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1.
Int J Mol Med ; 49(2)2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1594678

ABSTRACT

The pathophysiology of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID­19) is mainly dependent on the underlying mechanisms that mediate the entry of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS­CoV­2) into the host cells of the various human tissues/organs. Recent studies have indicated a higher order of complexity of the mechanisms of infectivity, given that there is a wide­repertoire of possible cell entry mediators that appear to co­localise in a cell­ and tissue­specific manner. The present study provides an overview of the 'canonical' SARS­CoV­2 mediators, namely angiotensin converting enzyme 2, transmembrane protease serine 2 and 4, and neuropilin­1, expanding on the involvement of novel candidates, including glucose­regulated protein 78, basigin, kidney injury molecule­1, metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 2, ADAM metallopeptidase domain 17 (also termed tumour necrosis factor­α convertase) and Toll­like receptor 4. Furthermore, emerging data indicate that changes in microRNA (miRNA/miR) expression levels in patients with COVID­19 are suggestive of further complexity in the regulation of these viral mediators. An in silico analysis revealed 160 candidate miRNAs with potential strong binding capacity in the aforementioned genes. Future studies should concentrate on elucidating the association between the cellular tropism of the SARS­CoV­2 cell entry mediators and the mechanisms through which they might affect the clinical outcome. Finally, the clinical utility as a biomarker or therapeutic target of miRNAs in the context of COVID­19 warrants further investigation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , MicroRNAs/metabolism , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Virus Internalization , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/virology , /metabolism , Gene Expression Regulation , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Membrane Proteins/genetics , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , MicroRNAs/genetics , Neuropilin-1/genetics , Neuropilin-1/metabolism , Receptors, Virus/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Toll-Like Receptor 4/genetics , Toll-Like Receptor 4/metabolism , Viral Tropism
3.
Biochem J ; 478(19): 3671-3684, 2021 10 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1557441

ABSTRACT

COVID-19, the clinical syndrome caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus, has rapidly spread globally causing hundreds of millions of infections and over two million deaths. The potential animal reservoirs for SARS-CoV-2 are currently unknown, however sequence analysis has provided plausible potential candidate species. SARS-CoV-2 binds to the angiotensin I converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) to enable its entry into host cells and establish infection. We analyzed the binding surface of ACE2 from several important animal species to begin to understand the parameters for the ACE2 recognition by the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein receptor binding domain (RBD). We employed Shannon entropy analysis to determine the variability of ACE2 across its sequence and particularly in its RBD interacting region, and assessed differences between various species' ACE2 and human ACE2. Recombinant ACE2 from human, hamster, horseshoe bat, cat, ferret, and cow were evaluated for RBD binding. A gradient of binding affinities were seen where human and hamster ACE2 were similarly in the low nanomolar range, followed by cat and cow. Surprisingly, horseshoe bat (Rhinolophus sinicus) and ferret (Mustela putorius) ACE2s had poor binding activity compared with the other species' ACE2. The residue differences and binding properties between the species' variants provide a framework for understanding ACE2-RBD binding and virus tropism.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/metabolism , Cats , Dogs , Humans , Mice , Protein Binding , Protein Domains , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Species Specificity , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Viral Tropism
4.
Curr Pain Headache Rep ; 25(11): 73, 2021 Nov 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1527506

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Headache is a common symptom of COVID-19 with emerging literature being published on the subject. Although it may seem unspecific, scientific evidence has allowed a better definition of this headache type, revealing relevant associations with other COVID-19 symptoms and prognoses. We therefore sought to highlight the most remarkable findings concerning headache secondary to COVID-19, specifically focusing on epidemiology, characteristics, pathophysiology, and treatments. RECENT FINDINGS: The real prevalence of headache as a symptom of COVID-19 is still unclear ranging from 10 to 70%. Headache mainly has a tension-type-like phenotype, although 25% of individuals present with migraine-like features that also occur in patients without personal migraine history. This finding suggests that a likely pathophysiological mechanism is the activation of the trigeminovascular system. SARS-CoV-2 neurotropism can occur by trans-synaptic invasion through the olfactory route from the nasal cavity, leading to anosmia which has been associated with headache. SARS-CoV-2 protein has been found not only in olfactory mucosa and bulbs but also in trigeminal branches and the trigeminal ganglion, supporting this hypothesis. However, other mechanisms such as brain vessels inflammation due to SARS-CoV-2 damage to the endothelium or systemic inflammation in the context of cytokine storm cannot be ruled out. Interestingly, headache has been associated with lower COVID-19 mortality. No specific treatment for COVID-19 headache is available at present. Studies show that investigating COVID-19 headache represents an opportunity not only to better understand COVID-19 in general but also to advance in the knowledge of both secondary and primary headaches. Future research is therefore warranted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Headache/epidemiology , Anosmia/physiopathology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/physiopathology , Endothelium, Vascular , Headache/etiology , Headache/physiopathology , Headache/therapy , Humans , Inflammation , Migraine Disorders/physiopathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Tension-Type Headache/physiopathology , Trigeminal Ganglion/physiopathology , Trigeminal Ganglion/virology , Trigeminal Nerve/physiopathology , Trigeminal Nerve/virology , Viral Tropism
5.
Nat Med ; 27(9): 1600-1606, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526089

