Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 14 de 14
Filter
1.
J Neuroophthalmol ; 41(3): 351-355, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1367099

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: A 47-year-old man with a history of COVID-19 infection 2 months before presentation, presented with a scotoma of the paracentral visual field of the right eye. After thorough testing and evaluation, a diagnosis of paracentral acute middle maculopathy (PAMM) was established. Two months later, the patient developed temporal headache and jaw claudication. High-dose steroids were initiated, and workup for giant cell arteritis (GCA) was undertaken. The patient experienced resolution of the symptoms within 24 hours of steroid initiation. ESR, CRP, and temporal artery biopsy results were normal, although all were obtained more than 2 weeks after steroid initiation. To the best of our knowledge, our patient represents the first individual to date to potentially implicate COVID-19 in both small and large vessel vasculitis in the ophthalmic setting.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Giant Cell Arteritis/etiology , Macular Degeneration/etiology , Visual Fields/physiology , Acute Disease , Biopsy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Giant Cell Arteritis/diagnosis , Humans , Macular Degeneration/diagnosis , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2
2.
PLoS One ; 16(6): e0253067, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1280622

ABSTRACT

Modern accounts of visual motion processing in the primate brain emphasize a hierarchy of different regions within the dorsal visual pathway, especially primary visual cortex (V1) and the middle temporal area (MT). However, recent studies have called the idea of a processing pipeline with fixed contributions to motion perception from each area into doubt. Instead, the role that each area plays appears to depend on properties of the stimulus as well as perceptual history. We propose to test this hypothesis in human subjects by comparing motion perception of two commonly used stimulus types: drifting sinusoidal gratings (DSGs) and random dot patterns (RDPs). To avoid potential biases in our approach we are pre-registering our study. We will compare the effects of size and contrast levels on the perception of the direction of motion for DSGs and RDPs. In addition, based on intriguing results in a pilot study, we will also explore the effects of a post-stimulus mask. Our approach will offer valuable insights into how motion is processed by the visual system and guide further behavioral and neurophysiological research.


Subject(s)
Motion Perception/physiology , Neurons/physiology , Photic Stimulation/methods , Visual Cortex/physiology , Visual Fields/physiology , Visual Pathways/physiology , Visual Perception/physiology , Humans
3.
Am J Ophthalmol ; 227: 222-230, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1252395

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to determine if a mobile application, the Checkup Vision Assessment System, could reliably monitor visual acuity (VA) and metamorphopsia remotely versus standard VA reference tests in the clinic. With the current COVID-19 pandemic, an even greater need for remote monitoring exists. Mobile tools enhance the ability to monitor patients virtually by enabling remote monitoring of VA and Amsler grid findings. DESIGN: Prospective, multicenter reliability analysis. METHODS: Participants: Patients (N = 108) with near corrected VA better than 20/200 and a diagnosis of age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, or healthy patients without retinal disease (best-corrected visual acuity [BCVA] of 20/32 or better). INTERVENTION: participants were tested using the Checkup, reference VA, and Amsler tests, with the order of testing (Checkup or reference) randomized. Patients monitored their vision using Checkup at least twice a week at home between office visits. Main outcome measurements were near corrected VA and Amsler grid test results. RESULTS: Agreement was strong between Checkup and reference tests for VA (r = 0.86) and Amsler grid (sensitivity: 93%; specificity: 92%). Home versus clinic testing showed excellent agreement (r = 0.96). Patients reported successful home use. There were no serious adverse events or discontinuations. Patients rated the usability of Checkup to be excellent. CONCLUSIONS: There was good agreement between Checkup and in-clinic test results for VA and Amsler grid. The low variance of Checkup testing, agreement between in-clinic and home results, and excellent usability support Checkup as a reliable method for monitoring retinal pathology in clinic and home settings.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetic Retinopathy/physiopathology , Macular Degeneration/physiopathology , Mobile Applications , Monitoring, Physiologic/methods , Visual Acuity , Visual Fields/physiology , Aged , Comorbidity , Diabetic Retinopathy/diagnosis , Diabetic Retinopathy/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Macular Degeneration/diagnosis , Macular Degeneration/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Am J Ophthalmol ; 227: 53-65, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1157089

