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1.
J Nanobiotechnology ; 19(1): 348, 2021 Oct 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1555350

ABSTRACT

Viral infections are the most common among diseases that globally require around 60 percent of medical care. However, in the heat of the pandemic, there was a lack of medical equipment and inpatient facilities to provide all patients with viral infections. The detection of viral infections is possible in three general ways such as (i) direct virus detection, which is performed immediately 1-3 days after the infection, (ii) determination of antibodies against some virus proteins mainly observed during/after virus incubation period, (iii) detection of virus-induced disease when specific tissue changes in the organism. This review surveys some global pandemics from 1889 to 2020, virus types, which induced these pandemics, and symptoms of some viral diseases. Non-analytical methods such as radiology and microscopy also are overviewed. This review overlooks molecular analysis methods such as nucleic acid amplification, antibody-antigen complex determination, CRISPR-Cas system-based viral genome determination methods. Methods widely used in the certificated diagnostic laboratory for SARS-CoV-2, Influenza A, B, C, HIV, and other viruses during a viral pandemic are outlined. A comprehensive overview of molecular analytical methods has shown that the assay's sensitivity, accuracy, and suitability for virus detection depends on the choice of the number of regions in the viral open reading frame (ORF) genome sequence and the validity of the selected analytical method.


Subject(s)
Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Virus Diseases/diagnosis , Viruses/isolation & purification , Biosensing Techniques , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Nucleic Acid Amplification Techniques , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Viral Proteins/genetics , Viral Proteins/immunology , Virus Diseases/epidemiology , Viruses/classification , Viruses/genetics , Viruses/immunology
2.
PLoS Pathog ; 17(9): e1009811, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526706
3.
Curr Protein Pept Sci ; 22(4): 273-289, 2021 Oct 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1515505

ABSTRACT

Innate immunity is the first line of defence elicited by the host immune system to fight against invading pathogens such as viruses and bacteria. From this elementary immune response, the more complex antigen-specific adaptive responses are recruited to provide a long-lasting memory against the pathogens. Innate immunity gets activated when the host cell utilizes a diverse set of receptors known as pattern recognition receptors (PRR) to recognize the viruses that have penetrated the host and responds with cellular processes like complement system, phagocytosis, cytokine release and inflammation and destruction of NK cells. Viral RNA or DNA or viral intermediate products are recognized by receptors like toll-like receptors(TLRs), nucleotide oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors (NLRs) and retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I)-like receptors (RLRs) thereby, inducing type I interferon response (IFN) and other proinflammatory cytokines in infected cells or other immune cells. But certain viruses can evade the host innate immune response to replicate efficiently, triggering the spread of the viral infection. The present review describes the similarity in the mechanism chosen by viruses from different families -HIV, SARSCoV- 2 and Nipah viruses to evade the innate immune response and how efficiently they establish the infection in the host. The review also addresses the stages of developments of various vaccines against these viral diseases and the challenges encountered by the researchers during vaccine development.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , HIV Infections/virology , Henipavirus Infections/virology , RNA, Viral/immunology , Viral Vaccines/immunology , Viruses , Animals , Humans , Immune Evasion , Immunity, Innate , Viruses/genetics , Viruses/immunology
4.
PLoS Biol ; 19(4): e3001135, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1508487

ABSTRACT

Identifying the animal reservoirs from which zoonotic viruses will likely emerge is central to understanding the determinants of disease emergence. Accordingly, there has been an increase in studies attempting zoonotic "risk assessment." Herein, we demonstrate that the virological data on which these analyses are conducted are incomplete, biased, and rapidly changing with ongoing virus discovery. Together, these shortcomings suggest that attempts to assess zoonotic risk using available virological data are likely to be inaccurate and largely only identify those host taxa that have been studied most extensively. We suggest that virus surveillance at the human-animal interface may be more productive.


Subject(s)
Environmental Monitoring , Virus Diseases , Zoonoses/etiology , Zoonoses/prevention & control , Animals , Biodiversity , Disease Reservoirs/classification , Disease Reservoirs/statistics & numerical data , Environmental Monitoring/methods , Environmental Monitoring/standards , Host Specificity/genetics , Humans , Metagenomics/methods , Metagenomics/organization & administration , Metagenomics/standards , Phylogeny , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Selection Bias , Virus Diseases/epidemiology , Virus Diseases/etiology , Virus Diseases/prevention & control , Virus Diseases/transmission , Viruses/classification , Viruses/genetics , Viruses/isolation & purification , Viruses/pathogenicity , Zoonoses/epidemiology , Zoonoses/virology
5.
PLoS Biol ; 19(9): e3001403, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470646

ABSTRACT

Powered by metagenomics, viral discovery is outpacing our capacity for the downstream characterization needed to fully assess zoonotic potential. A study published in PLOS Biology uses machine learning to prioritize novel viruses based only on genomic signatures.


