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1.
Arq. Ciênc. Vet. Zool. UNIPAR (Online) ; 24(2, cont.): e2401, jul-dez. 2021. graf, tab
Article in Portuguese | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1904129

ABSTRACT

O Brasil passa atualmente por uma grave pandemia de uma doença viral emergente denominada Covid-19, a qual já levou ao óbito centenas de milhares de pessoas. Como medidas de controle da doença, vêm sendo implementadas ações de distanciamento social com o fechamento, total ou parcial, de diversas atividades econômicas não prioritárias. O setor veterinário se encontra entre os estabelecimentos não atingidos por essas medidas, devido à necessidade de atendimentos emergenciais para a saúde animal. O presente trabalho, de caráter observacional, seccional e descritivo, buscou descrever e avaliar o conhecimento dos médicos veterinários acerca da doença e seu potencial zoonótico, as medidas tomadas nos estabelecimentos veterinários visando prevenir a transmissão do vírus da Covid-19 para as pessoas e animais e as recomendações realizadas aos tutores de animais de companhia no município de Niterói. Os resultados indicaram que os médicos veterinários apresentaram dificuldade quanto ao reconhecimento da doença como uma zoonose, apesar de conhecerem os modos de transmissão e os animais afetados pela enfermidade, além disso, esses profissionais faziam recomendações aos tutores visando evitar a transmissão da doença. Os estabelecimentos veterinários pesquisados buscaram se adequar para o enfrentamento da epidemia, principalmente com medidas que não os impactassem do ponto de vista econômico.(AU)


Brazil is currently facing a severe pandemic caused by an emerging viral disease referred to as Covid-19, which has led to thousands of deaths. As a means to control the spread of the disease, total and partial social distancing initiatives have been implemented in several non-essential economic activities. Veterinary clinics and pet shops have not been affected by these measures due to the demand for emergency animal care. This work, as an observational, sectional and descriptive based effort, aimed at describing and evaluating the knowledge among veterinarians regarding the disease and its zoonotic potential, the measures adopted by the clinics to prevent Covid-19 transmission to people and animals, and the recommendations to pet tutors in the municipality of Niterói. According to the results, veterinarians presented difficulty in recognizing the disease as a zoonosis, despite being aware of its transmission methods and the animals it affected. These professionals also recommended certain actions to pet tutors to avoid the spread of the disease. The surveyed clinics sought to be prepared to face the epidemic, mainly through measures that would not cause them economic impact.(AU)


Brasil atraviesa actualmente una grave pandemia de una enfermedad viral emergente llamada Covid-19, que ya ha provocado la muerte de cientos de miles de personas. Como medidas de control de la enfermedad se han implementado acciones de distanciamiento social con el cierre, total o parcial, de varias actividades económicas no prioritarias. Entre los establecimientos no afectados por estas medidas se encuentran los del ramo veterinario, debido a la necesidad de cuidados urgentes a la salud animal. El presente trabajo, de carácter observacional, seccional y descriptivo, buscó describir y evaluar el conocimiento de los médicos veterinarios sobre la enfermedad y su potencial zoonótico, las medidas tomadas en los establecimientos veterinarios con el fin de prevenir la transmisión del virus de la Covid-19 a personas y animales, y las recomendaciones realizadas a los tutores de animales de compañía del municipio de Niterói. Los resultados mostraron que los veterinarios tenían dificultades para reconocer la enfermedad como una zoonosis, a pesar de conocer los modos de transmisión y los animales afectados por la enfermedad, además, los profesionales hacían recomendaciones a los tutores para evitar la transmisión de la enfermedad. Los establecimientos veterinarios investigados buscaron adaptarse para hacer frente a la epidemia, especialmente con medidas que no les afectaran mucho desde el punto de vista económico.(AU)


Subject(s)
Occupational Health , Veterinarians , Containment of Biohazards/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19 , Zoonoses
2.
Vet Rec ; 190 Suppl 1: 12, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1877689

