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1.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(10)2022 May 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1875640

ABSTRACT

Viral infections can be fatal and consequently, they are a serious threat to human health. Therefore, the development of vaccines and appropriate antiviral therapeutic agents is essential. Depending on the virus, it can cause an acute or a chronic infection. The characteristics of viruses can act as inhibiting factors for the development of appropriate treatment methods. Genome editing technology, including the use of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins, zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), is a technology that can directly target and modify genomic sequences in almost all eukaryotic cells. The development of this technology has greatly expanded its applicability in life science research and gene therapy development. Research on the use of this technology to develop therapeutics for viral diseases is being conducted for various purposes, such as eliminating latent infections or providing resistance to new infections. In this review, we will look at the current status of the development of viral therapeutic agents using genome editing technology and discuss how this technology can be used as a new treatment approach for viral diseases.


Subject(s)
Gene Editing , Virus Diseases , Genome , Humans , Technology , Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases/genetics , Virus Diseases/genetics , Virus Diseases/therapy
2.
Biomed Pharmacother ; 148: 112743, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1803592

ABSTRACT

Viral infections are a common cause of morbidity worldwide. The emergence of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) has led to more attention to viral infections and finding novel therapeutics. The CRISPR-Cas9 system has been recently proposed as a potential therapeutic tool for the treatment of viral diseases. Here, we review the research progress in the use of CRISPR-Cas technology for treating viral infections, as well as the strategies for improving the delivery of this gene-editing tool in vivo. Key challenges that hinder the widespread clinical application of CRISPR-Cas9 technology are also discussed, and several possible directions for future research are proposed.


Subject(s)
CRISPR-Cas Systems , Gene Editing/methods , Genetic Therapy/methods , Virus Diseases/therapy , COVID-19/therapy , Genome, Viral , HIV Infections/therapy , Hepatitis B/therapy , Herpesviridae Infections/therapy , Humans , Papillomavirus Infections/therapy , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Semin Respir Crit Care Med ; 43(1): 60-74, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1688937

ABSTRACT

Severe viral infections may result in severe illnesses capable of causing acute respiratory failure that could progress rapidly to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), related to worse outcomes, especially in individuals with a higher risk of infection, including the elderly and those with comorbidities such as asthma, diabetes mellitus and chronic respiratory or cardiovascular disease. In addition, in cases of severe viral pneumonia, co-infection with bacteria such as Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus is related to worse outcomes. Respiratory viruses like influenza, rhinovirus, parainfluenza, adenovirus, metapneumovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, and coronavirus have increasingly been detected. This trend has become more prevalent, especially in critically ill patients, due to the availability and implementation of molecular assays in clinical practice. Respiratory viruses have been diagnosed as a frequent cause of severe pneumonia, including cases of community-acquired pneumonia, hospital-acquired pneumonia, and ventilator-associated pneumonia. In this review, we will discuss the epidemiology, diagnosis, clinical characteristics, management, and prognosis of patients with severe infections due to respiratory viruses, with a focus on influenza viruses, non-influenza viruses, and coronaviruses.


Subject(s)
Respiratory Tract Infections , Virus Diseases , Aged , Coronavirus , Humans , Patient Acuity , Prognosis , Respiratory Tract Infections/diagnosis , Respiratory Tract Infections/epidemiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/therapy , Respiratory Tract Infections/virology , Virus Diseases/diagnosis , Virus Diseases/epidemiology , Virus Diseases/therapy
4.
Pediatr Infect Dis J ; 41(4): e146-e148, 2022 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1706949

ABSTRACT

Respiratory viruses were detected by multiplex-polymerase chain reaction from oropharyngeal swabs in 114/168 (67.9%) children with acute respiratory infection presenting to 5 pediatric practices in Germany between November 2020 and April 2021. In contrast to rhino- (48.8%), adeno- (14.3%) and endemic coronaviruses (14.9%), SARS-CoV-2 and influenza virus were detected only once; respiratory syncytial virus was not detected. This demonstrates differing impacts of pandemic infection control measures on the spread of respiratory viruses.


