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1.
Child Adolesc Psychiatr Clin N Am ; 32(2): 421-450, 2023 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20245186

ABSTRACT

Eating disorders (EDs) are a non-heterogeneous group of illnesses with significant physical and mental comorbidity and mortality associated with maladaptive coping. With the exception of lisdexamfetamine (Vyvanse) for binge eating disorder, no medications have been effective for the core symptoms of ED. ED requires a multimodal approach. Complementary and integrative medicine (CIM) can be helpful as an adjunct. The most promising CIM interventions are traditional yoga, virtual reality, eye movement desensitization and reprocessing, Music Therapy, and biofeedback/neurofeedback.


Subject(s)
Acupuncture Therapy , Anorexia Nervosa , Art Therapy , Binge-Eating Disorder , Bulimia Nervosa , Feeding and Eating Disorders , Integrative Medicine , Neurofeedback , Virtual Reality , Yoga , Humans , Adolescent , Bulimia Nervosa/therapy , Spirituality , Binge-Eating Disorder/diagnosis , Lisdexamfetamine Dimesylate , Phototherapy , Anorexia Nervosa/diagnosis
2.
J Nurs Educ ; 62(6): 364-373, 2023 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20243500

ABSTRACT

AIM: The purpose of this article was to evaluate the ability of an interactive virtual reality (VR) platform guided by standards of best practice to provide an effective immersive learning environment. We specifically evaluated usability of the platform and learners' perceptions of the experience. BACKGROUND: A variety of strategies are needed to train a highly competent nursing workforce. METHODS: We conducted a quantitative cross-sectional study to evaluate the VR experience using the System Usability Scale (SUS)® and the Simulation Effectiveness Tool-Modified (SET-M). RESULTS: Post-simulation evaluations were completed by 127 prelicensure and 28 advanced practice students. On the SUS scale, students found the overall VR system easy to navigate, and on the SET-M, they rated the VR experience positively. CONCLUSION: Immersive technology such as VR with a defined curriculum and facilitated debriefing can be valuable for student learning and may ultimately effect patient care. [J Nurs Educ. 2023;62(6):364-373.].


Subject(s)
Education, Nursing , Virtual Reality , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , Learning , Computer Simulation
3.
GMS J Med Educ ; 40(2): Doc19, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2326439

ABSTRACT

Aim: During the COVID-19 pandemic, the absence of in-person teaching was partially compensated for through videoconferencing. However, lecturers complain that students do not participate actively in video-based online seminars. One reason cited for this is Zoom fatigue. Conferences in virtual reality (VR), accessible with and without head-mounted display, represent one potential remedy to this issue. The research to date does not shed any light on the (1.) teaching experience, (2.) student demand, (3.) learning experience (including participation and social presence), and (4.) learning performance (declarative and spatial) associated with VR conferences. The present work will compare these aspects for videoconferencing, independent study, and - in the case of teaching experience - with in-person teaching. Methods: A compulsory seminar in General Physiology was offered during the 2020/21 winter semester and the 2021 summer semester as part of the Human Medicine program at the Faculty of Medicine at Ulm University. The seminars were offered in three different formats with identical content: (a) VR conference, (b) video conference, and (c) independent study, with students selecting the format of their choice. In the VR conferences, the lecturer taught using a head-mounted display while students participated via PC, laptop, or tablet. The learning experience and learning performance were assessed using questionnaires and a knowledge test. A semi-structured interview was conducted to assess the VR teaching experience. Results: The lecturer's teaching experience in the VR conferences was similar to in-person teaching. Students predominantly chose independent study and videoconferencing. The latter resulted in worse outcomes with regard to learning experience (including participation and social presence) and spatial learning performance than the VR conferences. Declarative learning performance differed only slightly between teaching formats. Conclusions: VR conferencing offers lecturers new didactic opportunities and a teaching experience similar to that of in-person teaching. Students prefer time-efficient videoconferencing and independent study, but rate participation and social presence, among other things, higher in VR conferencing. If faculty and students are open to the technology, VR conferencing can promote interactive exchange in online seminars. This subjective assessment is not associated with better declarative learning performance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Virtual Reality , Humans , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Learning , Fatigue
4.
GMS J Med Educ ; 40(2): Doc16, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2325837