ABSTRACT

The immediate crisis of the UK's Covid-19 pandemic may be over but many in the veterinary professions find themselves still working in crisis mode. Carolyne Crowe will be encouraging vets at BVA Live to take a step back and reassess what they want from their 'new normal'.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Rodent Diseases , Veterinarians , Animals , COVID-19/veterinary , Cricetinae , Humans , Occupations , Pandemics
3.
J Vet Emerg Crit Care (San Antonio) ; 32(3): 322-333, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1861560

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To examine owner experiences with and perceptions of owner-witnessed resuscitation (OWR) in veterinary medicine and to determine if previous experience with family-witnessed resuscitation (FWR) influenced perceptions. DESIGN: Multicenter survey. SETTING: Two academic and 2 private practice referral hospitals in the United States. SUBJECTS: Four hundred and seven clients presenting their small animal or exotic pet to the emergency service, or owners of patients hospitalized in the small animal ICU, April 1 to May 15, 2019. INTERVENTIONS: None MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Anonymous, online survey. Demographic variables, familiarity with CPR, previous experience with FWR or OWR, and open-ended questions and 4-point Likert items assessing level of agreement with statements on OWR were included. Scores equal or greater than 2 represented positive agreement. An overall OWR mean score was calculated from Likert items. Seventy-nine (19.4%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 15.7%-23.7%) participants reported having been involved with FWR, and 13 (3.2%; 95% CI, 1.8%-5.5%) reported having witnessed CPR on their pet. Owners were significantly more likely to participate in OWR if they had been present for FWR (P = 0.0004). Ninety-two percent of respondents who had been present for OWR would elect to be present again (95% CI, 62.1%-99.6%). Whether present for OWR or not, owners believed there may be benefits from witnessing CPR and had overall positive feelings toward the practice (OWR mean score, 2.87, SD 0.45 and 2.68, SD 0.54, respectively). Most respondents (78.6%; 95% CI, 74.2%-82.4%) felt that owners should be offered the opportunity to witness CPR on their pets. CONCLUSIONS: Owners expressed overall positive experiences with and attitudes toward OWR and believe the option for presence should be provided. As pet owners become more aware of FWR in human medicine, veterinarians may need to be prepared to entertain the possibility of OWR and owners' wishes to remain with their pet during CPR.


Subject(s)
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation , Veterinarians , Veterinary Medicine , Animals , Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation/veterinary , Humans , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States
4.
Viruses ; 14(2)2022 01 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1715759

ABSTRACT

A 67-year-old male veterinarian presented with fatigue, anorexia, and diarrhea. Although there were no tick bite marks, we suspected severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) due to bicytopenia, mild disturbance of consciousness, and a history of outdoor activities. Thus, we started immunoglobulin therapy immediately. A serum reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) test for SFTS virus (SFTSV) was positive. The patient had treated a cat with thrombocytopenia 10 days prior to admission. The cat's serum SFTSV RT-PCR test result was positive, and the whole genome sequences of the patient's and cat's SFTSV were identical, suggesting the possibility of transmission from the cat to the patient. Other cases of direct cat-to-human SFTV transmission have been reported recently. Mucous membranes should be protected, including eye protection, in addition to standard precautions, when in contact with any cat with suspected SFTS.


Subject(s)
Cat Diseases/virology , Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome/transmission , Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome/virology , Aged , Animals , Cat Diseases/blood , Cats , DNA, Viral/blood , DNA, Viral/genetics , Humans , Male , Phlebovirus/classification , Phlebovirus/genetics , Phlebovirus/isolation & purification , Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome/blood , Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome/diagnosis , Veterinarians
5.
Aust Vet J ; 100(6): 243-253, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1685211

