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3.
Psychogeriatrics ; 23(4): 561-570, 2023 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2306116

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Social distancing and 'stay-at-home' orders are essential to contain the coronavirus outbreak; however, it has affected older adults very negatively psychosocially. The present study explored the impact of a videoconferencing-implemented program on older adults' psychosocial health during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: We carried out this experimental research with pretest-posttest and control groups between November 02 to December 26, 2020 on individuals aged 60 years and over who were enrolled at Fethiye Refreshment University (60+ FRU). While the intervention group consisted of 40 people, we recruited 52 participants in the control group. Unlike the control group, the intervention group participated in a structured videoconferencing program held there days a week for 8 weeks. We collected the data using the Fear of COVID-19 Scale (FCV-19S), the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPS), the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS-21), and the Loneliness Scale for Elderly (LSE). The data were then analysed on the SPSS 22.0 program. RESULTS: The participants had a mean age of 66.13 ± 5.13 years; 65.2% were females, 58.7% were married, 55.4% held a university degree and 93.5% had a regular income. Following the intervention, we found the experimental group to have significantly a lower posttest FCV-19S score (p < 0.05) and a higher posttest MSPS score than the control group (p < 0.05). Besides, the experimental group had significantly lower posttest scores on the DASS-21 and the anxiety and stress subscales than the control group (p < 0.05). Moreover, the posttest score of the experiential group on the emotional loneliness subscale (LSE) was found to be significantly lower than that of the control group (p < 0.05); nevertheless, we could not conclude significant differences between the groups' pretest and posttest LSE scores and their scores on the other LSE subscales (p > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Overall, the videoconferencing program was found to be efficient in providing older adults with psychosocial support amid social isolation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Aged , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Male , Pandemics , Social Isolation/psychology , Loneliness/psychology , Videoconferencing
4.
Indian J Tuberc ; 69(4): 721-723, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2303164

ABSTRACT

WHO has given a special call to involve youth in END TB initiative. Involvement of youth, especially in the medical fraternity, in the TB control activities can ensure we reach our goal of ending TB in India by 2025. This study was planned to recruit and monitor young volunteers from medical colleges of Andhra Pradesh. 183 volunteers were recruited from 15 medical colleges and were tasked to spread awareness among general public. Work of these volunteers was monitored via Whatsapp group chats and videoconferencing. 4 follow-up meetings were held via videoconferencing and various hurdles and challenges were discussed. Major challenges faced included lack of physical meetings due to COVID-19 pandemic, which adversely affected their motivation and monitoring activities. Increased involvement from medical colleges, regular telecommunication and meetings can improve the work and motivation of these volunteers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Humans , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Motivation , Videoconferencing , India/epidemiology
5.
Front Public Health ; 11: 1014302, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2287775

ABSTRACT

Background: At the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, it was foreseen that the number of face-to-face psychiatry consultations would suffer a reduction. In order to compensate, the Australian Government introduced new Medicare-subsidized telephone and video-linked consultations. This study investigates how these developments affected the pre-existing inequity of psychiatry service delivery in Australia. Methods: The study analyses five and a half years of national Medicare data listing all subsidized psychiatry consultation consumption aggregated to areas defined as Statistical Area level 3 (SA3s; which have population sizes of 30 k-300 k). Face-to-face, video-linked and telephone consultations are considered separately. The analysis consists of presenting rates of consumption, concentration graphs, and concentration indices to quantify inequity, using Socio Economic Indexes for Areas (SEIFA) scores to rank the SA3 areas according to socio-economic disadvantage. Results: There is a 22% drop in the rate of face-to-face psychiatry consultation consumption across Australia in the final study period compared with the last study period predating the COVID-19 pandemic. However, the loss is made up by the introduction of the new subsidized telephone and video-linked consultations. Referring to the same time periods, there is a reduction in the inequity of the distribution of face-to-face consultations, where the concentration index reduces from 0.166 to 0.129. The new subsidized video-linked consultations are distributed with severe inequity in the great majority of subpopulations studied. Australia-wide, video-linked consultations are also distributed with gross inequity, with a concentration index of 0.356 in the final study period. The effect of this upon overall inequity was to cancel out the reduction of inequity resulting from the reduction of face-to face appointments. Conclusion: Australian subsidized video-linked psychiatry consultations have been distributed with gross inequity and have been a significant exacerbator of the overall inequity of psychiatric service provision. Future policy decisions wishing to reduce this inequity should take care to reduce the risk posed by expanding telepsychiatry.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Data Analysis , Pandemics , Psychiatry , Telemedicine , Psychiatry/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Humans , Australia/epidemiology , Remote Consultation/statistics & numerical data , Healthcare Disparities/statistics & numerical data , Mental Health/standards , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult , Adult , Middle Aged , Office Visits/statistics & numerical data , Rural Health/statistics & numerical data , Urban Health/statistics & numerical data , Videoconferencing/statistics & numerical data
6.
Transl Behav Med ; 13(7): 442-452, 2023 Jul 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2287113