ABSTRACT

Background: Virtual reality (VR) can offer an innovative approach to providing training in emergency situations, especially in times of COVID-19. There is no risk of infection, and the procedure is scalable and resource-efficient. Nevertheless, the challenges and problems that can arise in the development of VR training are often unclear or underestimated. As an example, we present the evaluation of the feasibility of development of a VR training session for the treatment of dyspnoea. This is based on frameworks for serious games, and provides lessons learned. We evaluate the VR training session with respect to usability, satisfaction, as well as perceived effectiveness and workload of participants. Methods: The VR training was developed using the established framework (Steps 1-4) for serious games of Verschueren et al. and Nicholson's RECIPE elements for meaningful gamification. Primary validation (Step 4) was performed at the University of Bern, Switzerland, in a pilot study without control group, with a convenience sample of medical students (n=16) and established measurement tools. Results: The theoretical frameworks permitted guided development of the VR training session. Validation gave a median System Usability Scale of 80 (IQR 77.5-85); for the User Satisfaction Evaluation Questionnaire, the median score was 27 (IQR 26-28). After the VR training, there was a significant gain in the participants' confidence in treating a dyspnoeic patient (median pre-training 2 (IQR 2-3) vs. post-training 3 (IQR 3-3), p=0.016).Lessons learned include the need for involving medical experts, medical educators and technical experts at an equivalent level during the entire development process. Peer-teaching guidance for VR training was feasible. Conclusion: The proposed frameworks can be valuable tools to guide the development and validation of scientifically founded VR training. The new VR training session is easy and satisfying to use and is effective - and is almost without motion sickness.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Virtual Reality , Humans , Pilot Projects , COVID-19/epidemiology , Emergency Treatment , Dyspnea/therapy
5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(9)2023 04 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2315760

ABSTRACT

Virtual reality is an emerging field in mental health and has gained widespread acceptance due to its potential to treat various disorders, such as anxiety and depression. This paper presents a bibliometric analysis of virtual reality (VR) use in addressing depression and anxiety from 1995 to 2022. The study analysed 1872 documents using the Scopus database, identifying the field's most relevant journals and authors. The results indicate that using VR for addressing anxiety and depression is a multidisciplinary field with a wide variety of research topics, leading to significant collaborative research in this area. The Annual Review of Cybertherapy and Telemedicine was identified as the most relevant journal, while Behavior Research and Therapy was found to be the most cited journal. The analysis of keywords suggests that there is more research on using VR for anxiety and related disorders than for depression. Riva G. was identified as the top author in producing research outputs on VR-AD, and the University of Washington emerged as the leading institution in scientific outputs on VR-AD. Thematic and intellectual analyses helped identify the main themes within the research domain, providing valuable insight into the current and future directions of the field.


Subject(s)
Virtual Reality Exposure Therapy , Virtual Reality , Depression/therapy , Virtual Reality Exposure Therapy/methods , Anxiety/therapy , Bibliometrics
6.
J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg ; 82: 255-263, 2023 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2309267

ABSTRACT

Continuing problems with fewer training opportunities and a greater awareness of patient safety have led to a constant search for an alternative technique to bridge the existing theory-practice gap in plastic surgery training and education. The current COVID-19 epidemic has aggravated the situation, making it urgent to implement breakthrough technological initiatives currently underway to improve surgical education. The cutting edge of technological development, augmented reality (AR), has already been applied in numerous facets of plastic surgery training, and it is capable of realizing the aims of education and training in this field. In this article, we will take a look at some of the most important ways that AR is now being used in plastic surgery education and training, as well as offer an exciting glimpse into the potential future of this field thanks to technological advancements.


