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1.
BMJ Case Rep ; 14(12)2021 Dec 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1596156

ABSTRACT

Vitamin D-resistant rickets shows the resistance to vitamin D (Vit-D) therapy, which traditionally works well in cases with deficiency rickets. The signs start appearing as early as in the first month of life and are characterised by the defective mineralisation at the ends of cartilage and bones despite having normal Vit-D levels in the serum. This case report highlights the dental and maxillofacial manifestations in a 3-year-old girl diagnosed with pseudo-Vit-D deficiency rickets. The report also highlights the variations in the dental manifestations of the condition reported in the literature.


Subject(s)
Familial Hypophosphatemic Rickets , Rickets , Vitamin D Deficiency , Bone and Bones , Child , Child, Preschool , Familial Hypophosphatemic Rickets/complications , Female , Humans , Rickets/diagnosis , Rickets/etiology , Vitamin D , Vitamins
2.
Rev Endocr Metab Disord ; 22(4): 1201-1218, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1588754

ABSTRACT

The 4th International Conference on Controversies in Vitamin D was held as a virtual meeting in September, 2020, gathering together leading international scientific and medical experts in vitamin D. Since vitamin D has a crucial role in skeletal and extra-skeletal systems, the aim of the Conference was to discuss improved management of vitamin D dosing, therapeutic levels and form or route of administration in the general population and in different clinical conditions. A tailored approach, based on the specific mechanisms underlying vitamin D deficiency in different diseases that were discussed, was recommended. Specifically, in comparison to healthy populations, higher levels of vitamin D and greater amounts of vitamin D were deemed necessary in osteoporosis, diabetes mellitus, obesity (particularly after bariatric surgery), and in those treated with glucocorticoids. Emerging and still open issues were related to target vitamin D levels and the role of vitamin D supplementation in COVID-19 since low vitamin D may predispose to SARS-CoV-2 infection and to worse COVID-19 outcomes. Finally, whereas oral daily cholecalciferol appears to be the preferred choice for vitamin D supplementation in the general population, and in most clinical conditions, active vitamin D analogs may be indicated in patients with hypoparathyroidism and severe kidney and liver insufficiency. Parenteral vitamin D administration could be helpful in malabsorption syndromes or in states of vitamin D resistance.Specific guidelines for desired levels of vitamin D should be tailored to the different conditions affecting vitamin D metabolism with the goal to define disease-specific normative values.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vitamin D Deficiency , Cholecalciferol , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Vitamin D , Vitamin D Deficiency/drug therapy
3.
J Med Virol ; 93(12): 6605-6610, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1544306

ABSTRACT

AIMS: We have previously demonstrated that vitamin D deficiency might be associated with worse outcomes in hospitalized Covid-19 patients. The aim of our study was to explore this relationship with dexamethasone therapy. METHODS: We prospectively studied two cohorts of hospitalized Covid-19 patients between March and April and between September and December 2020 (n = 192). Patients were tested for serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OH-D) levels during admission. The first cohort not treated with dexamethasone (n = 107) was divided into vitamin D deficient (25-OH-D ≤ 30 nmol/L) (n = 47) and replete subgroups (25-OH-D > 30 nmol/L) (n = 60). The second cohort treated with dexamethasone (n = 85) was similarly divided into deficient (25-OH-D ≤ 30 nmol/L) (n = 27) and replete subgroups (25-OH-D > 30 nmol/L) (n = 58). Primary outcome was in-hospital mortality and secondary outcomes were elevation in markers of cytokine storm and ventilatory requirement. RESULTS: No mortality difference was identified between cohorts and subgroups. The "no dexamethasone" cohort 25-OH-D deplete subgroup recorded significantly higher peak D-Dimer levels (1874 vs. 1233 µgFEU/L) (p = 0.0309), CRP (177 vs. 107.5) (p = 0.0055), and ventilatory support requirement (25.5% vs. 6.67%) (p = 0.007) compared to the replete subgroup. Among the 25-OH-D deplete subgroup higher peak neutrophil counts, peak CRP, peak LDH, peak ferritin, and lower trough lymphocyte counts were observed, without statistical significance. In the "dexamethasone" cohort, there was no apparent association between 25-OH-D deficiency and markers of cytokine storm or ventilatory requirement. CONCLUSION: Vitamin D deficiency is associated with elevated markers of cytokine storm and higher ventilatory requirements in hospitalized Covid-19 patients. Dexamethasone treatment appears to mitigate adverse effects of vitamin D deficiency.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Dexamethasone/therapeutic use , Vitamin D Deficiency/complications , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/complications , Cytokine Release Syndrome/etiology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/prevention & control , Cytokines/blood , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Prospective Studies , Treatment Outcome , Vitamin D/analogs & derivatives , Vitamin D/blood
4.
Probl Endokrinol (Mosk) ; 67(5): 20-28, 2021 10 06.
Article in Russian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1515661