ABSTRACT

The SPIN-CHAT Program was designed to support mental health among individuals with systemic sclerosis (SSc; commonly known as scleroderma) and at least mild anxiety symptoms at the onset of COVID-19. The program was formally evaluated in the SPIN-CHAT Trial. Little is known about program and trial acceptability, and factors impacting implementation from the perspectives of research team members and trial participants. Thus, the propose of this follow-up study was to explore research team members' and trial participants' experiences with the program and trial to identify factors impacting acceptability and successful implementation. Data were collected cross-sectionally through one-on-one, videoconference-based, semi-structured interviews with 22 research team members and 30 purposefully recruited trial participants (Mage = 54.9, SD = 13.0 years). A social constructivist paradigm was adopted, and data were analyzed thematically. Data were organized into seven themes: (i) getting started: the importance of prolonged engagement and exceeding expectations; (ii) designing the program and trial: including multiple features; (iii) training: research team members are critical to positive program and trial experiences; (iv) offering the program and trial: it needs to be flexible and patient-oriented; (v) maximizing engagement: navigating and managing group dynamics; (vi) delivering a videoconference-based supportive care intervention: necessary, appreciated, and associated with some barriers; and (vii) refining the program and trial: considering modification when offered beyond the period of COVID-19 restrictions. Trial participants were satisfied with and found the SPIN-CHAT Program and Trial to be acceptable. Results offer implementation data that can guide the design, development, and refinement of other supportive care programs seeking to promote psychological health during and beyond COVID-19.


The Scleroderma Patient-centered Intervention Network COVID-19 Home-isolation Activities Together (SPIN-CHAT) Program, a videoconference-based supportive care program, was designed to protect and enhance mental health in individuals affected by systemic sclerosis (commonly known as scleroderma) with at least mild anxiety symptoms during the COVID-19 pandemic. A trial was conducted to evaluate the SPIN-CHAT Program, and results were generally positive. However, important gaps in knowledge remained. Specifically, research team members' and participants' perceptions of SPIN-CHAT Trial acceptability (including satisfaction) and factors impacting implementation of the SPIN-CHAT Program had not yet been explored. To fill this gap, we conducted one-on-one, videoconference-based, semi-structured interviewed with 22 research team members and 30 purposefully recruited trial participants. Interviews sought to gain insights into research team members' and trial participants' experiences within the SPIN-CHAT Program, delivery preferences, and aspects that were/were not beneficial. Findings suggest research team members and participants valued the SPIN-CHAT Program and found the trial to be acceptable. Results also highlight important factors to consider when designing, developing, and/or refining videoconference-based supportive care programs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Scleroderma, Systemic , Humans , Follow-Up Studies , Qualitative Research , Scleroderma, Systemic/therapy , Videoconferencing
7.
Int J Nurs Educ Scholarsh ; 20(1)2023 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2197329

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: During the COVID-19 pandemic, educators shifted from traditional lectures to videoconferencing. This systematic review explored the use of videoconferencing as a teaching tool in response to the pandemic as well as issues related to digital equity and inclusion. CONTENT: The review was conducted using the Joanna Briggs Institute for Systematic Reviews methodology and reported using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses 2020 statement. SUMMARY: A total of nine studies met eligibility criteria. The participants in the included studies were medical students from various parts of the world. Technical difficulties and lack of human interactions were identified as barriers to learning through videoconferencing. OUTLOOK: To achieve full success, pedagogical videoconferencing must prioritize digital equity and a universal design for learning. Although useful for maintaining education during the pandemic, in the future, videoconferencing will present challenges related to the digital divide as well as opportunities as a teaching tool for nurse educators globally.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Digital Divide , Humans , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Occupations , Videoconferencing
8.
Body Image ; 44: 170-177, 2023 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2176839

