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1.
Am J Health Behav ; 46(5): 576-585, 2022 Oct 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2110727

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Tai Chi, an ancient Chinese martial art, has been credited for improving the physical and mental health of community-dwelling older adults. Virtual reality (VR) has developed as a therapeutic technique for improving health and well-being in older adults. Previous research on exercise-based VR interventions in older adults has focused primarily on the physical and cognitive health effects. The extent to which a program integrating the ancient practice of Tai Chi with virtual reality might benefit older individuals' physical and mental health is an unknown entity. In this pilot study, we examined potential advantages of the virtual Tai Chi program in terms of health outcomes, as well as to gather qualitative data on the barriers to VR program participation. METHODS: We conducted semi-structured, in-depth interviews with 5 participants who had participated at least 5 years in traditional Tai Chi. RESULTS: Three key salient themes emerged as beneficial results of VR experiences: (1) mindfulness/ meditation, (2) enjoyment, and (3) physical exercise. Participants also reported 3 main challenges: (1) some difficulties with controllers and functions, (2) cybersickness/pain, and (3) absence of group synergy. CONCLUSIONS: These challenges suggest further avenues of investigation for researchers in refining this approach.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Tai Ji , Virtual Reality , Humans , Aged , Tai Ji/methods , Tai Ji/psychology , Pilot Projects , Mental Health , Pandemics
2.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 775, 2022 Nov 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2117192

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since COVID-19 limits safe clinical practice settings, virtual reality (VR) emerged as an alternative to practical education. Using VR simulation to learn mechanical ventilation is rare in nursing education. METHODS: This study developed a VR simulation program for mechanical ventilation care and evaluated its effects. We adopted a quasi-experiment design. Participants were fourth-year students across nursing colleges in South Korea. RESULTS: The interaction effect of the intervention time point and control group, to which the VR simulation program was applied, showed a significant difference in self-efficacy (F = 19.54, p < .001) and clinical reasoning capacity (F = 16.97, p < .001). Learning satisfaction of the experimental group was statistically significantly higher than that of the control group(F = 5.22, p = .026). The level of learning immersion (t = - 3.13, p = .003) and learning satisfaction (t = - 3.49, p = .001) were statistically significantly higher in the experimental group than in the control group. CONCLUSION: These findings confirmed that the VR stimulation program for nursing students had a positive effect on their self-efficacy, clinical reasoning capacity, and learning satisfaction. Furthermore, it was effective in improving their nursing competence.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Nursing , Students, Nursing , Virtual Reality , Humans , Respiration, Artificial , Clinical Competence , COVID-19/epidemiology
3.
Medicina (Kaunas) ; 58(11)2022 Oct 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2121403

ABSTRACT

Background and Objectives: for isolated older adults, alternative training indoors to maintain balance is essential; however, related studies are lacking. To improve the balance of isolated older adults and reduce their fear of falling, we aimed to examine the balance-keeping effect of a virtual reality (VR) program and motor imagery training (MIT) and propose training that could improve physical activity among older adults. Methods: a total of 34 older adults admitted to a convalescent hospital were assessed. VR (n = 12) and MIT (n = 10) groups completed their assigned intervention in six weeks, whereas the control group (CG) (n = 12) did not. The follow-up was performed after two weeks. Results: in group × time interactions, body center movement area, open and closed eyes balance scores, and fall efficacy were significantly different (p < 0.05). In contrast with the VR group, the MIT group did not show a significant difference in the open or closed eyes balance scores depending on the period. However, there was a significant difference between the MIT group and CG in the open eyes balance score post-test (d = 1.13, 95% confidence interval, 0.40-12.33). Conclusions: we propose VR and MIT as training methods to prevent physical weakness in isolated older adults.


