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1.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(11): e2133877, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1530062

ABSTRACT

Importance: Telehealth use including secure messages has rapidly expanded since the COVID-19 pandemic, including for multidisciplinary aspects of cancer care. Recent reports described rapid uptake and various benefits for patients and clinicians, suggesting that telehealth may be in standard use after the pandemic. Objective: To examine attitudes and perceptions of multidisciplinary cancer care clinicians toward telehealth and secure messages. Design, Setting, and Participants: Cross-sectional specialty-specific survey (ie, some questions appear only for relevant specialties) among multidisciplinary cancer care clinicians, collected from April 29, 2020, to June 5, 2020. Participants were all 285 clinicians in the fields of medical oncology, radiation oncology, surgical oncology, survivorship, and oncology navigation from all 21 community cancer centers of Kaiser Permanente Northern California. Main Outcomes and Measures: Clinician satisfaction, perceived benefits and challenges of telehealth, perceived quality of telehealth and secure messaging, preferred visit and communication types for different clinical activities, and preferences regarding postpandemic telehealth use. Results: A total of 202 clinicians (71%) responded (104 of 128 medical oncologists, 34 of 37 radiation oncologists, 16 of 62 breast surgeons, 18 of 28 navigators, and 30 of 30 survivorship experts; 57% (116 of 202) were women; 73% [147 of 202] between ages 36-55 years). Seventy-six percent (n = 154) were satisfied with telehealth without statistically significant variations based on clinician characteristics. In-person visits were thought to promote a strong patient-clinician connection by 99% (n = 137) of respondents compared with 77% (n = 106) for video visits, 43% (n = 59) for telephone, and 14% (n = 19) for secure messages. The most commonly cited benefits of telehealth to clinicians included reduced commute (79%; n = 160), working from home (74%; n = 149), and staying on time (65%; n = 132); the most commonly cited negative factors included internet connection (84%; n = 170) or equipment problems (72%; n = 146), or physical examination needed (64%; n = 131). Most respondents (59%; n = 120) thought that video is adequate to manage the greater part of patient care in general; and most deemed various telehealth modalities suitable for any of the queried types of patient-clinician activities. For some specific activities, less than half of respondents thought that only an in-person visit is acceptable (eg, 49%; n = 66 for end-of-life discussion, 35%; n = 58 for new diagnosis). Most clinicians (82%; n = 166) preferred to maintain or increase use of telehealth after the pandemic. Conclusions and Relevance: In this survey of multidisciplinary cancer care clinicians in the COVID-19 era, telehealth was well received and often preferred by most cancer care clinicians, who deemed it appropriate to manage most aspects of cancer care. As telehealth use becomes routine in some cancer care settings, video and telephone visits and use of asynchronous secure messaging with patients in cancer care has clear potential to extend beyond the pandemic period.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , Medical Oncology/statistics & numerical data , Neoplasms/therapy , Patient Care Team/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Surveys and Questionnaires , Videoconferencing/statistics & numerical data
2.
J Appl Gerontol ; 40(9): 958-962, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1226831

ABSTRACT

While U.S. adults living in affordable senior housing represent a vulnerable population during the COVID-19 pandemic, affordable housing may provide a foundation for interventions designed to improve technology access to support health. To better understand technology access among residents of affordable senior housing, we surveyed members of a national association of resident service coordinators to assess their experiences working with residents during the pandemic (n = 1,440). While nearly all service coordinators report that most or all residents have reliable phone access, under a quarter report that most or all have reliable internet access; they also report limited access to technology for video calls. Lack of internet access and technology literacy are perceived as barriers to medical visits and food procurement for low-income older adult residents of affordable housing. Policies to expand internet access as well as training and support to enable use of online services are required to overcome these barriers.


Subject(s)
Cell Phone Use/statistics & numerical data , Communication Barriers , Homes for the Aged , Internet Access/statistics & numerical data , Nursing Homes , Videoconferencing , Aged , COVID-19 , Computer Literacy , Female , Health Services Accessibility , Homes for the Aged/economics , Homes for the Aged/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Internet Use/statistics & numerical data , Male , Nursing Homes/economics , Nursing Homes/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology , Videoconferencing/statistics & numerical data , Videoconferencing/supply & distribution , Vulnerable Populations
3.
Rev Neurol ; 72(9): 307-312, 2021 05 01.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1206625