Subject(s)
Primary Health Care , Respiratory Tract Infections/epidemiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/etiology , Virus Diseases/epidemiology , Virus Diseases/etiology , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Child , Child, Preschool , Disease Susceptibility , Female , Humans , Incidence , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Influenza, Human/virology , Male , Pandemics , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/epidemiology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/virology , Respiratory Tract Infections/diagnosis , Respiratory Tract Infections/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Virus Diseases/diagnosis , Virus Diseases/therapy
5.
Viruses ; 14(2)2022 01 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1662709

ABSTRACT

The human body is colonized by a wide range of microorganisms. The field of viromics has expanded since the first reports on the detection of viruses via metagenomic sequencing in 2002. With the continued development of reference materials and databases, viral metagenomic approaches have been used to explore known components of the virome and discover new viruses from various types of samples. The virome has attracted substantial interest since the outbreak of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Increasing numbers of studies and review articles have documented the diverse virome in various sites in the human body, as well as interactions between the human host and the virome with regard to health and disease. However, there have been few studies of direct causal relationships. Viral metagenomic analyses often lack standard references and are potentially subject to bias. Moreover, most virome-related review articles have focused on the gut virome and did not investigate the roles of the virome in other sites of the body in human disease. This review presents an overview of viral metagenomics, with updates regarding the relations between alterations in the human virome and the pathogenesis of human diseases, recent findings related to COVID-19, and therapeutic applications related to the human virome.


Subject(s)
Gastrointestinal Microbiome/genetics , Metagenome , Metagenomics/methods , Virome/genetics , Virus Diseases/drug therapy , Animals , COVID-19/therapy , Humans , Mice , Obesity/complications , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Virus Diseases/therapy , Viruses/classification , Viruses/genetics
6.
Semin Respir Crit Care Med ; 42(6): 735-736, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1591801
7.
Public Health ; 201: 78-88, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1517445

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To analyze the literature to determine whether autohemotherapy has any effect either clinically or on the immune system on viral diseases on the last ten years. STUDY DESIGN: Systematic review. METHODS: Searches from the year 2010, with at least 5 patients were conducted in PubMed/MEDLINE, Embase, Scopus, Cochrane, LILACS, SciELO, and Web of Science databases. Hand searches were performed in systematic reviews and literature reviews related to autohemotherapy. Unpublished manuscripts were hand-searched in specialized journals. RESULTS: Eight articles were included. Hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, and Coronavirus were evaluated. Autohemotherapy had good results in hepatitis C, hepatitis B, and Coronavirus. CONCLUSION: Autohemotherapy is a safe practice that improves symptoms in the treatment of hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, and Coronavirus. It is necessary to perform more prospective comparative studies with homogeneous protocols.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Virus Diseases , Humans , Prospective Studies , Systematic Reviews as Topic , Virus Diseases/therapy
8.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(20)2021 Oct 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477961

ABSTRACT

Chronic diseases and viral infections have threatened human life over the ages and constitute the main reason for increasing death globally. The rising burden of these diseases extends to negatively affecting the economy and trading globally, as well as daily life, which requires inexpensive, novel, and safe therapeutics. Therefore, scientists have paid close attention to probiotics as safe remedies to combat these morbidities owing to their health benefits and biotherapeutic effects. Probiotics have been broadly adopted as functional foods, nutraceuticals, and food supplements to improve human health and prevent some morbidity. Intriguingly, recent research indicates that probiotics are a promising solution for treating and prophylactic against certain dangerous diseases. Probiotics could also be associated with their essential role in animating the immune system to fight COVID-19 infection. This comprehensive review concentrates on the newest literature on probiotics and their metabolism in treating life-threatening diseases, including immune disorders, pathogens, inflammatory and allergic diseases, cancer, cardiovascular disease, gastrointestinal dysfunctions, and COVID-19 infection. The recent information in this report will particularly furnish a platform for emerging novel probiotics-based therapeutics as cheap and safe, encouraging researchers and stakeholders to develop innovative treatments based on probiotics to prevent and treat chronic and viral diseases.


