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1.
Am J Speech Lang Pathol ; 31(6): 2825-2834, 2022 Nov 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2133697

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: During the COVID-19 pandemic, clinicians and researchers have increasingly used remote online assessments to pursue their activities, but mostly with tests not validated for videoconference administration. This study aims to validate the remote online administration of picture description in Canadian French neurotypical speakers and to explore the thematic unit (TU) checklist recently developed. METHOD: Spoken discourse elicited through the picture description task of the Western Aphasia Battery-Revised (WAB-R) was collected from Canadian French neurotypical speakers from Québec aged between 50 and 79 years old. Forty-seven participants completed the task in person, and 49 participants completed the task by videoconference. Videos of each discourse sample were transcribed using CHAT conventions. Microstructural variables were extracted using the CLAN (Computerized Language ANalysis) program, whereas thematic informativeness was scored for each sample using TUs. Chi-square tests were conducted to compare both groups on each TU; t tests were also performed on the total score of TUs and microstructural variables. RESULTS: Groups were matched on sex, age, and education variables. The t tests revealed no intergroup difference for the total TU score and for the microstructural variables (e.g., mean length of utterances and number of words per minute). Chi-square tests showed no significant intergroup difference for all 16 TUs. CONCLUSIONS: These findings support remote online assessment of the picnic scene of the WAB-R picture description in Canadian French neurotypical speakers. These results also validate the 16 TUs most consistently produced. The use of videoconference could promote and improve the recruitment of participants who are usually less accessible, such as people using assistive mobility technologies. SUPPLEMENTAL MATERIAL: https://doi.org/10.23641/asha.21476961.


Subject(s)
Aphasia , COVID-19 , Humans , Middle Aged , Aged , Language , Pandemics , Canada , Videoconferencing
2.
J Telemed Telecare ; 28(10): 750-756, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2108474

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The primary aim was to compare the successful completion rates of pre-treatment medication history consults conducted by pharmacists with patients either via an unscheduled telephone consult (current standard care) or a scheduled videoconference consult model. Secondary aims were to examine pharmacist perceptions of the telephone and videoconference consults and explore patient (+/- support person) perceptions of videoconference consults. METHOD: Completion data were collected and compared for the two modalities. In addition, pharmacists commented on any positive/negative factors impacting all consults. For the final 35 participants completing a videoconference consult, patients, support people, and pharmacists involved, completed a survey exploring perceptions and satisfaction. RESULTS: A significantly higher completion rate (p < 0.0001) was found for the videoconferencing model, with 94% (76 of 81) completed successfully compared to 72% (76 of 105) of the unscheduled telephone consults. Pharmacists reported multiple factors impacting the success of the telephone consults including scheduling issues and patient factors. Survey responses revealed that 100% of patients/support people and 82% of pharmacists reported satisfaction with videoconference consults. Surveyed participants noted some technical issues, however, the 'ability to show/view medication containers and/or labels' and 'convenience of scheduled time' were benefits of the videoconference model. DISCUSSION: Results indicate that pre-treatment medication history consults should be offered via videoconference to maximise success.


Subject(s)
Neoplasms , Pharmacists , Humans , Videoconferencing , Telephone , Medical History Taking
4.
Surgeon ; 20(6): e405-e409, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2106017