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION AND AIM: COVID-19 pandemic has disturbed many hospital activities, including medical education. We describe the switch from in-person didactic sessions to videoconferencing in a Neurology department. We analyse the opinions and satisfaction of participants. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Narrative description of the adopted measures; Online survey among participants. RESULTS: One of the three weekly sessions was cancelled, and two switched to videoconferencing. There were more participants online than in the conference hall. 49 users answered the survey, 51% women, mean age 40.5 years (range 25-65). Satisfaction was higher for previous face-to-face meetings (8.68) than for videoconferencing (8.12) (p=0.006). There was a significant inverse correlation between age and satisfaction with virtual sessions (r=-0.37; p=0.01), that was not found for in-person attendance. Most users (75.5%) would prefer to continue with online sessions when the pandemic is over, and 87.8% support inter-hospital remote meetings, but the safety of web platforms is a concern (53.1%). CONCLUSIONS: The change from in-person to virtual sessions is an easy measure to implement in a neurology department, with a good degree of satisfaction among users. There are some unsolved problems with the use of commercial web platforms and inter-hospital connection. Most users recommend leadership and support from educational and health authorities.


TITLE: Cambio de sesiones docentes presenciales a virtuales durante la pandemia de COVID-19 en un servicio de neurología: descripción del proceso y satisfacción de los usuarios.Introducción y objetivo. La pandemia de COVID-19 ha trastornado la actividad hospitalaria, incluyendo la docente. Se describe el cambio de un sistema presencial a otro de sesiones en línea en un servicio de neurología, y se analizan la satisfacción y las opiniones de los usuarios. Material y métodos. Exposición de las medidas adoptadas para pasar a modalidad en línea y análisis de una encuesta entre los participantes. Resultados. Se pasó de tres a dos sesiones semanales, con restricción del público presencial. El público virtual superó al presencial. Contestaron la encuesta 49 participantes, un 51% mujeres, con una media de 40,5 años (rango: 25-65). La satisfacción de los asistentes fue mayor para las sesiones presenciales (8,68) que para las en línea (8,12) (p = 0,006). Existía una correlación inversa significativa entre la edad y la satisfacción con las sesiones en línea (r = ­0,37; p = 0,01) que no se daba para las sesiones presenciales. El 75,5% fue partidario de mantener las sesiones virtuales cuando se eliminaran las restricciones de aforo. Una mayoría (87,8%) apoyó sesiones interhospitalarias y recomienda que las autoridades sanitarias faciliten aplicaciones informáticas seguras (53,1%). Conclusiones. La introducción de sesiones virtuales es una medida fácil de implementar en un servicio de neurología, con un alto grado de satisfacción de los usuarios, aunque menor que con las sesiones presenciales. Existen problemas no resueltos respecto al uso de plataformas comerciales y conexión interhospitalaria. Sería recomendable que las autoridades sanitarias y educativas desarrollaran aplicaciones seguras y fomentaran la educación médica en línea.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Consumer Behavior , Education, Medical, Continuing/methods , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Neurology/education , Pandemics , Videoconferencing , Adult , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Hospital Departments , Hospitals, University , Humans , Internship and Residency , Male , Middle Aged , Neurologists/education , Neurologists/psychology , Patient Handoff , Students, Medical/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Videoconferencing/instrumentation , Videoconferencing/statistics & numerical data
5.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(6): e24141, 2021 Feb 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1101918

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The global neo-coronary pneumonia epidemic has increased the workload of healthcare institutions in various countries and directly affected the physical and psychological recovery of the vast majority of patients requiring hospitalization in China. We anticipate that post-total knee arthroplasty kinesiophobia may have an impact on patients' postoperative pain scores, knee function, and ability to care for themselves in daily life. The purpose of this study is to conduct a micro-video intervention via WeChat to verify the impact of this method on the rapid recovery of patients with kinesiophobia after total knee arthroplasty during neo-coronary pneumonia. METHODS: Using convenience sampling method, 78 patients with kinesiophobia after artificial total knee arthroplasty who met the exclusion criteria were selected and randomly grouped, with the control group receiving routine off-line instruction and the intervention group receiving micro-video intervention, and the changes in the relevant indexes of the two groups of patients at different time points on postoperative day 1, 3 and 7 were recorded and analyzed. RESULTS: There were no statistical differences in the scores of kinesiophobia, pain, knee flexion mobility (ROM) and ability to take care of daily life between the two groups on the first postoperative day (P > .05). On postoperative day 3 and 7, there were statistical differences in Tampa Scale for kinesiophobia, pain, activities of daily living scale score and ROM between the two groups (P < .01), and the first time of getting out of bed between the two groups (P < .05), and by repeated-measures ANOVA, there were statistically significant time points, groups and interaction effects of the outcome indicators between the 2 groups (P < .01), indicating that the intervention group reconstructed the patients' postoperative kinesiophobiaand hyperactivity. The level of pain awareness facilitates the patient's acquisition of the correct functional exercises to make them change their misbehavior. CONCLUSIONS: WeChat micro-video can reduce the fear of movement score and pain score in patients with kinesiophobia after unilateral total knee arthroplasty, shorten the first time out of bed, and improve their joint mobility and daily living ability. ETHICS: This study has passed the ethical review of the hospital where it was conducted and has been filed, Ethics Approval Number: 20181203-01.


