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1.
Life Sci ; 295: 120411, 2022 Apr 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1683412

ABSTRACT

AIMS: Virus-infected host cells switch their metabolism to a more glycolytic phenotype, required for new virion synthesis and packaging. Therefore, we investigated the effect and mechanistic action of glycolytic inhibitor 2-Deoxy-d-glucose (2-DG) on virus multiplication in host cells following SARS-CoV-2 infection. MAIN METHODS: SARS-CoV-2 induced change in glycolysis was examined in Vero E6 cells. Effect of 2-DG on virus multiplication was evaluated by RT-PCR (N and RdRp genes) analysis, protein expression analysis of Nucleocapsid (N) and Spike (S) proteins and visual indication of cytopathy effect (CPE), The mass spectrometry analysis was performed to examine the 2-DG induced change in glycosylation status of receptor binding domain (RBD) in SARS-CoV-2 spike protein. KEY FINDINGS: We observed SARS-COV-2 infection induced increased glucose influx and glycolysis, resulting in selectively high accumulation of the fluorescent glucose analog, 2-NBDG in Vero E6 cells. 2-DG inhibited glycolysis, reduced virus multiplication and alleviated cells from virus-induced cytopathic effect (CPE) in SARS-CoV-2 infected cells. The progeny virions produced from 2-DG treated cells were found unglycosylated at crucial N-glycosites (N331 and N343) of the receptor-binding domain (RBD) in the spike protein, resulting in production of defective progeny virions with compromised infective potential. SIGNIFICANCE: The mechanistic study revealed that the inhibition of SARS-COV-2 multiplication is attributed to 2-DG induced glycolysis inhibition and possibly un-glycosylation of the spike protein, also. Therefore, based on its previous human trials in different types of Cancer and Herpes patients, it could be a potential molecule to study in COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Deoxyglucose/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Adenosine Triphosphate/metabolism , Animals , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Cell Proliferation/drug effects , Cell Survival/drug effects , Chlorocebus aethiops , Glucose/metabolism , Glycolysis/drug effects , Glycosylation , Host-Pathogen Interactions/drug effects , Mannose/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Vero Cells , Virion/drug effects , Virion/pathogenicity , Virus Replication/drug effects
2.
Viruses ; 14(1)2022 01 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1614009

ABSTRACT

Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) employs a photosensitizer, light, and oxygen to create a local burst of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that can inactivate microorganisms. The botanical extract PhytoQuinTM is a powerful photosensitizer with antimicrobial properties. We previously demonstrated that photoactivated PhytoQuin also has antiviral properties against herpes simplex viruses and adenoviruses in a dose-dependent manner across a broad range of sub-cytotoxic concentrations. Here, we report that human coronaviruses (HCoVs) are also susceptible to photodynamic inactivation. Photoactivated-PhytoQuin inhibited the replication of the alphacoronavirus HCoV-229E and the betacoronavirus HCoV-OC43 in cultured cells across a range of sub-cytotoxic doses. This antiviral effect was light-dependent, as we observed minimal antiviral effect of PhytoQuin in the absence of photoactivation. Using RNase protection assays, we observed that PDI disrupted HCoV particle integrity allowing for the digestion of viral RNA by exogenous ribonucleases. Using lentiviruses pseudotyped with the SARS-CoV-2 Spike (S) protein, we once again observed a strong, light-dependent antiviral effect of PhytoQuin, which prevented S-mediated entry into human cells. We also observed that PhytoQuin PDI altered S protein electrophoretic mobility. The PhytoQuin constituent emodin displayed equivalent light-dependent antiviral activity to PhytoQuin in matched-dose experiments, indicating that it plays a central role in PhytoQuin PDI against CoVs. Together, these findings demonstrate that HCoV lipid envelopes and proteins are damaged by PhytoQuin PDI and expands the list of susceptible viruses.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Coronavirus/drug effects , Photosensitizing Agents/pharmacology , Virus Inactivation/drug effects , Animals , Antiviral Agents/radiation effects , Cell Line , Cell Survival/drug effects , Cricetinae , Emodin/pharmacology , Emodin/radiation effects , Humans , Light , Photosensitizing Agents/radiation effects , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , Plant Extracts/radiation effects , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/drug effects , Virion/drug effects
3.
J Cell Mol Med ; 26(1): 25-34, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1570773