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The association between vitamin D deficiency and the severity of COVID-19 is currently being actively discussed around the world. AIM: The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency and compare it with the incidence rates of SARS-CoV-2 in eight Federal Districts of the Russian Federation. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We included 304,564 patients (234,716 women; 77,1%) with serum 25(OH)D levels results performed September 2019 through October 2020. RESULTS: Only 112,877 people (37.1%) had a normal serum 25(OH)D level, others had a deficiency. Vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency was presented with the same frequency in women and men, and no differences were found depending on the geographical location and age in subjects from 18 to 74 years old. However, subjects over 75 years more often had vitamin D deficiency, while subjects under 18 years had normal levels in over 50% cases. In addition, 21,506 patients were tested for SARS-CoV-2 by PCR with further comparison of results with serum 25(OH)D level. The SARS-CoV-2 positivity rate was detected in 3,193 subjects, negative in 18,313. There were no differences in the morbidity in a vitamin D deficiency and a normal level. Thus, 14.8% subjects had positive PCR rates among vitamin D deficiency patients (4,978 tests), 14.9% when 25(OD)D level was from 20 to 30 ng/ml (7,542 tests), 15.0% among those who had 25(OH)D 30- 50 ng/ml (6,622 tests), and 13.9% when vitamin D was more than 50 ng/ml (4,612 tests). CONCLUSION: There was no association between the COVID-19 incidence and vitamin D status in different regions of Russia. Although the nutrient deficiency persists in all regions and is most often diagnosed in people over 75 years old.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vitamin D Deficiency , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Morbidity , SARS-CoV-2 , Vitamin D , Vitamin D Deficiency/diagnosis , Young Adult
5.
Zhongguo Dang Dai Er Ke Za Zhi ; 23(11): 1091-1096, 2021 Nov 15.
Article in English, Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1513019

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To investigate vitamin D nutritional status in children after outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), as well as the effect of strict epidemic prevention and control measures for the COVID-19 epidemic on vitamin D nutritional status in children. METHODS: A total of 7 460 children who underwent routine physical examinations from February to August, 2020 and had normal results were retrospectively enrolled as the observation group, and 10 102 children who underwent routine physical examinations from February to August, 2019 (no epidemic of COVID-19) and had normal results were enrolled as the control group. The serum level of 25-hydroxy vitamin D [25(OH)D] was compared between the two groups. The children in the observation and control groups who underwent physical examinations in March and April were selected as the epidemic prevention subgroup (n=1 710) and non-epidemic subgroup (n=2 877) respectively. The subjects were divided into five age groups (infancy, early childhood, preschool, school age and adolescence), and serum 25(OH)D levels of children of all ages were compared between the epidemic prevention and non-epidemic subgroups. RESULTS: The observation group had a lower serum level of 25(OH)D than the control group in March and April (P<0.001). The epidemic prevention subgroup had a lower serum level of 25(OH)D than the non-epidemic subgroup in all age groups (P<0.001). The vitamin D sufficiency rate in early childhood, preschool, school and adolescent children from the epidemic prevention subgroup was lower than the non-epidemic subgroup (P<0.001), with a reduction of 10.71%, 18.76%, 59.63% and 56.29% respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Strict prevention and control measures for the COVID-19 epidemic may lead to a significant reduction in vitamin D level in children, especially school-aged and adolescent children. It is recommended to timely monitor vitamin D level in children, take vitamin D supplements, and increase the time of outdoor sunshine as far as possible under the premise of adherence to epidemic prevention regulations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vitamin D Deficiency , Adolescent , Child , Child, Preschool , Disease Outbreaks , Humans , Nutritional Status , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Vitamin D , Vitamin D Deficiency/epidemiology
6.
QJM ; 114(7): 447-453, 2021 Nov 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1506797