Subject(s)
Chronic Disease/therapy , Probiotics/administration & dosage , Cardiovascular Diseases/metabolism , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Fatty Acids, Volatile/metabolism , Gastrointestinal Microbiome , Humans , Immune System/metabolism , Inflammation/metabolism , Inflammation/pathology , Neoplasms/metabolism , Neoplasms/therapy , Virus Diseases/immunology , Virus Diseases/metabolism , Virus Diseases/therapy
9.
Int J Mol Med ; 47(5)2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1448967

ABSTRACT

Circular RNAs (circRNAs) are a class of non­coding RNAs with a circular, covalent structure that lack both 5' ends and 3' poly(A) tails, which are stable and specific molecules that exist in eukaryotic cells and are highly conserved. The role of circRNAs in viral infections is being increasingly acknowledged, since circRNAs have been discovered to be involved in several viral infections (such as hepatitis B virus infection and human papilloma virus infection) through a range of circRNA/microRNA/mRNA regulatory axes. These findings have prompted investigations into the potential of circRNAs as targets for the diagnosis and treatment of viral infection­related diseases. The aim of the present review was to systematically examine and discuss the role of circRNAs in several common viral infections, as well as their potential as diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets.


Subject(s)
MicroRNAs/genetics , RNA, Circular/physiology , RNA, Messenger/genetics , Virus Diseases/genetics , Biomarkers/analysis , Humans , RNA, Circular/genetics , Virus Diseases/diagnosis , Virus Diseases/therapy , Virus Diseases/virology
10.
J Clin Invest ; 131(11)2021 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1448082

ABSTRACT

First administered to a human subject as a tuberculosis (TB) vaccine on July 18, 1921, Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) has a long history of use for the prevention of TB and later the immunotherapy of bladder cancer. For TB prevention, BCG is given to infants born globally across over 180 countries and has been in use since the late 1920s. With about 352 million BCG doses procured annually and tens of billions of doses having been administered over the past century, it is estimated to be the most widely used vaccine in human history. While its roles for TB prevention and bladder cancer immunotherapy are widely appreciated, over the past century, BCG has been also studied for nontraditional purposes, which include (a) prevention of viral infections and nontuberculous mycobacterial infections, (b) cancer immunotherapy aside from bladder cancer, and (c) immunologic diseases, including multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes, and atopic diseases. The basis for these heterologous effects lies in the ability of BCG to alter immunologic set points via heterologous T cell immunity, as well as epigenetic and metabolomic changes in innate immune cells, a process called "trained immunity." In this Review, we provide an overview of what is known regarding the trained immunity mechanism of heterologous protection, and we describe the current knowledge base for these nontraditional uses of BCG.


Subject(s)
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/therapy , Immunity, Cellular , Multiple Sclerosis/therapy , Mycobacterium bovis/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Urinary Bladder Neoplasms/therapy , Virus Diseases/therapy , Animals , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/history , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/immunology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/pathology , History, 20th Century , History, 21st Century , Humans , Multiple Sclerosis/history , Multiple Sclerosis/immunology , Multiple Sclerosis/pathology , Mycobacterium Infections, Nontuberculous/history , Mycobacterium Infections, Nontuberculous/immunology , Mycobacterium Infections, Nontuberculous/pathology , Mycobacterium Infections, Nontuberculous/prevention & control , Tuberculosis/history , Tuberculosis/immunology , Tuberculosis/prevention & control , Urinary Bladder Neoplasms/history , Urinary Bladder Neoplasms/immunology , Urinary Bladder Neoplasms/pathology , Virus Diseases/history , Virus Diseases/immunology , Virus Diseases/pathology
11.
Int J Biol Macromol ; 189: 785-791, 2021 Oct 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1409445

ABSTRACT

Immunoglobulin yolk (IgY) is therapeutic antibodies presented in yolk eggs of birds, reptiles, and amphibians. These proteins produced by the immune system of the animal, are capable of neutralizing antigenic molecules, including viral antigens, fulfilling a role in the body defense. The specificity of these antibodies and the facility for their production, make these molecules capable of being used as tools for diagnosis and immunotherapy. Regarding this last aspect, it is common knowledge that the field of virology, is racing against time in the development of new drugs and vaccines to try to contain pandemics and local epidemics and, in counterproposal, avian antibodies are neutralizing molecules that can help in the control and spread of disease. These molecules have been explored for years and currently chicken eggs are produced in large quantities from the animal's immunization against a specific pathogen. Thus, on this subject, this review made a survey of these researches and presents a summary of all the successful cases and perspectives in the use of IgYs as tools for viral immunization.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Immunoglobulins/pharmacology , Animals , Humans , Immunization , Immunoglobulins/chemistry , Immunoglobulins/isolation & purification , Virus Diseases/immunology , Virus Diseases/therapy , Viruses/drug effects , Viruses/immunology
12.
FEBS J ; 288(17): 5071-5088, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1393880

