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5.
J Headache Pain ; 21(1): 128, 2020 Oct 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-992434

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The Covid-19 pandemic is causing changes in delivery of medical care worldwide. It is not known how the management of headache patients was affected by the lockdown during the pandemic. The aim of the present study was to investigate how the initial phase of the Covid-19 pandemic affected the hospital management of headache in Denmark and Norway. METHODS: All neurological departments in Denmark (n = 14) and Norway (n = 18) were invited to a questionnaire survey. The study focused on the lockdown and all questions were answered in regard to the period between March 12th and April 15th, 2020. RESULTS: The responder rate was 91% (29/32). Of the neurological departments 86% changed their headache practice during the lockdown. The most common change was a shift to more telephone consultations (86%). Video consultations were offered by 45%. The number of new headache referrals decreased. Only 36% administered botulinum toxin A treatment according to usual schemes. Sixty% reported that fewer patients were admitted for in-hospital emergency diagnostics and treatment. Among departments conducting headache research 57% had to halt ongoing projects. Overall, 54% reported that the standard of care was worse for headache patients during the pandemic. CONCLUSION: Hospital-based headache care and research was impacted in Denmark and Norway during the initial phase of the Covid-19-pandemic.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Delivery of Health Care , Headache Disorders/therapy , Neurology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Betacoronavirus , Botulinum Toxins, Type A/therapeutic use , Cluster Headache/diagnosis , Cluster Headache/therapy , Denmark , Disease Management , Headache/diagnosis , Headache/therapy , Headache Disorders/diagnosis , Hospital Departments , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Migraine Disorders/diagnosis , Migraine Disorders/therapy , Neuromuscular Agents/therapeutic use , Norway , Outpatient Clinics, Hospital , Referral and Consultation , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telecommunications/statistics & numerical data , Videoconferencing/statistics & numerical data
6.
J Med Internet Res ; 22(11): e22302, 2020 11 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-979836

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: With the global proliferation of the novel COVID-19 disease, conventionally conducting institutional review board (IRB) meetings has become a difficult task. Amid concerns about the suspension of drug development due to delays within IRBs, it has been suggested that IRB meetings should be temporarily conducted via the internet. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to elucidate the current status of IRB meetings conducted through web conference systems. METHODS: A survey on conducting IRB meetings through web conference systems was administered to Japanese national university hospitals. Respondents were in charge of operating IRB offices at different universities. This study was not a randomized controlled trial. RESULTS: The survey was performed at 42 facilities between the end of May and early June, 2020, immediately after the state of emergency was lifted in Japan. The survey yielded a response rate of 74% (31/42). Additionally, while 68% (21/31) of facilities introduced web conference systems for IRB meetings, 13% (4/31) of the surveyed facilities postponed IRB meetings. Therefore, we conducted a further survey of 21 facilities that implemented web conference systems for IRB meetings. According to 71% (15/21) of the respondents, there was no financial burden for implementing these systems, as they were free of charge. In 90% (19/21) of the facilities, IRB meetings through web conference systems were already being conducted with personal electronic devices. Furthermore, in 48% (10/21) of facilities, a web conference system was used in conjunction with face-to-face meetings. CONCLUSIONS: Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the number of reviews in clinical trial core hospitals has decreased. This suggests that the development of pharmaceuticals has stagnated because of COVID-19. According to 71% (15/21) of the respondents who conducted IRB meetings through web conference systems, the cost of introducing such meetings was US $0, showing a negligible financial burden. Moreover, it was shown that online deliberations could be carried out in the same manner as face-to-face meetings, as 86% (18/21) of facilities stated that the number of comments made by board members did not change. To improve the quality of IRB meetings conducted through web conference systems, it is necessary to further examine camera use and the content displayed on members' screens during meetings. Further examination of all members who use web conference systems is required. Our measures for addressing the requests and problems identified in our study could potentially be considered protocols for future IRB meetings, when the COVID-19 pandemic has passed and face-to-face meetings are possible again. This study also highlights the importance of developing web conference systems for IRB meetings to respond to future unforeseen pandemics.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Ethics Committees, Research/statistics & numerical data , Hospitals, University , Internet , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Surveys and Questionnaires , Videoconferencing/statistics & numerical data , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Ethics Committees, Research/organization & administration , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Videoconferencing/organization & administration
8.
Isr Med Assoc J ; 22(8): 489-493, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-972993