Subject(s)
Postural Balance , Virtual Reality , Humans , Aged , Fear , Exercise Therapy/methods
4.
PLoS One ; 17(10): e0276267, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2079763

ABSTRACT

Many university-taught courses moved to online form since the outbreak of the global pandemic of coronavirus disease (COVID-19). Distance learning has become broadly used as a result of the widely applied lockdowns, however, many students lack personal contact in the learning process. A classical web-based distance learning does not provide means for natural interpersonal interaction. The technology of immersive virtual reality (iVR) may mitigate this problem. Current research has been aimed mainly at specific instances of collaborative immersive virtual environment (CIVE) applications for learning. The fields utilizing iVR for knowledge construction and skills training with the use of spatial visualizations show promising results. The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of collaborative and individual use of iVR for learning geography, specifically training in hypsography. Furthermore, the study's goals were to determine whether collaborative learning would be more effective and to investigate the key elements in which collaborative and individual learning were expected to differ-motivation and use of cognitive resources. The CIVE application developed at Masaryk University was utilized to train 80 participants in inferring conclusions from cartographic visualizations. The collaborative and individual experimental group underwent a research procedure consisting of a pretest, training in iVR, posttest, and questionnaires. A statistical comparison between the geography pretest and posttest for the individual learning showed a significant increase in the score (p = 0.024, ES = 0.128) and speed (p = 0.027, ES = 0.123), while for the collaborative learning, there was a significant increase in the score (p<0.001, ES = 0.333) but not in speed (p = 1.000, ES = 0.000). Thus, iVR as a medium proved to be an effective tool for learning geography. However, comparing the collaborative and individual learning showed no significant difference in the learning gain (p = 0.303, ES = 0.115), speed gain (p = 0.098, ES = 0.185), or performance motivation (p = 0.368, ES = 0.101). Nevertheless, the collaborative learning group had significantly higher use of cognitive resources (p = 0.046, ES = 0.223) than the individual learning group. The results were discussed in relation to the cognitive load theories, and future research directions for iVR learning were proposed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Virtual Reality , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Learning , Geography
5.
Sensors (Basel) ; 22(20)2022 Oct 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2071708

ABSTRACT

In the world reference context, although virtual reality, augmented reality and mixed reality have been emerging methodologies for several years, only today technological and scientific advances have made them suitable to revolutionize clinical care and medical contexts through the provision of enhanced functionalities and improved health services. This systematic review provides the state-of-the-art applications of the Microsoft® HoloLens 2 in a medical and healthcare context. Focusing on the potential that this technology has in providing digitally supported clinical care, also but not only in relation to the COVID-19 pandemic, studies that proved the applicability and feasibility of HoloLens 2 in a medical and healthcare scenario were considered. The review presents a thorough examination of the different studies conducted since 2019, focusing on HoloLens 2 medical sub-field applications, device functionalities provided to users, software/platform/framework used, as well as the study validation. The results provided in this paper could highlight the potential and limitations of the HoloLens 2-based innovative solutions and bring focus to emerging research topics, such as telemedicine, remote control and motor rehabilitation.


Subject(s)
Augmented Reality , COVID-19 , Virtual Reality , Humans , Pandemics , Delivery of Health Care
6.
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand ; 66(9): 1077-1082, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2063327

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Pain management in children is often inadequate, and the single most common painful procedure in children who are hospitalized is needle procedures. Virtual reality (VR) has been shown to decrease anxiety and pain in children undergoing painful procedures primarily in children from the age of 7 years. Our aim for this study is to investigate patient satisfaction and pain reduction by using a three-dimensional VR interactive game as a distraction in 4-7 years old children during venous cannulation. METHODS: In this randomized clinical trial, we enrolled 106 children aged 4-7 years who were scheduled for venous cannulation. Patients assigned to the control group were adherent to standard of care, including topical numbing cream, positioning, and distraction in this group by games of choice on a tablet/smartphone. In the study group, children were adherent to standard of care and were distracted by an interactive VR game. Primary outcomes were patient satisfaction and the procedural pain assessed by using Wong-Baker Faces Pain Rating Scale; secondary outcomes were the procedural time and any adverse events. RESULTS: We found an overall high level of patient satisfaction with our regime of topical numbing cream, positioning, and distraction. The primary outcome of pain during the procedure was median 20 mm (IQR 0-40) and 20 mm (IQR 0-55) (Wong-Baker 0-100 mm) in the VR group and the control group, respectively (difference: 0 mm, 95%CI: 0-20, p = .19). No significant difference was found in procedural times. The number of adverse effects was low, with no significant difference between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: VR distraction is an acceptable form of distraction for children 4-7 years old when combined with topical numbing cream and positioning during preoperative venous cannulation. No difference was found between VR- and smartphone/tablet distraction.