ABSTRACT

Videoconferencing for work/study purposes has increased rapidly due to the COVID-19 global pandemic. Given this practice often involves viewing one's own video image, higher appearance concerns whilst videoconferencing may be linked to poorer performance whereby individuals may not feel they are able to engage or have control during a work/study meeting. The present study cross-sectionally examined whether both facial appearance concerns and fear of negative evaluation during videoconferencing for work/study purposes were directly and indirectly related to performance control and engagement, through self-focused attention and appearance distraction. Adult participants (N = 534, Mage = 26.32, SD = 11.08; 78% female) completed an online survey during the COVID-19 pandemic in Australia. Path analysis revealed direct and indirect effects, suggesting that heightened appearance self-consciousness was associated with greater self- and appearance-focused attention. In turn, this was related to impaired performance during videoconferencing. Multigroup analyses demonstrated that the magnitude of the proposed correlational effects were comparable across men and women. Given the ongoing reliance on videoconferencing, these findings have important theoretical and practical implications.


Subject(s)
Body Image , COVID-19 , Male , Humans , Adult , Female , Body Image/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Australia , Videoconferencing
9.
Dementia (London) ; 22(3): 561-575, 2023 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2195264

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study aimed to explore the experiences of carers of people living with dementia who participated in videoconferencing support groups during the COVID-19 pandemic to investigate their preferences and experiences with online, hybrid, and face-to-face support. METHODS: This convergent mixed methods design study utilised an online questionnaire and semi-structured interviews. Interviews took place over videoconferencing software and were analysed through thematic analysis. Participants were recruited from support groups based in the UK and Ireland. RESULTS: 39 carers of people living with dementia completed the questionnaire and 16 carers participated in interviews. Participants found videoconferencing support groups more convenient, but face-to-face groups more enjoyable. Participants who had found it difficult to access face-to-face groups prior to COVID-19 expressed more positive perceptions of videoconference-based groups. Many felt that hybrid groups would make it easier for more people to attend. However, some carers described lacking the resources and technological skills to participate in online support groups effectively. Some suggested making IT training available may improve the capacity of carers to access support online. CONCLUSION: Videoconferencing support groups can be an appropriate way of supporting carers of people with dementia, especially for those who do not have access to face-to-face support groups. However, face-to-face support remains important to carers and should be made available when it can be implemented safely. Hybrid support groups could allow for increased accessibility while still providing the option of face-to-face contact for those who prefer it or are not adept with technology.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dementia , Humans , Social Support , Caregivers , Pandemics , Communicable Disease Control , Self-Help Groups , Videoconferencing
10.
Am J Speech Lang Pathol ; 31(6): 2825-2834, 2022 Nov 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2133697

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: During the COVID-19 pandemic, clinicians and researchers have increasingly used remote online assessments to pursue their activities, but mostly with tests not validated for videoconference administration. This study aims to validate the remote online administration of picture description in Canadian French neurotypical speakers and to explore the thematic unit (TU) checklist recently developed. METHOD: Spoken discourse elicited through the picture description task of the Western Aphasia Battery-Revised (WAB-R) was collected from Canadian French neurotypical speakers from Québec aged between 50 and 79 years old. Forty-seven participants completed the task in person, and 49 participants completed the task by videoconference. Videos of each discourse sample were transcribed using CHAT conventions. Microstructural variables were extracted using the CLAN (Computerized Language ANalysis) program, whereas thematic informativeness was scored for each sample using TUs. Chi-square tests were conducted to compare both groups on each TU; t tests were also performed on the total score of TUs and microstructural variables. RESULTS: Groups were matched on sex, age, and education variables. The t tests revealed no intergroup difference for the total TU score and for the microstructural variables (e.g., mean length of utterances and number of words per minute). Chi-square tests showed no significant intergroup difference for all 16 TUs. CONCLUSIONS: These findings support remote online assessment of the picnic scene of the WAB-R picture description in Canadian French neurotypical speakers. These results also validate the 16 TUs most consistently produced. The use of videoconference could promote and improve the recruitment of participants who are usually less accessible, such as people using assistive mobility technologies. SUPPLEMENTAL MATERIAL: https://doi.org/10.23641/asha.21476961.


