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1.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(6)2022 Mar 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1742487

ABSTRACT

The published literature makes a very strong case that a wide range of disease morbidity associates with and may in part be due to epithelial barrier leak. An equally large body of published literature substantiates that a diverse group of micronutrients can reduce barrier leak across a wide array of epithelial tissue types, stemming from both cell culture as well as animal and human tissue models. Conversely, micronutrient deficiencies can exacerbate both barrier leak and morbidity. Focusing on zinc, Vitamin A and Vitamin D, this review shows that at concentrations above RDA levels but well below toxicity limits, these micronutrients can induce cell- and tissue-specific molecular-level changes in tight junctional complexes (and by other mechanisms) that reduce barrier leak. An opportunity now exists in critical care-but also medical prophylactic and therapeutic care in general-to consider implementation of select micronutrients at elevated dosages as adjuvant therapeutics in a variety of disease management. This consideration is particularly pointed amidst the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases/metabolism , Intestinal Mucosa/metabolism , Micronutrients/metabolism , Vitamin A/metabolism , Vitamin D/metabolism , Zinc/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Micronutrients/pharmacology , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Tight Junctions/drug effects , Tight Junctions/metabolism , Vitamin A/pharmacology , Vitamin D/pharmacology , Vitamins/metabolism , Vitamins/pharmacology , Zinc/pharmacology
2.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(2)2022 Jan 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1633064

ABSTRACT

Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) belong to the innate and adaptive immune system and are highly sensitive and responsive to changes in their systemic environment. In this study, we focused on the time course of transcriptional changes in freshly isolated human PBMCs 4, 8, 24 and 48 h after onset of stimulation with the active vitamin D metabolite 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3). Taking all four time points together, 662 target genes were identified and segregated either by time of differential gene expression into 179 primary and 483 secondary targets or by driver of expression change into 293 direct and 369 indirect targets. The latter classification revealed that more than 50% of target genes were primarily driven by the cells' response to ex vivo exposure than by the nuclear hormone and largely explained its down-regulatory effect. Functional analysis indicated vitamin D's role in the suppression of the inflammatory and adaptive immune response by down-regulating ten major histocompatibility complex class II genes, five alarmins of the S100 calcium binding protein A family and by affecting six chemokines of the C-X-C motif ligand family. Taken together, studying time-resolved responses allows to better contextualize the effects of vitamin D on the immune system.


Subject(s)
Adaptive Immunity/genetics , Gene Expression Profiling , Gene Expression Regulation , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Transcriptome , Vitamin D/metabolism , Computational Biology/methods , Gene Expression Profiling/methods , Gene Expression Regulation/drug effects , Humans , Inflammation/etiology , Inflammation/metabolism , Inflammation/pathology , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/drug effects , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/immunology , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/metabolism , Molecular Sequence Annotation , Vitamin D/analogs & derivatives , Vitamin D/pharmacology
4.
J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol ; 213: 105957, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1561628