Subject(s)
Pain, Procedural , Virtual Reality , Catheterization , Child , Child, Preschool , Humans , Pain/etiology , Pain/prevention & control , Pain Management/methods , Pain, Procedural/etiology , Pain, Procedural/prevention & control
7.
Korean J Intern Med ; 37(6): 1223-1233, 2022 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2055497

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has accelerated digital transformation (DT). We investigated the trend of the public interest in technologies regarding the DT and Koreans' experiences and their perceptions of the future impact of these technologies. METHODS: Using Google Trends, the relative search volume (RSV) for topics including "coronavirus," "artificial intelligence," "cloud," "big data," and "metaverse" were retrieved for the period from January 2020 to January 2022. A survey was conducted to assess the population's knowledge, experience, and perceptions regarding the DT. RESULTS: The RSV for "metaverse" showed an increasing trend, in contrast to those for "cloud," "big data," and "coronavirus." The RSVs for DT-related keywords had a negative correlation with the number of new weekly COVID-19 cases. In our survey, 78.1% responded that the positive impact of the DT on future lives would outweigh the negative impact. The predictors for this positive perception included experiences with the metaverse (4.0-fold) and virtual reality (VR)/augmented reality (AR) education (3.8-fold). Respondents predicted that the biggest change would occur in the healthcare sector after transportation/ communication. CONCLUSION: Koreans' search interest for "metaverse" showed an increasing trend during the COVID-19 pandemic. Koreans believe that DT will bring about big changes in the healthcare sector. Most of the survey respondents have a positive outlook about the impact of DT on future life, and the predictors for this positive perception include the experiences with the metaverse or VR/AR education. Healthcare professionals need to accelerate the adoption of DT in clinical practice, education and training.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Virtual Reality , Humans , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Artificial Intelligence , Perception
8.
Neurosurg Focus ; 53(2): E4, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2054887

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Training of residents is an essential but time-consuming and costly task in the surgical disciplines. During the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, surgical education became even more challenging because of the reduced caseload due to the increased shift to corona care. In this context, augmented 360° 3D virtual reality (VR) videos of surgical procedures enable effective off-site training through virtual participation in the surgery. The goal of this study was to establish and evaluate 360° 3D VR operative videos for neurosurgical training. METHODS: Using a 360° camera, the authors recorded three standard neurosurgical procedures: a lumbar discectomy, brain metastasis resection, and clipping of an aneurysm. Combined with the stereoscopic view of the surgical microscope, 7- to 10-minute 360° 3D VR videos augmented with annotations, overlays, and commentary were created. These videos were then presented to the neurosurgical residents at the authors' institution using a head-mounted display. Before viewing the videos, the residents were asked to fill out a questionnaire indicating their VR experience and self-assessment of surgical skills regarding the specific procedure. After watching the videos, the residents completed another questionnaire to evaluate their quality and usefulness. The parameters were scaled with a 5-point Likert scale. RESULTS: Twenty-two residents participated in this study. The mean years of experience of the participants in neurosurgery was 3.2 years, ranging from the 1st through the 7th year of training. Most participants (86.4%) had no or less than 15 minutes of VR experience. The overall quality of the videos was rated good to very good. Immersion, the feeling of being in the operating room, was high, and almost all participants (91%) stated that 360° VR videos provide a useful addition to the neurosurgical training. VR sickness was negligible in the cohort. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, the authors demonstrated the feasibility and high acceptance of augmented 360° 3D VR videos in neurosurgical training. Augmentation of 360° videos with complementary and interactive content has the potential to effectively support trainees in acquiring conceptual knowledge. Further studies are necessary to investigate the effectiveness of their use in improving surgical skills.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neurosurgery , Virtual Reality , Clinical Competence , Humans , Neurosurgery/education , Neurosurgical Procedures/methods
9.
Psychiatr Danub ; 34(Suppl 8): 276-284, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2045060