Subject(s)
Augmented Reality , COVID-19 , Plastic Surgery Procedures , Surgery, Plastic , Virtual Reality , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology
7.
Sensors (Basel) ; 23(8)2023 Apr 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2299429

ABSTRACT

Seniors, in order to be able to fight loneliness, need to communicate with other people and be engaged in activities to keep their minds active to increase their social capital. There is an intensified interest in the development of social virtual reality environments, either by commerce or by academia, to address the problem of social isolation of older people. Due to the vulnerability of the social group involved in this field of research, the need for the application of evaluation methods regarding the proposed VR environments becomes even more important. The range of techniques that can be exploited in this field is constantly expanding, with visual sentiment analysis being a characteristic example. In this study, we introduce the use of image-based sentiment analysis and behavioural analysis as a technique to assess a social VR space for elders and present some promising preliminary results.


Subject(s)
Sentiment Analysis , Virtual Reality , Humans , Aged , Loneliness , Social Isolation
9.
Front Public Health ; 11: 1115393, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2282474

ABSTRACT

Long-post-coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) patients tend to claim residual symptomatology from various systems, most importantly the respiratory and central nervous systems. Breathlessness and brain fog are the main complaints. The pulmonary function pattern is consistent with restrictive defects, which, in most cases, are self-resolved, while the cognitive profile may be impaired. Rehabilitation is an ongoing field for holistic management of long-post-COVID-19 patients. Virtual reality (VR) applications may represent an innovative implementation of rehabilitation. We aimed to investigate the effect of exercise with and without the VR system and to assess further breathlessness and functional fitness indicators in long-post-COVID-19 patients with mild cognitive impairment after self-selected exercise duration using the VR system. Twenty long-post-COVID-19 patients were enrolled in our study (age: 53.9 ± 9.1 years, male: 80%, body mass index: 28.1 ± 3.1 kg/m2). Participants' anthropometric data were recorded, and they underwent pulmonary functional test evaluation as well as sleep quality and cognitive assessment. The participants randomly exercised with and without a VR system (VR vs. no-VR) and, later, self-selected the exercise duration using the VR system. The results showed that exercise with VR resulted in a lower dyspnea score than exercise without VR. In conclusion, VR applications seem to be an attractive and safe tool for implementing rehabilitation. They can enhance performance during exercise and benefit patients with both respiratory and cognitive symptoms.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cognitive Dysfunction , Virtual Reality , Adult , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Dyspnea , Physical Therapy Modalities
10.
Sci Data ; 10(1): 177, 2023 03 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2269566

ABSTRACT

We present GazeBaseVR, a large-scale, longitudinal, binocular eye-tracking (ET) dataset collected at 250 Hz with an ET-enabled virtual-reality (VR) headset. GazeBaseVR comprises 5,020 binocular recordings from a diverse population of 407 college-aged participants. Participants were recorded up to six times each over a 26-month period, each time performing a series of five different ET tasks: (1) a vergence task, (2) a horizontal smooth pursuit task, (3) a video-viewing task, (4) a self-paced reading task, and (5) a random oblique saccade task. Many of these participants have also been recorded for two previously published datasets with different ET devices, and 11 participants were recorded before and after COVID-19 infection and recovery. GazeBaseVR is suitable for a wide range of research on ET data in VR devices, especially eye movement biometrics due to its large population and longitudinal nature. In addition to ET data, additional participant details are provided to enable further research on topics such as fairness.


Subject(s)
Eye Movements , Eye-Tracking Technology , Virtual Reality , Humans , Young Adult , Saccades
11.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(6)2023 03 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2286091

ABSTRACT

During COVID-19, many renowned galleries and art fairs used Virtual Reality (VR) exhibitions for art information dissemination and online displays. To avoid the risks of offline viewing of exhibitions, users can access a web-based VR exhibition platform for remote appreciation of artworks, gaining a rich art experience and thus contributing to physical and mental health. The reasons affecting users' continued usage intentions are not clear enough in the existing studies of VR exhibitions. Therefore, further studies are needed. This paper explores the relationship between users' escapist experience, aesthetic experience, presence, emotional responses, and continued usage intention through a survey of VR exhibition users. The survey data were collected from 543 users who had experienced the VR exhibition through an online survey website. The study results show that users' continued usage intentions are influenced by escapist experience and aesthetic experience. Presence plays a mediating role in the influence of escapist experiences and aesthetic experiences on continued usage intention. Emotional responses play a moderating role in the impact of user experience on continued usage intention. This paper provides a theoretical reference for the study of the impact mechanism of continued usage intention of VR exhibitions from the perspective of mental health. In addition, this study enables VR exhibition platforms to better understand the emotional state of users during art experiences to create and share healthy aesthetic information that can contribute to the management and enhancement of mental health. At the same time, it provides valuable and innovative guidance solutions for the future development of VR exhibitions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Virtual Reality , Humans , Emotions/physiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Creativity , Intention
12.
Front Public Health ; 11: 1121554, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2279071