ABSTRACT

Transmission electron microscopy has historically been indispensable for virology research, as it offers unique insight into virus function. In the past decade, as cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) has matured and become more accessible, we have been able to peer into the structure of viruses at the atomic level and understand how they interact with the host cell, with drugs or with antibodies. Perhaps, there was no time in recent history where cryo-EM was more needed, as SARS-CoV-2 has spread around the globe, causing millions of deaths and almost unquantifiable economic devastation. In this concise review, we aim to mark the most important contributions of cryo-EM to understanding the structure and function of SARS-CoV-2 proteins, from surface spikes to the virus core and from virus-receptor interactions to antibody binding.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/chemistry , Antibodies, Viral/chemistry , COVID-19 Vaccines/chemistry , COVID-19/prevention & control , Receptors, Virus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/immunology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Antibodies, Viral/biosynthesis , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19 Vaccines/biosynthesis , Cryoelectron Microscopy , Epitopes/chemistry , Epitopes/immunology , Epitopes/metabolism , Humans , Models, Molecular , Protein Binding , Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs , Protein Structure, Secondary , Receptors, Virus/immunology , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , SARS-CoV-2/ultrastructure , Serine Endopeptidases/chemistry , Serine Endopeptidases/immunology , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Virion/drug effects , Virion/pathogenicity , Virion/ultrastructure
4.
Viruses ; 13(12)2021 12 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1554971

ABSTRACT

Epidemic RNA viruses seem to arise year after year leading to countless infections and devastating disease. SARS-CoV-2 is the most recent of these viruses, but there will undoubtedly be more to come. While effective SARS-CoV-2 vaccines are being deployed, one approach that is still missing is effective antivirals that can be used at the onset of infections and therefore prevent pandemics. Here, we screened FDA-approved compounds against SARS-CoV-2. We found that atovaquone, a pyrimidine biosynthesis inhibitor, is able to reduce SARS-CoV-2 infection in human lung cells. In addition, we found that berberine chloride, a plant-based compound used in holistic medicine, was able to inhibit SARS-CoV-2 infection in cells through direct interaction with the virion. Taken together, these studies highlight potential avenues of antiviral development to block emerging viruses. Such proactive approaches, conducted well before the next pandemic, will be essential to have drugs ready for when the next emerging virus hits.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Atovaquone/pharmacology , Berberine/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Virus Replication/drug effects , Alveolar Epithelial Cells , Animals , Berberine/chemistry , Cell Proliferation/drug effects , Chlorides/chemistry , Chlorides/pharmacology , Chlorocebus aethiops , Drug Synergism , Humans , Proguanil/pharmacology , Vero Cells , Virion/drug effects
5.
Virus Res ; 305: 198555, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1412516

ABSTRACT

Inactivated viral preparations are important resources in vaccine and antisera industry. Of the many vaccines that are being developed against COVID-19, inactivated whole-virus vaccines are also considered effective. ß-propiolactone (BPL) is a widely used chemical inactivator of several viruses. Here, we analyze various concentrations of BPL to effectively inactivate SARS-CoV-2 and their effects on the biochemical properties of the virion particles. BPL at 1:2000 (v/v) concentrations effectively inactivated SARS-CoV-2. However, higher BPL concentrations resulted in the loss of both protein content as well as the antigenic integrity of the structural proteins. Higher concentrations also caused substantial aggregation of the virion particles possibly resulting in insufficient inactivation, and a loss in antigenic potential. We also identify that the viral RNA content in the culture supernatants can be a direct indicator of their antigenic content. Our findings may have important implications in the vaccine and antisera industry during COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19 Vaccines/chemistry , Propiolactone/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Virion/drug effects , Virus Inactivation/drug effects , Animals , Antigens, Viral/chemistry , Antigens, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Chlorocebus aethiops , Flocculation/drug effects , Humans , Immune Sera/chemistry , RNA, Viral/chemistry , RNA, Viral/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Vaccines, Inactivated , Vero Cells , Virion/chemistry , Virion/immunology
6.
PLoS Pathog ; 17(9): e1009898, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1394564