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 pandemic as much as 40% of the global population reported deterioration in depressive mood, whereas 26% experienced increased need for emotional support. At the same time, the availability of on-site psychiatric care declined drastically because of the COVID-19 preventive social restriction measures. To address this shortfall, telepsychiatry assumes a greater role in mental health care services. Among various on-line treatment modalities, immersive virtual reality (VR) environments provide an important resource for adjusting the emotional state in people living with depression. Therefore, we reviewed the literature on VR-based interventions for depression treatment during the COVID-19 pandemic. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: We searched the PubMed and Scopus databases, as well as the Internet, for full-length articles published during the period of 2020-2022 citing a set of following key words: "virtual reality", "depression", "COVID-19", as well as their terminological synonyms and word combinations. The inclusion criteria were: 1) the primary or secondary study objectives included the treatment of depressive states or symptoms; 2) the immersive VR intervention used a head-mounted display (HMD); 3) the article presented clinical study results and/or case reports 4) the study was urged by or took place during the COVID-19-associated lockdown period. RESULTS: Overall, 904 records were retrieved using the search strategy. Remarkably, only three studies and one case report satisfied all the inclusion criteria elaborated for the review. These studies included 155 participants: representatives of healthy population (n=40), a case report of a patient with major depressive disorder (n=1), patients with cognitive impairments (n=25), and COVID-19 patients who had survived from ICU treatment (n=89). The described interventions used immersive VR scenarios, in combination with other treatment techniques, and targeted depression. The most robust effect, which the VR-based approach had demonstrated, was an immediate post-intervention improvement in mood and the reduction of depressive symptoms in healthy population. However, studies showed no significant findings in relation to both short-term effectiveness in treatment of depression and primary prevention of depressive symptoms. Also, safety issues were identified, such as: three participants developed mild adverse events (e.g., headache, "giddiness", and VR misuse behavior), and three cases of discomfort related to wearing a VR device were registered. CONCLUSIONS: There has been a lack of appropriately designed clinical trials of the VR-based interventions for depression since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. Moreover, all these studies had substantial limitations due to the imprecise study design, small sample size, and minor safety issues, that did not allow us making meaningful judgments and conclude regarding the efficacy of VR in the treatment of depression, taking into account those investigations we have retrieved upon the inclusion criteria of our particularistic review design. This may call for randomized, prospective studies of the short-term and long-lasting effect of VR modalities in managing negative affectivity (sadness, anxiety, anhedonia, self-guilt, ignorance) and inducing positive affectivity (feeling of happiness, joy, motivation, self-confidence, viability) in patients suffering from clinical depression.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Depressive Disorder, Major , Psychiatry , Telemedicine , Virtual Reality , Anxiety , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Pandemics , Prospective Studies
10.
Sensors (Basel) ; 22(16)2022 Aug 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2024043

ABSTRACT

In recent years, there has been a renewed interest in using virtual reality (VR) to (re)create different scenarios and environments with interactive and immersive experiences. Although VR has been popular in the tourism sector to reconfigure tourists' relationships with places and overcome mobility restrictions, its usage in senior cyclotourism has been understudied. VR is suggested to positively impact tourism promotion, cycling simulation, and active and healthy ageing due to physical and mental rehabilitation. The purpose of this study is to assess the senior citizens' perceived experience and attitudes toward a designed 360° VR cyclotouristic experiment, using a head-mounted display (HMD) setting within a laboratory context. A total of 76 participants aged between 50 and 97 years old were involved in convergent parallel mixed-method research, and data were collected using a questionnaire based on the technology acceptance model, as well as the researchers' field notes. Findings suggest that 360° VR with HMD can be an effective assistive technology to foster senior cyclotourism by promoting tourism sites, simulating the cycling pedaling effect, and improving senior citizens' general wellbeing and independence with physical and mental rehabilitation.