ABSTRACT

We aim to study the relationship between vitamin D level, risk and severity of Coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19) infection in pediatric population through systematic review. We searched PubMed, CINAHL, EMBASE, Cochrane Library and Google Scholar from December 2019 to June 2021 for retrieving articles studying association between vitamin D deficiencies with COVID-19. Qualitative details were synthesized in evidence table and quantitative data was used for deriving pooled estimate through meta-analysis. After initial search of 2261 articles, eight eligible studies (two reviews) were included in the systematic review. Meta-analysis of the quantitative data (six studies) showed pooled prevalence of vitamin D deficiency as 45.91% (95% CI: 25.148-67.450). In infected pediatric patients, low levels of vitamin D increased the risk of severe disease (odds ratio-5.5; 95% CI: 1.560-19.515; P = 0.008). It was also found that children and adolescents having vitamin D deficiency had greater risk of COVID infection as compared to patients with normal vitamin D levels. Improvement in disease severity with vitamin D supplementation was also noted. The systematic review showed that almost half of the pediatric COVID patients suffer from vitamin D deficiency. It is also clear that the low level of vitamin D is associated with greater risk of infection and poorer outcome in pediatrics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pediatrics , Vitamin D Deficiency , Adolescent , Child , Humans , Prognosis , SARS-CoV-2 , Vitamin D , Vitamin D Deficiency/epidemiology
10.
Aging Clin Exp Res ; 33(7): 2031-2041, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1491488

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The rapid global spread of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the virus that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), has re-ignited interest in the possible role of vitamin D in modulation of host responses to respiratory pathogens. Indeed, vitamin D supplementation has been proposed as a potential preventative or therapeutic strategy. Recommendations for any intervention, particularly in the context of a potentially fatal pandemic infection, should be strictly based on clinically informed appraisal of the evidence base. In this narrative review, we examine current evidence relating to vitamin D and COVID-19 and consider the most appropriate practical recommendations. OBSERVATIONS: Although there are a growing number of studies investigating the links between vitamin D and COVID-19, they are mostly small and observational with high risk of bias, residual confounding, and reverse causality. Extrapolation of molecular actions of 1,25(OH)2-vitamin D to an effect of increased 25(OH)-vitamin D as a result of vitamin D supplementation is generally unfounded, as is the automatic conclusion of causal mechanisms from observational studies linking low 25(OH)-vitamin D to incident disease. Efficacy is ideally demonstrated in the context of adequately powered randomised intervention studies, although such approaches may not always be feasible. CONCLUSIONS: At present, evidence to support vitamin D supplementation for the prevention or treatment of COVID-19 is inconclusive. In the absence of any further compelling data, adherence to existing national guidance on vitamin D supplementation to prevent vitamin D deficiency, predicated principally on maintaining musculoskeletal health, appears appropriate.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vitamin D Deficiency , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Vitamin D , Vitamins
11.
J Clin Endocrinol Metab ; 106(11): e4708-e4715, 2021 10 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1484819