ABSTRACT

The respiratory disease COVID-19 is caused by the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2. Here we report the discovery of ethacridine as a potent drug against SARS-CoV-2 (EC50 ~ 0.08 µM). Ethacridine was identified via high-throughput screening of an FDA-approved drug library in living cells using a fluorescence assay. Plaque assays, RT-PCR and immunofluorescence imaging at various stages of viral infection demonstrate that the main mode of action of ethacridine is through inactivation of viral particles, preventing their binding to the host cells. Consistently, ethacridine is effective in various cell types, including primary human nasal epithelial cells that are cultured in an air-liquid interface. Taken together, our work identifies a promising, potent, and new use of the old drug via a distinct mode of action for inhibiting SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Ethacridine/pharmacology , Protease Inhibitors/pharmacology , Virus Activation/drug effects , Animals , Cell Line , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/antagonists & inhibitors , Genes, Reporter , Green Fluorescent Proteins/genetics , Humans , Vero Cells , Virion/drug effects , Virus Replication/drug effects
7.
PLoS One ; 16(6): e0253489, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1388925

ABSTRACT

In the pursuit of suitable and effective solutions to SARS-CoV-2 infection, we investigated the efficacy of several phenolic compounds in controlling key cellular mechanisms involved in its infectivity. The way the SARS-CoV-2 virus infects the cell is a complex process and comprises four main stages: attachment to the cognate receptor, cellular entry, replication and cellular egress. Since, this is a multi-part process, it creates many opportunities to develop effective interventions. Targeting binding of the virus to the host receptor in order to prevent its entry has been of particular interest. Here, we provide experimental evidence that, among 56 tested polyphenols, including plant extracts, brazilin, theaflavin-3,3'-digallate, and curcumin displayed the highest binding with the receptor-binding domain of spike protein, inhibiting viral attachment to the human angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 receptor, and thus cellular entry of pseudo-typed SARS-CoV-2 virions. Both, theaflavin-3,3'-digallate at 25 µg/ml and curcumin above 10 µg/ml concentration, showed binding with the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 receptor reducing at the same time its activity in both cell-free and cell-based assays. Our study also demonstrates that brazilin and theaflavin-3,3'-digallate, and to a still greater extent, curcumin, decrease the activity of transmembrane serine protease 2 both in cell-free and cell-based assays. Similar pattern was observed with cathepsin L, although only theaflavin-3,3'-digallate showed a modest diminution of cathepsin L expression at protein level. Finally, each of these three compounds moderately increased endosomal/lysosomal pH. In conclusion, this study demonstrates pleiotropic anti-SARS-CoV-2 efficacy of specific polyphenols and their prospects for further scientific and clinical investigations.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/prevention & control , Polyphenols/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Virus Internalization/drug effects , A549 Cells , Benzopyrans/pharmacology , Biflavonoids/pharmacology , COVID-19/virology , Catechin/analogs & derivatives , Catechin/pharmacology , Cell Survival/drug effects , Curcumin/pharmacology , Humans , Protein Binding/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Virion/drug effects , Virion/metabolism , Virion/physiology , Virus Attachment/drug effects
8.
Pharmacol Res ; 158: 104850, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1318927