ABSTRACT

This review examines the beneficial effects of ultraviolet radiation on systemic autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis and type I diabetes, where the epidemiological evidence for the vitamin D-independent effects of sunlight is most apparent. Ultraviolet radiation, in addition to its role in the synthesis of vitamin D, stimulates anti-inflammatory pathways, alters the composition of dendritic cells, T cells, and T regulatory cells, and induces nitric oxide synthase and heme oxygenase metabolic pathways, which may directly or indirectly mitigate disease progression and susceptibility. Recent work has also explored how the immune-modulating functions of ultraviolet radiation affect type II diabetes, cancer, and the current global pandemic caused by SARS-CoV-2. These diseases are particularly important amidst global changes in lifestyle that result in unhealthy eating, increased sedentary habits, and alcohol and tobacco consumption. Compelling epidemiological data shows increased ultraviolet radiation associated with reduced rates of certain cancers, such as colorectal cancer, breast cancer, non-Hodgkins lymphoma, and ultraviolet radiation exposure correlated with susceptibility and mortality rates of COVID-19. Therefore, understanding the effects of ultraviolet radiation on both vitamin D-dependent and -independent pathways is necessary to understand how they influence the course of many human diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/prevention & control , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/prevention & control , Multiple Sclerosis/prevention & control , Neoplasms/prevention & control , Sunlight , Vitamin D/metabolism , Alcohol Drinking/adverse effects , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Dendritic Cells/immunology , Dendritic Cells/radiation effects , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/immunology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/pathology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/immunology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/pathology , Disease Progression , Disease Susceptibility , Heme Oxygenase (Decyclizing)/genetics , Heme Oxygenase (Decyclizing)/immunology , Humans , Multiple Sclerosis/immunology , Multiple Sclerosis/pathology , Neoplasms/immunology , Neoplasms/pathology , Nitric Oxide Synthase/genetics , Nitric Oxide Synthase/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , SARS-CoV-2/radiation effects , Sedentary Behavior , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/radiation effects , Vitamin D/immunology
5.
Nat Immunol ; 23(1): 62-74, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1514418

ABSTRACT

The molecular mechanisms governing orderly shutdown and retraction of CD4+ type 1 helper T (TH1) cell responses remain poorly understood. Here we show that complement triggers contraction of TH1 responses by inducing intrinsic expression of the vitamin D (VitD) receptor and the VitD-activating enzyme CYP27B1, permitting T cells to both activate and respond to VitD. VitD then initiated the transition from pro-inflammatory interferon-γ+ TH1 cells to suppressive interleukin-10+ cells. This process was primed by dynamic changes in the epigenetic landscape of CD4+ T cells, generating super-enhancers and recruiting several transcription factors, notably c-JUN, STAT3 and BACH2, which together with VitD receptor shaped the transcriptional response to VitD. Accordingly, VitD did not induce interleukin-10 expression in cells with dysfunctional BACH2 or STAT3. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid CD4+ T cells of patients with COVID-19 were TH1-skewed and showed de-repression of genes downregulated by VitD, from either lack of substrate (VitD deficiency) and/or abnormal regulation of this system.


Subject(s)
Interferon-gamma/immunology , Interleukin-10/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Th1 Cells/immunology , Vitamin D/metabolism , 25-Hydroxyvitamin D3 1-alpha-Hydroxylase/metabolism , Basic-Leucine Zipper Transcription Factors/metabolism , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/cytology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , Complement C3a/immunology , Complement C3b/immunology , Humans , JNK Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases/metabolism , Lymphocyte Activation/immunology , Receptors, Calcitriol/metabolism , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/immunology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/pathology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/virology , STAT3 Transcription Factor/metabolism , Signal Transduction/immunology , Transcription, Genetic/genetics
6.
Inflamm Res ; 71(1): 13-26, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1504767