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Social distancing, implemented to decrease the spread of coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19), forced major changes in medical practices, including an abrupt transition from face-to-face to remote patient care. Pre-clinical medical studies were concomitantly switched to electronic distance learning. OBJECTIVES: To explore potential implications of COVID-19 on future pre-clinical medical studies. METHODS: We examined responses of pre-clinical medical students to the remote electronic learning in terms of quality of and satisfaction with teaching and technical support, attendance to classes, and the desire to continue electronic learning in the post-epidemic era. A survey of responses from first-year students at the Adelson School of Medicine was conducted. To optimize the reliability of the survey, a single research assistant conducted telephone interviews with each student, using a structured questionnaire concerning aspects of participation and satisfaction with teaching and with technical components of the remote electronic learning. RESULTS: With 100% response rate, the students reported high satisfaction with the electronic learning regarding its quality, online interactions, instructions given, technical assistance, and availability of recording for future studies. Most of the students (68.6%) noted a preference to continue < 90% of the learning online in the post-outbreak era. A high level of overall satisfaction and a low rate of technical problems during electronic learning were significantly correlated with the desire to continue online learning (P < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: The high satisfaction and the positive experience with the electronic distance learning imposed by the COVID-19 epidemic implied a successful transition and might induce future changes in pre-clinical medical studies.


Subject(s)
/epidemiology , Education, Distance , Education, Medical/standards , Students, Medical/psychology , Attitude , Consumer Behavior , Education, Medical/methods , Education, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Surveys and Questionnaires , Teaching/standards , Videoconferencing
9.
Ann Acad Med Singap ; 49(9): 652-660, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-972949

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) has significantly affected the way healthcare is delivered in Singapore. Healthcare services such as renal transplantation had to rapidly adjust and meet the needs to (1) protect patients and staff, (2) ramp up, conserve or redeploy resources while (3) ensuring that critical services remained operational. This paper aims to describe the experience of the renal transplant programme at the Singapore General Hospital (SGH) in responding to the risks and constraints posed by the pandemic. METHODS AND MATERIALS: This is a review and summary of the SGH renal transplant programme's policy and protocols that were either modified or developed in response to the COVID-19 Pandemic. RESULTS: A multi-pronged approach was adopted to respond to the challenges of COVID-19. These included ensuring business continuity by splitting the transplant team into different locations, adopting video and tele-consults to minimise potential patient exposure to COVID-19, streamlining work processes using electronic forms, ensuring safe paths for patients who needed to come to hospital, ring-fencing and testing new inpatients at risk for COVID-19, enhancing precautionary measures for transplant surgery, ensuring a stable supply chain of immunosuppression, and sustaining patient and staff education programmes via video conferencing. CONCLUSIONS: Though the COVID-19 pandemic has reduced access to kidney transplantation, opportunities arose to adopt telemedicine into mainstream transplant practice as well as use electronic platforms to streamline work processes. Screening protocols were established to ensure that transplantation could be performed safely, while webinars reached out to empower patients to take precautions against COVID-19.


Subject(s)
/prevention & control , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Immunosuppressive Agents/supply & distribution , Kidney Transplantation , Telemedicine , Videoconferencing , /diagnosis , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Graft Rejection/prevention & control , Humans , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , Mass Screening , Organizational Policy , Patient Education as Topic/methods , Patient Education as Topic/organization & administration , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling , Singapore/epidemiology , Workflow
10.
11.
Public Health Rep ; 136(1): 39-46, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-961218