ABSTRACT

Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has spread worldwide through person-to-person contact, causing a public health emergency of international concern. At present, there is no specific antiviral treatment recommended for SARS-CoV-2 infection. Liu Shen capsule (LS), a traditional Chinese medicine, has been proven to have a wide spectrum of pharmacological properties, such as anti-inflammatory, antiviral and immunomodulatory activities. However, little is known about the antiviral effect of LS against SARS-CoV-2. Herein, the study was designed to investigate the antiviral activity of SARS-CoV-2 and its potential effect in regulating the host's immune response. The inhibitory effect of LS against SARS-CoV-2 replication in Vero E6 cells was evaluated by using the cytopathic effect (CPE) and plaque reduction assay. The number of virions of SARS-CoV-2 was observed under transmission electron microscope after treatment with LS. Proinflammatory cytokine expression levels upon SARS-CoV-2 infection in Huh-7 cells were measured by real-time quantitative PCR assays. The results showed that LS could significantly inhibit SARS-CoV-2 replication in Vero E6 cells, and reduce the number of virus particles and it could markedly reduce pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1ß, IL-8, CCL-2/MCP-1 and CXCL-10/IP-10) production at the mRNA levels. Moreover, the expression of the key proteins in the NF-κB/MAPK signaling pathway was detected by western blot and it was found that LS could inhibit the expression of p-NF-κB p65, p-IκBα and p-p38 MAPK, while increasing the expression of IκBα. These findings indicate that LS could inhibit SARS-CoV-2 virus infection via downregulating the expression of inflammatory cytokines induced virus and regulating the activity of NF-κB/MAPK signaling pathway in vitro, making its promising candidate treatment for controlling COVID-19 disease.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Complex Mixtures/pharmacology , NF-kappa B/antagonists & inhibitors , NF-kappa B/metabolism , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine Monophosphate/pharmacology , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/pharmacology , Animals , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19 , Cell Proliferation/drug effects , Cells, Cultured , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Virion/drug effects
9.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(8)2021 Apr 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1206368

ABSTRACT

Viral infections cause a host of fatal diseases and seriously affect every form of life from bacteria to humans. Although most viral infections can receive appropriate treatment thereby limiting damage to life and livelihood with modern medicine and early diagnosis, new types of viral infections are continuously emerging that need to be properly and timely treated. As time is the most important factor in the progress of many deadly viral diseases, early detection becomes of paramount importance for effective treatment. Aptamers are small oligonucleotide molecules made by the systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX). Aptamers are characterized by being able to specifically bind to a target, much like antibodies. However, unlike antibodies, aptamers are easily synthesized, modified, and are able to target a wider range of substances, including proteins and carbohydrates. With these advantages in mind, many studies on aptamer-based viral diagnosis and treatments are currently in progress. The use of aptamers for viral diagnosis requires a system that recognizes the binding of viral molecules to aptamers in samples of blood, serum, plasma, or in virus-infected cells. From a therapeutic perspective, aptamers target viral particles or host cell receptors to prevent the interaction between the virus and host cells or target intracellular viral proteins to interrupt the life cycle of the virus within infected cells. In this paper, we review recent attempts to use aptamers for the diagnosis and treatment of various viral infections.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Aptamers, Nucleotide/therapeutic use , Virus Diseases/diagnosis , Virus Diseases/drug therapy , Animals , DNA Viruses/drug effects , Humans , RNA Viruses/drug effects , Viral Proteins/drug effects , Virion/drug effects
10.
Bioessays ; 43(6): e2000312, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1184571

ABSTRACT

Biocidal agents such as formaldehyde and glutaraldehyde are able to inactivate several coronaviruses including SARS-CoV-2. In this article, an insight into one mechanism for the inactivation of these viruses by those two agents is presented, based on analysis of previous observations during electron microscopic examination of several members of the orthocoronavirinae subfamily, including the new virus SARS-CoV-2. This inactivation is proposed to occur through Schiff base reaction-induced conformational changes in the spike glycoprotein leading to its disruption or breakage, which can prevent binding of the virus to cellular receptors. Also, a new prophylactic and therapeutic measure against SARS-CoV-2 using acetoacetate is proposed, suggesting that it could similarly break the viral spike through Schiff base reaction with lysines of the spike protein. This measure needs to be confirmed experimentally before consideration. In addition, a new line of research is proposed to help find a broad-spectrum antivirus against several members of this subfamily.