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic continues to spread sporadically in the Unites States and worldwide. The severity and mortality excessively affected the frail elderly with co-existing medical diseases. There is growing evidence that cross-talk between the gut microbiome, Vitamin D and RAS/ACE2 system is essential for a balanced functioning of the elderly immune system and in regulating inflammation. In this review, we hypothesize that the state of gut microbiome, prior to infection determines the outcome associated with COVID-19 sepsis and may also be a critical factor in success to vaccination. METHODS: Articles from PubMed/Medline searches were reviewed using a combination of terms "SARS-CoV-2, COVID-19, Inflammaging, Immune-senescence, Gut microbiome, Vitamin D, RAS/ACE2, Vaccination". CONCLUSION: Evidence indicates a complex association between gut microbiota, ACE-2 expression and Vitamin D in COVID-19 severity. Status of gut microbiome is highly predictive of the blood molecular signatures and inflammatory markers and host responses to infection. Vitamin D has immunomodulatory function in innate and adaptive immune responses to viral infection. Anti-inflammatory functions of Vit D include regulation of gut microbiome and maintaining microbial diversity. It promotes growth of gut-friendly commensal strains of Bifida and Fermicutus species. In addition, Vitamin D is a negative regulator for expression of renin and interacts with the RAS/ ACE/ACE-2 signaling axis. Collectively, this triad may be the critical, link in determination of outcomes in SARS-CoV-2 infection. The presented data are empirical and informative. Further research using advanced systems biology techniques and artificial intelligence-assisted integration could assist with correlation of the gut microbiome with sepsis and vaccine responses. Modulating these factors may impact in guiding the success of vaccines and clinical outcomes in COVID-19 infections.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19/blood , Gastrointestinal Microbiome , SARS-CoV-2 , Vitamin D/metabolism , Adaptive Immunity , Aged , Animals , Anti-Inflammatory Agents , Artificial Intelligence , COVID-19/metabolism , Disease Models, Animal , Humans , Immune System , Immunity, Innate , Immunomodulation , Inflammation , Machine Learning , Male , Mice , Probiotics , Proteomics
7.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(18)2021 Sep 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1409707

ABSTRACT

Global data correlate severe vitamin D deficiency with COVID-19-associated coagulopathy, further suggesting the presence of a hypercoagulable state in severe COVID-19 patients, which could promote thrombosis in the lungs and in other organs. The feedback loop between COVID-19-associated coagulopathy and vitamin D also involves platelets (PLTs), since vitamin D deficiency stimulates PLT activation and aggregation and increases fibrinolysis and thrombosis. Vitamin D and PLTs share and play specific roles not only in coagulation and thrombosis but also during inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, and immune response. Additionally, another 'fil rouge' between vitamin D and PLTs is represented by their role in mineral metabolism and bone health, since vitamin D deficiency, low PLT count, and altered PLT-related parameters are linked to abnormal bone remodeling in certain pathological conditions, such as osteoporosis (OP). Hence, it is possible to speculate that severe COVID-19 patients are characterized by the presence of several predisposing factors to bone fragility and OP that may be monitored to avoid potential complications. Here, we hypothesize different pervasive actions of vitamin D and PLT association in COVID-19, also allowing for potential preliminary information on bone health status during COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
Blood Platelets/immunology , COVID-19/complications , Osteoporosis/immunology , Thrombosis/immunology , Vitamin D Deficiency/immunology , Vitamin D/metabolism , Blood Platelets/metabolism , Bone Remodeling/immunology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/immunology , Feedback, Physiological , Humans , Osteoporosis/blood , Platelet Activation/immunology , Platelet Count , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Severity of Illness Index , Thrombosis/blood , Vitamin D/blood , Vitamin D Deficiency/blood , Vitamin D Deficiency/complications
8.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(15)2021 Jul 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1325680

ABSTRACT

Nowadays, type II diabetes mellitus, more specifically ensuing diabetic nephropathy, and severe COVID-19 disease are known to be closely associated. The exact mechanisms behind this association are less known. An implication for the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 remains controversial. Some researchers have started looking into other potential actors, such as neuropilin-1, mitochondrial glutathione, vitamin D, and DPP4. In particular, neuropilin-1 seems to play an important role in the underlying mechanism linking COVID-19 and diabetic nephropathy. We suggest, based on the findings in this review, that its up-regulation in the diabetic kidney facilitates viral entry in this tissue, and that the engagement of both processes leads to a depletion of neuropilin-1, which was demonstrated to be strongly associated with the pathogenesis of DN. More studies are needed to confirm this hypothesis, and research should be directed towards elucidating the potential roles of all these suggested actors and eventually discovering new therapeutic strategies that could reduce the burden of COVID-19 in patients with diabetic nephropathy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , Diabetic Nephropathies/complications , Diabetic Nephropathies/immunology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Dipeptidyl Peptidase 4/metabolism , Glutathione/metabolism , Humans , Neuropilin-1/metabolism , SARS Virus/immunology , Vitamin D/metabolism
9.
Curr Opin Nephrol Hypertens ; 30(4): 387-396, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1297432