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: TO assess perceptions and implications of COVID-19 infection across the spectrum of individuals with visually impairment (VI) and those with normal sight. DESIGN: Prospective cross-sectional comparative study. METHODS: Setting: institutional. PATIENTS: 232 patients and their caregivers. Four groups were created based on better eye characteristics: blind (best-corrected distance visual acuity [BCDVA] <3/60 or visual field <10 central degrees); severe VI (BCDVA ≤3/60 to <6/60; vertical cup-to-disc ratio ≥0.85 or neuroretinal rim width ≤0.1); moderate VI (BCDVA ≤6/60 to <6/18); or no or mild VI (controls: BCDVA ≥6/18) based on International Classification of Diseases-10 criteria and Foster and Quigley's consensus definition of glaucoma. PROCEDURE: telephone questionnaires. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: differences in perceptions and implications of COVID-19 infection across various levels of VI. Caregiver perceptions were a secondary outcome measure. RESULTS: Surveys were completed by 232 participants, with 58 participants in each VI group. Mean age was 58.9 ± 13.2 years old. Greater degrees of VI were associated with older age (P = .008) and lower education level (P = .046). Blind participants more commonly perceived vision as a risk factor for contracting COVID-19 (P = .045), were concerned about access to health care (P <.001), obtained news through word of mouth (P <.001), and less commonly wore masks (P = .003). Controls more commonly performed frequent handwashing (P = .001), were aware of telemedicine (P = .029), and had fewer concerns about social interactions (P = .020) than groups with substantial VI. All caregivers reported more frequent patient care since the COVID-19 pandemic began. CONCLUSIONS: The pandemic might have had a disproportionate impact on the visually impaired, and evidence-based assessments of COVID-19 health outcomes in this population are warranted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Vision, Low/epidemiology , Visual Acuity , Visual Fields/physiology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Comorbidity , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States/epidemiology , Visually Impaired Persons/statistics & numerical data
6.
J Glaucoma ; 30(3): 219-222, 2021 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1147202

ABSTRACT

PRECIS: Designing and demonstrating an experiment that shows the risk of airborne transmission of COVID-19 between patients having visual fields analyzed is low. PURPOSE: The aim was to investigate the possibility of airborne transmission of COVID-19 during Humphrey visual field testing in a real-world scenario. METHODS: A particle counter was placed within the bowl of Humphrey visual field analyzer (HFA) before and after turning on the machine to ascertain the effect of the air current produced by the ventilation system on aerosols. A second experiment was run where the particle counter was placed in the bowl and recorded particulates, in the air, as a 24-2 SITA standard was performed by a mock patient and then again immediately after the patient had moved away. We measured aerosol particle counts sized ≤0.3 µm, >0.3≤0.5 µm, >0.5≤1 µm, >1≤2.5 µm, >2.5≤5 µm, and >5≤10 µm. RESULTS: Particulates of all sizes were shown to be significantly reduced within the bowl after turning the machine on, demonstrating that the air current produced by the HFA pushes air out of the bowl and it cannot stagnate. There was no significant difference in measurement of aerosol while there was a patient performing the test and immediately after they had moved away, suggesting that aerosols breathed out by the patient are not able to remain in suspension in the bowl because of the ventilation current. CONCLUSION: There is no significant difference between aerosol count in the bowl of a HFA before, during and after testing. This suggests the risk of airborne transmission of COVID-19 is low between subsequent patients. This is in keeping with manufacturer's guidance on Humphrey visual field testing.


Subject(s)
Aerosols/adverse effects , COVID-19/transmission , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Ocular Hypertension/diagnosis , Visual Field Tests/methods , Visual Fields/physiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Humans , Intraocular Pressure/physiology , Ocular Hypertension/epidemiology , Ocular Hypertension/physiopathology , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Indian J Ophthalmol ; 69(4): 989-991, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1138825