Subject(s)
Self-Help Devices , Smart Glasses , Virtual Reality , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Computer Simulation , Humans , Middle Aged , Tourism
11.
BMJ Open ; 12(8): e061722, 2022 08 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2001849

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Increasingly more studies are being conducted on the use of virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) in aged care settings. These technologies can decrease experiences of loneliness which is especially important during the COVID-19 pandemic. With the growing interest in using VR/AR in care settings among older adults, a comprehensive review of studies examining the facilitators and barriers of adopting VR/AR in these settings is needed. This scoping review will focus on facilitators and barriers related to VR/AR in care settings among older adults, as well as the impact on social engagement and/or loneliness. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: We will follow the Joanna Briggs Institute scoping review methodology. We will search the following databases: CINHAL, Embase, Medline, PsycINFO, Scopus and Web of Science. Additional articles will be handpicked from reference lists of included articles. Inclusion criteria includes articles that focus on older adults using VR or AR in aged care settings. Our team (which includes patient and family partners, an academic nurse researcher, a clinical lead and trainees) will be involved in the search, review and analysis process. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: We will be collecting data from publicly available articles for this scoping review, so ethics approval is not required. By providing a comprehensive overview of the current evidence on the strategies, facilitators, and barriers of using VR/AR in aged care settings, findings will offer insights and recommendations for future research and practice to better implement VR/AR. The results of this scoping review will be shared through conference presentations and an open-access publication in a peer-reviewed journal.


Subject(s)
Augmented Reality , COVID-19 , Virtual Reality , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Research Design , Review Literature as Topic , Social Participation
12.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(15)2022 08 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1994059

ABSTRACT

Improving the mental health of urban residents is a global public health priority. This study builds on existing work that demonstrates the ability of virtual exposure to restorative environments to improve population mental health. It compares the restorative effects of green, blue and historic environments delivered by both flat screen and immersive virtual reality technology, and triangulates data from psychological, physiological and qualitative sources. Results from the subjective measure analyses showed that exposures to all the experimental videos were associated with self-reported reduced anxiety and improved mood, although the historic environment was associated with a smaller reduction of anxiety (p < 0.01). These results were supported by the qualitative accounts. For two of the electroencephalography (EEG) frequency bands, higher levels of activity were observed for historic environments. In relation to the mode of delivery, the subjective measures did not suggest any effect, while for the EEG analyses there was evidence of a significant effect of technology across three out of four frequency bands. In conclusion, this study adds to the evidence that the benefits of restorative environments can be delivered through virtual exposure and suggests that virtual reality may provide greater levels of immersion than flat screen viewing.


Subject(s)
Smart Glasses , Virtual Reality , Anxiety Disorders , Electroencephalography , Humans , Mental Health
13.
Br J Nurs ; 31(14): 756-757, 2022 07 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1975395
14.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 483, 2022 Jun 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1951190

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Virtual reality (VR) is a computer-generated simulation technique which yields plenty of benefits and its application in medical education is growing. This study explored the effectiveness of a VR Basic Life Support (BLS) training compared to a web-based training during the COVID-19 pandemic, in which face-to-face trainings were disrupted or reduced. METHODS: This randomised, double-blinded, controlled study, enrolled 1st year medical students. The control group took part in web-based BLS training, the intervention group received an additional individual VR BLS training. The primary endpoint was the no-flow time-an indicator for the quality of BLS-, assessed during a structural clinical examination, in which also the overall quality of BLS (secondary outcome) was rated. The tertiary outcome was the learning gain of the undergraduates, assessed with a comparative self-assessment (CSA). RESULTS: Data from 88 undergraduates (n = 46 intervention- and n = 42 control group) were analysed. The intervention group had a significant lower no-flow time (p = .009) with a difference between the two groups of 28% (95%-CI [8%;43%]). The overall BLS performance of the intervention group was also significantly better than the control group with a mean difference of 15.44 points (95%-CI [21.049.83]), p < .001. In the CSA the undergraduates of the intervention group reported a significant higher learning gain. CONCLUSION: VR proved to be effective in enhancing process quality of BLS, therefore, the integration of VR into resuscitation trainings should be considered. Further research needs to explore which combination of instructional designs leads to deliberate practice and mastery learning of BLS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation , Students, Medical , Virtual Reality , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation/education , Clinical Competence , Humans , Pandemics
15.
J Nerv Ment Dis ; 210(10): 754-759, 2022 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1948589