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The purpose of this review is to summarize the emerging studies analyzing the association between vitamin D and risk of COVID-19 infection and severity, as well as the early interventional studies investigating the protective effect of vitamin D supplementation against COVID-19. RECENT FINDINGS: Studies investigating the association between vitamin D levels and risk of COVID-19 infection and risk of severe disease and mortality among those infected have yielded mixed results. Thus far, the majority of studies investigating the association between vitamin D and COVID-19 have been observational and rely on vitamin D levels obtained at the time of admission, limiting causal inference. Currently, clinical trials assessing the effects of vitamin D supplementation in individuals with COVID-19 infection are extremely limited. Randomized, interventional trials may offer more clarity on the protective effects of vitamin D against COVID-19 infection and outcomes. SUMMARY: Decreased levels of vitamin D may amplify the inflammatory effects of COVID-19 infection, yet, data regarding the mortality benefits of vitamin D supplementation in COVID-19-infected individuals are still limited. Current observational data provides the impetus for future studies to including randomized controlled trials to determine whether vitamin D supplementation in COVID-19-infected individuals with kidney disease can improve mortality outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/therapy , Vitamin D Deficiency/etiology , Vitamin D Deficiency/therapy , Vitamin D/metabolism , Vitamin D/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , Dietary Supplements , Humans , Kidney/physiopathology , Vitamin D Deficiency/physiopathology , Vitamins/pharmacology , Vitamins/therapeutic use
10.
Inflammopharmacology ; 29(4): 1017-1031, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1286160

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-COV-2) is the culprit of the Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19), which has infected approximately 173 million people and killed more than 3.73 million. At risk groups including diabetic and obese patients are more vulnerable to COVID-19-related complications and poor outcomes. Substantial evidence points to hypovitaminosis D as a risk factor for severe disease, the need for ICU, and mortality. 1,25(OH)D, a key regulator of calcium homeostasis, is believed to have various immune-regulatory roles including; promoting anti-inflammatory cytokines, down regulating pro-inflammatory cytokines, dampening entry and replication of SARS-COV-2, and the production of antimicrobial peptides. In addition, there are strong connections which suggest that dysregulated 1,25(OH)D levels play a mechanistic and pathophysiologic role in several disease processes that are shared with COVID-19 including: diabetes, obesity, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), cytokine storm, and even hypercoagulable states. With evidence continuing to grow for the case that low vitamin D status is a risk factor for COVID-19 disease and poor outcomes, there is a need now to address the public health efforts set in place to minimize infection, such as lock down orders, which may have inadvertently increased hypovitaminosis D in the general population and those already at risk (elderly, obese, and disabled). Moreover, there is a need to address the implications of this evidence and how we may apply the use of cheaply available supplementation, which has yet to overcome the near global concern of hypovitaminosis D. In our review, we exhaustively scope these shared pathophysiologic connections between COVID-19 and hypovitaminosis D.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Cytokine Release Syndrome/metabolism , Thrombophilia/metabolism , Vitamin D Deficiency/metabolism , Vitamin D/administration & dosage , Vitamin D/metabolism , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/drug therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/physiopathology , Humans , Obesity/epidemiology , Obesity/metabolism , Obesity/physiopathology , Risk Factors , Thrombophilia/drug therapy , Thrombophilia/physiopathology , Vitamin D Deficiency/drug therapy , Vitamin D Deficiency/physiopathology
11.
J Cell Mol Med ; 25(16): 7825-7839, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1280337