ABSTRACT

Project ECHO (Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes) at the University of New Mexico is a telementoring program that uses videoconferencing technology to connect health care providers in underserved communities with subject matter experts. In March 2020, Project ECHO created 10 coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) telementoring programs to meet the public health needs of clinicians and teachers living in underserved rural and urban regions of New Mexico. The newly created COVID-19 programs include 7 weekly sessions (Community Health Worker [in English and Spanish], Critical Care, Education, First-Responder Resiliency, Infectious Disease Office Hours, and Multi-specialty) and 3 one-day special sessions. We calculated the total number of attendees, along with the range and standard deviation, per session by program. Certain programs (Critical Care, Infectious Disease Office Hours, Multi-specialty) recorded the profession of attendees when available. The Project ECHO research team collected COVID-19 infection data by county from March 11 through May 31, 2020. During that same period, 9765 health care and general education professionals participated in the COVID-19 programs, and participants from 31 of 35 (89%) counties in New Mexico attended the sessions. Our initial evaluation of these programs demonstrates that an interprofessional clinician group and teachers used the Project ECHO network to build a community of practice and social network while meeting their educational and professional needs. Because of Project ECHO's large reach, the results of the New Mexico COVID-19 response suggest that the rapid use of ECHO telementoring could be used for other urgent national public health problems.


Subject(s)
/epidemiology , Community Health Services/organization & administration , Health Personnel/education , Inservice Training/organization & administration , Mentoring/organization & administration , Rural Population , Community Health Services/standards , Community Health Workers/education , Evidence-Based Practice , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Medically Underserved Area , Mental Health Services/organization & administration , New Mexico/epidemiology , Pandemics , Resilience, Psychological , Telemedicine , Urban Population , Videoconferencing
12.
Int J Eat Disord ; 53(12): 2038-2043, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-959148

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: As video chatting has emerged as a leading form of communication for work, education, and socialization during the COVID-19 pandemic, it is important to investigate the association between video chatting and appearance satisfaction. METHOD: Participants included women from the United States (n = 438; age: M = 31.3, SD = 12.71) who completed measures examining their use of video chatting services, self-objectification, video chatting appearance comparison, and appearance satisfaction. RESULTS: The total time spent on video chatting services was not associated with appearance satisfaction; however, self-objectification moderated the relationship between total hours of video chatting and appearance satisfaction. In addition, participants who engaged in more video chatting appearance comparisons reported lower face and body satisfaction. Furthermore, video chatting appearance comparison was associated with more frequent usage of certain Zoom features, such as the "touch up my appearance" feature, and more time spent looking at oneself on video calls. Finally, those who spent more time engaged with their families over video chatting services reported greater face and body satisfaction. DISCUSSION: The results of the current study demonstrate that time spent video chatting is not predictive of appearance satisfaction, but that self-objectification can exacerbate these associations.


Subject(s)
/psychology , Personal Satisfaction , Physical Appearance, Body/physiology , Videoconferencing , Adult , Body Dysmorphic Disorders/psychology , /virology , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , /isolation & purification
13.
J Nurs Educ ; 59(12): 697-700, 2020 Dec 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-948857

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic closed university campuses across the country. Nurse educators were challenged to develop innovative solutions for students to complete course requirements. The on-campus poster session used by a college of nursing as a scholarly forum for dissemination of all Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) student final projects was cancelled due to the pandemic. METHOD: Nurse educators developed and implemented an interactive, synchronous virtual session using the Zoom Video Communications platform. RESULTS: Twelve virtual sessions were held, and 73 students presented DNP project posters. More than 150 students and faculty attended the virtual poster sessions. Students and faculty had positive feedback regarding the virtual format. Student presentations were academically rigorous, and audiences engaged in robust discussion with DNP students. CONCLUSION: The virtual platform was successfully used for an interactive presentation by DNP student and nursing faculty participants. This format may be especially valuable for use of scholarship dissemination by distance learning programs. [J Nurs Educ. 2020;59(12):697-700.].


