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3.
Circ Heart Fail ; 14(10): e008573, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1443687

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: An unprecedented shift to remote heart failure outpatient care occurred during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Given challenges inherent to remote care, we studied whether remote visits (video or telephone) were associated with different patient usage, clinician practice patterns, and outcomes. METHODS: We included all ambulatory cardiology visits for heart failure at a multisite health system from April 1, 2019, to December 31, 2019 (pre-COVID) or April 1, 2020, to December 31, 2020 (COVID era), resulting in 10 591 pre-COVID in-person, 7775 COVID-era in-person, 1009 COVID-era video, and 2322 COVID-era telephone visits. We used multivariable logistic and Cox proportional hazards regressions with propensity weighting and patient clustering to study ordering practices and outcomes. RESULTS: Compared with in-person visits, video visits were used more often by younger (mean 64.7 years [SD 14.5] versus 74.2 [14.1]), male (68.3% versus 61.4%), and privately insured (45.9% versus 28.9%) individuals (P<0.05 for all). Remote visits were more frequently used by non-White patients (35.8% video, 37.0% telephone versus 33.2% in-person). During remote visits, clinicians were less likely to order diagnostic testing (odds ratio, 0.20 [0.18-0.22] video versus in-person, 0.18 [0.17-0.19] telephone versus in-person) or prescribe ß-blockers (0.82 [0.68-0.99], 0.35 [0.26-0.47]), mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (0.69 [0.50-0.96], 0.48 [0.35-0.66]), or loop diuretics (0.67 [0.53-0.85], 0.45 [0.37-0.55]). During telephone visits, clinicians were less likely to prescribe ACE (angiotensin-converting enzyme) inhibitor/ARB (angiotensin receptor blockers)/ARNIs (angiotensin receptor-neprilysin inhibitors; 0.54 [0.40-0.72]). Telephone visits but not video visits were associated with higher rates of 90-day mortality (1.82 [1.14-2.90]) and nonsignificant trends towards higher rates of 90-day heart failure emergency department visits (1.34 [0.97-1.86]) and hospitalizations (1.36 [0.98-1.89]). CONCLUSIONS: Remote visits for heart failure care were associated with reduced diagnostic testing and guideline-directed medical therapy prescription. Telephone but not video visits were associated with increased 90-day mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiologists/trends , Heart Failure/therapy , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , Telemedicine/trends , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Diagnostic Techniques and Procedures/trends , Drug Prescriptions , Drug Utilization/trends , Emergency Service, Hospital/trends , Female , Guideline Adherence/trends , Heart Failure/diagnosis , Heart Failure/mortality , Heart Failure/physiopathology , Hospitalization/trends , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Telephone/trends , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome , Videoconferencing/trends
4.
J Genet Couns ; 30(4): 1038-1045, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1320073

ABSTRACT

Overnight, as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, telehealth rapidly transitioned from limited application to widespread implementation. The field of genetic counseling was well positioned to make this transition to virtual care since there is generally less of a need for patients to be seen in-person for physical exams or urgent care. Going forward, virtual visits will presumably become a mainstay in the provision of genetic services and it is anticipated that clinics will adopt "hybrid" models with both in-person and virtual visit options. This commentary highlights the successes and challenges in the rapid implementation of virtual visits, focusing on who has benefited versus who has been challenged or left behind. We also discuss genetic testing considerations, including the additional steps required for patients and clinicians when testing is ordered outside of the clinical setting, which can result in delays or a lack of testing altogether. Future research considerations are presented to address the needs among the most vulnerable and help ensure equitable access and benefit.


Subject(s)
Genetic Counseling/trends , Telemedicine/trends , Videoconferencing/trends , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics
5.
J Surg Oncol ; 124(2): 174-180, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1303279

ABSTRACT

Electronic resources have changed surgical education in the 21st century. Resources spanning from digital textbooks to multiple choice question banks, online society meetings, and social media can facilitate surgical education. The COVID pandemic drastically changed the paradigm for education. The ramifications of Zoom lectures and online surgical society meetings will last into the future. Educators and learners can be empowered by the many available electronic resources to enhance surgical training and education.