Subject(s)
Disinfectants/pharmacology , Ketone Bodies/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Animals , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Disinfectants/chemistry , Formaldehyde/chemistry , Formaldehyde/pharmacology , Glutaral/chemistry , Glutaral/pharmacology , Humans , Ketone Bodies/chemistry , Ketone Bodies/metabolism , Ketosis/etiology , Ketosis/virology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Virion/drug effects , Virion/pathogenicity
11.
Viruses ; 12(10)2020 09 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-906373

ABSTRACT

The Gammacoronavirus infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) causes a highly contagious and economically important respiratory disease in poultry. In the laboratory, most IBV strains are restricted to replication in ex vivo organ cultures or in ovo and do not replicate in cell culture, making the study of their basic virology difficult. Entry of IBV into cells is facilitated by the large glycoprotein on the surface of the virion, the spike (S) protein, comprised of S1 and S2 subunits. Previous research showed that the S2' cleavage site is responsible for the extended tropism of the IBV Beaudette strain. This study aims to investigate whether protease treatment can extend the tropism of other IBV strains. Here we demonstrate that the addition of exogenous trypsin during IBV propagation in cell culture results in significantly increased viral titres. Using a panel of IBV strains, exhibiting varied tropisms, the effects of spike cleavage on entry and replication were assessed by serial passage cell culture in the presence of trypsin. Replication could be maintained over serial passages, indicating that the addition of exogenous protease is sufficient to overcome the barrier to infection. Mutations were identified in both S1 and S2 subunits following serial passage in cell culture. This work provides a proof of concept that exogenous proteases can remove the barrier to IBV replication in otherwise non-permissive cells, providing a platform for further study of elusive field strains and enabling sustainable vaccine production in vitro.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Infectious bronchitis virus/drug effects , Infectious bronchitis virus/physiology , Trypsin/therapeutic use , Viral Tropism/drug effects , Animals , Cell Line , Chlorocebus aethiops , Gammacoronavirus/drug effects , Infectious bronchitis virus/metabolism , Kinetics , Serial Passage , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Vero Cells , Viral Envelope Proteins/metabolism , Virion/drug effects , Virion/metabolism , Virus Replication/drug effects
12.
Structure ; 28(11): 1218-1224.e4, 2020 11 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-872505

ABSTRACT

The ongoing global pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) resulted from the outbreak of SARS-CoV-2 in December 2019. Currently, multiple efforts are being made to rapidly develop vaccines and treatments to fight COVID-19. Current vaccine candidates use inactivated SARS-CoV-2 viruses; therefore, it is important to understand the architecture of inactivated SARS-CoV-2. We have genetically and structurally characterized ß-propiolactone-inactivated viruses from a propagated and purified clinical strain of SARS-CoV-2. We observed that the virus particles are roughly spherical or moderately pleiomorphic. Although a small fraction of prefusion spikes are found, most spikes appear nail shaped, thus resembling a postfusion state, where the S1 protein of the spike has disassociated from S2. Cryoelectron tomography and subtomogram averaging of these spikes yielded a density map that closely matches the overall structure of the SARS-CoV postfusion spike and its corresponding glycosylation site. Our findings have major implications for SARS-CoV-2 vaccine design, especially those using inactivated viruses.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/ultrastructure , Disinfectants/pharmacology , Propiolactone/pharmacology , Virion/drug effects , Animals , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Betacoronavirus/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Cryoelectron Microscopy , Electron Microscope Tomography , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/ultrastructure , Vaccines, Inactivated/immunology , Vero Cells , Viral Vaccines/immunology , Virion/ultrastructure
13.
J Med Virol ; 92(10): 2087-2095, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-763177