Subject(s)
Aphasia , COVID-19 , Humans , Middle Aged , Aged , Language , Pandemics , Canada , Videoconferencing
11.
J Telemed Telecare ; 28(10): 750-756, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2108474

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The primary aim was to compare the successful completion rates of pre-treatment medication history consults conducted by pharmacists with patients either via an unscheduled telephone consult (current standard care) or a scheduled videoconference consult model. Secondary aims were to examine pharmacist perceptions of the telephone and videoconference consults and explore patient (+/- support person) perceptions of videoconference consults. METHOD: Completion data were collected and compared for the two modalities. In addition, pharmacists commented on any positive/negative factors impacting all consults. For the final 35 participants completing a videoconference consult, patients, support people, and pharmacists involved, completed a survey exploring perceptions and satisfaction. RESULTS: A significantly higher completion rate (p < 0.0001) was found for the videoconferencing model, with 94% (76 of 81) completed successfully compared to 72% (76 of 105) of the unscheduled telephone consults. Pharmacists reported multiple factors impacting the success of the telephone consults including scheduling issues and patient factors. Survey responses revealed that 100% of patients/support people and 82% of pharmacists reported satisfaction with videoconference consults. Surveyed participants noted some technical issues, however, the 'ability to show/view medication containers and/or labels' and 'convenience of scheduled time' were benefits of the videoconference model. DISCUSSION: Results indicate that pre-treatment medication history consults should be offered via videoconference to maximise success.


Subject(s)
Neoplasms , Pharmacists , Humans , Videoconferencing , Telephone , Medical History Taking
13.
Surgeon ; 20(6): e405-e409, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2106017

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: During the COVID-19 pandemic, regular teaching for core surgical trainees (CSTs) in Northern Ireland was cancelled at short notice, leaving a significant gap in training. We aimed to develop an effective core surgical teaching programme, within the remit of government regulations, to ensure training was not negatively affected by COVID-19. DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: A novel virtual teaching programme was designed and implemented regionally across Northern Ireland. One-year free Affiliate Membership to the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (RCSEd) was provided for Northern Ireland CSTs, allowing access to RCSEd online webinars. A weekly teaching schedule based on the Member of the Royal College of Surgeons (MRCS) exam curriculum and accompanied by a webinar was created and disseminated to trainees. Senior surgeons were recruited to conduct a virtual teaching session via videoconferencing. RESULTS: Ten teaching sessions were conducted over three months. Feedback was collated, with positive results and requests for virtual teaching to continue. As such, the Northern Ireland Medical and Dental Training Agency (NIMDTA) adopted the teaching programme as their new primary method of central teaching for Northern Ireland CSTs during the pandemic. CONCLUSION: A novel, highly successful teaching programme was developed in Northern Ireland to meet the training needs of CSTs resulting in a sustained change to training. Virtual surgical teaching can be as effective as face-to-face didactic learning and may be imperative in a foreseeably socially distanced world.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Surgeons , Humans , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Curriculum , Surgeons/education , Videoconferencing
14.
Behav Res Ther ; 159: 104226, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2104457

ABSTRACT

Mitigating the COVID-19 related disruptions in mental health care services is crucial in a time of increased mental health disorders. Numerous reviews have been conducted on the process of implementing technology-based mental health care during the pandemic. The research question of this umbrella review was to examine what the impact of COVID-19 was on access and delivery of mental health services and how mental health services have changed during the pandemic. A systematic search for systematic reviews and meta-analyses was conducted up to August 12, 2022, and 38 systematic reviews were identified. Main disruptions during COVID-19 were reduced access to outpatient mental health care and reduced admissions and earlier discharge from inpatient care. In response, synchronous telemental health tools such as videoconferencing were used to provide remote care similar to pre-COVID care, and to a lesser extent asynchronous virtual mental health tools such as apps. Implementation of synchronous tools were facilitated by time-efficiency and flexibility during the pandemic but there was a lack of accessibility for specific vulnerable populations. Main barriers among practitioners and patients to use digital mental health tools were poor technological literacy, particularly when preexisting inequalities existed, and beliefs about reduced therapeutic alliance particularly in case of severe mental disorders. Absence of organizational support for technological implementation of digital mental health interventions due to inadequate IT infrastructure, lack of funding, as well as lack of privacy and safety, challenged implementation during COVID-19. Reviews were of low to moderate quality, covered heterogeneously designed primary studies and lacked findings of implementation in low- and middle-income countries. These gaps in the evidence were particularly prevalent in studies conducted early in the pandemic. This umbrella review shows that during the COVID-19 pandemic, practitioners and mental health care institutions mainly used synchronous telemental health tools, and to a lesser degree asynchronous tools to enable continued access to mental health care for patients. Numerous barriers to these tools were identified, and call for further improvements. In addition, more high quality research into comparative effectiveness and working mechanisms may improve scalability of mental health care in general and in future infectious disease outbreaks.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics , Mental Health , Systematic Reviews as Topic , Videoconferencing
15.
J Med Internet Res ; 24(11): e42431, 2022 11 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2089647