Subject(s)
Viruses , Genome, Viral/genetics , Machine Learning , Metagenomics , Viruses/genetics
7.
Water Res ; 203: 117568, 2021 Sep 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1355757

ABSTRACT

The discharge of wastewater-derived viruses in aquatic environments impacts catchment-scale virome composition. To explore this, we used viromic analysis of RNA and DNA virus-like particles to holistically track virus communities entering and leaving wastewater treatment plants and the connecting river catchment system and estuary. We reconstructed >40 000 partial viral genomes into 10 149 species-level groups, dominated by dsDNA and (+)ssRNA bacteriophages (Caudoviricetes and Leviviricetes) and a small number of genomes that could pose a risk to human health. We found substantial viral diversity and geographically distinct virus communities associated with different wastewater treatment plants. River and estuarine water bodies harboured more diverse viral communities in downstream locations, influenced by tidal movement and proximity to wastewater treatment plants. Shellfish and beach sand were enriched in viral communities when compared with the surrounding water, acting as entrapment matrices for virus particles. Extensive phylogenetic analyses of environmental-derived and reference sequences showed the presence of human-associated sapovirus GII in all sample types, multiple rotavirus A strains in wastewater and a diverse set of picorna-like viruses associated with shellfish. We conclude that wastewater-derived viral genetic material is commonly deposited in the environment and can be traced throughout the freshwater-marine continuum of the river catchment, where it is influenced by local geography, weather events and tidal effects. Our data illustrate the utility of viromic analyses for wastewater- and environment-based ecology and epidemiology, and we present a conceptual model for the circulation of all types of viruses in a freshwater catchment.


Subject(s)
Viruses , Waste Water , Humans , Phylogeny , Rivers , Virome , Viruses/genetics
8.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 5026, 2021 08 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1363491

ABSTRACT

Nationwide prospective surveillance of all-age patients with acute respiratory infections was conducted in China between 2009‒2019. Here we report the etiological and epidemiological features of the 231,107 eligible patients enrolled in this analysis. Children <5 years old and school-age children have the highest viral positivity rate (46.9%) and bacterial positivity rate (30.9%). Influenza virus, respiratory syncytial virus and human rhinovirus are the three leading viral pathogens with proportions of 28.5%, 16.8% and 16.7%, and Streptococcus pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Klebsiella pneumoniae are the three leading bacterial pathogens (29.9%, 18.6% and 15.8%). Negative interactions between viruses and positive interactions between viral and bacterial pathogens are common. A Join-Point analysis reveals the age-specific positivity rate and how this varied for individual pathogens. These data indicate that differential priorities for diagnosis, prevention and control should be highlighted in terms of acute respiratory tract infection patients' demography, geographic locations and season of illness in China.


Subject(s)
Bacteria/isolation & purification , Bacterial Infections/microbiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/microbiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/virology , Virus Diseases/virology , Viruses/isolation & purification , Adolescent , Adult , Bacteria/classification , Bacteria/genetics , Bacterial Infections/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , China/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Infant , Male , Prospective Studies , Respiratory Tract Infections/epidemiology , Seasons , Virus Diseases/epidemiology , Viruses/classification , Viruses/genetics , Young Adult
9.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 19579, 2021 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1447327

ABSTRACT

The increasing risk from viral outbreaks such as the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic exacerbates the need for rapid, affordable and sensitive methods for virus detection, identification and quantification; however, existing methods for detecting virus particles in biological samples usually depend on multistep protocols that take considerable time to yield a result. Here, we introduce a rapid fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) protocol capable of detecting influenza virus, avian infectious bronchitis virus and SARS-CoV-2 specifically and quantitatively in approximately 20 min, in virus cultures, combined nasal and throat swabs with added virus and likely patient samples without previous purification. This fast and facile workflow can be adapted both as a lab technique and a future diagnostic tool in enveloped viruses with an accessible genome.