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS CoV-2) is the causative agent of the coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Coronaviruses enter cells via fusion of the viral envelope with the plasma membrane and/or via fusion of the viral envelope with endosomal membranes after virion endocytosis. The spike (S) glycoprotein is a major determinant of virus infectivity. Herein, we show that the transient expression of the SARS CoV-2 S glycoprotein in Vero cells caused extensive cell fusion (formation of syncytia) in comparison to limited cell fusion caused by the SARS S glycoprotein. Both S glycoproteins were detected intracellularly and on transfected Vero cell surfaces. These results are in agreement with published pathology observations of extensive syncytia formation in lung tissues of patients with COVID-19. These results suggest that SARS CoV-2 is able to spread from cell-to-cell much more efficiently than SARS effectively avoiding extracellular neutralizing antibodies. A systematic screening of several drugs including cardiac glycosides and kinase inhibitors and inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) entry revealed that only the FDA-approved HIV protease inhibitor, nelfinavir mesylate (Viracept) drastically inhibited S-n- and S-o-mediated cell fusion with complete inhibition at a 10-µM concentration. In-silico docking experiments suggested the possibility that nelfinavir may bind inside the S trimer structure, proximal to the S2 amino terminus directly inhibiting S-n- and S-o-mediated membrane fusion. Also, it is possible that nelfinavir may act to inhibit S proteolytic processing within cells. These results warrant further investigations of the potential of nelfinavir mesylate to inhibit virus spread at early times after SARS CoV-2 symptoms appear.


Subject(s)
Anti-HIV Agents/pharmacology , Membrane Fusion/drug effects , Nelfinavir/pharmacology , SARS Virus/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/antagonists & inhibitors , Animals , Anti-HIV Agents/chemistry , Binding Sites , COVID-19/drug therapy , Cell Fusion , Chlorocebus aethiops , Giant Cells/drug effects , Giant Cells/pathology , Giant Cells/virology , Humans , Molecular Docking Simulation , Nelfinavir/chemistry , Plasmids/chemistry , Plasmids/metabolism , Protein Binding , Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs , Recombinant Proteins/chemistry , Recombinant Proteins/genetics , Recombinant Proteins/metabolism , SARS Virus/pathogenicity , SARS Virus/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Vero Cells , Virion/drug effects , Virion/pathogenicity , Virion/physiology
14.
Sci Rep ; 10(1): 4746, 2020 03 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-740043

ABSTRACT

Ginkgolic acids (GA) are alkylphenol constituents of the leaves and fruits of Ginkgo biloba. GA has shown pleiotropic effects in vitro, including: antitumor effects through inhibition of lipogenesis; decreased expression of invasion associated proteins through AMPK activation; and potential rescue of amyloid-ß (Aß) induced synaptic impairment. GA was also reported to have activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Several mechanisms for this activity have been suggested including: SUMOylation inhibition; blocking formation of the E1-SUMO intermediate; inhibition of fatty acid synthase; non-specific SIRT inhibition; and activation of protein phosphatase type-2C. Here we report that GA inhibits Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) by inhibition of both fusion and viral protein synthesis. Additionally, we report that GA inhibits human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) genome replication and Zika virus (ZIKV) infection of normal human astrocytes (NHA). We show a broad spectrum of fusion inhibition by GA of all three classes of fusion proteins including HIV, Ebola virus (EBOV), influenza A virus (IAV) and Epstein Barr virus (EBV). In addition, we show inhibition of a non-enveloped adenovirus. Our experiments suggest that GA inhibits virion entry by blocking the initial fusion event. Data showing inhibition of HSV-1 and CMV replication, when GA is administered post-infection, suggest a possible secondary mechanism targeting protein and DNA synthesis. Thus, in light of the strong effect of GA on viral infection, even after the infection begins, it may potentially be used to treat acute infections (e.g. Coronavirus, EBOV, ZIKV, IAV and measles), and also topically for the successful treatment of active lesions (e.g. HSV-1, HSV-2 and varicella-zoster virus (VZV)).