Subject(s)
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Phobic Disorders/psychology , Pneumonia/epidemiology , Activities of Daily Living , Aged , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee/adverse effects , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Case-Control Studies , China/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Knee Joint/physiopathology , Knee Joint/surgery , Male , Middle Aged , Pain, Postoperative/diagnosis , Pain, Postoperative/psychology , Pneumonia/virology , Postoperative Period , Prospective Studies , Range of Motion, Articular , Recovery of Function , Rehabilitation/methods , Rehabilitation/psychology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Videoconferencing/instrumentation , Videoconferencing/statistics & numerical data
6.
J Laryngol Otol ; 134(12): 1118-1119, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1042646

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic has led to the birth of videoconference multidisciplinary teams, which are now commonplace. This remote way of deciding care demands a new set of rules to ensure the quality of the complex decisions that are made for the patient group needing multidisciplinary care. Videoconference multidisciplinary teams bring with them novel forms of distraction that are under-appreciated and can impair decision-making. METHOD: A practical checklist was generated as applied to videoconference multidisciplinary teams using the principles of human factors awareness and recognition. RESULTS: Some of the strategies that should be adopted to minimise errors arising from human factors are: information technology support, a suitable environment to dial in, a global checklist employed prior to the videoconference, visible participants, avoiding distractions from other sources (e.g. e-mail, mobile phone), a videoconference sign-out and rapid dissemination of the outcomes sheet. CONCLUSION: This article presents a framework that uses human factors principles applied in this setting, which will contribute to enhanced patient safety, team working and a reduction in medical errors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Videoconferencing/instrumentation , Awareness , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Clinical Decision-Making , Group Processes , Humans , Patient Care Team/statistics & numerical data , Patient Safety , Videoconferencing/statistics & numerical data
7.
JAMA Netw Open ; 3(12): e2031640, 2020 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-995811

ABSTRACT

Importance: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has required a shift in health care delivery platforms, necessitating a new reliance on telemedicine. Objective: To evaluate whether inequities are present in telemedicine use and video visit use for telemedicine visits during the COVID-19 pandemic. Design, Setting, and Participants: In this cohort study, a retrospective medical record review was conducted from March 16 to May 11, 2020, of all patients scheduled for telemedicine visits in primary care and specialty ambulatory clinics at a large academic health system. Age, race/ethnicity, sex, language, median household income, and insurance type were all identified from the electronic medical record. Main Outcomes and Measures: A successfully completed telemedicine visit and video (vs telephone) visit for a telemedicine encounter. Multivariable models were used to assess the association between sociodemographic factors, including sex, race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and language, and the use of telemedicine visits, as well as video use specifically. Results: A total of 148 402 unique patients (86 055 women [58.0%]; mean [SD] age, 56.5 [17.7] years) had scheduled telemedicine visits during the study period; 80 780 patients (54.4%) completed visits. Of 78 539 patients with completed visits in which visit modality was specified, 35 824 (45.6%) were conducted via video, whereas 24 025 (56.9%) had a telephone visit. In multivariable models, older age (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 0.85 [95% CI, 0.83-0.88] for those aged 55-64 years; aOR, 0.75 [95% CI, 0.72-0.78] for those aged 65-74 years; aOR, 0.67 [95% CI, 0.64-0.70] for those aged ≥75 years), Asian race (aOR, 0.69 [95% CI, 0.66-0.73]), non-English language as the patient's preferred language (aOR, 0.84 [95% CI, 0.78-0.90]), and Medicaid insurance (aOR, 0.93 [95% CI, 0.89-0.97]) were independently associated with fewer completed telemedicine visits. Older age (aOR, 0.79 [95% CI, 0.76-0.82] for those aged 55-64 years; aOR, 0.78 [95% CI, 0.74-0.83] for those aged 65-74 years; aOR, 0.49 [95% CI, 0.46-0.53] for those aged ≥75 years), female sex (aOR, 0.92 [95% CI, 0.90-0.95]), Black race (aOR, 0.65 [95% CI, 0.62-0.68]), Latinx ethnicity (aOR, 0.90 [95% CI, 0.83-0.97]), and lower household income (aOR, 0.57 [95% CI, 0.54-0.60] for income <$50 000; aOR, 0.89 [95% CI, 0.85-0.92], for $50 000-$100 000) were associated with less video use for telemedicine visits. These results were similar across medical specialties. Conclusions and Relevance: In this cohort study of patients scheduled for primary care and medical specialty ambulatory telemedicine visits at a large academic health system during the early phase of the COVID-19 pandemic, older patients, Asian patients, and non-English-speaking patients had lower rates of telemedicine use, while older patients, female patients, Black, Latinx, and poorer patients had less video use. Inequities in accessing telemedicine care are present, which warrant further attention.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care/statistics & numerical data , Healthcare Disparities/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Telephone/statistics & numerical data , Videoconferencing/statistics & numerical data , Adult , African Americans , Age Factors , Aged , Asian Americans , COVID-19 , Female , Health Services Accessibility , Healthcare Disparities/ethnology , Humans , Income , Language , Male , Medicaid , Medicare , Middle Aged , Primary Health Care , SARS-CoV-2 , Secondary Care , Sex Factors , Tertiary Healthcare , United States
8.
J Headache Pain ; 21(1): 128, 2020 Oct 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-992434