ABSTRACT

While there is undeniable evidence to link endosomal acid-base homeostasis to viral pathogenesis, the lack of druggable molecular targets has hindered translation from bench to bedside. The recent identification of variants in the interferon-inducible endosomal Na+ /H+ exchanger 9 associated with severe coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) has brought a shift in the way we envision aberrant endosomal acidification. Is it linked to an increased susceptibility to viral infection or a propensity to develop critical illness? This review summarizes the genetic and cellular evidence linking endosomal Na+ /H+ exchangers and viral diseases to suggest how they can act as a broad-spectrum modulator of viral infection and downstream pathophysiology. The review also presents novel insights supporting the complex role of endosomal acid-base homeostasis in viral pathogenesis and discusses the potential causes for negative outcomes of clinical trials utilizing alkalinizing drugs as therapies for COVID-19. These findings lead to a pathogenic model of viral disease that predicts that nonspecific targeting of endosomal pH might fail, even if administered early on, and suggests that endosomal Na+ /H+ exchangers may regulate key host antiviral defence mechanisms and mediators that act to drive inflammatory organ injury.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Sodium-Hydrogen Exchangers/genetics , Virus Diseases/therapy , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/virology , Endosomes/genetics , Endosomes/virology , Humans , Protons , Sodium-Hydrogen Exchangers/antagonists & inhibitors , Virus Diseases/genetics , Virus Diseases/virology
13.
Bioessays ; 43(4): e2000315, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1384113

ABSTRACT

The versatile clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas system has emerged as a promising technology for therapy and molecular diagnosis. It is especially suited for overcoming viral infections outbreaks, since their effective control relies on an efficient treatment, but also on a fast diagnosis to prevent disease dissemination. The CRISPR toolbox offers DNA- and RNA-targeting nucleases that constitute dual weapons against viruses. They allow both the manipulation of viral and host genomes for therapeutic purposes and the detection of viral nucleic acids in "Point of Care" sensor devices. Here, we thoroughly review recent advances in the use of the CRISPR/Cas system for the treatment and diagnosis of viral deleterious infections such as HIV or SARS-CoV-2, examining their strengths and limitations. We describe the main points to consider when designing CRISPR antiviral strategies and the scientific efforts to develop more sensitive CRISPR-based viral detectors. Finally, we discuss future prospects to improve both applications. Also see the video abstract here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C0z1dLpJWl4.


Subject(s)
Biosensing Techniques/methods , CRISPR-Cas Systems , Virus Diseases/diagnosis , Virus Diseases/therapy , Viruses/genetics , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/therapy , Gene Knock-In Techniques , Genome, Viral , Humans , RNA, Guide/genetics
14.
Pharmacol Res ; 173: 105864, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1377431

ABSTRACT

The growing use of short-interfering RNA (siRNA)-based therapeutics for viral diseases reflects the most recent innovations in anti-viral vaccines and drugs. These drugs play crucial roles in the fight against many hitherto incurable diseases, the causes, pathophysiologies, and molecular processes of which remain unknown. Targeted liver drug delivery systems are in clinical trials. The receptor-mediated endocytosis approach involving the abundant asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGPRs) on the surfaces of liver cells show great promise. We here review N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc)-siRNA conjugates that treat viral diseases such as hepatitis B infection, but we also mention that novel, native conjugate-based, targeted siRNA anti-viral drugs may also cure several life-threatening diseases such as hemorrhagic cystitis, multifocal leukoencephalopathy, and severe acute respiratory syndrome caused by coronaviruses and human herpes virus.