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: During the COVID-19 pandemic, regular teaching for core surgical trainees (CSTs) in Northern Ireland was cancelled at short notice, leaving a significant gap in training. We aimed to develop an effective core surgical teaching programme, within the remit of government regulations, to ensure training was not negatively affected by COVID-19. DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: A novel virtual teaching programme was designed and implemented regionally across Northern Ireland. One-year free Affiliate Membership to the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (RCSEd) was provided for Northern Ireland CSTs, allowing access to RCSEd online webinars. A weekly teaching schedule based on the Member of the Royal College of Surgeons (MRCS) exam curriculum and accompanied by a webinar was created and disseminated to trainees. Senior surgeons were recruited to conduct a virtual teaching session via videoconferencing. RESULTS: Ten teaching sessions were conducted over three months. Feedback was collated, with positive results and requests for virtual teaching to continue. As such, the Northern Ireland Medical and Dental Training Agency (NIMDTA) adopted the teaching programme as their new primary method of central teaching for Northern Ireland CSTs during the pandemic. CONCLUSION: A novel, highly successful teaching programme was developed in Northern Ireland to meet the training needs of CSTs resulting in a sustained change to training. Virtual surgical teaching can be as effective as face-to-face didactic learning and may be imperative in a foreseeably socially distanced world.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Surgeons , Humans , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Curriculum , Surgeons/education , Videoconferencing
5.
J Med Internet Res ; 24(11): e42431, 2022 Nov 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2089647

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Until COVID-19, implementation and uptake of video consultations in health care was slow. However, the pandemic created a "burning platform" for scaling up such services. As health care organizations look to expand and maintain the use of video in the "new normal," it is important to understand infrastructural influences and changes that emerged during the pandemic and that may influence sustainability going forward. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to draw lessons from 4 National Health Service (NHS) organizations on how information infrastructures shaped, and were shaped by, the rapid scale-up of video consultations during COVID-19. METHODS: A mixed methods case study of 4 NHS trusts in England was conducted before and during the pandemic. Data comprised 90 interviews with 49 participants (eg, clinicians, managers, administrators, and IT support), ethnographic field notes, and video consultation activity data. We sought examples of infrastructural features and challenges related to the rapid scale-up of video. Analysis was guided by Gkeredakis et al's 3 perspectives on crisis and digital change: as opportunity (for accelerated innovation and removal of barriers to experimentation), disruption (to organizational practices, generating new dependencies and risks), and exposure (of vulnerabilities in both people and infrastructure). RESULTS: Before COVID-19, there was a strong policy push for video consultations as a way of delivering health care efficiently. However, the spread of video was slow, and adopting clinicians described their use as ad hoc rather than business as usual. When the pandemic hit, video was rapidly scaled up. The most rapid increase in use was during the first month of the pandemic (March-April 2020), from an average of 8 video consultations per week to 171 per week at each site. Uptake continued to increase during the pandemic, averaging approximately 800 video consultations per week by March 2021. From an opportunity perspective, participants talked about changes to institutional elements of infrastructure, which had historically restricted the introduction and use of video. This was supported by an "organizing vision" for video, bringing legitimacy and support. Perspectives on disruption centered on changes to social, technical, and material work environments and the emergence of new patterns of action. Retaining positive elements of such change required a judicious balance between managerial (top-down) and emergent (bottom-up) approaches. Perspectives on exposure foregrounded social and technical impediments to video consulting. This highlighted the need to attend to the materiality and dependability of the installed base, as well as the social and cultural context of use. CONCLUSIONS: For sustained adoption at scale, health care organizations need to enable incremental systemic change and flexibility through agile governance and knowledge transfer pathways, support process multiplicity within virtual clinic workflows, attend to the materiality and dependability of the IT infrastructure within and beyond organizational boundaries, and maintain an overall narrative within which the continued use of video can be framed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Humans , State Medicine , Pandemics , Videoconferencing , Telemedicine/methods
7.
J Med Internet Res ; 24(9): e39920, 2022 09 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2054801