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , DNA Virus Infections/metabolism , DNA Viruses/drug effects , RNA Virus Infections/metabolism , RNA Viruses/drug effects , Salicylates/pharmacology , Viral Envelope Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Viral Fusion Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Animals , Astrocytes/metabolism , Chlorocebus aethiops , DNA Replication/drug effects , DNA Virus Infections/virology , DNA Viruses/genetics , DNA, Viral/genetics , HEK293 Cells , Humans , RNA Virus Infections/virology , RNA Viruses/genetics , Vero Cells , Viral Envelope Proteins/biosynthesis , Viral Fusion Proteins/biosynthesis , Virion/drug effects , Virus Internalization/drug effects , Virus Replication/drug effects
15.
Anal Bioanal Chem ; 412(28): 7685-7699, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-737989

ABSTRACT

Pathogen-host cell interactions play an important role in many human infectious and inflammatory diseases. Several pathogens, including Escherichia coli (E. coli), Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb), and even the recent 2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV), can cause serious breathing and brain disorders, tissue injury and inflammation, leading to high rates of mortality and resulting in great loss to human physical and mental health as well as the global economy. These infectious diseases exploit the microbial and host factors to induce serious inflammatory and immunological symptoms. Thus the development of anti-inflammatory drugs targeting bacterial/viral infection is an urgent need. In previous studies, YojI-IFNAR2, YojI-IL10RA, YojI-NRP1,YojI-SIGLEC7, and YojI-MC4R membrane-protein interactions were found to mediate E. coli invasion of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which activated the downstream anti-inflammatory proteins NACHT, LRR and PYD domains-containing protein 2(NLRP2), using a proteomic chip conjugated with cell immunofluorescence labeling. However, the studies of pathogen (bacteria/virus)-host cell interactions mediated by membrane protein interactions did not extend their principles to broad biomedical applications such as 2019-nCoV infectious disease therapy. The first part of this feature article presents in-depth analysis of the cross-talk of cellular anti-inflammatory transduction signaling among interferon membrane protein receptor II (IFNAR2), interleukin-10 receptor subunit alpha (IL-10RA), NLRP2 and [Ca2+]-dependent phospholipase A2 (PLA2G5), based on experimental results and important published studies, which lays a theoretical foundation for the high-throughput construction of the cytokine and virion solution chip. The paper then moves on to the construction of the novel GPCR recombinant herpes virion chip and virion nano-oscillators for profiling membrane protein functions, which drove the idea of constructing the new recombinant virion and cytokine liquid chips for HTS of leading drugs. Due to the different structural properties of GPCR, IFNAR2, ACE2 and Spike of 2019-nCoV, their ligands will either bind the extracellular domain of IFNAR2/ACE2/Spike or the specific loops of the GPCR on the envelope of the recombinant herpes virions to induce dynamic charge distribution changes that lead to the variable electron transition for detection. Taken together, the combined overview of two of the most innovative and exciting developments in the immunoinflammatory field provides new insight into high-throughput construction of ultrasensitive cytokine and virion liquid chips for HTS of anti-inflammatory drugs or clinical diagnosis and treatment of inflammatory diseases including infectious diseases, acute or chronic inflammation (acute gouty arthritis or rheumatoid arthritis), cardiovascular disease, atheromatosis, diabetes, obesity, tissue injury and tumors. It has significant value in the prevention and treatment of these serious and painful diseases. Graphical abstract.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , High-Throughput Screening Assays/instrumentation , Lab-On-A-Chip Devices , Microbial Sensitivity Tests/instrumentation , Animals , Bacterial Infections/drug therapy , Bacterial Infections/immunology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Cytokines/immunology , Drug Discovery/instrumentation , Drug Discovery/methods , Equipment Design , High-Throughput Screening Assays/methods , Humans , Microbial Sensitivity Tests/methods , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Small Molecule Libraries/pharmacology , Virion/drug effects , Virion/immunology , Virus Diseases/drug therapy , Virus Diseases/immunology
16.
Infect Genet Evol ; 84: 104451, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-630854