ABSTRACT

The new coronavirus pandemic started in China in 2019. The intensity of the disease can range from mild to severe, leading to death in many cases. Despite extensive research in this area, the exact molecular nature of virus is not fully recognized; however, according to pieces of evidence, one of the mechanisms of virus pathogenesis is through the function of viral miRNAs. So, we hypothesized that SARS-CoV-2 pathogenesis may be due to targeting important genes in the host with its miRNAs, which involved in the respiratory system, immune pathways and vitamin D pathways, thus possibly contributing to disease progression and virus survival. Potential miRNA precursors and mature miRNA were predicted and confirmed based on the virus genome. The next step was to predict and identify their target genes and perform functional enrichment analysis to recognize the biological processes connected with these genes in the three pathways mentioned above through several comprehensive databases. Finally, cis-acting regulatory elements in 5' regulatory regions were analysed, and the analysis of available RNAseq data determined the expression level of genes. We revealed that thirty-nine mature miRNAs could theoretically derive from the SARS-CoV-2 genome. Functional enrichment analysis elucidated three highlighted pathways involved in SARS-CoV-2 pathogenesis: vitamin D, immune system and respiratory system. Our finding highlighted genes' involvement in three crucial molecular pathways and may help develop new therapeutic targets related to SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Host-Pathogen Interactions/physiology , MicroRNAs , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Vitamin D/metabolism , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/virology , Gene Expression Regulation , Humans , Immune System/virology , Molecular Sequence Annotation , Promoter Regions, Genetic , RNA, Viral , Respiratory System/virology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
12.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 25(10): 3923-3932, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1264769

ABSTRACT

Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) has potentially conflicting roles in health and disease. COVID-19 coronavirus binds to human cells via ACE2 receptor, which is expressed on almost all body organs. Boosting the ACE2 receptor levels on heart and lung cells may provide more cellular enter to virus thereby worsening the infection. Therefore, among the drug targets, ACE2 is suggested as a vital target of COVID-19 therapy. This hypothesis is based on the protective role of the drugs acting on ACE2. Therefore, this review discusses the impact and challenges of using ACE2 as a target in the current therapy of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/antagonists & inhibitors , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine Monophosphate/chemistry , Adenosine Monophosphate/metabolism , Adenosine Monophosphate/therapeutic use , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/chemistry , Alanine/metabolism , Alanine/therapeutic use , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/chemistry , Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/metabolism , Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Azithromycin/chemistry , Azithromycin/metabolism , Azithromycin/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/chemistry , Hydroxychloroquine/metabolism , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Vitamin D/chemistry , Vitamin D/metabolism , Vitamin D/therapeutic use
13.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(4)2021 Feb 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1256557

ABSTRACT

Vitamin D, a fat-soluble prohormone, is endogenously synthesized in response to sunlight or taken from dietary supplements. Since vitamin D receptors are present in most tissues and cells in the body, the mounting understanding of the role of vitamin D in humans indicates that it does not only play an important role in the musculoskeletal system, but has beneficial effects elsewhere as well. This review summarizes the metabolism of vitamin D, the research regarding the possible risk factors leading to vitamin D deficiency, and the relationships between vitamin D deficiency and numerous illnesses, including rickets, osteoporosis and osteomalacia, muscle weakness and falls, autoimmune disorders, infectious diseases, cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), cancers, and neurological disorders. The system-wide effects of vitamin D and the mechanisms of the diseases are also discussed. Although accumulating evidence supports associations of vitamin D deficiency with physical and mental disorders and beneficial effects of vitamin D with health maintenance and disease prevention, there continue to be controversies over the beneficial effects of vitamin D. Thus, more well-designed and statistically powered trials are required to enable the assessment of vitamin D's role in optimizing health and preventing disease.


