There were no RVAD/ECMO device complications. The duration of mechanical ventilation was not significantly different (10 versus 5 d, P = 0.44). CONCLUSIONS: RVAD support at the time of ECMO initiation resulted in the no secondary end-organ damage and higher in-hospital and 30-d survival versus IMV in specially selected patients with severe COVID-19 ARDS. Management of severe COVID-19 ARDS should prioritize right ventricular support.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/methods , Heart Failure/therapy , Heart-Assist Devices , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/therapy , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , Combined Modality Therapy , Critical Care/methods , Critical Care/statistics & numerical data , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/statistics & numerical data , Female , Heart Failure/diagnosis , Heart Failure/etiology , Heart Failure/mortality , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/diagnosis , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/mortality , Retrospective Studies , Severity of Illness Index , Treatment Outcome , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/diagnosis , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/etiology , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/mortality
18.
J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth ; 35(12): 3594-3603, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1033093

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To compare two-dimensional-speckle tracking echocardiographic parameters (2D-STE) and classic echocardiographic parameters of right ventricular (RV) systolic function in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)-related acute respiratory distress syndrome (CARDS) complicated or not by acute cor pulmonale (ACP). DESIGN: Prospective, between March 1, 2020 and April 15, 2020. SETTING: Intensive care unit of Amiens University Hospital (France). PARTICIPANTS: Adult patients with moderate-to-severe CARDS under mechanical ventilation for fewer than 24 hours. INTERVENTIONS: None. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Tricuspid annular displacement (TAD) parameters (TAD-septal, TAD-lateral, and RV longitudinal shortening fraction [RV-LSF]), RV global longitudinal strain (RV-GLS), and RV free wall longitudinal strain (RVFWLS) were measured using transesophageal echocardiography with a dedicated software and compared with classic RV systolic parameters (RV-FAC, S' wave, and tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion [TAPSE]). RV systolic dysfunction was defined as RV-FAC <35%. Twenty-nine consecutive patients with moderate-to-severe CARDS were included. ACP was diagnosed in 12 patients (41%). 2D-STE parameters were markedly altered in the ACP group, and no significant difference was found between patients with and without ACP for classic RV parameters (RV-FAC, S' wave, and TAPSE). In the ACP group, RV-LSF (17% [14%-22%]) had the best correlation with RV-FAC (r = 0.79, p < 0.001 v r = 0.27, p = 0.39 for RVGLS and r = 0.28, p = 0.39 for RVFWLS). A RV-LSF cut-off value of 17% had a sensitivity of 80% and a specificity of 86% to identify RV systolic dysfunction. CONCLUSIONS: Classic RV function parameters were not altered by ACP in patients with CARDS, contrary to 2D-STE parameters. RV-LSF seems to be a valuable parameter to detect early RV systolic dysfunction in CARDS patients with ACP.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pulmonary Heart Disease , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right , Adult , Humans , Prospective Studies , Pulmonary Heart Disease/diagnostic imaging , Pulmonary Heart Disease/etiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/diagnostic imaging , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/etiology , Ventricular Function, Right
19.
Rev Cardiovasc Med ; 21(4): 635-641, 2020 12 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1005370

ABSTRACT

To investigate the right heart function in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), a retrospective analysis of 49 COVID-19 patients with ARDS was performed. Patients were divided into severe group and critically-severe group according to the severity of illness. Age-matched healthy volunteers were recruited as a control group. The cardiac cavity diameters, tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE), tricuspid valve regurgitation pressure gradient biggest (TRPG), pulmonary arterial systolic pressure (PASP), maximum inferior vena cava diameter (IVCmax) and minimum diameter (IVCmin), and inferior vena cava collapse index (ICV-CI) were measured using echocardiography. We found that the TAPSE was significantly decreased in pneumonia patients compared to healthy subjects (P < 0.0001), and it was significantly lower in critically-severe patients (P = 0.0068). The TAPSE was less than 17 mm in three (8.6%) severe and five (35.7%) critically-severe patients. In addition, the TAPSE was significantly decreased in severe ARDS patients than in mild ARDS patients. The IVCmax and IVCmin were significantly increased in critically-severe patients compared to healthy subjects and severe patients (P < 0.01), whereas the ICV-CI was significantly decreased (P < 0.05). COVID-19 patients had significantly larger right atrium and ventricle than healthy controls (P < 0.01). The left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) in critically-severe patients was significantly lower than that in severe patients and healthy controls (P < 0.05). Right ventricular function was impaired in critically-severe COVID-19 patients. The assessment and protection of the right heart function in COVID-19 patients should be strengthened.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Heart Ventricles/physiopathology , Pandemics , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/etiology , Ventricular Function, Right/physiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Echocardiography, Doppler , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Heart Ventricles/diagnostic imaging , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/diagnosis , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/physiopathology
20.
J Thromb Thrombolysis ; 51(4): 978-984, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1002140

ABSTRACT

Disordered coagulation, endothelial dysfunction, dehydration and immobility contribute to a substantially elevated risk of deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism (PE) and systemic thrombosis in coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19). We evaluated the prevalence of pulmonary thrombosis and reported RV (right ventricular) dilatation/dysfunction associated with Covid-19 in a tertiary referral Covid-19 centre. Of 370 patients, positive for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), 39 patients (mean age 62.3 ± 15 years, 56% male) underwent computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA), due to increasing oxygen requirements or refractory hypoxia, not improving on oxygen, very elevated D-dimer or tachycardia disproportionate to clinical condition. Thrombosis in the pulmonary vasculature was found in 18 (46.2%) patients. However, pulmonary thrombosis did not predict survival (46.2% survivors vs 41.7% non-survivors, p = 0.796), but RV dilatation was less frequent among survivors (11.5% survivors vs 58.3% non-survivors, p = 0.002). Over the following month, we observed four Covid-19 patients, who were admitted with high and intermediate-high risk PE, and we treated them with UACTD (ultrasound-assisted catheter-directed thrombolysis), and four further patients, who were admitted with PE up to 4 weeks after recovery from Covid-19. Finally, we observed a case of RV dysfunction and pre-capillary pulmonary hypertension, associated with Covid-19 extensive lung disease. We demonstrated that pulmonary thrombosis is common in association with Covid-19. Also, the thrombotic risk in the pulmonary vasculature is present before and during hospital admission, and continues at least up to four weeks after discharge, and we present UACTD for high and intermediate-high risk PE management in Covid-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heart Ventricles , Pulmonary Embolism , Thrombolytic Therapy/methods , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Computed Tomography Angiography/methods , Female , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , Heart Ventricles/diagnostic imaging , Heart Ventricles/pathology , Humans , Hypoxia/etiology , Hypoxia/therapy , Male , Middle Aged , Organ Size , Outcome and Process Assessment, Health Care , Pulmonary Embolism/diagnostic imaging , Pulmonary Embolism/etiology , Pulmonary Embolism/physiopathology , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Ultrasonography, Interventional/methods , United Kingdom , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/diagnosis , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/etiology , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/physiopathology
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