Subject(s)
Acetylgalactosamine/administration & dosage , RNA, Small Interfering/administration & dosage , Virus Diseases/therapy , Animals , Humans , RNA Interference , Virus Diseases/genetics , Viruses/classification , Viruses/genetics
15.
J Gen Virol ; 102(8)2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1369239

ABSTRACT

Viruses may exploit the cardiovascular system to facilitate transmission or within-host dissemination, and the symptoms of many viral diseases stem at least in part from a loss of vascular integrity. The microvascular architecture is comprised of an endothelial cell barrier ensheathed by perivascular cells (pericytes). Pericytes are antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and play crucial roles in angiogenesis and the maintenance of microvascular integrity through complex reciprocal contact-mediated and paracrine crosstalk with endothelial cells. We here review the emerging ways that viruses interact with pericytes and pay consideration to how these interactions influence microvascular function and viral pathogenesis. Major outcomes of virus-pericyte interactions include vascular leakage or haemorrhage, organ tropism facilitated by barrier disruption, including viral penetration of the blood-brain barrier and placenta, as well as inflammatory, neurological, cognitive and developmental sequelae. The underlying pathogenic mechanisms may include direct infection of pericytes, pericyte modulation by secreted viral gene products and/or the dysregulation of paracrine signalling from or to pericytes. Viruses we cover include the herpesvirus human cytomegalovirus (HCMV, Human betaherpesvirus 5), the retrovirus human immunodeficiency virus (HIV; causative agent of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, AIDS, and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder, HAND), the flaviviruses dengue virus (DENV), Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) and Zika virus (ZIKV), and the coronavirus severe acute respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2; causative agent of coronavirus disease 2019, COVID-19). We touch on promising pericyte-focussed therapies for treating the diseases caused by these important human pathogens, many of which are emerging viruses or are causing new or long-standing global pandemics.


Subject(s)
Cell Physiological Phenomena , Disease Susceptibility , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Pericytes/virology , Virus Diseases/metabolism , Virus Diseases/virology , Animals , Cell Communication , Dengue Virus/physiology , Disease Management , Endothelial Cells/virology , Endothelium/metabolism , Endothelium/virology , HIV/physiology , Humans , Paracrine Communication , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Virus Diseases/diagnosis , Virus Diseases/therapy , Virus Physiological Phenomena
16.
Nat Med ; 27(3): 401-410, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1319040

ABSTRACT

The twenty-first century has already recorded more than ten major epidemic or pandemic virus emergence events, including the ongoing and devastating coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. As viral disease emergence is expected to accelerate, these data dictate a need for proactive approaches to develop broadly active family-specific and cross-family therapeutics for use in future disease outbreaks. Emphasis should focus not only on the development of broad-spectrum small-molecule and antibody direct-acting antivirals, but also on host-factor therapeutics, including repurposing previously approved or in-pipeline drugs. Another new class of therapeutics with great antiviral therapeutic potential is RNA-based therapeutics. Rather than only focusing on known risks, dedicated efforts must be made toward pre-emptive research focused on outbreak-prone virus families, ultimately offering a strategy to shorten the gap between outbreak and response. Emphasis should also focus on orally available drugs for outpatient use, if possible, and on identifying combination therapies that combat viral and immune-mediated pathologies, extend the effectiveness of therapeutic windows and reduce drug resistance. While such an undertaking will require new vision, dedicated funding and private, federal and academic partnerships, this approach offers hope that global populations need never experience future pandemics such as COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Communicable Diseases, Emerging/therapy , Therapies, Investigational , Virus Diseases/therapy , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Drug Development/methods , Drug Development/trends , Drug Repositioning , History, 21st Century , Humans , Inventions/trends , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Therapies, Investigational/methods , Therapies, Investigational/trends
17.
Front Immunol ; 12: 681449, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1314554

ABSTRACT

Immunosenescence is a process associated with aging that leads to dysregulation of cells of innate and adaptive immunity, which may become dysfunctional. Consequently, older adults show increased severity of viral and bacterial infections and impaired responses to vaccinations. A better understanding of the process of immunosenescence will aid the development of novel strategies to boost the immune system in older adults. In this review, we focus on major alterations of the immune system triggered by aging, and address the effect of chronic viral infections, effectiveness of vaccination of older adults and strategies to improve immune function in this vulnerable age group.


Subject(s)
Aging/immunology , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Immunity , Virus Diseases/immunology , Adaptive Immunity , Age Factors , Animals , Clinical Decision-Making , Disease Management , Disease Susceptibility/immunology , Humans , Immune System/immunology , Immune System/metabolism , Immunity, Innate , Virus Diseases/therapy , Virus Diseases/virology
18.
Drug Discov Ther ; 15(3): 130-138, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1296656

ABSTRACT

Dengue is a life-threatening mosquito borne viral disease. We are still in the era of supportive treatment where morbidity and mortality are a major concern. Dengue infection in presence of other co-infections makes this scenario rather worse. Timely recognition and raising alarm to be intensive is the need of the hour for primary care physicians practicing in the community and indoors. This review provides a comprehensive knowledge about the recent trends of coinfection in dengue as well as their management consideration which will be particularly helpful for physicians practicing in rural and remote areas of India.