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although videoconferencing between oncology patients and nurses became routine during the pandemic, little is known about the development of clinician-patient rapport in this care environment. Evidence that virtual visits may challenge nurses' ability to form connections with patients, demonstrate empathy, and provide support suggests that videoconferencing may not ensure optimal care for persons with cancer. Establishing rapport during videoconferencing visits (VCVs) is important in oncology nursing, as rapport enables the nurse to provide emotional support and assistance to patients as they navigate their cancer journey. OBJECTIVE: This study investigated the nature of nurse-patient rapport in ambulatory cancer care videoconferencing telehealth visits. Objectives included exploring (1) how patients with cancer and nurses describe experiences of and strategies for cultivating rapport and (2) similarities and differences between rapport in videoconferencing and in-person visits (IPVs). METHODS: In this qualitative descriptive study, interviews were conducted from October 2021 to March 2022 with 22 participants, including patients with cancer (n=10, 45%) and oncology nurses (n=12, 55%), about their experiences of rapport building during VCVs. All interviews were analyzed using conventional content analysis. Data from nurses and patients were analyzed separately using identical procedures, with a comparative analysis of patient and nurse results performed in the final analysis. RESULTS: Most patients in the study had experienced 3-5 video visits within the past 12 months (n=7, 70%). Half of the nurse participants (n=6, 50%) reported having participated in over 100 VCVs, and all had experiences with videoconferencing (ranging from 3 to 960 visits) over the past 12 months. In total, 3 themes and 6 categories were derived from the patient data, and 4 themes and 13 categories were derived from the nurse data. Comparisons of themes derived from participant interviews identified similarities in how nurses and patients described experiences of rapport during VCVs. Three themes fit the collective data: (1) person-centered and relationship-based care is valued and foundational to nurse-patient rapport in oncology ambulatory care regardless of how care is delivered, (2) adapting a bedside manner to facilitate rapport during VCVs is feasible, and (3) nurses and patients can work together to create person-centered options across the care trajectory to ensure quality care outcomes. Barriers to relationship building in VCVs included unexpected interruptions from others, breaks in the internet connection, concerns about privacy, and limitations associated with not being physically present. CONCLUSIONS: Person-centered and relationship-based approaches can be adapted to support nurse-patient rapport in VCVs, including forming a personal connection with the patient and using active listening techniques. Balancing the challenges and limitations with the benefits of videoconferencing is an essential competency requiring additional research and guidelines. INTERNATIONAL REGISTERED REPORT IDENTIFIER (IRRID): RR2-10.2196/27940.


Subject(s)
Neoplasms , Videoconferencing , Ambulatory Care/methods , Humans , Neoplasms/therapy , Patient Outcome Assessment , Qualitative Research
9.
Psychodyn Psychiatry ; 50(3): 529-534, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2009734

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In response to COVID-19, clinicians migrated psychoanalyses to videoconference platforms, creating an opportunity for a controlled empirical study in which only the site varied. HYPOTHESES: There will be no differences in the quality of the psychoanalytic process (QAP) in the consulting room (CR) and in videoconference (VC). Individuals' defensive functioning (adaptive style) will be associated with their capacity to maintain the analytic process when treatment moves from CR to VC. Underlying was the concept that empirical research of clinical psychoanalysis is possible. PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS: Forty psychoanalysts of all ranks in the Accreditation Council for Psychoanalytic Education, Inc., accredited programs contributed 50 cases. Participants scored QAP at each site on a 0-to-100 scale. They reported patients' characteristic defense mechanisms using the Defensive Functioning Scale (DFS). DATA ANALYSIS: To minimize bias, investigators calculated median DFS scores from data provided by clinicians. They compared QAP scores in CR and VC for the entire group without and with DFS scores, and for each DFS level (when feasible) using the related-samples Wilcoxon signed-rank test. FINDINGS: There was no difference in QAP between CR and VC for the group as a whole; but QAP of the Minor Image Distorting group degraded significantly from CR to VC. This was the only group showing a significant difference. CONCLUSIONS: While statistical significance may not reflect clinical significance, individual differences in adaptation to telepsychoanalysis warrant further study. Empirical research of phenomena occurring naturally in clinical psychoanalysis appears feasible.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Psychoanalysis , Psychoanalytic Therapy , Humans , Psychoanalytic Therapy/methods , Videoconferencing
10.
Bull Menninger Clin ; 86(3): 223-248, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2009733