Subject(s)
Musculoskeletal System/drug effects , Vitamin D/pharmacology , Animals , Biological Availability , Humans , Models, Biological , Muscle Weakness/complications , Vitamin D/chemistry , Vitamin D/metabolism , Vitamin D Deficiency/complications , Vitamin D Deficiency/pathology
14.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(10)2021 May 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1234743

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) is still an ongoing global health crisis. Immediately after the inhalation of SARS-CoV-2 viral particles, alveolar type II epithelial cells harbor and initiate local innate immunity. These particles can infect circulating macrophages, which then present the coronavirus antigens to T cells. Subsequently, the activation and differentiation of various types of T cells, as well as uncontrollable cytokine release (also known as cytokine storms), result in tissue destruction and amplification of the immune response. Vitamin D enhances the innate immunity required for combating COVID-19 by activating toll-like receptor 2. It also enhances antimicrobial peptide synthesis, such as through the promotion of the expression and secretion of cathelicidin and ß-defensin; promotes autophagy through autophagosome formation; and increases the synthesis of lysosomal degradation enzymes within macrophages. Regarding adaptive immunity, vitamin D enhances CD4+ T cells, suppresses T helper 17 cells, and promotes the production of virus-specific antibodies by activating T cell-dependent B cells. Moreover, vitamin D attenuates the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines by CD4+ T cells through nuclear factor κB signaling, thereby inhibiting the development of a cytokine storm. SARS-CoV-2 enters cells after its spike proteins are bound to angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptors. Vitamin D increases the bioavailability and expression of ACE2, which may be responsible for trapping and inactivating the virus. Activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAS) is responsible for tissue destruction, inflammation, and organ failure related to SARS-CoV-2. Vitamin D inhibits renin expression and serves as a negative RAS regulator. In conclusion, vitamin D defends the body against SARS-CoV-2 through a novel complex mechanism that operates through interactions between the activation of both innate and adaptive immunity, ACE2 expression, and inhibition of the RAS system. Multiple observation studies have shown that serum concentrations of 25 hydroxyvitamin D are inversely correlated with the incidence or severity of COVID-19. The evidence gathered thus far, generally meets Hill's causality criteria in a biological system, although experimental verification is not sufficient. We speculated that adequate vitamin D supplementation may be essential for mitigating the progression and severity of COVID-19. Future studies are warranted to determine the dosage and effectiveness of vitamin D supplementation among different populations of individuals with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Adaptive Immunity , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/immunology , Immunity, Innate , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Vitamin D/metabolism , Vitamin D/pharmacology , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/virology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/complications , Cytokines/metabolism , Humans , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , Renin-Angiotensin System/physiology
15.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 8570, 2021 04 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1196847

ABSTRACT

Although a defective vitamin D endocrine system has been widely suspected to be associated in SARS-CoV-2 pathobiology, the status of the vitamin D endocrine system and vitamin D-modulated genes in lung cells of patients infected with SARS-CoV-2 remains unknown. To understand the significance of the vitamin D endocrine system in SARS-CoV-2 pathobiology, computational approaches were applied to transcriptomic datasets from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) cells of such patients or healthy individuals. Levels of vitamin D receptor, retinoid X receptor, and CYP27A1 in BALF cells of patients infected with SARS-CoV-2 were found to be reduced. Additionally, 107 differentially expressed, predominantly downregulated genes, as potentially modulated by vitamin D endocrine system, were identified in transcriptomic datasets from patient's cells. Further analysis of differentially expressed genes provided eight novel genes with a conserved motif with vitamin D-responsive elements, implying the role of both direct and indirect mechanisms of gene expression by the dysregulated vitamin D endocrine system in SARS-CoV-2-infected cells. Protein-protein interaction network of differentially expressed vitamin D-modulated genes were enriched in the immune system, NF-κB/cytokine signaling, and cell cycle regulation as top predicted pathways that might be affected in the cells of such patients. In brief, the results presented here povide computational evidence to implicate a dysregulated vitamin D endocrine system in the pathobiology of SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/chemistry , COVID-19/genetics , Computational Biology/methods , Gene Expression Profiling/methods , Gene Regulatory Networks , Vitamin D/metabolism , A549 Cells , COVID-19/metabolism , Case-Control Studies , Cell Line , Cholestanetriol 26-Monooxygenase/genetics , Databases, Genetic , Down-Regulation , High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing , Humans , Protein Interaction Maps , Receptors, Calcitriol/genetics , Retinoid X Receptors/genetics
16.
Int Immunopharmacol ; 97: 107686, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1188660