Subject(s)
Education, Distance/trends , Education, Medical, Graduate/trends , General Surgery/education , Internet/trends , Audiovisual Aids , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Congresses as Topic/trends , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , General Surgery/trends , Humans , Models, Educational , Social Media/trends , Societies, Medical/trends , United States/epidemiology , Videoconferencing/trends
6.
Parkinsonism Relat Disord ; 86: 97-100, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1174447

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Traditionally, medical care and research in Parkinson's disease (PD) have been conducted with in-person encounters. The recent COVID-19 pandemic has profoundly impacted the delivery of in-person clinical care and clinical research. We conducted an online survey of active clinician members of the Parkinson Study Group (PSG) to evaluate the adoption of various non-face-to-face methods in clinical practice and research in PD during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: We conducted a survey using the open-access online SurveyMonkey tool (http://www.surveymonkey.com). The survey had 27 items and was designed to elucidate clinical/research care before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. The survey was sent to 414 active PSG members with weekly reminders and it remained accessible for 30 days from May 2020. RESULTS: We received 142 responses, of which 133 (93.7%) provided demographic data. The clinical use of virtual visits via synchronous video conferencing increased from 39.5% pre-COVID-19 to 94.6% during the COVID-19 pandemic. Lack of access for patients (68.2%) and patient resistance (51.4%) were the top barriers for its use. Approximately 70% respondents stated that 75-100% of their research activities were suspended during the COVID-19 pandemic. Many sites had to fill out protocol deviations (38.2%), protocol exceptions (25.5%) or change their research profile due to layoffs (16.8%). The overall use of video conferencing increased from 30.3% to 64.1%. CONCLUSION: The current results suggest a need for flexibility in conducting office visits and clinical trials in PD patients. Technology has the potential to enhance patient care and convenience, when in-person visits can be challenging.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Parkinson Disease/therapy , Telemedicine/trends , Adult , Clinical Protocols , Clinical Trials as Topic , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Office Visits , Patient Satisfaction , Research , Surveys and Questionnaires , User-Computer Interface , Videoconferencing/trends
8.
World Neurosurg ; 150: e445-e465, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1135597

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To replace educational opportunities lost during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, the Department of Neurosurgery at Lenox Hill Hospital produced an open-access webinar series ("BRAINterns") that covered a broad range of health care topics with a focus on neurosurgery. METHODS: This 8-week webinar series ran from July 1 to August 28, 2020. An optional exit survey was distributed to participants. Data were analyzed to characterize and better understand trends among a global cohort of participants. RESULTS: A total of 16,484 people registered for BRAINterns, and 6675 took the survey (40.5% response rate). Responders represented 87 countries, of which the majority were from the United States and Canada (90.48%, n = 6039). Responders were primarily female (82.9%, n = 5521). Racial and ethnic representation was majority Asian (42%, n = 2798), followed by White (22.7%, n = 1514), Hispanic/Latino (16.2%, n = 1080), and Black and African American (7.7%, n = 516). Participants reported hearing about BRAINterns through various social media platforms (72.18%, n = 4818)-the most popular was TikTok (33.4%, n = 2232). Overall, 93.4% of participants reported that the course was a good use of their time during the pandemic, and 86.7% reported that the course helped replace lost opportunities. CONCLUSIONS: These data demonstrate that webinar-based education is an effective method of expanding access to careers in medicine and in particular, neurosurgery, to traditionally underrepresented populations. Social media can be a powerful tool to combat barriers to early exposure and vastly improve diversity within the field.