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Until COVID-19, implementation and uptake of video consultations in health care was slow. However, the pandemic created a "burning platform" for scaling up such services. As health care organizations look to expand and maintain the use of video in the "new normal," it is important to understand infrastructural influences and changes that emerged during the pandemic and that may influence sustainability going forward. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to draw lessons from 4 National Health Service (NHS) organizations on how information infrastructures shaped, and were shaped by, the rapid scale-up of video consultations during COVID-19. METHODS: A mixed methods case study of 4 NHS trusts in England was conducted before and during the pandemic. Data comprised 90 interviews with 49 participants (eg, clinicians, managers, administrators, and IT support), ethnographic field notes, and video consultation activity data. We sought examples of infrastructural features and challenges related to the rapid scale-up of video. Analysis was guided by Gkeredakis et al's 3 perspectives on crisis and digital change: as opportunity (for accelerated innovation and removal of barriers to experimentation), disruption (to organizational practices, generating new dependencies and risks), and exposure (of vulnerabilities in both people and infrastructure). RESULTS: Before COVID-19, there was a strong policy push for video consultations as a way of delivering health care efficiently. However, the spread of video was slow, and adopting clinicians described their use as ad hoc rather than business as usual. When the pandemic hit, video was rapidly scaled up. The most rapid increase in use was during the first month of the pandemic (March-April 2020), from an average of 8 video consultations per week to 171 per week at each site. Uptake continued to increase during the pandemic, averaging approximately 800 video consultations per week by March 2021. From an opportunity perspective, participants talked about changes to institutional elements of infrastructure, which had historically restricted the introduction and use of video. This was supported by an "organizing vision" for video, bringing legitimacy and support. Perspectives on disruption centered on changes to social, technical, and material work environments and the emergence of new patterns of action. Retaining positive elements of such change required a judicious balance between managerial (top-down) and emergent (bottom-up) approaches. Perspectives on exposure foregrounded social and technical impediments to video consulting. This highlighted the need to attend to the materiality and dependability of the installed base, as well as the social and cultural context of use. CONCLUSIONS: For sustained adoption at scale, health care organizations need to enable incremental systemic change and flexibility through agile governance and knowledge transfer pathways, support process multiplicity within virtual clinic workflows, attend to the materiality and dependability of the IT infrastructure within and beyond organizational boundaries, and maintain an overall narrative within which the continued use of video can be framed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Humans , State Medicine , Pandemics , Videoconferencing , Telemedicine/methods
17.
J Med Internet Res ; 24(9): e39920, 2022 09 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2054801

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although videoconferencing between oncology patients and nurses became routine during the pandemic, little is known about the development of clinician-patient rapport in this care environment. Evidence that virtual visits may challenge nurses' ability to form connections with patients, demonstrate empathy, and provide support suggests that videoconferencing may not ensure optimal care for persons with cancer. Establishing rapport during videoconferencing visits (VCVs) is important in oncology nursing, as rapport enables the nurse to provide emotional support and assistance to patients as they navigate their cancer journey. OBJECTIVE: This study investigated the nature of nurse-patient rapport in ambulatory cancer care videoconferencing telehealth visits. Objectives included exploring (1) how patients with cancer and nurses describe experiences of and strategies for cultivating rapport and (2) similarities and differences between rapport in videoconferencing and in-person visits (IPVs). METHODS: In this qualitative descriptive study, interviews were conducted from October 2021 to March 2022 with 22 participants, including patients with cancer (n=10, 45%) and oncology nurses (n=12, 55%), about their experiences of rapport building during VCVs. All interviews were analyzed using conventional content analysis. Data from nurses and patients were analyzed separately using identical procedures, with a comparative analysis of patient and nurse results performed in the final analysis. RESULTS: Most patients in the study had experienced 3-5 video visits within the past 12 months (n=7, 70%). Half of the nurse participants (n=6, 50%) reported having participated in over 100 VCVs, and all had experiences with videoconferencing (ranging from 3 to 960 visits) over the past 12 months. In total, 3 themes and 6 categories were derived from the patient data, and 4 themes and 13 categories were derived from the nurse data. Comparisons of themes derived from participant interviews identified similarities in how nurses and patients described experiences of rapport during VCVs. Three themes fit the collective data: (1) person-centered and relationship-based care is valued and foundational to nurse-patient rapport in oncology ambulatory care regardless of how care is delivered, (2) adapting a bedside manner to facilitate rapport during VCVs is feasible, and (3) nurses and patients can work together to create person-centered options across the care trajectory to ensure quality care outcomes. Barriers to relationship building in VCVs included unexpected interruptions from others, breaks in the internet connection, concerns about privacy, and limitations associated with not being physically present. CONCLUSIONS: Person-centered and relationship-based approaches can be adapted to support nurse-patient rapport in VCVs, including forming a personal connection with the patient and using active listening techniques. Balancing the challenges and limitations with the benefits of videoconferencing is an essential competency requiring additional research and guidelines. INTERNATIONAL REGISTERED REPORT IDENTIFIER (IRRID): RR2-10.2196/27940.