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The Covid-19 pandemic is causing changes in delivery of medical care worldwide. It is not known how the management of headache patients was affected by the lockdown during the pandemic. The aim of the present study was to investigate how the initial phase of the Covid-19 pandemic affected the hospital management of headache in Denmark and Norway. METHODS: All neurological departments in Denmark (n = 14) and Norway (n = 18) were invited to a questionnaire survey. The study focused on the lockdown and all questions were answered in regard to the period between March 12th and April 15th, 2020. RESULTS: The responder rate was 91% (29/32). Of the neurological departments 86% changed their headache practice during the lockdown. The most common change was a shift to more telephone consultations (86%). Video consultations were offered by 45%. The number of new headache referrals decreased. Only 36% administered botulinum toxin A treatment according to usual schemes. Sixty% reported that fewer patients were admitted for in-hospital emergency diagnostics and treatment. Among departments conducting headache research 57% had to halt ongoing projects. Overall, 54% reported that the standard of care was worse for headache patients during the pandemic. CONCLUSION: Hospital-based headache care and research was impacted in Denmark and Norway during the initial phase of the Covid-19-pandemic.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Delivery of Health Care , Headache Disorders/therapy , Neurology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Betacoronavirus , Botulinum Toxins, Type A/therapeutic use , COVID-19 , Cluster Headache/diagnosis , Cluster Headache/therapy , Denmark , Disease Management , Headache/diagnosis , Headache/therapy , Headache Disorders/diagnosis , Hospital Departments , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Migraine Disorders/diagnosis , Migraine Disorders/therapy , Neuromuscular Agents/therapeutic use , Norway , Outpatient Clinics, Hospital , Referral and Consultation , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telecommunications/statistics & numerical data , Videoconferencing/statistics & numerical data
9.
J Med Internet Res ; 22(11): e22302, 2020 11 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-979836

