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1.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0261497, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1581739

ABSTRACT

Since the emergence of yellow fever in the Americas and the devastating 1918 influenza pandemic, biologists and clinicians have been drawn to human infecting viruses to understand their mechanisms of infection better and develop effective therapeutics against them. However, the complex molecular and cellular processes that these viruses use to infect and multiply in human cells have been a source of great concern for the scientific community since the discovery of the first human infecting virus. Viral disease outbreaks, such as the recent COVID-19 pandemic caused by a novel coronavirus, have claimed millions of lives and caused significant economic damage worldwide. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of host-virus interaction and the molecular machinery involved in the pathogenesis of some common human viruses. We also performed a phylogenetic analysis of viral proteins involved in host-virus interaction to understand the changes in the sequence organization of these proteins during evolution for various strains of viruses to gain insights into the viral origin's evolutionary perspectives.


Subject(s)
Host-Pathogen Interactions , Phylogeny , Viral Proteins/genetics , Virus Diseases/virology , HIV Envelope Protein gp160/genetics , Humans
2.
Viruses ; 13(12)2021 11 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1542801

ABSTRACT

Nestled within the Rocky Mountain National Forest, 114 scientists and students gathered at Colorado State University's Mountain Campus for this year's 21st annual Rocky Mountain National Virology Association meeting. This 3-day retreat consisted of 31 talks and 30 poster presentations discussing advances in research pertaining to viral and prion diseases. The keynote address provided a timely discussion on zoonotic coronaviruses, lessons learned, and the path forward towards predicting, preparing, and preventing future viral disease outbreaks. Other invited speakers discussed advances in SARS-CoV-2 surveillance, molecular interactions involved in flavivirus genome assembly, evaluation of ethnomedicines for their efficacy against infectious diseases, multi-omic analyses to define risk factors associated with long COVID, the role that interferon lambda plays in control of viral pathogenesis, cell-fusion-dependent pathogenesis of varicella zoster virus, and advances in the development of a vaccine platform against prion diseases. On behalf of the Rocky Mountain Virology Association, this report summarizes select presentations.


Subject(s)
Virology , Animals , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Prion Diseases/diagnosis , Prion Diseases/prevention & control , Prions/immunology , Prions/isolation & purification , Prions/pathogenicity , Vaccines , Virology/organization & administration , Virus Diseases/diagnosis , Virus Diseases/epidemiology , Virus Diseases/prevention & control , Virus Diseases/virology , Viruses/classification , Viruses/immunology , Viruses/isolation & purification , Viruses/pathogenicity
3.
J Med Virol ; 93(12): 6798-6802, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1530182

ABSTRACT

Viral infections have been on the rise for the past decades. The impact of the viruses worsened amidst the pandemic burdening the already overwhelmed health care system in African countries. This article sheds light on how the coronavirus together with the already existing viral infections, some of which re-emerged, impacted the continent. The strategies in place such as immunization, education, will have to be strengthened in all African countries to reduce the burden. Furthermore, governments can further collaborate with other countries in creating guidelines to reduce co-infection of the diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/enzymology , COVID-19/virology , Coinfection/epidemiology , Coinfection/virology , Virus Diseases/epidemiology , Africa/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , Coinfection/immunology , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Vaccination/methods , Virus Diseases/immunology , Virus Diseases/virology
4.
J Virol ; 95(12)2021 05 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1501541

ABSTRACT

Long disregarded as junk DNA or genomic dark matter, endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) have turned out to represent important components of the antiviral immune response. These remnants of once-infectious retroviruses not only regulate cellular immune activation, but may even directly target invading viral pathogens. In this Gem, we summarize mechanisms by which retroviral fossils protect us from viral infections. One focus will be on recent advances in the role of ERVs as regulators of antiviral gene expression.