Subject(s)
In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence/methods , RNA, Viral/isolation & purification , Viruses/isolation & purification , Viruses/genetics
10.
PLoS Biol ; 19(9): e3001390, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440977

ABSTRACT

Determining which animal viruses may be capable of infecting humans is currently intractable at the time of their discovery, precluding prioritization of high-risk viruses for early investigation and outbreak preparedness. Given the increasing use of genomics in virus discovery and the otherwise sparse knowledge of the biology of newly discovered viruses, we developed machine learning models that identify candidate zoonoses solely using signatures of host range encoded in viral genomes. Within a dataset of 861 viral species with known zoonotic status, our approach outperformed models based on the phylogenetic relatedness of viruses to known human-infecting viruses (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve [AUC] = 0.773), distinguishing high-risk viruses within families that contain a minority of human-infecting species and identifying putatively undetected or so far unrealized zoonoses. Analyses of the underpinnings of model predictions suggested the existence of generalizable features of viral genomes that are independent of virus taxonomic relationships and that may preadapt viruses to infect humans. Our model reduced a second set of 645 animal-associated viruses that were excluded from training to 272 high and 41 very high-risk candidate zoonoses and showed significantly elevated predicted zoonotic risk in viruses from nonhuman primates, but not other mammalian or avian host groups. A second application showed that our models could have identified Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) as a relatively high-risk coronavirus strain and that this prediction required no prior knowledge of zoonotic Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS)-related coronaviruses. Genome-based zoonotic risk assessment provides a rapid, low-cost approach to enable evidence-driven virus surveillance and increases the feasibility of downstream biological and ecological characterization of viruses.


Subject(s)
Forecasting/methods , Host Specificity/genetics , Zoonoses/genetics , Animals , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/prevention & control , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Genome, Viral/genetics , Humans , Machine Learning , Models, Theoretical , Phylogeny , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Viruses/classification , Viruses/genetics , Zoonoses/classification , Zoonoses/virology
11.
Theranostics ; 11(18): 9133-9161, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1410987

ABSTRACT

During an epidemic or pandemic, the primary task is to rapidly develop precise diagnostic approaches and effective therapeutics. Oligonucleotide aptamer-based pathogen detection assays and control therapeutics are promising, as aptamers that specifically recognize and block pathogens can be quickly developed and produced through simple chemical synthesis. This work reviews common aptamer-based diagnostic techniques for communicable diseases and summarizes currently available aptamers that target various pathogens, including the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Moreover, this review discusses how oligonucleotide aptamers might be leveraged to control pathogen propagation and improve host immune system responses. This review offers a comprehensive data source to the further develop aptamer-based diagnostics and therapeutics specific for infectious diseases.


Subject(s)
Aptamers, Nucleotide , Bacteria/genetics , Communicable Diseases/diagnosis , Molecular Diagnostic Techniques/methods , Viruses/genetics , Aptamers, Nucleotide/pharmacology , Biosensing Techniques , COVID-19 Testing/methods , Communicable Disease Control , Communicable Diseases/microbiology , Communicable Diseases/virology , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay/methods , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , SELEX Aptamer Technique , Virus Internalization
12.
Front Immunol ; 12: 624293, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1394756

ABSTRACT

The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor, which interacts with a wide range of organic molecules of endogenous and exogenous origin, including environmental pollutants, tryptophan metabolites, and microbial metabolites. The activation of AHR by these agonists drives its translocation into the nucleus where it controls the expression of a large number of target genes that include the AHR repressor (AHRR), detoxifying monooxygenases (CYP1A1 and CYP1B1), and cytokines. Recent advances reveal that AHR signaling modulates aspects of the intrinsic, innate and adaptive immune response to diverse microorganisms. This review will focus on the increasing evidence supporting a role for AHR as a modulator of the host response to viral infection.


Subject(s)
Adaptive Immunity , Immunity, Innate , Receptors, Aryl Hydrocarbon/metabolism , Virus Diseases/virology , Viruses/immunology , Active Transport, Cell Nucleus , Animals , Gene Expression Regulation , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Ligands , Signal Transduction , Virus Diseases/genetics , Virus Diseases/immunology , Virus Diseases/metabolism , Viruses/genetics , Viruses/pathogenicity
13.
Infection ; 49(3): 377-385, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1384709