Subject(s)
Academic Dissertations as Topic , Education, Nursing, Graduate , Internet , Nursing Research , Posters as Topic , Videoconferencing , /epidemiology , Humans , Illinois/epidemiology , Pandemics
14.
Vet Rec ; 187(Suppl 1): 1, 2020 11 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-944996

ABSTRACT

Overnight, the Covid-19 pandemic brought a need to use technology with which vets might not previously have grappled - most notably telemedicine. Here Daniella Dos Santos, president of the BVA throughout the first national lockdown, reflects on leading the profession through a sudden acceleration towards the future and questions what might come next.


Subject(s)
Veterinarians , Veterinary Medicine/methods , Animals , /prevention & control , Communication , Humans , Videoconferencing
18.
ChemMedChem ; 15(24): 2562-2568, 2020 12 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-932420

ABSTRACT

Virtual events are flourishing with the world lockdown due to the COVID-19 pandemic. As a result of the cancelation or postponement of scheduled physical meetings, a revolution in medicinal chemistry scientific meetings occurred, leading to an increase in new strategies to share science. One example are online events, namely e-schools or webinars. Taking this into consideration, we decided to promote the MedChemTrain e-School 2020, a virtual event aiming to bring together the scientific community and share some updates in the medicinal chemistry field. After organizing this free event, with more than 1.4 thousand participants worldwide, we decided to share some insights about the logistics behind organizing a virtual symposium to help scientists with this new challenge in science communication.


Subject(s)
Chemistry, Pharmaceutical/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral , Videoconferencing/organization & administration , Communication , Curriculum , Humans , Learning
19.
Am J Geriatr Psychiatry ; 28(11): 1185-1194, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-922025

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To describe the experiences and needs of caregivers of persons with dementia during the COVID-19 pandemic and lockdown in a city in India. DESIGN: Qualitative study using a telephonic semistructured interview. SETTING: A specialist geriatric outpatient mental health service based in a nongovernmental organization in Chennai, India. PARTICIPANTS: A purposive sampling of family members of persons with dementia registered in the database and seen within the previous 6 months. RESULTS: Thirty-one caregivers participated. Thematic analysis of the data showed two sets of issues that the caregivers of persons with dementia faced in their experiences during the pandemic. The first set was unique to the caregivers that directly related to their caregiving role, while the second set did not relate directly to their caregiving role. These two sets also appeared to have a two-way interaction influencing each other. These issues generated needs, some of which required immediate support while others required longer-term support. The caregivers suggested several methods, such as use of video-consultations, telephone-based support and clinic-based in-person visits to meet their needs. They also wanted more services postpandemic. CONCLUSION: Caregivers of persons with dementia had multiple needs during the pandemic. Supporting them during these times require a pragmatic multilayered approach. Systemic changes, policies and frameworks, increased awareness, use of technology, and better access to health are necessary.


Subject(s)
Caregivers/psychology , Coronavirus Infections , Dementia , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Quality of Life , Telemedicine/methods , Videoconferencing , Aged , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Dementia/epidemiology , Dementia/therapy , Dementia/virology , Female , Home Care Services/trends , Humans , Independent Living/psychology , India/epidemiology , Male , Mental Health , Needs Assessment , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Psychosocial Support Systems
20.
Neurodegener Dis Manag ; 11(1): 83-89, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-918964

ABSTRACT

The Covid-19 pandemic forced providers to alter their delivery of care to special populations, including older adults with cognitive impairment. The Montefiore-Einstein Center for the Aging Brain, a specialty multidisciplinary center for the evaluation and management of patients with neurodegenerative disorders, developed a coordinated approach (Coordinated Care At Risk/Remote Elderly program [CCARRE]) to reach our diverse population during the initial Covid-19 crisis in New York City, USA. In the tele-evaluation of the first 85 patients seen with CCARRE, we recognized unique factors that could improve patient care, lessen burden and optimize access to community resources. Lessons learned from the experience are shared.


Subject(s)
Advance Directives , Caregivers/psychology , Cognitive Dysfunction/therapy , Dementia/therapy , Patient Safety , Program Development , Telemedicine , Videoconferencing , Activities of Daily Living , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Cognitive Dysfunction/diagnosis , Culturally Competent Care , Dementia/diagnosis , Female , Humans , Male , New York City , Social Determinants of Health , Telephone
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