ABSTRACT

Background: Numerous recommendations from pulmonary scientific societies indicate the need to implement rehabilitation programs for patients after COVID-19. The aim of this study was to propose an innovative comprehensive intervention based on a hospital-based pulmonary rehabilitation program for individuals with post-acute sequelae of COVID-19. Methods: It was decided to evaluate two forms of hospital rehabilitation: traditional and one provided through virtual reality. Preliminary results are based on a group of 32 patients (20 female and 12 male), of average age 57.8 (4.92) years in the period of 3-6 months after the initial infection. Primary outcomes included analysis of lung function, exercise performance and stress level. A 3-week, high-intensity, five-times per week pulmonary rehabilitation program was designed to compare the effectiveness of a traditional form with a VR-led, novel form of therapy. Results: The analysis of the results showed a statistically significant improvement in both groups with regard to exercise performance expressed as 6MWT distance. Moreover, a statistically significant decrease in dyspnoea levels following the 6MWT was also noted in intergroup comparison, but the between-group comparison revealed non-statistically significant changes with low effect size. Regarding lung function, the analysis showed essentially normal lung function at baseline and a non-statistically significant improvement after the completion of the rehabilitation program. The analysis of the stress level showed a statistically significant improvement in both groups within the inter-group comparison, yet the between-group comparison of deltas values showed a non-significant difference with low effect size. Conclusion: A 3-weeks inpatients pulmonary rehabilitation program led to improvement of the exercise performance of people with post-acute sequelae of COVID-19, but not lung function. Furthermore, the program was shown to reduce patients' stress levels. A comparison of the traditional form of rehabilitation to the novel form using VR, shows similar effectiveness in terms of exercise performance and stress levels.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Virtual Reality , Humans , Male , Female , Middle Aged , Inpatients , Exercise , Exercise Therapy/methods
13.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(1)2022 12 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2245052

ABSTRACT

This study aims to determine whether the effect of interactivity on participation in virtual sports has risen because of the COVID-19 pandemic and if there is a difference in decision-making. The significance of social factors may be highlighted even more as a rationale for using virtual reality (VR) sports apps throughout the prolonged COVID-19 epidemic. A model was built based on the literature to describe the intention to participate in VR sports, and eight associated hypotheses were established. A sample of 301 submissions from a user poll on Korea's cycling information sharing website was used for our analysis. SPSS 23.0 (IBM, Armonk, NY, USA) and AMOS 18.0 (IBM, Armonk, NY, USA) were used to validate Hypotheses 1-8 using a multigroup structural equation model (SEM) analysis and multigroup analysis. Although some hypotheses were not validated, the impact of perceived interaction presented as an extra variable altered based on the group participating before and after the COVID-19 epidemic, and the study's goal was achieved. Given that information technology has evolved by overcoming physical space and socio-cultural constraints to create a society that connects people, the importance of online interaction, such as networking and competition between users, will be emphasized in the VR sports field in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sports , Virtual Reality , Humans , Pandemics , Theory of Planned Behavior , COVID-19/epidemiology
14.
Adv Exp Med Biol ; 1397: 135-149, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2243670