Subject(s)
Endogenous Retroviruses/physiology , Retroelements , Virus Diseases/immunology , Animals , Endogenous Retroviruses/genetics , Enhancer Elements, Genetic , Gene Expression Regulation , Humans , Immunity, Cellular , Promoter Regions, Genetic , RNA, Double-Stranded/genetics , RNA, Double-Stranded/metabolism , RNA, Long Noncoding/genetics , RNA, Long Noncoding/metabolism , RNA, Viral/genetics , RNA, Viral/metabolism , Receptors, Pattern Recognition/metabolism , Receptors, Virus/antagonists & inhibitors , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , Viral Proteins/metabolism , Virion/metabolism , Virus Diseases/genetics , Virus Diseases/virology
5.
Appl Environ Microbiol ; 87(22): e0121521, 2021 10 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1494942

ABSTRACT

Fomites can represent a reservoir for pathogens, which may be subsequently transferred from surfaces to skin. In this study, we aim to understand how different factors (including virus type, surface type, time since last hand wash, and direction of transfer) affect virus transfer rates, defined as the fraction of virus transferred, between fingerpads and fomites. To determine this, 360 transfer events were performed with 20 volunteers using Phi6 (a surrogate for enveloped viruses), MS2 (a surrogate for nonenveloped viruses), and three clean surfaces (stainless steel, painted wood, and plastic). Considering all transfer events (all surfaces and both transfer directions combined), the mean transfer rates of Phi6 and MS2 were 0.17 and 0.26, respectively. Transfer of MS2 was significantly higher than that of Phi6 (P < 0.05). Surface type was a significant factor that affected the transfer rate of Phi6: Phi6 is more easily transferred to and from stainless steel and plastic than to and from painted wood. Direction of transfer was a significant factor affecting MS2 transfer rates: MS2 is more easily transferred from surfaces to fingerpads than from fingerpads to surfaces. Data from these virus transfer events, and subsequent transfer rate distributions, provide information that can be used to refine quantitative microbial risk assessments. This study provides a large-scale data set of transfer events with a surrogate for enveloped viruses, which extends the reach of the study to the role of fomites in the transmission of human enveloped viruses like influenza and SARS-CoV-2. IMPORTANCE This study created a large-scale data set for the transfer of enveloped viruses between skin and surfaces. The data set produced by this study provides information on modeling the distribution of enveloped and nonenveloped virus transfer rates, which can aid in the implementation of risk assessment models in the future. Additionally, enveloped and nonenveloped viruses were applied to experimental surfaces in an equivalent matrix to avoid matrix effects, so results between different viral species can be directly compared without confounding effects of different matrices. Our results indicating how virus type, surface type, time since last hand wash, and direction of transfer affect virus transfer rates can be used in decision-making processes to lower the risk of viral infection from transmission through fomites.


Subject(s)
Fingers/virology , Fomites/virology , Virus Physiological Phenomena , Bacteriophage phi 6/physiology , Bacteriophage phi 6/ultrastructure , Fomites/classification , Hand Hygiene , Humans , Levivirus/physiology , Levivirus/ultrastructure , Viral Envelope/ultrastructure , Virus Diseases/transmission , Virus Diseases/virology , Viruses/ultrastructure
6.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(21)2021 Oct 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1487420

ABSTRACT

Tetraspanins are transmembrane glycoproteins that have been shown increasing interest as host factors in infectious diseases. In particular, they were implicated in the pathogenesis of both non-enveloped (human papillomavirus (HPV)) and enveloped (human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), Zika, influenza A virus, (IAV), and coronavirus) viruses through multiple stages of infection, from the initial cell membrane attachment to the syncytium formation and viral particle release. However, the mechanisms by which different tetraspanins mediate their effects vary. This review aimed to compare and contrast the role of tetraspanins in the life cycles of HPV, HIV, Zika, IAV, and coronavirus viruses, which cause the most significant health and economic burdens to society. In doing so, a better understanding of the relative contribution of tetraspanins in virus infection will allow for a more targeted approach in the treatment of these diseases.


Subject(s)
Host-Pathogen Interactions/physiology , Tetraspanins/physiology , Virus Diseases/metabolism , Gene Expression Regulation, Viral , HIV-1/pathogenicity , Humans , Influenza A virus/pathogenicity , Papillomaviridae/pathogenicity , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Virus Diseases/genetics , Virus Diseases/virology , Virus Internalization , Zika Virus/pathogenicity
7.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(14)2021 Jul 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1485149

ABSTRACT

Chronic neurodegenerative diseases are complex, and their pathogenesis is uncertain. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative brain alteration that is responsible for most dementia cases in the elderly. AD etiology is still uncertain; however, chronic neuroinflammation is a constant component of brain pathology. Infections have been associated with several neurological diseases and viruses of the Herpes family appear to be a probable cause of AD neurodegenerative alterations. Several different factors may contribute to the AD clinical progression. Exogeneous viruses or other microbes and environmental pollutants may directly induce neurodegeneration by activating brain inflammation. In this paper, we suggest that exogeneous brain insults may also activate retrotransposons and silent human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs). The initial inflammation of small brain areas induced by virus infections or other brain insults may activate HERV dis-regulation that contributes to neurodegenerative mechanisms. Chronic HERV activation in turn may cause progressive neurodegeneration that thereafter merges in cognitive impairment and dementia in genetically susceptible people. Specific treatment for exogenous end endogenous pathogens and decreasing pollutant exposure may show beneficial effect in early intervention protocol to prevent the progression of cognitive deterioration in the elderly.