ABSTRACT

As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, activities involving a large part of life have started to be carried out via videoconferencing. Videoconferencing can be disadvantageous for individuals with social anxiety due to increased social presence, decreased mutual understanding, and awkward communication. The authors aimed to develop a scale to explore the difficulties experienced by individuals with social anxiety during videoconferencing. A total of 598 children and adolescents participated in the study. The data were collected with the Sociodemographic Information Form, the Videoconference Anxiety Scale, and the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale. According to exploratory factor analysis, the scale consisted of 25 items and a single factor. Factor loads were between 0.62 and 0.81; the single factor explained 52.95% of the variance. This study shows that the Videoconference Anxiety Scale is a valid and reliable instrument for Turkish children.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adolescent , Anxiety/diagnosis , Child , Concept Formation , Humans , Videoconferencing
11.
Patient ; 15(5): 521-535, 2022 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1990815

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Face-to-face interviews are recommended for the collection of composite time trade-off (cTTO) data. The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) social distancing measures made researchers consider videoconferencing interviews as an alternative mode of administration, but little evidence about the implementation of videoconferencing in valuation studies is available. This study provides insights into the effect of videoconferencing on the quality of data, evaluating interviewers' and respondents' engagement level in videoconferences compared with face-to-face interviews. METHODS: We used cTTO data collected in Belgium and Spain following the EQ-5D-Y-3L valuation protocol. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, both projects interrupted the face-to-face data collection before reaching the target sample. The remaining interviews were conducted by videoconference. We compared both modes of administration in terms of interviewers' engagement (task duration and number of moves in each example) and respondents' engagement (task duration and proportions of specific response values, in half-year units). To minimise interviewers' learning effects, we split our sample into three groups: (1) first 20 interviews conducted face-to-face; (2) subsequent interviews conducted face-to-face; and (3) videoconferencing interviews. RESULTS: The comparison between videoconferencing and subsequent face-to-face interviews showed the interviewer's engagement was not affected by the mode of administration as almost no significant results were found either in the task duration or the numbers of moves shown in the examples. Similarly, none of the respondents' task duration or proportion of specific responses or half-year units were affected by the mode of administration in either of the two countries. CONCLUSIONS: No evidence suggested that the quality of cTTO data is reduced when using videoconferencing compared with face-to-face interviews.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Status , Belgium , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Pandemics , Quality of Life , Spain , Surveys and Questionnaires , Videoconferencing
12.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(15)2022 08 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1979215

ABSTRACT

This research examines the form in which undergraduates use video cameras during videoconferencing class sessions in a Smart Classroom context and, more specifically, the reasons why a considerable number of students opt to turn off their cameras when videoconferencing during the sessions while others keep them on. The study was carried out in an institution that had previously switched from face-to-face teaching to an Emergency Remote Teaching solution, initially adopted in 2019-2020 to cope with the COVID-19 pandemic restrictions. Findings suggest that using cameras when videoconferencing is associated with increasing and enhancing the interaction between the student and the rest of the class, although not all students agreed with this conclusion. In addition, having the video cameras switched fomented socialization and improved the overall online learning experience for students. However, the surveyed students pointed out diverse negative elements, such as why they had to turn on their personal cameras, privacy concerns, and limitations derived from the available technology infrastructure, in addition to other factors such as distractions, anxiety, and cognitive load. This work discusses how these elements can influence the well-being and the user experience of the students, both positively and negatively.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Qualitative Research , Videoconferencing
13.
Psychiatry Res ; 316: 114770, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1977745