ABSTRACT

Clinical evidence suggests the central nervous system is frequently impacted by SARS-CoV-2 infection, either directly or indirectly, although the mechanisms are unclear. Pericytes are perivascular cells within the brain that are proposed as SARS-CoV-2 infection points. Here we show that pericyte-like cells (PLCs), when integrated into a cortical organoid, are capable of infection with authentic SARS-CoV-2. Before infection, PLCs elicited astrocytic maturation and production of basement membrane components, features attributed to pericyte functions in vivo. While traditional cortical organoids showed little evidence of infection, PLCs within cortical organoids served as viral 'replication hubs', with virus spreading to astrocytes and mediating inflammatory type I interferon transcriptional responses. Therefore, PLC-containing cortical organoids (PCCOs) represent a new 'assembloid' model that supports astrocytic maturation as well as SARS-CoV-2 entry and replication in neural tissue; thus, PCCOs serve as an experimental model for neural infection.


Subject(s)
Astrocytes/virology , Brain/virology , COVID-19/pathology , Pericytes/virology , Viral Tropism/physiology , Astrocytes/cytology , Brain/pathology , Cell Differentiation/physiology , Cells, Cultured , Humans , Interferon Type I/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , Virus Replication/physiology
6.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 5809, 2021 10 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1450282

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 has caused a global pandemic of COVID-19 since its emergence in December 2019. The infection causes a severe acute respiratory syndrome and may also spread to central nervous system leading to neurological sequelae. We have developed and characterized two new organotypic cultures from hamster brainstem and lung tissues that offer a unique opportunity to study the early steps of viral infection and screening antivirals. These models are not dedicated to investigate how the virus reaches the brain. However, they allow validating the early tropism of the virus in the lungs and demonstrating that SARS-CoV-2 could infect the brainstem and the cerebellum, mainly by targeting granular neurons. Viral infection induces specific interferon and innate immune responses with patterns specific to each organ, along with cell death by apoptosis, necroptosis, and pyroptosis. Overall, our data illustrate the potential of rapid modeling of complex tissue-level interactions during infection by a newly emerged virus.


Subject(s)
Brain Stem/virology , Lung/virology , Models, Biological , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine Monophosphate/pharmacology , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/pharmacology , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/virology , Animals , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Brain Stem/cytology , Brain Stem/immunology , Brain Stem/pathology , Cricetinae , Immunity, Innate , Inflammation , Lung/cytology , Lung/immunology , Lung/pathology , Neurons/virology , Organ Culture Techniques , Regulated Cell Death , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Viral Tropism
7.
Viruses ; 13(10)2021 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1444334

ABSTRACT

Coronaviruses (CoVs) are a group of enveloped positive-sense RNA viruses and can cause deadly diseases in animals and humans. Cell entry is the first and essential step of successful virus infection and can be divided into two ongoing steps: cell binding and membrane fusion. Over the past two decades, stimulated by the global outbreak of SARS-CoV and pandemic of SARS-CoV-2, numerous efforts have been made in the CoV research. As a result, significant progress has been achieved in our understanding of the cell entry process. Here, we review the current knowledge of this essential process, including the viral and host components involved in cell binding and membrane fusion, molecular mechanisms of their interactions, and the sites of virus entry. We highlight the recent findings of host restriction factors that inhibit CoVs entry. This knowledge not only enhances our understanding of the cell entry process, pathogenesis, tissue tropism, host range, and interspecies-transmission of CoVs but also provides a theoretical basis to design effective preventive and therapeutic strategies to control CoVs infection.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Coronavirus/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Virus Attachment , Virus Internalization , Animals , Cats/virology , Cattle/virology , Chickens/virology , Coronavirus/genetics , Dogs/virology , Livestock/virology , Membrane Fusion/physiology , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Swine/virology , Viral Tropism/physiology
8.
Biochem J ; 478(19): 3671-3684, 2021 10 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1437701