Subject(s)
Alzheimer Disease/pathology , Alzheimer Disease/virology , Brain/pathology , Brain/virology , Endogenous Retroviruses/pathogenicity , Virus Diseases/pathology , Virus Diseases/virology , Animals , Cognition Disorders/pathology , Cognition Disorders/virology , Encephalitis/pathology , Encephalitis/virology , Humans
8.
Clin Sci (Lond) ; 135(19): 2217-2242, 2021 10 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1462047

ABSTRACT

The ability of dendritic cells (DCs) to sense viral pathogens and orchestrate a proper immune response makes them one of the key players in antiviral immunity. Different DC subsets have complementing functions during viral infections, some specialize in antigen presentation and cross-presentation and others in the production of cytokines with antiviral activity, such as type I interferons. In this review, we summarize the latest updates concerning the role of DCs in viral infections, with particular focus on the complex interplay between DC subsets and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2). Despite being initiated by a vast array of immune receptors, DC-mediated antiviral responses often converge towards the same endpoint, that is the production of proinflammatory cytokines and the activation of an adaptive immune response. Nonetheless, the inherent migratory properties of DCs make them a double-edged sword and often viral recognition by DCs results in further viral dissemination. Here we illustrate these various aspects of the antiviral functions of DCs and also provide a brief overview of novel antiviral vaccination strategies based on DCs targeting.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Dendritic Cells/virology , Receptors, Pattern Recognition/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Virus Diseases/virology , Cytokines/immunology , Dendritic Cells/immunology , Humans , Virus Diseases/immunology
9.
Int J Mol Med ; 47(5)2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1448967

ABSTRACT

Circular RNAs (circRNAs) are a class of non­coding RNAs with a circular, covalent structure that lack both 5' ends and 3' poly(A) tails, which are stable and specific molecules that exist in eukaryotic cells and are highly conserved. The role of circRNAs in viral infections is being increasingly acknowledged, since circRNAs have been discovered to be involved in several viral infections (such as hepatitis B virus infection and human papilloma virus infection) through a range of circRNA/microRNA/mRNA regulatory axes. These findings have prompted investigations into the potential of circRNAs as targets for the diagnosis and treatment of viral infection­related diseases. The aim of the present review was to systematically examine and discuss the role of circRNAs in several common viral infections, as well as their potential as diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets.


Subject(s)
MicroRNAs/genetics , RNA, Circular/physiology , RNA, Messenger/genetics , Virus Diseases/genetics , Biomarkers/analysis , Humans , RNA, Circular/genetics , Virus Diseases/diagnosis , Virus Diseases/therapy , Virus Diseases/virology
10.
Viruses ; 13(7)2021 07 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1448933

ABSTRACT

Virus-induced infections of the central nervous system (CNS) are among the most serious problems in public health and can be associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality, mainly in low- and middle-income countries, where these manifestations have been neglected. Typically, herpes simplex virus 1 and 2, varicella-zoster, and enterovirus are responsible for a high number of cases in immunocompetent hosts, whereas other herpesviruses (for example, cytomegalovirus) are the most common in immunocompromised individuals. Arboviruses have also been associated with outbreaks with a high burden of neurological disorders, such as the Zika virus epidemic in Brazil. There is a current lack of understanding in Brazil about the most common viruses involved in CNS infections. In this review, we briefly summarize the most recent studies and findings associated with the CNS, in addition to epidemiological data that provide extensive information on the circulation and diversity of the most common neuro-invasive viruses in Brazil. We also highlight important aspects of the prion-associated diseases. This review provides readers with better knowledge of virus-associated CNS infections. A deeper understanding of these infections will support the improvement of the current surveillance strategies to allow the timely monitoring of the emergence/re-emergence of neurotropic viruses.