ABSTRACT

WHO has declared the outbreak of COVID-19 as a public health emergency of international concern. The ever-growing new cases have called for an urgent emergency for specific anti-COVID-19 drugs. Three structural proteins (Membrane, Envelope and Nucleocapsid protein) play an essential role in the assembly and formation of the infectious virion particles. Thus, the present study was designed to identify potential drug candidates from the unique collection of 548 anti-viral compounds (natural and synthetic anti-viral), which target SARS-CoV-2 structural proteins. High-end molecular docking analysis was performed to characterize the binding affinity of the selected drugs-the ligand, with the SARS-CoV-2 structural proteins, while high-level Simulation studies analyzed the stability of drug-protein interactions. The present study identified rutin, a bioflavonoid and the antibiotic, doxycycline, as the most potent inhibitor of SARS-CoV-2 envelope protein. Caffeic acid and ferulic acid were found to inhibit SARS-CoV-2 membrane protein while the anti-viral agent's simeprevir and grazoprevir showed a high binding affinity for nucleocapsid protein. All these compounds not only showed excellent pharmacokinetic properties, absorption, metabolism, minimal toxicity and bioavailability but were also remain stabilized at the active site of proteins during the MD simulation. Thus, the identified lead compounds may act as potential molecules for the development of effective drugs against SARS-CoV-2 by inhibiting the envelope formation, virion assembly and viral pathogenesis.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Nucleocapsid Proteins/chemistry , Viral Envelope Proteins/chemistry , Viral Matrix Proteins/chemistry , Virion/drug effects , Amides , Amino Acid Sequence , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/metabolism , Binding Sites , COVID-19 , Caffeic Acids/chemistry , Caffeic Acids/pharmacology , Carbamates , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Coumaric Acids/chemistry , Coumaric Acids/pharmacology , Cyclopropanes , Doxycycline/chemistry , Doxycycline/pharmacology , Gene Expression , Humans , Kinetics , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Nucleocapsid Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Nucleocapsid Proteins/genetics , Nucleocapsid Proteins/metabolism , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Protein Binding , Protein Conformation, alpha-Helical , Protein Conformation, beta-Strand , Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs , Quinoxalines/chemistry , Quinoxalines/pharmacology , Rutin/chemistry , Rutin/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2 , Sequence Alignment , Sequence Homology, Amino Acid , Simeprevir/chemistry , Simeprevir/pharmacology , Sulfonamides , Thermodynamics , Viral Envelope Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Viral Envelope Proteins/genetics , Viral Envelope Proteins/metabolism , Viral Matrix Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Viral Matrix Proteins/genetics , Viral Matrix Proteins/metabolism , Virion/genetics
17.
J Vet Sci ; 21(1): e12, 2020 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-124741

ABSTRACT

Porcine deltacoronavirus (PDCoV) is an emerging swine enteric coronavirus that causes diarrhea in piglets. However, the biological characteristics of PDCoV are unclear. In this study, the hemagglutination (HA) abilities of two PDCoV strains (CH-01 and HNZK-04) were investigated. Our results showed that PDCoV has the ability to agglutinate rabbit erythrocytes after virion pretreatment with trypsin or neuraminidase. Additionally, the HA assay results showed a significant positive correlation with the infectious viral titer. Our results suggest that assessing the HA activity of PDCoV may be a useful diagnostic method for investigating and surveilling PDCoV infections.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/veterinary , Coronavirus/physiology , Hemagglutination , Swine Diseases/immunology , Animals , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Diarrhea/immunology , Diarrhea/veterinary , Diarrhea/virology , Erythrocytes/immunology , Neuraminidase/administration & dosage , Rabbits , Swine , Swine Diseases/virology , Trypsin/administration & dosage , Virion/drug effects
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