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: With the global proliferation of the novel COVID-19 disease, conventionally conducting institutional review board (IRB) meetings has become a difficult task. Amid concerns about the suspension of drug development due to delays within IRBs, it has been suggested that IRB meetings should be temporarily conducted via the internet. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to elucidate the current status of IRB meetings conducted through web conference systems. METHODS: A survey on conducting IRB meetings through web conference systems was administered to Japanese national university hospitals. Respondents were in charge of operating IRB offices at different universities. This study was not a randomized controlled trial. RESULTS: The survey was performed at 42 facilities between the end of May and early June, 2020, immediately after the state of emergency was lifted in Japan. The survey yielded a response rate of 74% (31/42). Additionally, while 68% (21/31) of facilities introduced web conference systems for IRB meetings, 13% (4/31) of the surveyed facilities postponed IRB meetings. Therefore, we conducted a further survey of 21 facilities that implemented web conference systems for IRB meetings. According to 71% (15/21) of the respondents, there was no financial burden for implementing these systems, as they were free of charge. In 90% (19/21) of the facilities, IRB meetings through web conference systems were already being conducted with personal electronic devices. Furthermore, in 48% (10/21) of facilities, a web conference system was used in conjunction with face-to-face meetings. CONCLUSIONS: Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the number of reviews in clinical trial core hospitals has decreased. This suggests that the development of pharmaceuticals has stagnated because of COVID-19. According to 71% (15/21) of the respondents who conducted IRB meetings through web conference systems, the cost of introducing such meetings was US $0, showing a negligible financial burden. Moreover, it was shown that online deliberations could be carried out in the same manner as face-to-face meetings, as 86% (18/21) of facilities stated that the number of comments made by board members did not change. To improve the quality of IRB meetings conducted through web conference systems, it is necessary to further examine camera use and the content displayed on members' screens during meetings. Further examination of all members who use web conference systems is required. Our measures for addressing the requests and problems identified in our study could potentially be considered protocols for future IRB meetings, when the COVID-19 pandemic has passed and face-to-face meetings are possible again. This study also highlights the importance of developing web conference systems for IRB meetings to respond to future unforeseen pandemics.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Ethics Committees, Research/statistics & numerical data , Hospitals, University , Internet , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Surveys and Questionnaires , Videoconferencing/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Ethics Committees, Research/organization & administration , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Videoconferencing/organization & administration
10.
J Surg Res ; 260: 300-306, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-922084

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 has mandated rapid adoption of telehealth for surgical care. However, many surgical providers may be unfamiliar with telehealth. This study evaluates the perspectives of surgical providers practicing telehealth care during COVID-19 to help identify targets for surgical telehealth optimization. MATERIALS AND METHODS: At a single tertiary care center with telehealth capabilities, all department of surgery providers (attending surgeons, residents, fellows, and advanced practice providers) were emailed a voluntary survey focused on telehealth during the pandemic. Descriptive statistics and Mann-Whitney U analyses were performed as appropriate on responses. Text responses were thematically coded to identify key concepts. RESULTS: The completion rate was 41.3% (145/351). Providers reported increased telehealth usage relative to the pandemic (P < 0.001). Of respondents, 80% (116/145) had no formal telehealth training. Providers estimated that new patient video visits required less time than traditional visits (P = 0.001). Satisfaction was high for several aspects of video visits. Comparatively lower satisfaction scores were reported for the ability to perform physical exams (sensitive and nonsensitive) and to break bad news. The largest barriers to effective video visits were limited physical exams (55.6%; 45/81) and lack of provider or patient internet access/equipment/connection (34.6%; 28/81). Other barriers included ineffective communication and difficulty with fostering rapport. Concerns regarding video-to-telephone visit conversion were loss of physical exam/visual cues (34.3%; 24/70), less personal interactions (18.6%; 13/70), and reduced efficiency (18.6%; 13/70). CONCLUSIONS: Telehealth remains a new experience for surgical providers despite its expansion. Optimization strategies should target technology barriers and include specialized virtual exam and communication training.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Surgeons/statistics & numerical data , Surgery Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Videoconferencing/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Communication , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personal Satisfaction , Physical Distancing , Physician-Patient Relations , Quality Improvement , Surgeons/psychology , Surgery Department, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Surgery Department, Hospital/trends , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/trends , Tertiary Care Centers/organization & administration , Tertiary Care Centers/statistics & numerical data , Tertiary Care Centers/trends , Videoconferencing/statistics & numerical data , Videoconferencing/trends
12.
Rheumatology (Oxford) ; 60(1): 392-398, 2021 01 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-817446