Subject(s)
Central Nervous System Diseases/virology , Central Nervous System Infections/epidemiology , Prion Diseases/epidemiology , Alphavirus/pathogenicity , Brazil/epidemiology , Central Nervous System/virology , Central Nervous System Diseases/metabolism , Central Nervous System Diseases/physiopathology , Central Nervous System Infections/virology , Central Nervous System Viral Diseases/physiopathology , Central Nervous System Viral Diseases/virology , Enterovirus/pathogenicity , Flavivirus/pathogenicity , Herpesviridae/pathogenicity , Humans , Nervous System Diseases/epidemiology , Nervous System Diseases/virology , Prion Diseases/physiopathology , Prions/metabolism , Prions/pathogenicity , Simplexvirus/pathogenicity , Virus Diseases/virology , Viruses/pathogenicity , Zika Virus/pathogenicity
11.
PLoS One ; 16(9): e0258002, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1448576

ABSTRACT

Detecting viruses, which have significant impact on health and the economy, is essential for controlling and combating viral infections. In recent years there has been a focus towards simpler and faster detection methods, specifically through the use of electronic-based detection at the point-of-care. Point-of-care sensors play a particularly important role in the detection of viruses. Tests can be performed in the field or in resource limited regions in a simple manner and short time frame, allowing for rapid treatment. Electronic based detection allows for speed and quantitative detection not otherwise possible at the point-of-care. Such approaches are largely based upon voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, field effect transistors, and similar electrical techniques. Here, we systematically review electronic and electrochemical point-of-care sensors for the detection of human viral pathogens. Using the reported limits of detection and assay times we compare approaches both by detection method and by the target analyte of interest. Compared to recent scoping and narrative reviews, this systematic review which follows established best practice for evidence synthesis adds substantial new evidence on 1) performance and 2) limitations, needed for sensor uptake in the clinical arena. 104 relevant studies were identified by conducting a search of current literature using 7 databases, only including original research articles detecting human viruses and reporting a limit of detection. Detection units were converted to nanomolars where possible in order to compare performance across devices. This approach allows us to identify field effect transistors as having the fastest median response time, and as being the most sensitive, some achieving single-molecule detection. In general, we found that antigens are the quickest targets to detect. We also observe however, that reports are highly variable in their chosen metrics of interest. We suggest that this lack of systematisation across studies may be a major bottleneck in sensor development and translation. Where appropriate, we use the findings of the systematic review to give recommendations for best reporting practice.


Subject(s)
Point-of-Care Systems , Virus Diseases/diagnosis , Electronics , Humans , Virus Diseases/virology
12.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 5026, 2021 08 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1363491

ABSTRACT

Nationwide prospective surveillance of all-age patients with acute respiratory infections was conducted in China between 2009‒2019. Here we report the etiological and epidemiological features of the 231,107 eligible patients enrolled in this analysis. Children <5 years old and school-age children have the highest viral positivity rate (46.9%) and bacterial positivity rate (30.9%). Influenza virus, respiratory syncytial virus and human rhinovirus are the three leading viral pathogens with proportions of 28.5%, 16.8% and 16.7%, and Streptococcus pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Klebsiella pneumoniae are the three leading bacterial pathogens (29.9%, 18.6% and 15.8%). Negative interactions between viruses and positive interactions between viral and bacterial pathogens are common. A Join-Point analysis reveals the age-specific positivity rate and how this varied for individual pathogens. These data indicate that differential priorities for diagnosis, prevention and control should be highlighted in terms of acute respiratory tract infection patients' demography, geographic locations and season of illness in China.


Subject(s)
Bacteria/isolation & purification , Bacterial Infections/microbiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/microbiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/virology , Virus Diseases/virology , Viruses/isolation & purification , Adolescent , Adult , Bacteria/classification , Bacteria/genetics , Bacterial Infections/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , China/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Infant , Male , Prospective Studies , Respiratory Tract Infections/epidemiology , Seasons , Virus Diseases/epidemiology , Viruses/classification , Viruses/genetics , Young Adult
13.
PLoS One ; 16(9): e0257512, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1416904

ABSTRACT

Reinfection and multiple viral strains are among the latest challenges in the current COVID-19 pandemic. In contrast, epidemic models often consider a single strain and perennial immunity. To bridge this gap, we present a new epidemic model that simultaneously considers multiple viral strains and reinfection due to waning immunity. The model is general, applies to any viral disease and includes an optimal control formulation to seek a trade-off between the societal and economic costs of mitigation. We validate the model, with and without mitigation, in the light of the COVID-19 epidemic in England and in the state of Amazonas, Brazil. The model can derive optimal mitigation strategies for any number of viral strains, whilst also evaluating the effect of distinct mitigation costs on the infection levels. The results show that relaxations in the mitigation measures cause a rapid increase in the number of cases, and therefore demand more restrictive measures in the future.