Subject(s)
Neoplasms , Videoconferencing , Ambulatory Care/methods , Humans , Neoplasms/therapy , Patient Outcome Assessment , Qualitative Research
19.
J Gen Intern Med ; 37(16): 4248-4256, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2048511

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Studies specifically focused on patients' perspectives on telemedicine visits in primary and behavioral health care are fairly limited and have often focused on highly selected populations or used overall satisfaction surveys. OBJECTIVE: To examine patient perspectives on the shift to telemedicine, the remote delivery of health care via the use of electronic information and communications technology, in primary and behavioral health care in Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) during COVID-19. DESIGN: Semi-structured interviews were conducted using video conference with patients and caregivers between October and December 2020. PARTICIPANTS: Providers from 6 FQHCs nominated participants. Eighteen patients and caregivers were interviewed: 6 patients with only primary care visits; 5 with only behavioral health visits; 3 with both primary care and behavioral health visits; and 4 caregivers of children with pediatric visits. APPROACH: Using a protocol-driven, rapid qualitative methodology, we analyzed the interview data and assessed the quality of care, benefits and challenges of telemedicine, and use of telemedicine post-pandemic. KEY RESULTS: Respondents broadly supported the option of home-based synchronous telemedicine visits in primary and behavioral health care. Nearly all respondents appreciated remote visits, largely because such visits provided a safe option during the pandemic. Patients were generally satisfied with telemedicine and believed the quality of visits to be similar to in-person visits, especially when delivered by a provider with whom they had established rapport. Although most respondents planned to return to mostly in-person visits when considered safe to do so, they remained supportive of the continued option for remote visits as remote care addresses some of the typical barriers faced by low-income patients. CONCLUSIONS: Addressing digital literacy challenges, enhancing remote visit privacy, and improving practice workflows will help ensure equitable access to all patients as we move to a new post-COVID-19 "normal" marked by increased reliance on telemedicine and technology.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Primary Health Care , Telemedicine , Child , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care , Pandemics , Telemedicine/methods , Videoconferencing
20.
Psychodyn Psychiatry ; 50(3): 529-534, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2009734

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In response to COVID-19, clinicians migrated psychoanalyses to videoconference platforms, creating an opportunity for a controlled empirical study in which only the site varied. HYPOTHESES: There will be no differences in the quality of the psychoanalytic process (QAP) in the consulting room (CR) and in videoconference (VC). Individuals' defensive functioning (adaptive style) will be associated with their capacity to maintain the analytic process when treatment moves from CR to VC. Underlying was the concept that empirical research of clinical psychoanalysis is possible. PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS: Forty psychoanalysts of all ranks in the Accreditation Council for Psychoanalytic Education, Inc., accredited programs contributed 50 cases. Participants scored QAP at each site on a 0-to-100 scale. They reported patients' characteristic defense mechanisms using the Defensive Functioning Scale (DFS). DATA ANALYSIS: To minimize bias, investigators calculated median DFS scores from data provided by clinicians. They compared QAP scores in CR and VC for the entire group without and with DFS scores, and for each DFS level (when feasible) using the related-samples Wilcoxon signed-rank test. FINDINGS: There was no difference in QAP between CR and VC for the group as a whole; but QAP of the Minor Image Distorting group degraded significantly from CR to VC. This was the only group showing a significant difference. CONCLUSIONS: While statistical significance may not reflect clinical significance, individual differences in adaptation to telepsychoanalysis warrant further study. Empirical research of phenomena occurring naturally in clinical psychoanalysis appears feasible.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Psychoanalysis , Psychoanalytic Therapy , Humans , Psychoanalytic Therapy/methods , Videoconferencing
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