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has led to significant challenges when it comes to the delivery of education across multiple domains. There has been a shift in paradigm towards the use of new innovative methods for the delivery of training within medicine and surgery. In this chapter, there is an outline of one such innovative method, the use of virtual reality for anatomy and surgical teaching. At all levels of training, undergraduate through to postgraduate specialty-based training, conventional methods of learning anatomy have had to be adapted due to difficulties encountered during the pandemic. The importance of hands-on cadaveric anatomy experience in surgical training cannot be understated. The decline in face-to-face sessions, as well as a reduction in bedside training due to the prioritisation of service provision and diminishing time spent in theatre have meant less exposure for trainees when it comes to learning procedural skills. Virtual Reality in Medicine and Surgery, a free for trainee resource utilising virtual reality technology, delivered 51-week courses with the aim to ensure high-quality training still occurred. The authors believe there is immense potential for immersive technology when it comes to the future of training within medicine and surgery.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Virtual Reality , Humans , Pandemics , Learning
15.
J Hand Surg Am ; 48(5): 499-505, 2023 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2232695

ABSTRACT

Accelerated in part by the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, medical education has increasingly moved into the virtual sphere in recent years. Virtual surgical education encompasses several domains, including live virtual surgery and virtual and augmented reality. These technologies range in complexity from streaming audio and video of surgeries in real-time to fully immersive virtual simulations of surgery. This article reviews the current use of virtual surgical education and its possible applications in hand surgery. Applications of virtual technologies for preoperative planning and intraoperative guidance, as well as care in underresourced settings, are discussed. The authors describe their experience creating a virtual surgery subinternship with live virtual surgeries. There are many roles virtual technology can have in surgery, and this review explores potential value these technologies may have in hand surgery.


Subject(s)
Augmented Reality , COVID-19 , Specialties, Surgical , Virtual Reality , Humans , Hand/surgery
16.
J Environ Manage ; 334: 117480, 2023 May 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2232004

ABSTRACT

Greater efforts are required to educate the public about marine conservation as the marine environment continues to deteriorate over time. A way to remotely travel during the pandemic is provided by virtual reality technologies in marine ecotourism. In order to present a theoretical framework that explains consumers' propensity to participate in virtual reality technology, this study draws on the theories of perceived risk, trust, and attitude. An online survey with 451 respondents was administered in Singapore and structural equation modeling was applied to analyze the data. The results reflect that perceived health risk, perceived financial risk, perceived social risk, and perceived performance risk, mediated by trust and attitude, have a significant influence on consumers' willingness to participate in virtual reality technologies in marine ecotourism. After analyzing their total effects, trust was found to have the highest effect on willingness to participate, followed by attitude, perceived social risk, perceived financial risk, perceived health risk, and perceived performance risk. Overall, the present research offers new perspectives on comprehending the drivers of willingness to participate, as well as implicating policies to raise public awareness of marine conservation, as well as to raise more money to support marine conservation initiatives.


Subject(s)
Attitude , Virtual Reality , Surveys and Questionnaires , Trust , Consumer Behavior
17.
Int Orthop ; 47(3): 611-621, 2023 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2237485

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Extended reality (XR) is defined as a spectrum of technologies that range from purely virtual environments to enhanced real-world environments. In the past two decades, XR-assisted surgery has seen an increase in its use and also in research and development. This scoping review aims to map out the historical trends in these technologies and their future prospects, with an emphasis on the reported outcomes and ethical considerations on the use of these technologies. METHODS: A systematic search of PubMed, Scopus, and Embase for literature related to XR-assisted surgery and telesurgery was performed using Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses extension for scoping reviews (PRISMA-ScR) guidelines. Primary studies, peer-reviewed articles that described procedures performed by surgeons on human subjects and cadavers, as well as studies describing general surgical education, were included. Non-surgical procedures, bedside procedures, veterinary procedures, procedures performed by medical students, and review articles were excluded. Studies were classified into the following categories: impact on surgery (pre-operative planning and intra-operative navigation/guidance), impact on the patient (pain and anxiety), and impact on the surgeon (surgical training and surgeon confidence). RESULTS: One hundred and sixty-eight studies were included for analysis. Thirty-one studies investigated the use of XR for pre-operative planning concluded that virtual reality (VR) enhanced the surgeon's spatial awareness of important anatomical landmarks. This leads to shorter operating sessions and decreases surgical insult. Forty-nine studies explored the use of XR for intra-operative planning. They noted that augmented reality (AR) headsets highlight key landmarks, as well as important structures to avoid, which lowers the chance of accidental surgical trauma. Eleven studies investigated patients' pain and noted that VR is able to generate a meditative state. This is beneficial for patients, as it reduces the need for analgesics. Ten studies commented on patient anxiety, suggesting that VR is unsuccessful at altering patients' physiological parameters such as mean arterial blood pressure or cortisol levels. Sixty studies investigated surgical training whilst seven studies suggested that the use of XR-assisted technology increased surgeon confidence. CONCLUSION: The growth of XR-assisted surgery is driven by advances in hardware and software. Whilst augmented virtuality and mixed reality are underexplored, the use of VR is growing especially in the fields of surgical training and pre-operative planning. Real-time intra-operative guidance is key for surgical precision, which is being supplemented with AR technology. XR-assisted surgery is likely to undertake a greater role in the near future, given the effect of COVID-19 limiting physical presence and the increasing complexity of surgical procedures.