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: CRISPR gene-editing technology has the potential to transform the diagnosis and treatment of infectious diseases, but most clinicians are unaware of its broad applicability. Derived from an ancient microbial defence system, these so-called "molecular scissors" enable precise gene editing with a low error rate. However, CRISPR systems can also be targeted against pathogenic DNA or RNA sequences. This potential is being combined with innovative delivery systems to develop new therapeutic approaches to infectious diseases. METHODS: We searched Pubmed and Google Scholar for CRISPR-based strategies in the diagnosis and treatment of infectious diseases. Reference lists were reviewed and synthesized for narrative review. RESULTS: CRISPR-based strategies represent a novel approach to many challenging infectious diseases. CRISPR technologies can be harnessed to create rapid, low-cost diagnostic systems, as well as to identify drug-resistance genes. Therapeutic strategies, such as CRISPR systems that cleave integrated viral genomes or that target resistant bacteria, are in development. CRISPR-based therapies for emerging viruses, such as SARS-CoV-2, have also been proposed. Finally, CRISPR systems can be used to reprogram human B cells to produce neutralizing antibodies. The risks of CRISPR-based therapies include off-target and on-target modifications. Strategies to control these risks are being developed and a phase 1 clinical trials of CRISPR-based therapies for cancer and monogenic diseases are already underway. CONCLUSIONS: CRISPR systems have broad applicability in the field of infectious diseases and may offer solutions to many of the most challenging human infections.


Subject(s)
CRISPR-Cas Systems , Communicable Diseases/diagnosis , Communicable Diseases/therapy , Animals , Bacteria/genetics , Bacteria/isolation & purification , Bacteria/pathogenicity , Gene Editing , Humans , Molecular Diagnostic Techniques , Molecular Targeted Therapy , Viruses/genetics , Viruses/isolation & purification , Viruses/pathogenicity
14.
Bioessays ; 43(4): e2000315, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1384113

ABSTRACT

The versatile clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas system has emerged as a promising technology for therapy and molecular diagnosis. It is especially suited for overcoming viral infections outbreaks, since their effective control relies on an efficient treatment, but also on a fast diagnosis to prevent disease dissemination. The CRISPR toolbox offers DNA- and RNA-targeting nucleases that constitute dual weapons against viruses. They allow both the manipulation of viral and host genomes for therapeutic purposes and the detection of viral nucleic acids in "Point of Care" sensor devices. Here, we thoroughly review recent advances in the use of the CRISPR/Cas system for the treatment and diagnosis of viral deleterious infections such as HIV or SARS-CoV-2, examining their strengths and limitations. We describe the main points to consider when designing CRISPR antiviral strategies and the scientific efforts to develop more sensitive CRISPR-based viral detectors. Finally, we discuss future prospects to improve both applications. Also see the video abstract here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C0z1dLpJWl4.


Subject(s)
Biosensing Techniques/methods , CRISPR-Cas Systems , Virus Diseases/diagnosis , Virus Diseases/therapy , Viruses/genetics , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/therapy , Gene Knock-In Techniques , Genome, Viral , Humans , RNA, Guide/genetics
15.
Viruses ; 12(7)2020 07 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389516

ABSTRACT

Next-generation sequencing (NGS) offers a powerful opportunity to identify low-abundance, intra-host viral sequence variants, yet the focus of many bioinformatic tools on consensus sequence construction has precluded a thorough analysis of intra-host diversity. To take full advantage of the resolution of NGS data, we developed HAplotype PHylodynamics PIPEline (HAPHPIPE), an open-source tool for the de novo and reference-based assembly of viral NGS data, with both consensus sequence assembly and a focus on the quantification of intra-host variation through haplotype reconstruction. We validate and compare the consensus sequence assembly methods of HAPHPIPE to those of two alternative software packages, HyDRA and Geneious, using simulated HIV and empirical HIV, HCV, and SARS-CoV-2 datasets. Our validation methods included read mapping, genetic distance, and genetic diversity metrics. In simulated NGS data, HAPHPIPE generated pol consensus sequences significantly closer to the true consensus sequence than those produced by HyDRA and Geneious and performed comparably to Geneious for HIV gp120 sequences. Furthermore, using empirical data from multiple viruses, we demonstrate that HAPHPIPE can analyze larger sequence datasets due to its greater computational speed. Therefore, we contend that HAPHPIPE provides a more user-friendly platform for users with and without bioinformatics experience to implement current best practices for viral NGS assembly than other currently available options.