ABSTRACT

CONTEXT: One risk factor for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection is postulated to be vitamin D deficiency. To better understand the role of vitamin D deficiency in the disease course of COVID-19, we undertook a retrospective case-control study in North West England. OBJECTIVE: To examine whether hospitalization with COVID-19 is more prevalent in individuals with lower vitamin D levels. METHODS: The study included individuals with test results for serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) between April 1, 2020, and January 29, 2021, from 2 districts in North West England. The last 25(OH)D level in the previous 12 months was categorized as "deficient" if less than 25 nmol/L and "insufficient" if 25 to 50 nmol/L. RESULTS: The study included 80 670 participants. Of these, 1808 were admitted to the hospital with COVID-19, of whom 670 died. In a primary cohort, median serum 25(OH)D in nonhospitalized participants with COVID-19 was 50.0 nmol/L (interquartile range [IQR], 34.0-66.7) vs 35.0 nmol/L (IQR, 21.0-57.0) in those admitted with COVID-19 (P < 0.005). In a validation cohort, median serum 25(OH)D was 47.1 nmol/L (IQR, 31.8-64.7) in nonhospitalized vs 33.0 nmol/L (IQR, 19.4-54.1) in hospitalized patients. Age-, sex-, and season-adjusted odds ratios for hospital admission were 2.3 to 2.4 times higher among participants with serum 25(OH)D <50 nmol/L compared with those with normal serum 25(OH)D levels, without excess mortality risk. CONCLUSION: Vitamin D deficiency is associated with higher risk of COVID-19 hospitalization. Widespread measurement of serum 25(OH)D and treatment of insufficiency or deficiency may reduce this risk.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/etiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Vitamin D Deficiency/complications , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Severity of Illness Index , Vitamin D/analogs & derivatives , Vitamin D/blood
12.
BMJ Open ; 11(10): e055435, 2021 10 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1480255

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The steroid hormone vitamin D has roles in immunomodulation and bone health. Insufficiency is associated with susceptibility to respiratory infections. We report 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25(OH)D) measurements in hospitalised people with COVID-19 and influenza A and in survivors of critical illness to test the hypotheses that vitamin D insufficiency scales with illness severity and persists in survivors. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Plasma was obtained from 295 hospitalised people with COVID-19 (International Severe Acute Respiratory and emerging Infections Consortium (ISARIC)/WHO Clinical Characterization Protocol for Severe Emerging Infections UK study), 93 with influenza A (Mechanisms of Severe Acute Influenza Consortium (MOSAIC) study, during the 2009-2010 H1N1 pandemic) and 139 survivors of non-selected critical illness (prior to the COVID-19 pandemic). Total 25(OH)D was measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Free 25(OH)D was measured by ELISA in COVID-19 samples. OUTCOME MEASURES: Receipt of invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV) and in-hospital mortality. RESULTS: Vitamin D insufficiency (total 25(OH)D 25-50 nmol/L) and deficiency (<25 nmol/L) were prevalent in COVID-19 (29.3% and 44.4%, respectively), influenza A (47.3% and 37.6%) and critical illness survivors (30.2% and 56.8%). In COVID-19 and influenza A, total 25(OH)D measured early in illness was lower in patients who received IMV (19.6 vs 31.9 nmol/L (p<0.0001) and 22.9 vs 31.1 nmol/L (p=0.0009), respectively). In COVID-19, biologically active free 25(OH)D correlated with total 25(OH)D and was lower in patients who received IMV, but was not associated with selected circulating inflammatory mediators. CONCLUSIONS: Vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency was present in majority of hospitalised patients with COVID-19 or influenza A and correlated with severity and persisted in critical illness survivors at concentrations expected to disrupt bone metabolism. These findings support early supplementation trials to determine if insufficiency is causal in progression to severe disease, and investigation of longer-term bone health outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype , Influenza, Human , Vitamin D Deficiency , Critical Illness , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Influenza, Human/complications , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Survivors , Vitamin D , Vitamin D Deficiency/complications , Vitamin D Deficiency/epidemiology
13.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 20837, 2021 10 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1479820