Subject(s)
Internship and Residency/trends , Neurosurgery/education , Social Media , Videoconferencing/trends , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19 , Career Choice , Child , Cultural Diversity , Curriculum , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
10.
Australas Psychiatry ; 29(2): 194-199, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1099852

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The Australian federal government introduced new COVID-19 psychiatrist Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS) telehealth items to assist with providing private specialist care. We investigate private psychiatrists' uptake of video and telephone telehealth, as well as total (telehealth and face-to-face) consultations for Quarter 3 (July-September), 2020. We compare these to the same quarter in 2019. METHOD: MBS-item service data were extracted for COVID-19-psychiatrist video and telephone telehealth item numbers and compared with Quarter 3 (July-September), 2019, of face-to-face consultations for the whole of Australia. RESULTS: The number of psychiatry consultations (telehealth and face-to-face) rose during the first wave of the pandemic in Quarter 3, 2020, by 14% compared to Quarter 3, 2019, with telehealth 43% of this total. Face-to-face consultations in Quarter 3, 2020 were only 64% of the comparative number of Quarter 3, 2019 consultations. Most telehealth involved short telephone consultations of ⩽15-30 min. Video consultations comprised 42% of total telehealth provision: these were for new patient assessments and longer consultations. These figures represent increased face-to-face consultation compared to Quarter 2, 2020, with substantial maintenance of telehealth consultations. CONCLUSIONS: Private psychiatrists continued using the new COVID-19 MBS telehealth items for Quarter 3, 2020 to increase the number of patient care contacts in the context of decreased face-to-face consultations compared to 2019, but increased face-to-face consultations compared to Quarter 2, 2020.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Mental Disorders/therapy , Mental Health Services/trends , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , Private Practice/trends , Psychiatry/trends , Telemedicine/trends , Ambulatory Care/methods , Ambulatory Care/organization & administration , Ambulatory Care/trends , Australia , COVID-19/epidemiology , Facilities and Services Utilization/trends , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Health Services Accessibility/trends , Humans , Mental Health Services/organization & administration , National Health Programs , Pandemics , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/organization & administration , Private Practice/organization & administration , Psychiatry/organization & administration , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Telephone/trends , Videoconferencing/trends
12.
Br Med Bull ; 135(1): 16-22, 2020 10 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1059990

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: During the UK Covid-19 lockdown, video consultations (telemedicine) were encouraged. The extent of usage, and to which concerns to earlier implementation were set aside, is unknown; this is worthy of exploration as data becomes available. SOURCES OF DATA: Sources of data are as follows: published case studies, editorials, news articles and government guidance. AREAS OF AGREEMENT: Video can be clinically effective, especially where patients cannot attend due to illness or infection risk. Patients are positive, and they can benefit from savings in time and money. Adoption of telemedicine is hindered by a range of known barriers including clinician resistance due to technological problems, disrupted routines, increased workload, decreased work satisfaction and organizational readiness. AREAS OF CONTROVERSY: Despite policy impetus and successful pilots, telemedicine has not been adopted at scale. GROWING POINTS: Increased use of telemedicine during the Covid-19 crisis presents opportunities to obtain robust evidence of issues and create service transformation effectively. AREAS TIMELY FOR DEVELOPING RESEARCH: Examination of telemedicine use during the Covid-19 crisis to ensure that the benefits and usage continue into the post-lockdown, 'new normal' world.


Subject(s)
Communicable Disease Control/methods , Coronavirus Infections , Delivery of Health Care/trends , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Remote Consultation , Attitude of Health Personnel , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Forecasting , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Remote Consultation/methods , Remote Consultation/trends , SARS-CoV-2 , United Kingdom , Videoconferencing/trends
13.
J Surg Res ; 260: 300-306, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-922084