ABSTRACT

Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is very common and can be significantly disabling. New treatments are needed as the remission rate for SAD is the lowest of all the anxiety disorders. Experimental medicine models, in which features resembling a clinical disorder are experimentally induced, are a cost-effective and timely approach to explore potential novel treatments for psychiatric disorders. Following the emergence of SARS-CoV-2, there is a need to develop experimental medicine models that can be carried out remotely. We developed a novel procedure to investigate SAD (the InterneT-based Stress test for Social Anxiety Disorder; ITSSAD) that can be carried out entirely online by a single investigator, potentially reducing costs and maximising internal reliability. The procedure involves an anticipatory period followed by a naturalistic social interaction task. In a sample of 20 non-treatment-seeking volunteers with symptoms of SAD, the ITSSAD induced significant subjective anxiety and reduced positive affect. Further, increased social anxiety symptoms at baseline predicted increased anxiety during the social interaction task. This protocol needs further validation with physiological measures. The ITSSAD is a new tool for researchers to investigate mechanisms underlying social anxiety disorder.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Phobia, Social , Anxiety/psychology , Humans , Phobia, Social/psychology , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2 , Software , Videoconferencing
14.
PLoS One ; 17(8): e0270399, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1974309

ABSTRACT

We found evidence from two experiments that a simple set of gestural techniques can improve the experience of online meetings. Video conferencing technology has practical benefits, but psychological costs. It has allowed industry, education and social interactions to continue in some form during the covid-19 lockdowns. But it has left many users feeling fatigued and socially isolated, perhaps because the limitations of video conferencing disrupt users' ability to coordinate interactions and foster social affiliation. Video Meeting Signals (VMS™) is a simple technique that uses gestures to overcome some of these limitations. First, we carried out a randomised controlled trial with over 100 students, in which half underwent a short training session in VMS. All participants rated their subjective experience of two weekly seminars, and transcripts were objectively coded for the valence of language used. Compared to controls, students with VMS training rated their personal experience, their feelings toward their seminar group, and their perceived learning outcomes as significantly higher. Also, they were more likely to use positive language and less likely to use negative language. A second, larger experiment replicated the first, and added a condition where groups were given a version of the VMS training but taught to use emoji response buttons rather than gestures to signal the same information. The emoji-trained groups did not experience the same improvement as the VMS groups. By exploiting the specific benefits of gestural communication, VMS has great potential to overcome the psychological problems of group video meetings.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communications Media , Communicable Disease Control , Gestures , Humans , Videoconferencing
16.
J Med Internet Res ; 24(7): e36996, 2022 07 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1963254

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Telemedicine can help mitigate important health care challenges, such as demographic changes and the current COVID-19 pandemic, in high-income countries such as Germany. It gives physicians and patients the opportunity to interact via video consultations, regardless of their location, thus offering cost and time savings for both sides. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to investigate whether telemedicine can be implemented efficiently in the follow-up care for patients in orthopedic and trauma surgery, with respect to patient satisfaction, physician satisfaction, and quality of care. METHODS: We conducted a prospective randomized controlled trial in a German university hospital and enrolled 60 patients with different knee and shoulder conditions. For follow-up appointments, patients received either an in-person consultation in the clinic (control group) or a video consultation with their physician (telemedicine group). Patients' and physicians' subsequent evaluations of these follow-up appointments were collected and assessed using separate questionnaires. RESULTS: On the basis of data from 52 consultations after 8 withdrawals, it was found that patients were slightly more satisfied with video consultations (mean 1.58, SD 0.643) than with in-clinic consultations (mean 1.64, SD 0.569), although the difference was not statistically significant (P=.69). After excluding video consultations marred by technical problems, no significant difference was found in physician satisfaction between the groups (mean 1.47, SD 0.516 vs mean 1.32, SD 0.557; P=.31). Further analysis indicated that telemedicine can be applied to broader groups of patients and that patients who have prior experience with telemedicine are more willing to use telemedicine for follow-up care. CONCLUSIONS: Telemedicine can be an alternative and efficient form of follow-up care for patients in orthopedic and trauma surgery in Germany, and it has no significant disadvantages compared with in-person consultations in the clinic. TRIAL REGISTRATION: German Clinical Trials Register DRKS00023445; https://www.drks.de/drks_web/navigate.do?navigationId=trial.HTML&TRIAL_ID=DRKS00023445.