ABSTRACT

Vitamin D is a fundamental regulator of host defences by activating genes related to innate and adaptive immunity. Previous research shows a correlation between the levels of vitamin D in patients infected with SARS-CoV-2 and the degree of disease severity. This work investigates the impact of the genetic background related to vitamin D pathways on COVID-19 severity. For the first time, the Portuguese population was characterized regarding the prevalence of high impact variants in genes associated with the vitamin D pathways. This study enrolled 517 patients admitted to two tertiary Portuguese hospitals. The serum concentration of 25 (OH)D, was measured in the hospital at the time of patient admission. Genetic variants, 18 variants, in the genes AMDHD1, CYP2R1, CYP24A1, DHCR7, GC, SEC23A, and VDR were analysed. The results show that polymorphisms in the vitamin D binding protein encoded by the GC gene are related to the infection severity (p = 0.005). There is an association between vitamin D polygenic risk score and the serum concentration of 25 (OH)D (p = 0.04). There is an association between 25 (OH)D levels and the survival and fatal outcomes (p = 1.5e-4). The Portuguese population has a higher prevalence of the DHCR7 RS12785878 variant when compared with its prevalence in the European population (19% versus 10%). This study shows a genetic susceptibility for vitamin D deficiency that might explain higher severity degrees in COVID-19 patients. These results reinforce the relevance of personalized strategies in the context of viral diseases.Trial registration: NCT04370808.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , Polymorphism, Genetic , Vitamin D Deficiency/blood , Vitamin D/analogs & derivatives , Vitamin D/blood , Vitamin D/genetics , Aged , Biomarkers , Cholestanetriol 26-Monooxygenase/genetics , Cytochrome P450 Family 2/genetics , Female , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Oxidoreductases Acting on CH-CH Group Donors/genetics , Portugal/epidemiology , Prevalence , Severity of Illness Index , Vesicular Transport Proteins/genetics , Vitamin D-Binding Protein/genetics , Vitamin D3 24-Hydroxylase/genetics
14.
Acta Biomed ; 92(S6): e2021451, 2021 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1472540

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIM: Vitamin D is known to modulate immune response and its deficiency was associated with respiratory distress in patients hospitalized for pneumonia. Nevertheless, numerous reviews on vitamin D in COVID-19 patients have shown conflicting results, as previously reported also for other respiratory diseases (e.g., influenza). METHODS: This umbrella review aims to assess whether low serum 25-OHD is associated with susceptibility to COVID 19, their severity, and mortality. A total of 1559 studies were excluded after the title, abstract and full-text articles screening and 9 papers were included in this review: 2 systematic reviews and 7 metanalysis. RESULTS: The findings of this review that summarized studies from 5 WHO regions (European Region, Region of the Americas, South-East Asia Region, Eastern Mediterranean Region, Western Pacific Region) to exclusion only African region, show that low serum 25-OHD levels are associated with higher infection risks for COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: Although the umbrella findings indicate a potential role of vitamin D deficiency in COVID-19 severity in hospitalized patients and showing an association between Vitamin D supplementation and COVID-19 severity, however, more robust data from randomized controlled trials are further needed to confirm a possible association with the mortality rates.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vitamin D Deficiency , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Vitamin D , Vitamin D Deficiency/prevention & control , Vitamins/therapeutic use
15.
Medicina (Kaunas) ; 57(10)2021 Oct 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463752

ABSTRACT

Background and Objectives: Vitamin D, in addition to its effect on mineral homeostasis, plays a key role in muscle metabolism. Vitamin D supplementation is involved in muscle recovery after damage as a consequence of either pathology or after high-intensity exercise. In this context, the aim of this study was to analyze the effect of vitamin D on muscle fitness in elderly patients in the recovery phase after SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) infection. Materials and Methods: This pilot study was conducted at the Soria Norte Health Center. The study consisted of a double-blind trial with two groups of men (placebo and vitamin D-supplemented) (n = 15/group). Treatment with vitamin D (cholecalciferol: 2000 IU/day) and placebo was carried out for 6 weeks. Circulating hematological and biochemical parameters (total protein, glucose, vitamin D, urea, uric acid, aspartate aminotransferase/glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase, alanine aminotransferase/glutamic-pyruvic transaminase, creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, aldolase, gamma-glutamyl transferase and myoglobin) and the hormones cortisol and testosterone were determined. As for respiratory function tests, FEV1 and respiratory flow were also studied. For physical fitness tests, the "six-minute walk test" (6MWT) was used. Results: After vitamin D supplementation, we observed that serum creatine kinase levels returned to optimal values. This change suggests a protective role of vitamin D against muscle catabolism compared to placebo. In terms of physical test results, we observed only slight non-significant improvements, although patients reported feeling better. Conclusions: Vitamin D supplementation produces decreases in indicators of muscle damage, which may ultimately contribute to improving the health status and quality of life of patients who have suffered from COVID-19, during the recovery process.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vitamin D Deficiency , Aged , Dietary Supplements , Double-Blind Method , Humans , Male , Muscles , Pilot Projects , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Vitamin D
16.
J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol ; 214: 105965, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1454329