Subject(s)
Bacterial Infections/therapy , Coinfection/therapy , Dengue Virus , Malaria/therapy , Virus Diseases/therapy , Bacterial Infections/epidemiology , Coinfection/epidemiology , Dengue Virus/genetics , Dengue Virus/pathogenicity , Humans , Malaria/epidemiology , Reinfection , Serogroup , Virulence , Virus Diseases/epidemiology
19.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(13)2021 Jun 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1288899

ABSTRACT

Viral-associated respiratory infectious diseases are one of the most prominent subsets of respiratory failures, known as viral respiratory infections (VRI). VRIs are proceeded by an infection caused by viruses infecting the respiratory system. For the past 100 years, viral associated respiratory epidemics have been the most common cause of infectious disease worldwide. Due to several drawbacks of the current anti-viral treatments, such as drug resistance generation and non-targeting of viral proteins, the development of novel nanotherapeutic or nano-vaccine strategies can be considered essential. Due to their specific physical and biological properties, nanoparticles hold promising opportunities for both anti-viral treatments and vaccines against viral infections. Besides the specific physiological properties of the respiratory system, there is a significant demand for utilizing nano-designs in the production of vaccines or antiviral agents for airway-localized administration. SARS-CoV-2, as an immediate example of respiratory viruses, is an enveloped, positive-sense, single-stranded RNA virus belonging to the coronaviridae family. COVID-19 can lead to acute respiratory distress syndrome, similarly to other members of the coronaviridae. Hence, reviewing the current and past emerging nanotechnology-based medications on similar respiratory viral diseases can identify pathways towards generating novel SARS-CoV-2 nanotherapeutics and/or nano-vaccines.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Drug Carriers/chemistry , Nanomedicine , Respiratory Tract Infections/pathology , Viral Vaccines/chemistry , Virus Diseases/pathology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Immune System/metabolism , Respiratory Tract Infections/therapy , Respiratory Tract Infections/virology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Viral Vaccines/administration & dosage , Viral Vaccines/immunology , Virus Diseases/immunology , Virus Diseases/prevention & control , Virus Diseases/therapy
20.
Expert Rev Respir Med ; 15(6): 805-821, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1187906

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Viral respiratory tract infections (RTIs) have been recognized as a global public health burden. Despite current theories about their effectiveness, the true benefits of dietary supplements on the prevention and treatment of viral RTIs remain elusive, due to contradictory reports. Hence, we aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of dietary supplements on the prevention and treatment of viral RTIs.Areas covered: We systematically searched databases of PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, and Google Scholar through 4 March 2020, to identify randomized controlled trials that evaluated the effects of consuming selected dietary supplements on the prevention or treatment of viral RTIs.Expert opinion: Thirty-nine randomized controlled trials (n = 16,797 participants) were eligible and included. Namely, vitamin D supplementation appeared to improve viral RTIs across cohorts particulate in those with vitamin D deficiency. Among the evaluated dietary supplements, specific lactobacillus strains were used most commonly with selected prebiotics that showed potentially positive effects on the prevention and treatment of viral RTIs. Further, ginseng extract supplementation may effectively prevent viral RTIs as adjuvant therapy. However, longitudinal research is required to confirm these observations and address the optimal dose, duration, and safety of dietary supplements being publicly recommended.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/therapy , Dietary Supplements , Respiratory Tract Infections , Virus Diseases , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Dietary Supplements/classification , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/therapeutic use , Humans , Lactobacillus/physiology , Panax/chemistry , Quercetin/therapeutic use , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic/statistics & numerical data , Respiratory Tract Infections/epidemiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/prevention & control , Respiratory Tract Infections/therapy , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Virus Diseases/epidemiology , Virus Diseases/prevention & control , Virus Diseases/therapy , Vitamin D/therapeutic use , Vitamin D Deficiency/complications , Vitamin D Deficiency/diet therapy , Vitamin D Deficiency/epidemiology , beta-Glucans/therapeutic use
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