Subject(s)
Aftercare/methods , COVID-19 , Orthopedic Procedures/standards , Telemedicine/standards , Wounds and Injuries/surgery , Aftercare/standards , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Germany , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Satisfaction , Prospective Studies , Referral and Consultation/classification , Referral and Consultation/standards , Referral and Consultation/trends , Telemedicine/methods , Videoconferencing/standards
17.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(13)2022 06 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1934022

ABSTRACT

Telehealth holds much potential for supporting older adults' physical and social health. In particular, telewellness interventions to support the physical and social wellness of older adults are needed to overcome participation barriers with in-person programs. This paper presents guidelines for delivering telewellness interventions to older adults, which were informed by a human factors approach to developing a Tele Tai Chi intervention for older adults with mobility disabilities, including reviewing user needs literature and conducting user-centered needs assessment research. From these findings, we developed a protocol and support materials for delivering a telewellness intervention and conducted a feasibility study. We also established an adaptation committee to provide recommendations on the intervention. The outcome of our human factors approach was the establishment of research-driven design guidelines for delivering group exercise programs to older adults using videoconferencing. The guidelines provide direction for designing a telewellness protocol, supporting remote participation, and promoting socialization and engagement. These guidelines can be used to deliver interventions that increase access to socially-engaging, physical activity programs for older adults, which can ultimately help support their physical health, mental health, and quality of life.


Subject(s)
Quality of Life , Videoconferencing , Aged , Exercise/psychology , Exercise Therapy , Humans , Physical Therapy Modalities
18.
Curr Opin Pediatr ; 34(4): 320-325, 2022 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1922411

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The cessation of in-person teaching to reduce the spread of COVID-19 dramatically increased the use of videoconferencing for home learning among adolescents. RECENT FINDINGS: A consistent finding across studies assessing the relationship between videoconferencing and appearance concerns was that time spent focused on self-view was related to greater appearance concerns. Videoconferencing was associated with an increase in desire for cosmetic surgery and other nonsurgical treatments. Among those at risk of eating disorders, videoconferencing was associated with more appearance-management behaviours and less engagement in the video call. Research to date has been correlational and predominantly involved White, adult women in the USA and in Australia, leaving important gaps in our knowledge, especially around impacts on adolescents. SUMMARY: Given their vulnerability to appearance concerns, we encourage practitioners to speak to adolescents about their use of videoconferencing and how they can migitate the potential negative impacts on body image.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescent , Adult , Australia , Body Image , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Videoconferencing
20.
Eur J Cancer Care (Engl) ; 31(5): e13624, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1861298

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We aimed to determine the feasibility and benefits of a videoconferencing-based home exercise programme to improve health-related quality of life (HRQOL), posttraumatic growth and physical strength levels of paediatric cancer survivors during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). METHODS: Eight paediatric cancer survivors participated in the intervention for 8 weeks. The programme comprised home exercise sessions administered using Zoom, a videoconferencing platform. The supervised exercise sessions were performed two times per week; the participants were taught to perform joint exercises at home for the remaining 5 days of the week. HRQOL, posttraumatic growth and physical strength levels were assessed at baseline and after the intervention. RESULTS: The rates of recruitment, retention and attendance were 52.9%, 88.9% and 98.4%, respectively. There were no cases of adverse events. The programme significantly improved flexibility (z = -2.21, p = 0.03), muscle strength (z = -2.67, p = 0.01) and power (z = -2.41, p = 0.02) among five domains of physical fitness measured using a physical activity promotion system and also improved total physical strength (z = -2.67, p = 0.01). Posttraumatic growth decreased slightly, whereas HRQOL improved slightly; however, the change was not statistically significant. CONCLUSION: The study findings present preliminary evidence of the feasibility and benefits of this videoconferencing-based home exercise programme among paediatric cancer survivors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cancer Survivors , Neoplasms , Child , Exercise Therapy , Feasibility Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Quality of Life , Videoconferencing
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