ABSTRACT

Vitamin D deficiency is a negative endocrine renin-angiotensin system (RAS) modulator and PCOS women are often vitamin D deficient, leading to RAS overactivation in PCOS. A cross-sectional study was performed in 99 PCOS and 68 control women who presented sequentially. Circulating plasma levels of RAS proteins (Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), renin and angiotensinogen) were measured by Slow Off-rate Modified Aptamer (SOMA)-scan and 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] was measured by tandem mass spectroscopy. The RAS system was found to be overactivated in the PCOS women compared to non-PCOS control women with increased renin and decreased angiotensinogen (p < 0.05); 25-hydroxyvitamin D was also significantly lower in the PCOS group (p < 0.0001). In PCOS women, plasma renin was increased in vitamin D deficient and insufficient groups compared with the vitamin D sufficient group (p < 0.005), but did not differ across non-PCOS control subgroups. In non-PCOS controls, plasma ACE2 decreased from vitamin D insufficiency to deficiency (p < 0.05). Angiotensinogen was not different across the vitamin D sufficiency, insufficiency and deficiency strata for either PCOS or non-PCOS controls. These data show that RAS activation through increased plasma renin levels was seen in vitamin D insufficient and deficient PCOS subjects compared to non-PCOS control women. In addition, decreased plasma ACE2 levels were seen in vitamin D deficiency in non-PCOS controls, which may predispose these vitamin D deficient subjects to increased cardiovascular risk and susceptibility to infectious agents such as COVID-19 where this is a risk factor.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/blood , Angiotensinogen/blood , Polycystic Ovary Syndrome/blood , Renin/blood , Vitamin D Deficiency/blood , Adult , Blood Pressure , Female , Humans , Polycystic Ovary Syndrome/physiopathology , Renin-Angiotensin System , Vitamin D/blood , Vitamin D Deficiency/physiopathology , Vitamins/blood , Young Adult
17.
Adv Nutr ; 12(5): 2037-2039, 2021 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1452681
18.
Endocrine ; 74(2): 219-225, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1442182

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Hypocalcemia has been identified as a major distinctive feature of COVID-19, predicting poor clinical outcomes. Among the mechanisms underlying this biochemical finding, high prevalence of vitamin D (VD) deficiency in COVID-19 patients reported so far in several studies was advocated. However, robust data in favor of this hypothesis are still lacking. Therefore, aim of our study was to investigate the role of hypovitaminosis D and parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels in the development of hypocalcemia in COVID-19 patients. METHODS: Patients admitted to IRCCS Ospedale San Raffaele for COVID-19 were enrolled in this study, excluding those with comorbidities and therapies influencing calcium and VD metabolism. Serum levels of total calcium (tCa), ionized calcium (Ca2+), 25-OH-VD, and PTH were evaluated at admission. We defined VD deficiency as VD below 20 ng/mL, hypocalcemia as tCa below 2.2 mmol/L or as Ca2+ below 1.18 mmol/L, and hyperparathyroidism as PTH above 65 pg/mL. RESULTS: A total of 78 patients were included in the study. Median tCa and Ca2+ levels were 2.15 and 1.15 mmol/L, respectively. Total and ionized hypocalcemia were observed in 53 (67.9%) and 55 (70.5%) patients, respectively. VD deficiency was found in 67.9% of patients, but secondary hyperparathyroidism was detected in 20.5% of them, only. tCa levels were significantly lower in patients with VD deficiency and regression analyses showed a positive correlation between VD and tCa. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, we confirmed a high prevalence of hypocalcemia in COVID-19 patients and we showed for the first time that it occurred largely in the context of marked hypovitaminosis D not adequately compensated by secondary hyperparathyroidism.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hyperparathyroidism, Secondary , Hypocalcemia , Parathyroid Hormone/physiology , Vitamin D Deficiency , COVID-19/complications , Calcium , Humans , Hyperparathyroidism, Secondary/epidemiology , Hyperparathyroidism, Secondary/virology , Hypocalcemia/epidemiology , Hypocalcemia/virology , Italy , Vitamin D/blood , Vitamin D Deficiency/complications , Vitamin D Deficiency/epidemiology
19.
Bratisl Lek Listy ; 122(10): 744-747, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1441312