Subject(s)
Algorithms , COVID-19/prevention & control , Models, Theoretical , Virus Diseases/prevention & control , Brazil/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Computer Simulation , England/epidemiology , Epidemics/prevention & control , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Virus Diseases/epidemiology , Virus Diseases/virology
14.
Zool Res ; 42(5): 626-632, 2021 Sep 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1414833

ABSTRACT

Viruses can be transmitted from animals to humans (and vice versa) and across animal species. As such, host-virus interactions and transmission have attracted considerable attention. Non-human primates (NHPs), our closest evolutionary relatives, are susceptible to human viruses and certain pathogens are known to circulate between humans and NHPs. Here, we generated global statistics on VI-NHPs based on a literature search and public data mining. In total, 140 NHP species from 12 families are reported to be infected by 186 DNA and RNA virus species, 68.8% of which are also found in humans, indicating high potential for crossing species boundaries. The top 10 NHP species with high centrality in the NHP-virus network include two great apes (Pan troglodytes, Pongo pygmaeus) and eight Old World monkeys (Macaca mulatta, M. fascicularis, M. leonina, Papio cynocephalus, Cercopithecus ascanius, C. erythrotis, Chlorocebus aethiops, and Allochrocebus lhoesti). Given the wide distribution of Old World monkeys and their frequent contact with humans, there is a high risk of virus circulation between humans and such species. Thus, we suggest recurring epidemiological surveillance of NHPs, specifically Old World monkeys that are in frequent contact with humans, and other effective measures to prevent potential circulation and transmission of viruses. Avoidance of false positives and sampling bias should also be a focus in future work.


Subject(s)
Conservation of Natural Resources , Primates/virology , Public Health , Virus Diseases/veterinary , Viruses/classification , Animals , Animals, Wild , Global Health , Virus Diseases/epidemiology , Virus Diseases/virology
15.
Biomed Res Int ; 2021: 9998420, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1398744

ABSTRACT

The global burden of viral infection, especially the current pandemics of SARS-CoV-2, HIV/AIDS, and hepatitis, is a very risky one. Additionally, HCV expresses the necessity for antiviral therapeutic elements. Venoms are known to contain an array of bioactive peptides that are commonly used in the treatment of various medical issues. Several peptides isolated from scorpion venom have recently been proven to possess an antiviral activity against several viral families. The aim of this review is to provide an up-to-date overview of scorpion antiviral peptides and to discuss their modes of action and potential biomedical application against different viruses.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Peptides/pharmacology , Scorpion Venoms/chemistry , Virus Diseases/drug therapy , Animals , Coronavirus/drug effects , HIV-1/drug effects , Hepatitis Viruses/drug effects , Herpesvirus 1, Human/drug effects , Humans , Measles virus/drug effects , Peptides/chemistry , Peptides/isolation & purification , Virus Diseases/virology
16.
Cell ; 184(6): 1604-1620, 2021 03 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1392179

ABSTRACT

Historically, emerging viruses appear constantly and have cost millions of human lives. Currently, climate change and intense globalization have created favorable conditions for viral transmission. Therefore, effective antivirals, especially those targeting the conserved protein in multiple unrelated viruses, such as the compounds targeting RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, are urgently needed to combat more emerging and re-emerging viruses in the future. Here we reviewed the development of antivirals with common targets, including those against the same protein across viruses, or the same viral function, to provide clues for development of antivirals for future epidemics.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Communicable Diseases, Emerging/drug therapy , Communicable Diseases, Emerging/epidemiology , Molecular Targeted Therapy/methods , Pandemics , Virus Diseases/drug therapy , Virus Diseases/epidemiology , Viruses/enzymology , Animals , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Communicable Diseases, Emerging/virology , Humans , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/antagonists & inhibitors , Viral Envelope Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Virus Diseases/virology , Virus Internalization/drug effects
17.
Front Immunol ; 12: 624293, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1394756