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Virtual reality therapy (VRT) is a new psychotherapeutic approach integrating virtual reality technology and psychotherapy. This case series aimed to study effectiveness of VRT in treating psychological problems. We described four cases of first-line health care professionals with emerging clinically significant early psychological problems during the COVID-19 outbreak, and specifically received the VRT treatment. We compared the Patient Health Questionnaire 9 items (PHQ-9), Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 (GAD-7), PHQ-15, and Athens Insomnia Scale to evaluate psychological symptoms and sleep quality before and after sessions. All four cases showed a reduction in scale comparison. General scores of the PHQ-9 reduced 65%, GAD-7 reduced 52.17%, PHQ-15 decreased 38.17%, and scores of the Athens Insomnia Scale reduced 67.44%. Meanwhile, a reduction in depression, anxiety, psychosomatic, and sleeping symptoms was also found, which decreased 76.92% in general. These results are highly significant statistically. This case series demonstrated the effectiveness of VRT on psychological problems as a promising approach to apply on various psychological distress and disorders.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Virtual Reality , Anxiety/psychology , Depression/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Pandemics , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/therapy
16.
PLoS One ; 17(2): e0262703, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1938409

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The novel coronavirus-19 (COVID-19) has taken an immense physical, social, and emotional toll on frontline healthcare workers. Research has documented higher levels of anxiety, depression, and burnout among healthcare workers during the pandemic. Thus, creative interventions are needed now more than ever to provide brief, accessible support to frontline workers. Virtual reality is a rapidly growing technology with potential psychological applications. In this study, we piloted a three-minute Tranquil Cinematic-VR simulation of a nature scene to lower subjective stress among frontline healthcare workers in COVID-19 treatment units. We chose to film a nature scene because of the extensive empirical literature documenting the benefits of nature exposure and health. METHODS: A convenience sample of frontline healthcare workers, including direct care providers, indirect care providers, and support or administrative services, were recruited from three COVID-19 units located in the United States. Inclusion criteria for participation included adults aged 18 years and older who could read and speak in English and were currently employed by the healthcare system. Participants viewed a 360-degree video capture of a lush, green nature preserve in an Oculus Go or Pico G2 4K head-mounted display. Prior to viewing the simulation, participants completed a brief demographic questionnaire and the visual analogue scale to rate their subjective stress on a 10-point scale, with 1 = 'Not at all stressed' to 10 = 'Extremely stressed.' We conducted paired t-tests to examine pre- and post-simulation changes in subjective stress as well as Kruskal-Wallis tests and Mann-Whitney U tests to examine differences by demographic variables. All analyses were conducted in SPSS statistical software version 28.0. We defined statistical significance as a p-value less than .05. RESULTS: A total of 102 individuals consented to participate in the study. Eighty-four (82.4%) participants reported providing direct patient care, 73 (71.6%) identified as women, 49 (48.0%) were between the ages of 25-34 years old, and 35 (34.3%) had prior experience with VR. The pre-simulation mean stress score was 5.5±2.2, with a range of 1 to 10. Thirty-three (32.4%) participants met the 6.8 cutoff for high stress pre-simulation. Pre-simulation stress scores did not differ by any demographic variables. Post-simulation, we observed a significant reduction in subjective stress scores from pre- to post-simulation (mean change = -2.2±1.7, t = 12.749, p < .001), with a Cohen's d of 1.08, indicating a very large effect. Further, only four (3.9%) participants met the cutoff for high stress after the simulation. Post-simulations scores did not differ by provider type, age range, gender, or prior experience with virtual reality. CONCLUSIONS: Findings from this pilot study suggest that the application of this Tranquil Cinematic-VR simulation was effective in reducing subjective stress among frontline healthcare workers in the short-term. More research is needed to compare the Tranquil Cinematic-VR simulation to a control condition and assess subjective and objective measures of stress over time.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/therapy , COVID-19 , Health Personnel/psychology , Virtual Reality , Adult , Anxiety , Burnout, Professional/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Complementary Therapies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pilot Projects , Young Adult
17.
Games Health J ; 11(4): 262-267, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1937622