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Sickness presenteeism in the veterinary profession potentially jeopardises the wellbeing of veterinary team members and endangers quality of patient care. In veterinary team members with influenza-like illness (ILI), sickness presenteeism poses a risk to the health and wellbeing of colleagues and clients, particularly in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. This study aimed to evaluate factors associated with sickness presenteeism in NSW registered veterinarians suffering from ILI, both before and since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Veterinarians registered in NSW were invited to complete an anonymous online mixed-methods survey between 31 March 2021 and 31 June 2021, regarding sickness presenteeism and absenteeism associated with ILI. The questionnaire was distributed through online and print newsletters of the Australian Veterinary Association NSW Branch and the NSW Veterinary Practitioners Board. RESULTS: From a total of 122 participants, 81 veterinarians (66.4%) reported that they would attend work despite displaying symptoms of ILI. Most veterinarians would stay at home with a fever alone (n = 108, 88.5%), however, many would still attend work with a sore throat (n = 121, 99.2%) or a dry cough (n = 91, 74.6%). Sickness presenteeism was significantly associated with lack of staff to cover workers. Although sickness presenteeism remained common, participants reported that they were less likely to attend work with symptoms of ILI since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. DISCUSSION: The data are discussed in relation to sickness presenteeism in healthcare workers. These findings underscore an urgent need for relief staff to decrease sickness presenteeism.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Influenza, Human , Veterinarians , Animals , Australia/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/veterinary , Humans , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , New South Wales/epidemiology , Pandemics , Presenteeism , Surveys and Questionnaires
6.
J Am Vet Med Assoc ; 259(10): 1140-1147, 2021 11 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496888

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To gather and evaluate veterinarians' perspectives about the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on the use of veterinary telehealth and on cat owners' versus dog owners' attitudes toward transmission of the SARS-CoV-2 virus from their pets. SAMPLE: 93 respondent veterinarians (47 in primary care practice and 46 in specialty practice). PROCEDURES: An online survey was conducted between June 15 and July 15, 2020, and included 21 questions concerning demographics, use of telehealth before and after the onset of the pandemic (before March 15, 2020, and between March 15 and June 15, 2020, respectively), changes in caseloads, and perception of clients' concerns about potential for transmission of the SARS-CoV-2 virus from pets. Reported zip codes informed the collection of census data. RESULTS: The level of poverty was significantly lower in zip code areas for respondents who reported telehealth services were (vs were not) offered before the pandemic. The percentage of respondents who reported their practice offered telehealth services increased from 12% (11/93) before the pandemic to 38% (35/93) between March 15 and June 15, 2020. Although most respondents reported owner-expressed concerns over SARS-CoV-2 virus transmission from their pets, most also reported increased caseloads, seeing newly adopted pets, and few discussions of surrender of pets for reasons related to the SARS-CoV-2 virus. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Findings indicated that caseloads increased and telehealth services expanded during the pandemic but that there was no evidence of differences in respondent-reported owner concern for SARS-CoV-2 virus transmission from cats versus dogs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cat Diseases , Dog Diseases , Telemedicine , Veterinarians , Animals , Attitude , COVID-19/veterinary , Cat Diseases/epidemiology , Cats , Dog Diseases/epidemiology , Dogs , Humans , Ownership , Pandemics , Perception , Pets , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
7.
Aust Vet J ; 100(1-2): 79-81, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1467540

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic and associated restrictions have caused major changes in veterinary practice. Utilising a subset of qualitative data from a global survey of 540 veterinarians, veterinary nurses and animal health technicians, we highlight the impact of these changes on communication in veterinary clinical practice. Communication challenges experienced by veterinary team members included lack of face-to-face contact with clients; increased difficulty in communicating in general; inability to demonstrate physical examination, diagnostic findings or treatment information to clients; difficulty in communicating while wearing personal protective equipment; increased 'miscommunication' and challenges in convincing clients of the importance of pandemic-associated protocols. These findings suggest a need for veterinary teams to modify and adapt their communication strategies to facilitate effective communication where social distancing and noncontact consultations are required.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Veterinarians , Animals , COVID-19/veterinary , Communication , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2
8.
BMJ ; 374: n1719, 2021 07 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1311067
9.
10.
Vet Rec ; 188(7): 239, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1298543
11.
J Am Vet Med Assoc ; 258(12): 1372-1377, 2021 06 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1249634