ABSTRACT

The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor, which interacts with a wide range of organic molecules of endogenous and exogenous origin, including environmental pollutants, tryptophan metabolites, and microbial metabolites. The activation of AHR by these agonists drives its translocation into the nucleus where it controls the expression of a large number of target genes that include the AHR repressor (AHRR), detoxifying monooxygenases (CYP1A1 and CYP1B1), and cytokines. Recent advances reveal that AHR signaling modulates aspects of the intrinsic, innate and adaptive immune response to diverse microorganisms. This review will focus on the increasing evidence supporting a role for AHR as a modulator of the host response to viral infection.


Subject(s)
Adaptive Immunity , Immunity, Innate , Receptors, Aryl Hydrocarbon/metabolism , Virus Diseases/virology , Viruses/immunology , Active Transport, Cell Nucleus , Animals , Gene Expression Regulation , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Ligands , Signal Transduction , Virus Diseases/genetics , Virus Diseases/immunology , Virus Diseases/metabolism , Viruses/genetics , Viruses/pathogenicity
18.
Biomed Res Int ; 2021: 5313832, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1394270

ABSTRACT

Background: Coinfections have a potential role in increased morbidity and mortality rates during pandemics. Our investigation is aimed at evaluating the viral coinfection prevalence in COVID-19 patients. Methods: We systematically searched scientific databases, including Medline, Scopus, WOS, and Embase, from December 1, 2019, to December 30, 2020. Preprint servers such as medRxiv were also scanned to find other related preprint papers. All types of studies evaluating the viral coinfection prevalence in COVID-19 patients were considered. We applied the random effects model to pool all of the related studies. Results: Thirty-three studies including 10484 patients were identified. The viral coinfection estimated pooled prevalence was 12.58%; 95% CI: 7.31 to 18.96). Blood viruses (pooled prevalence: 12.48%; 95% CI: 8.57 to 16.93) had the most frequent viral coinfection, and respiratory viruses (pooled prevalence: 4.32%; 95% CI: 2.78 to 6.15) had less frequent viral coinfection. The herpesvirus pooled prevalence was 11.71% (95% CI: 3.02 to 24.80). Also, the maximum and minimum of viral coinfection pooled prevalence were in AMRO and EMRO with 15.63% (95% CI: 3.78 to 33.31) and 7.05% (95% CI: 3.84 to 11.07), respectively. Conclusion: The lowest rate of coinfection belonged to respiratory viruses. Blood-borne viruses had the highest coinfection rate. Our results provide important data about the prevalence of blood-borne viruses among COVID-19 patients which can be critical when it comes to their treatment procedure.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Coinfection/epidemiology , Coinfection/virology , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Virus Diseases/epidemiology , Virus Diseases/virology , Viruses/pathogenicity
19.
FEBS J ; 288(17): 5071-5088, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1393880

ABSTRACT

While there is undeniable evidence to link endosomal acid-base homeostasis to viral pathogenesis, the lack of druggable molecular targets has hindered translation from bench to bedside. The recent identification of variants in the interferon-inducible endosomal Na+ /H+ exchanger 9 associated with severe coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) has brought a shift in the way we envision aberrant endosomal acidification. Is it linked to an increased susceptibility to viral infection or a propensity to develop critical illness? This review summarizes the genetic and cellular evidence linking endosomal Na+ /H+ exchangers and viral diseases to suggest how they can act as a broad-spectrum modulator of viral infection and downstream pathophysiology. The review also presents novel insights supporting the complex role of endosomal acid-base homeostasis in viral pathogenesis and discusses the potential causes for negative outcomes of clinical trials utilizing alkalinizing drugs as therapies for COVID-19. These findings lead to a pathogenic model of viral disease that predicts that nonspecific targeting of endosomal pH might fail, even if administered early on, and suggests that endosomal Na+ /H+ exchangers may regulate key host antiviral defence mechanisms and mediators that act to drive inflammatory organ injury.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Sodium-Hydrogen Exchangers/genetics , Virus Diseases/therapy , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/virology , Endosomes/genetics , Endosomes/virology , Humans , Protons , Sodium-Hydrogen Exchangers/antagonists & inhibitors , Virus Diseases/genetics , Virus Diseases/virology
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