ABSTRACT

COVID-19, the clinical syndrome caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus, has rapidly spread globally causing hundreds of millions of infections and over two million deaths. The potential animal reservoirs for SARS-CoV-2 are currently unknown, however sequence analysis has provided plausible potential candidate species. SARS-CoV-2 binds to the angiotensin I converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) to enable its entry into host cells and establish infection. We analyzed the binding surface of ACE2 from several important animal species to begin to understand the parameters for the ACE2 recognition by the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein receptor binding domain (RBD). We employed Shannon entropy analysis to determine the variability of ACE2 across its sequence and particularly in its RBD interacting region, and assessed differences between various species' ACE2 and human ACE2. Recombinant ACE2 from human, hamster, horseshoe bat, cat, ferret, and cow were evaluated for RBD binding. A gradient of binding affinities were seen where human and hamster ACE2 were similarly in the low nanomolar range, followed by cat and cow. Surprisingly, horseshoe bat (Rhinolophus sinicus) and ferret (Mustela putorius) ACE2s had poor binding activity compared with the other species' ACE2. The residue differences and binding properties between the species' variants provide a framework for understanding ACE2-RBD binding and virus tropism.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/metabolism , Cats , Dogs , Humans , Mice , Protein Binding , Protein Domains , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Species Specificity , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Viral Tropism
9.
Int J Legal Med ; 135(6): 2347-2349, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1391863

ABSTRACT

Due to the development of novel functionalities, distinct SARS-CoV-2 variants such as B.1.1.7 fuel the current pandemic. B.1.1.7 is not only more transmissible, but may also cause an increased mortality compared to previous SARS-CoV-2 variants. Human tissue analysis of the SARS-CoV-2 lineage B.1.1.7 is urgently needed, and we here present autopsy data from 7 consecutive SARS-CoV-2 B.1.1.7 cases. The initial RT-qPCR analyses from nasopharyngeal swabs taken post mortem included typing assays for B.1.1.7. We quantitated SARS-CoV-2 B.1.1.7 viral load in autopsy tissue of multiple organs. Highest levels of SARS-CoV-2 B.1.1.7 copies normalized to ß-globin were detected in the respiratory system (lung and pharynx), followed by the liver and heart. Importantly, SARS-CoV-2 lineage B.1.1.7 was found in 100% of cases in the lungs and in 85.7% in pharynx tissue. Detection also in the kidney and brain highlighting a pronounced organ tropism. Comparison of the given results to a former cohort of SARS-CoV-2 deaths during the first wave in spring 2020 showed resembling organ tropism. Our results indicate that also SARS-CoV-2 B.1.1.7 has a relevant organ tropism beyond the respiratory tract. We speculate that B.1.1.7 spike protein's affinity to human ACE2 facilitates transmission, organ tropism, and ultimately morbidity and mortality. Further studies and larger cohorts are obligatory to proof this link.


Subject(s)
SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Viral Load , Viral Tropism , Aged , Autopsy , Female , Heart/virology , Humans , Kidney/virology , Liver/virology , Lung/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Pharynx/virology
11.
Med Hypotheses ; 144: 109976, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1386300

ABSTRACT

Several attempts to control the dreadfulness of SARS-CoV-2 are still underway. Based on the literature evidences we have speculated a prospective contemporary remedy, which was categorized into Specificity, Remedy, and a Conveyor. In which, pros and cons were discussed and inferred the possible alternatives. (a) Specificity: Implicit to express the ACE2 receptors in conveyor cells to deceive SARS-CoV-2 frompreponetargets. (b) Remedy: As depletion of pulmonary surfactants causes strong acute respiratory distress syndrome, we propose an entity of a cost-effective artificialsurfactantsystem as a remedy to pulmonary complications. (c) Conveyor: We propose red blood cells (RBCs) as a conveyor with embedded artificial surfactant and protruding ACE2 receptors for the target-specific delivery. Overall we postulate focused insights by employing a combinational contemporary strategy to steer towards a prospective direction on combating SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/therapeutic use , COVID-19/virology , Erythrocytes , Pulmonary Surfactants/therapeutic use , Receptors, Virus/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Viral Tropism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/administration & dosage , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/prevention & control , Drug Costs , Drug Delivery Systems , Humans , Pulmonary Alveoli/drug effects , Pulmonary Alveoli/virology , Pulmonary Surfactants/administration & dosage , Pulmonary Surfactants/chemical synthesis , Pulmonary Surfactants/economics , Receptors, Virus/administration & dosage , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/prevention & control
14.
PLoS Genet ; 16(12): e1009272, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1388879