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 has mandated rapid adoption of telehealth for surgical care. However, many surgical providers may be unfamiliar with telehealth. This study evaluates the perspectives of surgical providers practicing telehealth care during COVID-19 to help identify targets for surgical telehealth optimization. MATERIALS AND METHODS: At a single tertiary care center with telehealth capabilities, all department of surgery providers (attending surgeons, residents, fellows, and advanced practice providers) were emailed a voluntary survey focused on telehealth during the pandemic. Descriptive statistics and Mann-Whitney U analyses were performed as appropriate on responses. Text responses were thematically coded to identify key concepts. RESULTS: The completion rate was 41.3% (145/351). Providers reported increased telehealth usage relative to the pandemic (P < 0.001). Of respondents, 80% (116/145) had no formal telehealth training. Providers estimated that new patient video visits required less time than traditional visits (P = 0.001). Satisfaction was high for several aspects of video visits. Comparatively lower satisfaction scores were reported for the ability to perform physical exams (sensitive and nonsensitive) and to break bad news. The largest barriers to effective video visits were limited physical exams (55.6%; 45/81) and lack of provider or patient internet access/equipment/connection (34.6%; 28/81). Other barriers included ineffective communication and difficulty with fostering rapport. Concerns regarding video-to-telephone visit conversion were loss of physical exam/visual cues (34.3%; 24/70), less personal interactions (18.6%; 13/70), and reduced efficiency (18.6%; 13/70). CONCLUSIONS: Telehealth remains a new experience for surgical providers despite its expansion. Optimization strategies should target technology barriers and include specialized virtual exam and communication training.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Surgeons/statistics & numerical data , Surgery Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Videoconferencing/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Communication , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personal Satisfaction , Physical Distancing , Physician-Patient Relations , Quality Improvement , Surgeons/psychology , Surgery Department, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Surgery Department, Hospital/trends , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/trends , Tertiary Care Centers/organization & administration , Tertiary Care Centers/statistics & numerical data , Tertiary Care Centers/trends , Videoconferencing/statistics & numerical data , Videoconferencing/trends
14.
West J Emerg Med ; 21(5): 1105-1113, 2020 Aug 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-793145

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has had a significant impact on undergraduate medical education with limitation of patient care activities and disruption to medical licensing examinations. In an effort to promote both safety and equity, the emergency medicine (EM) community has recommended no away rotations for EM applicants and entirely virtual interviews during this year's residency application cycle. These changes affect the components of the EM residency application most highly regarded by program directors - Standardized Letters of Evaluation from EM rotations, board scores, and interactions during the interview. The Council of Residency Directors in Emergency Medicine Application Process Improvement Committee suggests solutions not only for the upcoming year but also to address longstanding difficulties within the process, encouraging residency programs to leverage these challenges as an opportunity for disruptive innovation.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Emergency Medicine/education , Internship and Residency/methods , Organizational Innovation , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , School Admission Criteria/trends , COVID-19 , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , United States , Videoconferencing/organization & administration , Videoconferencing/trends
16.
Radiographics ; 40(5): 1309-1317, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-737819

ABSTRACT

The recent shutting down of in-person events owing to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has elevated the popularity of web-based conferencing. This development provides an opportunity for educators to test their teaching skills on what, for many, is a new platform. Many of the basic elements of what constitutes an effective presentation are the same regardless of whether they are delivered in person or online. However, there are advantages and disadvantages of each mode of presentation, and understanding how to best leverage the features of an online platform will lead to a better educational experience for the presenter and audience. The effectiveness of any presentation is dependent on the ability of the speaker to communicate with the audience. This is accomplished by including as much audience participation as possible. Many of the techniques used to encourage audience participation in person can be adapted for use in online presentations (eg, the use of features such as chat, hand raising, polling, and question-and-answer sessions). In any type of presentation, both the quality of the content and the oral delivery are important. The author reviews the common elements of an effective presentation and how they can be optimized for online platforms. ©RSNA, 2020.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Internet , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Radiology/methods , Videoconferencing , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Data Display , Guidelines as Topic , Humans , Marketing , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Radiology/trends , SARS-CoV-2 , Speech , Videoconferencing/organization & administration , Videoconferencing/trends
17.
J Surg Educ ; 78(1): 99-103, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-703140

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The COVID-19 pandemic significantly altered medical student education. The ability for students to be a part of the operating room team was highly restricted. Technology can be used to ensure ongoing surgical education during this time of limited in-person educational opportunities. DESIGN: We have developed an innovative solution of securely live-streaming surgery with real-time communication between the surgeon and students to allow for ongoing education during the pandemic. RESULTS: We successfully live-streamed multiple different types of neurosurgical operations utilizing multiple video sources. This method uses inexpensive, universal equipment that can be implemented at any institution to enable virtual education of medical students and other learners. CONCLUSIONS: This technology has facilitated education during this challenging time. This technological set-up for live-streaming surgery has the potential of improving medical and graduate medical education in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical/trends , Educational Technology/trends , Neurosurgery/education , Videoconferencing/trends , Humans , Models, Educational , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
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