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess small animal general practice veterinarians' use and perceptions of synchronous video-based telemedicine before and during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. SAMPLE: 550 respondent veterinarian members of the Veterinary Information Network (VIN). PROCEDURES: An anonymous online survey was used to gather data from VIN-member veterinarians in small animal general practice regarding their perceptions and use of synchronous video-based telemedicine. Two emails to all VIN members were used to distribute the web-based questionnaire. For consistency, only responses from North American veterinarians who reported working in small animal general practice were included in analyses. Responses were collected between September 28, 2020, and October 21, 2020. RESULTS: There were 69,488 recipients and 680 respondents (1.0% response rate), 550 of whom had North American internet protocol addresses and reported working in small animal general practice. Not all respondents answered all questions. Use of video-based telemedicine substantially increased among respondents during the COVID-19 pandemic, and most (86/130 [66.2%]) reported little to no difficulty in adopting videoconferencing. Respondents also reported that telemedicine took less time (61/135 [45.2%]) and resulted in less financial compensation (103/135 [76.3%]) than in-person consultation. Several respondents reported concerns regarding legal issues and potential inferiorities of telemedicine. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Our results indicated that a substantial proportion of respondents incorporated synchronous video-based telemedicine into their practices during the COVID-19 pandemic. Despite low perceived difficulty in adopting videoconferencing telemedicine, many planned to discontinue it for some clinical applications once the pandemic is over. Further research is required to elucidate the perceptions and challenges in successful use of veterinary telemedicine.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , General Practice , Telemedicine , Veterinarians , Animals , COVID-19/veterinary , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , North America , Pandemics , Perception , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
12.
Vet Surg ; 50(5): 924-932, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1243683

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess the perceived effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on small animal surgical specialist training, among trainees and supervisors and to propose changes, based upon the results, that could be incorporated into training programs. STUDY DESIGN: Anonymous online questionnaire survey. SAMPLE POPULATION: Eighty-one eligible responses were collected in September 2020, including 52 European College of Veterinary Surgeons (ECVS) residents and 29 ECVS Diplomates acting as supervisors. METHODS: Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data. Fisher's exact test was used to test for significance. RESULTS: A reduction in surgical case load was reported by 82% (n = 66/81) of respondents, with 82% (n = 54/66) of those believing that COVID-19 had a mild-to-moderate impact on training. Compared to supervisors, residents were less likely to feel that appropriate guidance, a safe working environment, and measures to preserve training had been provided (p < .01). Only 45% (n = 22/49) of residents reported confidence with performing teleconsultations. Ninety percent (n = 73/81) of respondents considered online "case presentations" and "edited surgical video footage" as a positive ancillary tool. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 has resulted in a reduction in case load and training for the majority of residents. A discrepancy between the opinions of residents and supervisors was noted on various aspects of COVID-19 related effects. IMPACT: Open communication, as well as the use of additional training tools through digital platforms may help to preserve safe and effective training during times of decreased clinical activity. While this study has focused on surgical specialist training, the results could be applied to other disciplines.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Education, Veterinary/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , Veterinarians , Animals , Data Collection , Humans , Internship and Residency , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workload
14.
Vet Rec ; 186(19): 653, 2020 06 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1147445

ABSTRACT

Ben Sturgeon argues that the rise in unregulated wet markets and traditional Chinese medicine production will potentially lead to further disease outbreaks and loss of important animal populations.


Subject(s)
Disease Outbreaks/veterinary , Medicine, Chinese Traditional/adverse effects , Veterinarians/psychology , Animals , Forecasting , Humans , United Kingdom/epidemiology
15.
Vet Rec ; 187(4): e26, 2020 08 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-774829
16.
Vet Rec ; 188(3): 90, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1068702
17.
Vet Rec ; 187(8): 290-291, 2020 10 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1024268
19.
Vet Rec ; 187(12): 465, 2020 12 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1021105
20.
Vet Rec ; 187(12): e108, 2020 12 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1021103
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