ABSTRACT

The ongoing severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic is having a disastrous impact on global health. Recently, several studies examined the potential of vitamin D to reduce the effects of SARS-CoV-2 infection by modulating the immune system. Indeed, vitamin D has been found to boost the innate immune system and stimulate the adaptive immune response against SARS-CoV-2 infection. In this review, we provide a comprehensive update of the immunological mechanisms underlying the positive effects of vitamin D in reducing SARS-CoV-2 infection as well as a thorough survey of the recent epidemiological studies and clinical trials that tested vitamin D as a potential therapeutic agent against COVID-19 infection. We believe that a better understanding of the histopathology and immunopathology of the disease as well as the mechanism of vitamin D effects on COVID-19 severity will ultimately pave the way for a more effective prevention and control of this global pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Vitamin D/pharmacology , Vitamin D/therapeutic use , Adaptive Immunity/drug effects , COVID-19/etiology , COVID-19/immunology , Dietary Supplements , Humans , Immunity, Innate/drug effects , Seasons , Severity of Illness Index , Vitamin D/immunology , Vitamin D/metabolism
19.
Kidney Blood Press Res ; 46(2): 152-161, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1146996

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Vitamin D is a hormone regulating not only calcium and phosphate homeostasis but also, at the same time, exerting many other extraskeletal functions via genomic effects (gene transcription) and probably by non-genomic effects as well. Availability is ensured by dietary intake of its precursors and by de novo production via sunlight. Yet, vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency are very common across the globe and are connected to many pathophysiological states, for example, diabetes mellitus, allergies, autoimmune diseases, pregnancy complications, and recently have also been associated with worse COVID-19 clinical outcomes. SUMMARY: In this review, we summarize current knowledge about vitamin D metabolism in general, its role in diabetes mellitus (mainly type 2) and diabetic complications (mainly diabetic kidney disease), and potential therapeutic perspectives including vitamin D signalling as a druggable target. Key Messages: Vitamin D is not only a vitamin but also a hormone involved in many physiological processes. Its insufficiency or deficiency can lead to many pathological states.


Subject(s)
Diabetes Mellitus/metabolism , Diabetic Nephropathies/metabolism , Vitamin D Deficiency/metabolism , Vitamin D/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/metabolism , Diabetes Mellitus/drug therapy , Diabetes Mellitus/etiology , Diabetes Mellitus/physiopathology , Diabetic Nephropathies/drug therapy , Diabetic Nephropathies/etiology , Diabetic Nephropathies/physiopathology , Humans , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Vitamin D/therapeutic use , Vitamin D Deficiency/complications , Vitamin D Deficiency/drug therapy , Vitamin D Deficiency/physiopathology , Vitamins/metabolism , Vitamins/therapeutic use
20.
Rev Med Virol ; 31(2): e2159, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1064422

ABSTRACT

Evidence suggests that vitamin D supplementation could potentially be effective either in treatment or prevention of coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19). Indeed, several studies and trials have begun to investigate the impact of vitamin D supplementation on patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. In this review, we focus on the potential mechanisms of vitamin D in the pathogenesis of Covid-19. We consider whether deficiency of vitamin D may be one of the underlying biological factors that could explain the excess mortality seen among non-Caucasians. We also raise several important questions which need to be addressed to provide a clear picture of the extent to which vitamin D supplementation may benefit patients with Covid-19, particularly those with underlying risk factors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/prevention & control , Vitamin D/therapeutic use , Animals , Dietary Supplements , Humans , Risk Factors , Vitamin D/metabolism , Vitamin D Deficiency/metabolism
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