ABSTRACT

Objective: The use of virtual reality (VR) has been increasing worldwide, as devices are becoming more sophisticated and provide an escape from reality during the COVID-19 lockdown. This recent rise in the use of VR leads to new side effects being reported, such as dissociative symptoms that may or may not constitute a mental health concern. This retrospective study investigated the prevalence and intensity of dissociative symptoms in VR users, as well as some potential predisposing conditions that may trigger them, and their impact on the subjects' wellbeing. Materials and Methods: We conducted a survey (n = 358) that was posted on VR Facebook groups. This survey was approved by the University of Lisbon Medical Faculty's IRB, and comprised a modified version of the Clinician-Administered Dissociative State Scale (CADSS) and questions regarding potential risk factors known to induce dissociative disorders or experiences. Results: Data analysis revealed that 83.9% participants reported dissociative symptoms, with varying intensity according to CADSS (X̄=7.62;s=7.89). Significant correlations were found between CADSS score and the time spent playing, the use of software applications (apps) that involve virtual hands or hand tracking, history of previous dissociative experiences, traumatic childhood events, avoidant coping strategies, and psychiatric disorders. Nonetheless, most participants categorized the symptoms as nonanxiogenic (85.8%) and minute lasting (77.4%). Conclusion: In conclusion, this study revealed that although VR can induce dissociative experiences, they seem to be short lasting and nonthreatening to the individual's wellbeing and might be predicted or attenuated by managing other known risk factors for dissociative phenomena.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Video Games , Virtual Reality , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Communicable Disease Control , Dissociative Disorders/diagnosis , Dissociative Disorders/epidemiology , Dissociative Disorders/psychology , Humans , Retrospective Studies
18.
Med Educ Online ; 27(1): 2101417, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1937567

ABSTRACT

As a consequence of the continued Covid-19 lockdown in Germany, in-hospital teaching for medical students was impossible. While lectures and other theoretical training were relatively easily converted into online sessions using platforms such as Moodle, Zoom and Microsoft Teams, this was not the case for practical skills and clinical interventions, such as bronchoscopy or colonoscopy. This study describes a workaround that was implemented at the Saarland University Hospital utilizing virtual reality equipment to convey the impressions of shadowing clinical procedures to the students without physical presence. To achieve this, 3D 180° videos of key clinical interventions of various internal medicine specialities were recorded, cut, and censored. The videos were uploaded to the e-learning YouTube channel of our institution and shared with the students via the private share function. The students could choose whether to use a VR-viewer to watch the videos immersively or to watch them without a viewer on a screen non-immersively. At the end of the course after 1 week, the students completed a questionnaire anonymously focusing on learning-success regarding the presented topics, a self-assessment, and an evaluation of the course. A total of 27 students watched the videos with a VR-Viewer and 74 watched non-immersively. Although the VR-viewer group self-assessed their expertise higher, there was no significant difference between the two groups in the learning-success test score. However, students in the VR-viewer group rated the learning atmosphere, comprehensibility, and overall recommendation of the course significantly higher. They also agreed significantly more to the statement, that they gained a better conception of the presented procedures, and that virtual reality might be an appropriate tool for online teaching. Video-assisted teaching facilitates learning and might be a valuable add-on to conventional teaching.Abbreviations: Covid-19: severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2; 3D: three-dimensional; 2D: Two-dimensional; VR: virtual reality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Medical , Virtual Reality , Communicable Disease Control , Germany , Hospitals , Humans , Surveys and Questionnaires
19.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(13)2022 06 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1934048