Subject(s)
Augmented Reality , COVID-19 , Surgeons , Virtual Reality , Humans , Software
18.
J Am Med Dir Assoc ; 24(4): 564-572, 2023 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2234840

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The development of negative behavioral and psychosocial factors (depression, anxiety, apathy, etc) is associated with poor well-being, which can contribute to health issues in ageing, especially in the context of COVID-19. Despite its relative novelty, fully immersive virtual reality (VR) interventions through 360° immersive videos are becoming more accessible and flexible and constitute an emerging method to potentially enhance well-being. The aim of this scoping review is to assess the effectiveness of 360° interventions on well-being in older adults with or without cognitive impairment, as well as cybersickness and attitudes toward this technology. DESIGN: Scoping review. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Older adults with or without cognitive impairment. METHODS: The PRISMA-SR guideline was followed. Four databases were used, and we selected articles published until April 2022. We have analyzed the effect of 360° videos on the well-being of older adults with respect to the study design, the population, the contents, the duration of intervention, and the outcomes. RESULTS: A total of 2262 articles were screened, of which 10 articles were finally included in this review. Most of them are pilot studies and used mixed methods including scales and interviews. The material and content of VR are diversified. Many behavioral and psychological outcomes were assessed, including anxiety, apathy, loneliness, depression, social engagement, quality of life, and emotions. The results were positive or mixed, according to the outcomes. We recorded few adverse events, and the interviews show contrasting results concerning the participants' feelings (ie, degree of immersion, familiarity with technology, and VR content). CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: The use of VR 360° videos seems feasible in community-dwelling older adults or residential aged care facilities, as they are safe and provide enjoyment. It constitutes an emerging and promising therapeutic tool to manage psychosocial disorders. This review provides key considerations for the design and implementation of interventions using VR 360° video in clinical practice.


Subject(s)
Apathy , COVID-19 , Virtual Reality , Aged , Humans , Aging , Quality of Life
19.
FEBS Open Bio ; 13(3): 396-407, 2023 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2219618

ABSTRACT

The use of gamified learning interventions is expanding in postsecondary education as a means to improve students' motivation and learning outcomes. Virtual laboratory simulations have been used in science education to supplement students' learning, as well as to increase engagement with course material. Due to COVID-19, many instructors sought to replace or supplement hands-on 'wet-lab' work in an online environment. In this paper, we explored how the use of head-mounted display technology in two laboratory simulations impacts learner motivation and learning outcomes. We used a mixed-methods approach to analyze the experience of 39 undergraduate participants, examining test scores pre- and postsimulation, qualitative feedback, and quantitative experience ratings. The head-mounted display technology was described as easy to use, with eye strain identified as a common occurrence. Participants had increased test scores following the laboratory simulations, with no significant difference between simulation groups. Very positive self-reported measures of motivation and learner engagement were documented. Ninety-one percent of participants agreed that virtual reality laboratory simulation would be a good supplement to regular teaching modalities. Overall, our results suggest that immersive virtual reality laboratory simulations experienced through head-mounted display technology can be used to enhance learning outcomes and increase learner motivation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Virtual Reality , Humans , Motivation , Learning , Students
20.
Nat Rev Urol ; 20(6): 325-326, 2023 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2185923
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