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To identify the changes in rheumatology service delivery across the five regions of Africa from the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: The COVID-19 African Rheumatology Study Group created an online survey consisting of 40 questions relating to the current practices and experiences of rheumatologists across Africa. The CHERRIES checklist for reporting results of internet e-surveys was adhered to. RESULTS: A total of 554 completed responses were received from 20 countries, which include six in Northern Africa, six in West Africa, four in Southern Africa, three in East Africa and one in Central Africa. Consultant grade rheumatologists constituted 436 (78.7%) of respondents with a mean of 14.5 ± 10.3 years of experience. A total of 77 (13.9%) rheumatologists avoided starting a new biologic. Face-to-face clinics with the use of some personal protective equipment continued to be held in only 293 (52.9%) rheumatologists' practices. Teleconsultation modalities found usage as follows: telephone in 335 (60.5%), WhatsApp in 241 (43.5%), emails in 90 (16.3%) and video calls in 53 (9.6%). Physical examinations were mostly reduced in 295 (53.3%) or done with personal protective equipment in 128 (23.1%) practices. Only 316 (57.0%) reported that the national rheumatology society in their country had produced any recommendation around COVID-19 while only 73 (13.2%) confirmed the availability of a national rheumatology COVID-19 registry in their country. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 has shifted daily rheumatology practices across Africa to more virtual consultations and regional disparities are more apparent in the availability of local protocols and registries.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/statistics & numerical data , Rheumatologists , Adult , Africa , Antirheumatic Agents/therapeutic use , Biological Products/therapeutic use , Delivery of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Electronic Mail/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Mobile Applications/statistics & numerical data , Personal Protective Equipment , Physical Examination/methods , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Registries/statistics & numerical data , Rheumatic Diseases/therapy , Rheumatology , SARS-CoV-2 , Societies, Medical , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Telephone/statistics & numerical data , Videoconferencing/statistics & numerical data
14.
Trends Microbiol ; 28(12): 949-952, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-779694

ABSTRACT

Virtual conferences can offer significant benefits but require considerable planning and creativity to be successful. Here we describe the successes and failures of a hybrid in-person/virtual conference model. The COVID-19 epidemic presents the scientific community with an opportunity to pioneer novel models that effectively engage virtual participants to advance conference goals.


Subject(s)
Videoconferencing/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 , Congresses as Topic , Cooperative Behavior , Internet , Models, Theoretical , Social Media
15.
J Med Internet Res ; 22(7): e19322, 2020 07 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-668090

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The emergence of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic in March 2020 created unprecedented challenges in the provision of scheduled ambulatory cancer care. As a result, there has been a renewed focus on video-based telehealth consultations as a means to continue ambulatory care. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to analyze the change in video visit volume at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) Comprehensive Cancer Center in response to COVID-19 and compare patient demographics and appointment data from January 1, 2020, and in the 11 weeks after the transition to video visits. METHODS: Patient demographics and appointment data (dates, visit types, and departments) were extracted from the electronic health record reporting database. Video visits were performed using a HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act)-compliant video conferencing platform with a pre-existing workflow. RESULTS: In 17 departments and divisions at the UCSF Cancer Center, 2284 video visits were performed in the 11 weeks before COVID-19 changes were implemented (mean 208, SD 75 per week) and 12,946 video visits were performed in the 11-week post-COVID-19 period (mean 1177, SD 120 per week). The proportion of video visits increased from 7%-18% to 54%-72%, between the pre- and post-COVID-19 periods without any disparity based on race/ethnicity, primary language, or payor. CONCLUSIONS: In a remarkably brief period of time, we rapidly scaled the utilization of telehealth in response to COVID-19 and maintained access to complex oncologic care at a time of social distancing.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care/statistics & numerical data , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Neoplasms/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Videoconferencing/statistics & numerical data , Aged , Ambulatory Care Facilities/statistics & numerical data , Appointments and Schedules , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Electronic Health Records , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Referral and Consultation/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , San Francisco
17.
Neurology ; 95(7): 305-311, 2020 08 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-621584

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) pandemic has rapidly moved telemedicine from discretionary to necessary. Here, we describe how the Stanford Neurology Department (1) rapidly adapted to the COVID-19 pandemic, resulting in over 1,000 video visits within 4 weeks, and (2) accelerated an existing quality improvement plan of a tiered roll out of video visits for ambulatory neurology to a full-scale roll out. Key issues we encountered and addressed were related to equipment/software, provider engagement, workflow/triage, and training. On reflection, the key drivers of our success were provider engagement and dedicated support from a physician champion, who plays a critical role understanding stakeholder needs. Before COVID-19, physician interest in telemedicine was mixed. However, in response to county and state stay-at-home orders related to COVID-19, physician engagement changed completely; all providers wanted to convert a majority of visits to video visits as quickly as possible. Rapid deployment of neurology video visits across all its subspecialties is feasible. Our experience and lessons learned can facilitate broader utilization, acceptance, and normalization of video visits for neurology patients in the present as well as the much anticipated postpandemic era.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Neurology/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Telemedicine/methods , Videoconferencing/statistics & numerical data , Ambulatory Care Facilities/statistics & numerical data , Attitude of Health Personnel , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics , Program Development/methods , SARS-CoV-2
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