ABSTRACT

Ocular manifestations of COVID-19 are still being studied. Posterior segment involvement in viral entities is either direct viral involvement or a delayed immune response to the antigen. A 22-year-old woman presented with history of perceiving absolute inferior scotoma in the right eye for 4 days and history of fever and sore throat 10 days ago. Fundus examination revealed disc edema and vessel tortuosity. Humphreys Field Analyzer confirmed inferior field defect and Optical Coherence Tomography showed superior, nasal and inferior retinal nerve fiber layer thickening in the right eye. Patient was positive for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) testing. Patient received three doses of injection methylprednisolone over 3 days. There was subjective resolution of scotoma reported 3 weeks posttreatment. We bring forward the first reported case of parainfectious optic neuritis associated with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Eye Infections, Viral/diagnosis , Papilledema/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2 , Scotoma/diagnosis , Visual Fields/physiology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , Eye Infections, Viral/drug therapy , Eye Infections, Viral/virology , Female , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Humans , Methylprednisolone/therapeutic use , Papilledema/drug therapy , Papilledema/virology , Scotoma/drug therapy , Scotoma/virology , Tomography, Optical Coherence , Visual Acuity , Visual Field Tests , Young Adult
8.
J Neurol Phys Ther ; 45(1): 36-40, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1035551

ABSTRACT

Individuals with balance and gait problems encounter additional challenges navigating this post-coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) world. All but the best fitting facemasks partially obscure the lower visual field. Facemask use by individuals with balance and gait problems has the potential to further compromise walking safety. More broadly, as the world reopens for business, balance and gait testing in clinics and research laboratories will also be impacted by facemask use. Here, we highlight some of the challenges faced by patients, clinicians, and researchers as they return to "normal" after COVID-19.Video Abstract is available for insights from the authors (see the Video, Supplemental Digital Content 1, available at: http://links.lww.com/JNPT/A328).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Gait Disorders, Neurologic , Masks/adverse effects , N95 Respirators/adverse effects , Postural Balance , Spatial Navigation , Visual Fields , Aged , Female , Gait Disorders, Neurologic/physiopathology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Postural Balance/physiology , Spatial Navigation/physiology , Visual Fields/physiology
9.
Neurosurg Focus ; 49(6): E15, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-954715

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: During the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, neurosurgeons all around the globe continue to operate in emergency cases using new self-protective measures. Personal protective equipment (PPE) use is recommended in all surgeries. The authors have experienced varying degrees of field of view (FOV) loss under the surgical microscope with different PPE. Herein, they aimed to investigate the effects of different PPE on FOV while using the surgical microscope. METHODS: Fifteen neurosurgeons and neurosurgery residents participated in this study. Three kinds of PPE (safety spectacles, blast goggles, and face shields) were tested while using a surgical microscope. FOV was measured using a 12 × 12-cm checkered sheet of paper on which every square had an area of 25 mm2 under the microscope. The surgical microscope was positioned perpendicular to the test paper, and the zoom was fixed. Each participant marked on the test sheet the peripheral borders of their FOV while using different PPE and without wearing any PPE. A one-way repeated-measures ANOVA was performed to determine if there was a significant difference in FOV values with the different PPE. RESULTS: FOV was significantly different between each PPE (F[3, 42] = 6339.845, p < 0.0005). Post hoc analysis revealed a significant decrease in the FOV from the naked eye (9305.33 ± 406.1 mm2) to blast goggles (2501.91 ± 176.5 mm2) and face shields (92.33 ± 6.4 mm2). There were no significant FOV changes with the safety spectacles (9267.45 ± 410.5 mm2). CONCLUSIONS: While operating under a surgical microscope safety spectacles provide favorable FOVs. Face shields increase the eye piece-pupil distance, which causes a severe reduction in FOV.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Microsurgery/trends , Neurosurgeons/trends , Neurosurgical Procedures/trends , Personal Protective Equipment/trends , Visual Fields , COVID-19/transmission , Humans , Microscopy/instrumentation , Microscopy/trends , Microsurgery/instrumentation , Neurosurgical Procedures/instrumentation , Personal Protective Equipment/adverse effects , Visual Fields/physiology
10.
J Neurol Phys Ther ; 45(1): 36-40, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-930140