ABSTRACT

The Betacoronaviruses comprise multiple subgenera whose members have been implicated in human disease. As with SARS, MERS and now SARS-CoV-2, the origin and emergence of new variants are often attributed to events of recombination that alter host tropism or disease severity. In most cases, recombination has been detected by searches for excessively similar genomic regions in divergent strains; however, such analyses are complicated by the high mutation rates of RNA viruses, which can produce sequence similarities in distant strains by convergent mutations. By applying a genome-wide approach that examines the source of individual polymorphisms and that can be tested against null models in which recombination is absent and homoplasies can arise only by convergent mutations, we examine the extent and limits of recombination in Betacoronaviruses. We find that recombination accounts for nearly 40% of the polymorphisms circulating in populations and that gene exchange occurs almost exclusively among strains belonging to the same subgenus. Although experimental studies have shown that recombinational exchanges occur at random along the coronaviral genome, in nature, they are vastly overrepresented in regions controlling viral interaction with host cells.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/classification , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Recombination, Genetic/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Crossing Over, Genetic/genetics , Genes, Viral/genetics , Genome, Viral/genetics , Host Specificity/genetics , Models, Genetic , Polymorphism, Genetic , SARS-CoV-2/classification , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Viral Tropism/genetics
15.
Neuropharmacology ; 198: 108766, 2021 10 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1376075

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19) pandemic intensified the already catastrophic drug overdose and substance use disorder (SUD) epidemic, signaling a syndemic as social isolation, economic and mental health distress, and disrupted treatment services disproportionally impacted this vulnerable population. Along with these social and societal factors, biological factors triggered by intense stress intertwined with incumbent overactivity of the immune system and the resulting inflammatory outcomes may impact the functional status of the central nervous system (CNS). We review the literature concerning SARS-CoV2 infiltration and infection in the CNS and the prospects of synergy between stress, inflammation, and kynurenine pathway function during illness and recovery from Covid-19. Taken together, inflammation and neuroimmune signaling, a consequence of Covid-19 infection, may dysregulate critical pathways and underlie maladaptive changes in the CNS, to exacerbate the development of neuropsychiatric symptoms and in the vulnerability to develop SUD. This article is part of the special Issue on 'Vulnerabilities to Substance Abuse'.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Drug Misuse/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Substance-Related Disorders/epidemiology , Adaptation, Psychological , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/physiology , Animals , Axons/virology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/psychology , Comorbidity , Disease Susceptibility , Endothelial Cells/virology , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Inflammation/etiology , Kynurenine/metabolism , Neurons/virology , Neurotransmitter Agents/metabolism , Olfactory Mucosa/virology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Social Isolation , Stress, Psychological , Substance-Related Disorders/etiology , Substance-Related Disorders/physiopathology , Tryptophan/metabolism , Viral Tropism
16.
Cell Signal ; 87: 110121, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1370457

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 virus has caused a worldwide COVID-19 pandemic. In less than a year and a half, more than 200 million people have been infected and more than four million have died. Despite some improvement in the treatment strategies, no definitive treatment protocol has been developed. The pathogenesis of the disease has not been clearly elucidated yet. A clear understanding of its pathogenesis will help develop effective vaccines and drugs. The immunopathogenesis of COVID-19 is characteristic with acute respiratory distress syndrome and multiorgan involvement with impaired Type I interferon response and hyperinflammation. The destructive systemic effects of COVID-19 cannot be explained simply by the viral tropism through the ACE2 and TMPRSS2 receptors. In addition, the recently identified mutations cannot fully explain the defect in all cases of Type I interferon synthesis. We hypothesize that retinol depletion and resulting impaired retinoid signaling play a central role in the COVID-19 pathogenesis that is characteristic for dysregulated immune system, defect in Type I interferon synthesis, severe inflammatory process, and destructive systemic multiorgan involvement. Viral RNA recognition mechanism through RIG-I receptors can quickly consume a large amount of the body's retinoid reserve, which causes the retinol levels to fall below the normal serum levels. This causes retinoid insufficiency and impaired retinoid signaling, which leads to interruption in Type I interferon synthesis and an excessive inflammation. Therefore, reconstitution of the retinoid signaling may prove to be a valid strategy for management of COVID-19 as well for some other chronic, degenerative, inflammatory, and autoimmune diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Signal Transduction/physiology , Vitamin A/metabolism , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Central Nervous System/metabolism , DEAD Box Protein 58/metabolism , Humans , Immune Tolerance , Interferon Type I/metabolism , Receptors, Immunologic/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory/immunology , T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory/metabolism , Viral Tropism/physiology , Vitamin A/blood
17.
Microb Biotechnol ; 13(5): 1289-1299, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1352399