ABSTRACT

Anxiety and depression have been growing global mental health problems. The following studies explored the effect of interactive VR scenarios to find a low-cost and high-efficiency solution. Study 1 designed a 2 (anxiety and depression state) × 4 (interactive VR scenarios) experiment, the results of 20 participants showed that the designed scenarios had good restoration and presence, assisting to improve depression mood for people with mild to moderate anxiety and depression. Study 2 further investigated the intervention effects of two environment types (urban and park) and four interactive activities (automatic viewing, free-roaming, fishing, and watering plants in the park environment), based on data from a 10-minute experiment conducted by 195 participants with mild to moderate anxiety and depression. The subjective scales, EEG and EMG, and scenario experience were analyzed and the results showed that: (1) the restorative and present VR scenarios were beneficial in alleviating state anxiety and depression; (2) the restorative environment and presence were significantly and positively related to the reduction of anxiety and depression respectively, moreover, presence mediated the restorative environment on the recovery from anxiety and depression; (3) the environmental settings, the complexity of interaction, human factors, and maturity of VR devices and technology were also key factors that influenced the effects of interactive VR scenario experience and intervention. These studies revealed VR psychological intervention scenarios could be designed with comprehensive factors. Moreover, they might help pave the way for future study in exploring the physiology and psychology mode in virtual and real spaces, enhancing intervention effectiveness.


Subject(s)
Depression , Virtual Reality , Anxiety/therapy , Anxiety Disorders , Depression/therapy , Humans
20.
Front Public Health ; 10: 852311, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1933891

ABSTRACT

Background: Physical activity is an essential need of the human body that helps improve the physical fitness of an individual and creates a positive impact on overall wellbeing. Smartphone applications play an essential role in providing several benefits to consumers by offering various capabilities in terms of health and fitness.COVID-19 preventive measures shut down public places, and people cannot go to the gym and parks for physical activity. Smart applications for physical activity are an effective way to keep active while staying at home. Objective: The objective of the present study was to assess the mediating role of the e-platforms physical activity among the Chinese people in China during the COVID-19 lockdown. Method: The participants in this study were Chinese citizens living in home isolation during the early stages of the epidemic in China. The primary data was collected via an online survey using a convenience sample strategy in accordance with the study purpose. The collected data were cleaned by using the SPSS-25 statistical software. SmartPLS 3.0 software was used to investigate the suggested study framework utilizing the structural equation modeling technique. Results: Descriptive statistics shows that the ratio of gender includes 49% (n = 2,626) male and 51% females in the entire sample. SEM results show that all hypotheses (H1: ß = 0.497, T = 43.068, P = <0.001; H2: ß = 0.498, T = 41.078, P = <0.001; H3: ß = 0.498, T = 41.078, P = <0.001; H4: ß = 0.471, T = 39.103, P = <0.001; H5: ß = 0.468, T = 42.633, P = <0.001; H6: ß = 0.251, T = 11.212, P = <0.001; H7: ß = 0.367, T = 16.032, P = <0.001; H8: ß = 0.170, T = 13.750, P = <0.001; H9: ß = 0.125, T = 10.604, P = <0.001; H10: ß = 0.173, T = 14.842, P = <0.001) were statistically confirmed. Conclusion: In COVID-19, when there are limited physical activity resources, smart applications play an essential role as an alternative to gyms and change people's perspective regarding the adoption of health and fitness. Smart applications have made exercise and physical activity accessible and convenient to adopt.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mobile Applications , Virtual Reality , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Exercise , Female , Humans , Male
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