ABSTRACT

Individuals with balance and gait problems encounter additional challenges navigating this post-coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) world. All but the best fitting facemasks partially obscure the lower visual field. Facemask use by individuals with balance and gait problems has the potential to further compromise walking safety. More broadly, as the world reopens for business, balance and gait testing in clinics and research laboratories will also be impacted by facemask use. Here, we highlight some of the challenges faced by patients, clinicians, and researchers as they return to "normal" after COVID-19.Video Abstract is available for insights from the authors (see the Video, Supplemental Digital Content 1, available at: http://links.lww.com/JNPT/A328).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Gait Disorders, Neurologic , Masks/adverse effects , N95 Respirators/adverse effects , Postural Balance , Spatial Navigation , Visual Fields , Aged , Female , Gait Disorders, Neurologic/physiopathology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Postural Balance/physiology , Spatial Navigation/physiology , Visual Fields/physiology
11.
J Glaucoma ; 29(12): 1184-1188, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-894677

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has changed how outpatient care is delivered in ophthalmology clinics, particularly with glaucoma care. This case series highlights the need for awareness of fogging and improper face mask fit as causes of standard automated perimetry artifacts in patients with ocular hypertension and glaucoma. CLINICAL PRESENTATIONS: Six patients with the diagnosis of ocular hypertension, glaucoma suspect, or glaucoma underwent standard automated perimetry (24-2 or 10-2 SITA, Humphrey Field Analyzer) while wearing ear-loop surgical face masks. Due to patient complaints of fogging during the testing, low test reliability, and unexpected results, the tests were repeated after taping securely the mask to the bridge of the nose. CLINICAL FINDINGS: Fogging may reduce visual field (VF) test reliability and induce artifacts that mimic glaucomatous defects. VF test reliability can be improved and artifacts minimized following mask taping. In 1 case there was worsening of VF defects after mask taping. This suggests that fogging may also disguise true VF defects. CONCLUSIONS: Fogging can result in unreliable VF testing with glaucoma-like artifacts. Secure taping of the face mask to the nose bridge may minimize this problem and reduce unnecessary additional testing and follow-up visits.


Subject(s)
Artifacts , COVID-19/prevention & control , Glaucoma, Open-Angle/diagnosis , Optic Nerve Diseases/diagnosis , Respiratory Protective Devices/adverse effects , SARS-CoV-2 , Visual Fields/physiology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Algorithms , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Glaucoma, Open-Angle/physiopathology , Humans , Intraocular Pressure/physiology , Male , Middle Aged , Ocular Hypertension/diagnosis , Ocular Hypertension/physiopathology , Optic Nerve Diseases/physiopathology , Pandemics , Reproducibility of Results , Visual Field Tests
13.
J Glaucoma ; 29(10): 989-991, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-648474

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has had a profound impact on how glaucoma care is delivered, necessitating reduced clinic flow, social distancing, and use of face coverings by patients and staff. This case highlights the need to be aware of improperly fitted face masks as a cause of artifact on standard automated perimetry (SAP). CLINICAL PRESENTATION: A 32-year-old female underwent SAP with the 24-2 SITA Fast test of the Humphrey Field Analyzer wearing an ear-loop surgical face mask. At the end of testing, it was noted that the mask had ridden up the patient's face. Small amounts of condensate were noted on the perimeter lens. CLINICAL FINDINGS: SAP demonstrated good reliability indices but in both eyes, there was a marked reduction in sensitivity inferiorly. The glaucoma hemifield test was outside normal limits. It was ensured the upper border of the mask was well sealed with the loops secured around the ears and nasal strip of the mask pinched down. Visual fields were repeated and were found to be normal. CONCLUSIONS: Poorly fitting face masks represent a new cause of visual field artifact which may mimic pathologic field defects. Without careful attention during testing, the cause of such artifacts may not be apparent, especially as reliability indices may be normal. Adjustments to the fit of face masks may help prevent fogging or mask slippage and increase test reliability.


Subject(s)
Artifacts , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Glaucoma/diagnosis , Masks/adverse effects , Optic Nerve Diseases/diagnosis , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Visual Field Tests , Adult , COVID-19 , False Positive Reactions , Female , Humans , Intraocular Pressure , Predictive Value of Tests , SARS-CoV-2 , Visual Fields/physiology
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL