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2.
Neurology ; 96(20): e2558-e2560, 2021 05 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1232452

ABSTRACT

Patients with traumatic brain injury may be dependent on the decision-making of their families. Restrictive visitation policies implemented during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic disproportionately affect these patients and their families. This narrative aims to illustrate this phenomenon and catalyze discussions regarding the need for careful evaluation of restrictive family visitation policies and exceptions that may be required for patients with brain injuries.


Subject(s)
Brain Injuries, Traumatic/therapy , COVID-19/prevention & control , Critical Care , Decision Making, Shared , Head Injuries, Penetrating/therapy , Visitors to Patients , Wounds, Gunshot/therapy , Adult , Critical Care/legislation & jurisprudence , Critical Care/psychology , Critical Care/standards , Glasgow Coma Scale , Humans , Internship and Residency , Male , Neurosurgeons , Palliative Care , Visitors to Patients/legislation & jurisprudence , Visitors to Patients/psychology
4.
Cancer ; 127(14): 2397-2398, 2021 07 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1147556

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) restrictions on visitation policies have created barriers for cancer caregivers and patients. Awareness of the critical role that cancer caregivers play should lead to better integration of the caregiver into clinical care and research after the pandemic ends.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Common Bile Duct Neoplasms/psychology , Pandemics/legislation & jurisprudence , Visitors to Patients/legislation & jurisprudence , Aged , Ampulla of Vater/pathology , Common Bile Duct Neoplasms/pathology , Common Bile Duct Neoplasms/surgery , Decision Making , Humans , Male , Narration , Physician-Patient Relations , Visitors to Patients/psychology
5.
Neurology ; 96(20): e2558-e2560, 2021 05 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1127739

ABSTRACT

Patients with traumatic brain injury may be dependent on the decision-making of their families. Restrictive visitation policies implemented during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic disproportionately affect these patients and their families. This narrative aims to illustrate this phenomenon and catalyze discussions regarding the need for careful evaluation of restrictive family visitation policies and exceptions that may be required for patients with brain injuries.


Subject(s)
Brain Injuries, Traumatic/therapy , COVID-19/prevention & control , Critical Care , Decision Making, Shared , Head Injuries, Penetrating/therapy , Visitors to Patients , Wounds, Gunshot/therapy , Adult , Critical Care/legislation & jurisprudence , Critical Care/psychology , Critical Care/standards , Glasgow Coma Scale , Humans , Internship and Residency , Male , Neurosurgeons , Palliative Care , Visitors to Patients/legislation & jurisprudence , Visitors to Patients/psychology
6.
Eur J Health Law ; 28(1): 81-101, 2021 01 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1112375

ABSTRACT

This article reflects on COVID-19 restrictions imposed on elders in Ireland through the lens of the right to private and family life (Article 8 ECHR), focusing on stay at home orders and recommendations advising elders to avoid social contact. Furthermore, we examine restrictions on visiting nursing homes given the high death toll in that setting. In our analysis, we zero in on the principles of foreseeability and proportionality, highlighting areas of concern and aspects that we submit should be considered in a proportionality assessment. Ultimately, we argue that it is a mistake to view the COVID-19 pandemic solely as an emergency. In this manner, the solutions suggested through the law - restrictions on movement and visitation bans - are too narrow and fail to address the underlying structures, such as, issues in the healthcare system, the limited home help for elderly and poor conditions in nursing homes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Disease Outbreaks/legislation & jurisprudence , Family , Patient Isolation/legislation & jurisprudence , Privacy , Visitors to Patients/legislation & jurisprudence , Aged , Freedom of Movement/legislation & jurisprudence , Homes for the Aged/standards , Humans , Ireland/epidemiology , Nursing Homes/standards
7.
J Am Med Dir Assoc ; 21(7): 900-904, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-598614

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To prevent and control COVID-19 infections, nursing homes across the world have taken very restrictive measures, including a ban for visitors. These restrictive measures have an enormous impact on residents' well-being and pose dilemmas for staff, although primary data are lacking. A Dutch guideline was developed to cautiously open nursing homes for visitors during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study reports the first findings on how the guideline was applied in the local context; the compliance to local protocols; and the impact on well-being of residents, their family caregivers, and staff. DESIGN: A mixed-methods cross-sectional study was conducted. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: In total, 26 nursing homes were permitted to enlarge their possibilities for allowing visitors in their facility. These nursing homes were proportionally representative of the Netherlands as they were selected by their local Area Health Authority for participation. At each nursing home, a contact person was selected for participation in the current study. METHODS: A mixed-methods cross-sectional study was conducted, consisting of questionnaire, telephone interviews, analyses of documentation (ie, local visiting protocols), and a WhatsApp group. RESULTS: Variation in local protocols was observed, for example, related to the use of personal protective equipment, location, and supervision of visits. In general, experiences were very positive. All nursing homes recognized the added value of real and personal contact between residents and their loved ones and indicated a positive impact on well-being. Compliance with local guidelines was sufficient to good. No new COVID-19 infections were reported during this time. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: These results indicate the value of family visitation in nursing homes and positive impact of visits. Based on these results, the Dutch government has decided to allow all nursing homes in the Netherlands to cautiously open their homes using the guidelines. More research is needed on impact and long-term compliance.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Guidelines as Topic , Infection Control/organization & administration , Nursing Homes/organization & administration , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Visitors to Patients/legislation & jurisprudence , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Geriatric Assessment , Guideline Adherence , Homes for the Aged/organization & administration , Humans , Male , Netherlands , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Patient Safety , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology
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