ABSTRACT

The number of people infected with SARS-CoV-2, and sadly dying from COVID-19, has exploded, and so the amount of literature on the novel coronavirus and the disease it causes has increased proportionately. The case numbers in some countries are beyond the epidemic peak, but the uncertainty about a second wave keeps politicians and societies under pressure. Appropriate decision-making and winning support from the population depends on precise scientific information rather than leaving the field to scaremongers of all proveniences. This mini-review is an update of earlier reports (Brüssow, Microb Biotechnol 2020a;13:607; Brüssow, Microb Biotechnol 2020b; https://doi.org/10.1111/1751-7915.13592).


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/etiology , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/etiology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Animals , COVID-19 , Clinical Trials as Topic , Disease Models, Animal , Humans , Pandemics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/physiology , RNA, Viral/analysis , SARS-CoV-2 , Viral Tropism
18.
Trends Endocrinol Metab ; 32(11): 842-845, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1349597

ABSTRACT

The widespread extrapulmonary complications of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) have gained momentum; the pancreas is another major target for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Here, we take a closer look into potential pathological interactions. We provide an overview of the current knowledge and understanding of SARS-CoV-2 infection of the pancreas with a special focus on pancreatic islets and propose direct, indirect, and systemic mechanisms for pancreas injury as result of the COVID-19-diabetes fatal bidirectional relationship.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Diabetes Mellitus/metabolism , Insulin-Secreting Cells/metabolism , Acinar Cells/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Glucagon-Secreting Cells/metabolism , Humans , Islets of Langerhans/metabolism , Pancreas/metabolism , Receptors, Coronavirus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Viral Tropism
19.
Brief Bioinform ; 22(2): 1096-1105, 2021 03 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1343665

ABSTRACT

Human coronaviruses (CoVs) can cause respiratory infection epidemics that sometimes expand into globally relevant pandemics. All human CoVs have sister strains isolated from animal hosts and seem to have an animal origin, yet the process of host jumping is largely unknown. RNA interference (RNAi) is an ancient mechanism in many eukaryotes to defend against viral infections through the hybridization of host endogenous small RNAs (miRNAs) with target sites in invading RNAs. Here, we developed a method to identify potential RNAi-sensitive sites in the viral genome and discovered that human-adapted coronavirus strains had deleted some of their sites targeted by miRNAs in human lungs when compared to their close zoonic relatives. We further confirmed using a phylogenetic analysis that the loss of RNAi-sensitive target sites could be a major driver of the host-jumping process, and adaptive mutations that lead to the loss-of-target might be as simple as point mutation. Up-to-date genomic data of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 and Middle-East respiratory syndromes-CoV strains demonstrate that the stress from host miRNA milieus sustained even after their epidemics in humans. Thus, this study illustrates a new mechanism about coronavirus to explain its host-jumping process and provides a novel avenue for pathogenesis research, epidemiological modeling, and development of drugs and vaccines against coronavirus, taking into consideration these findings.


Subject(s)
Biological Evolution , COVID-19/virology , Host-Pathogen Interactions , RNA/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Viral Tropism , Humans
20.
Biomed Res Int ; 2021: 8856018, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1303204

ABSTRACT

Coronaviruses (CoVs) are enveloped nonsegmented positive-sense RNA viruses belonging to the family Coronaviridae that contain the largest genome among RNA viruses. Their genome encodes 4 major structural proteins, and among them, the Spike (S) protein plays a crucial role in determining the viral tropism. It mediates viral attachment to the host cell, fusion to the membranes, and cell entry using cellular proteases as activators. Several in vitro models have been developed to study the CoVs entry, pathogenesis, and possible therapeutic approaches. This article is aimed at summarizing the current knowledge about the use of relevant methodologies and cell lines permissive for CoV life cycle studies. The synthesis of this information can be useful for setting up specific experimental procedures. We also discuss different strategies for inhibiting the binding of the S protein to the cell receptors and the fusion process which may offer opportunities for therapeutic intervention.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents , Coronaviridae , Models, Biological , Viral Tropism , Virus Internalization , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19 , Cells, Cultured , Coronaviridae/drug effects , Coronaviridae/metabolism , Coronaviridae/pathogenicity , Coronaviridae/physiology , Coronaviridae Infections , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism
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