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Vitamin D has anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects via the downregulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines. We aimed to demonstrate the effect of vitamin D levels on survival in COVID-19 patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 207 COVID-19 patients were included in the study. Serum vitamin D levels were measured, and patients with levels <20 ng/ml or 21 to 30 ng received a single 300.000 IU dose of vitamin D. RESULTS: Of 207 patients, 37 received vitamin D, while 170 did not. Demographic, radiologic and mean laboratory values were similar between the groups. The mean plasma vitamin D level without vitamin D support (n=170) was 50.82±16.12 ng/ml (30.28-81.35) vs. 16.98±6.2 ng/ml (4.20-28.30) in vitamin D group. The most remarkable finding were the mortality rates; while only 1 patient (2.7 %) died in the vitamin D group, 24 patients (14.1 %) died in no vitamin D supplementation group (p=0.038). CONCLUSION: Although a few retrospective studies put forth a relation between vitamin D deficiency and COVID-19 course severity there is still paucity of data about the efficacy of vitamin supplementations in COVID-19 patients. A single 300.000 IU dose of vitamin D seems to represent a useful, practical, and safe adjunctive approach for the treatment or prevention of COVID-19 (Tab. 1, Fig. 1, Ref. 30).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vitamin D Deficiency , Humans , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Vitamin D , Vitamin D Deficiency/complications , Vitamin D Deficiency/diagnosis , Vitamin D Deficiency/drug therapy
20.
Nutrients ; 13(10)2021 Sep 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1438687

ABSTRACT

Vitamin D and zinc are important components of nutritional immunity. This study compared the serum concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) and zinc in COVID-19 outpatients with those of potentially non-infected participants. The association of clinical symptoms with vitamin D and zinc status was also examined. A checklist and laboratory examination were applied to collect data in a cross-sectional study conducted on 53 infected outpatients with COVID-19 and 53 potentially non-infected participants. Serum concentration of 25(OH)D were not significantly lower in patients with moderate illness (19 ± 12 ng/mL) than patients with asymptomatic or mild illness (29 ± 18 ng/mL), with a trend noted for a lower serum concentration of 25(OH)D in moderate than asymptomatic or mild illness patients (p = 0.054). Infected patients (101 ± 18 µg/dL) showed a lower serum concentration of zinc than potentially non-infected participants (114 ± 13 µg/dL) (p = 0.01). Patients with normal (odds ratio (OR), 0.19; p ≤ 0.001) and insufficient (OR, 0.3; p = 0.007) vitamin D status at the second to seventh days of disease had decreased OR of general symptoms compared to patients with vitamin D deficiency. This study revealed the importance of 25(OH)D measurement to predict the progression of general and pulmonary symptoms and showed that infected patients had significantly lower zinc concentrations than potentially non-infected participants.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/physiopathology , Outpatients/statistics & numerical data , Vitamin D Deficiency/blood , Vitamin D/analogs & derivatives , Zinc/blood , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disease Progression , Female , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Trace Elements/blood , Vitamin D/blood , Vitamins/blood
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