Subject(s)
Computational Biology/methods , High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing/methods , Viruses/genetics , Betacoronavirus/genetics , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Genome, Viral , Genomics/methods , HIV/genetics , Haplotypes , Hepacivirus/genetics , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Nat Rev Mol Cell Biol ; 22(9): 585, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1366820

Subject(s)
Viruses , Viruses/genetics
17.
Brief Bioinform ; 22(2): 924-935, 2021 03 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1343628

ABSTRACT

In this paper, we present a toolset and related resources for rapid identification of viruses and microorganisms from short-read or long-read sequencing data. We present fastv as an ultra-fast tool to detect microbial sequences present in sequencing data, identify target microorganisms and visualize coverage of microbial genomes. This tool is based on the k-mer mapping and extension method. K-mer sets are generated by UniqueKMER, another tool provided in this toolset. UniqueKMER can generate complete sets of unique k-mers for each genome within a large set of viral or microbial genomes. For convenience, unique k-mers for microorganisms and common viruses that afflict humans have been generated and are provided with the tools. As a lightweight tool, fastv accepts FASTQ data as input and directly outputs the results in both HTML and JSON formats. Prior to the k-mer analysis, fastv automatically performs adapter trimming, quality pruning, base correction and other preprocessing to ensure the accuracy of k-mer analysis. Specifically, fastv provides built-in support for rapid severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) identification and typing. Experimental results showed that fastv achieved 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity for detecting SARS-CoV-2 from sequencing data; and can distinguish SARS-CoV-2 from SARS, Middle East respiratory syndrome and other coronaviruses. This toolset is available at: https://github.com/OpenGene/fastv.


Subject(s)
SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Sequence Analysis/methods , Viruses/isolation & purification , Algorithms , Genes, Viral , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Viruses/genetics
18.
Adv Virus Res ; 110: 1-26, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1300028

ABSTRACT

Over the last two decades, the viromes of our closest relatives, the African great apes (AGA), have been intensively studied. Comparative approaches have unveiled diverse evolutionary patterns, highlighting both stable host-virus associations over extended evolutionary timescales and much more recent viral emergence events. In this chapter, we summarize these findings and outline how they have shed a new light on the origins and evolution of many human-infecting viruses. We also show how this knowledge can be used to better understand the evolution of human health in relation to viral infections.


Subject(s)
Hominidae , Virus Diseases , Viruses , Animals , Biological Evolution , DNA Viruses , Humans , Virus Diseases/veterinary , Viruses/genetics
19.
Emerg Microbes Infect ; 10(1): 1515-1518, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1313723

ABSTRACT

We show a shift in the prevalence of respiratory viral pathogens in community-acquired pneumonia patients during the COVID-19 pandemic. Our data support the efficiency of non-pharmaceutical interventions on virus circulation except for rhinoviruses. The consequences of an altered circulation on subsequent winter seasons remain unclear and support the importance of systematic virological surveillance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Community-Acquired Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia/epidemiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , Bacteria/classification , Bacteria/genetics , Bacteria/isolation & purification , COVID-19/virology , Community-Acquired Infections/microbiology , Community-Acquired Infections/virology , Female , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia/microbiology , Pneumonia/virology , Prevalence , Prospective Studies , Respiratory Tract Infections/microbiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/virology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Viruses/classification , Viruses/genetics , Viruses/isolation & purification , Young Adult
20.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 14276, 2021 07 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1307342

ABSTRACT

The Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the causal agent of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. To date, viruses closely related to SARS-CoV-2 have been reported in four bat species: Rhinolophus acuminatus, Rhinolophus affinis, Rhinolophus malayanus, and Rhinolophus shameli. Here, we analysed 343 sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene (CO1) from georeferenced bats of the four Rhinolophus species identified as reservoirs of viruses closely related to SARS-CoV-2. Haplotype networks were constructed in order to investigate patterns of genetic diversity among bat populations of Southeast Asia and China. No strong geographic structure was found for the four Rhinolophus species, suggesting high dispersal capacity. The ecological niche of bat viruses closely related to SARS-CoV-2 was predicted using the four localities in which bat viruses were recently discovered and the localities where bats showed the same CO1 haplotypes than virus-positive bats. The ecological niche of bat viruses related to SARS-CoV was deduced from the localities where bat viruses were previously detected. The results show that the ecological niche of bat viruses related to SARS-CoV2 includes several regions of mainland Southeast Asia whereas the ecological niche of bat viruses related to SARS-CoV is mainly restricted to China. In agreement with these results, human populations in Laos, Vietnam, Cambodia, and Thailand appear to be much less affected by the COVID-19 pandemic than other countries of Southeast Asia. In the climatic transitional zone between the two ecological niches (southern Yunnan, northern Laos, northern Vietnam), genomic recombination between highly divergent viruses is more likely to occur. Considering the limited data and the risk of recombinant bat-CoVs emergence as the source of new pandemics in humans, the bat populations in these regions should be under surveillance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Chiroptera/virology , Phylogeography , Viruses/genetics , Animals , Asia, Southeastern/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/transmission , China/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Viruses/pathogenicity
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