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1.
Iran J Med Sci ; 47(2): 114-122, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1761632

ABSTRACT

Background: Negative effects of statins on glucose metabolism have been reported. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of co-administration of vitamin E and atorvastatin on glycemic control in hyperlipidemic patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods: A randomized double-blind clinical trial was conducted at Vali-e-Asr Teaching Hospital (Zanjan, Iran) from July 2017 to March 2018. A total of 30 T2DM female patients were allocated to two groups, namely atorvastatin with placebo (n=15) and atorvastatin with vitamin E (n=15). The patients received daily 20 mg atorvastatin and 400 IU vitamin E or placebo for 12 weeks. Anthropometric and biochemical measures were recorded pre- and post-intervention. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) expression was measured in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Independent sample t test and paired t test were used to analyze between- and within-group variables, respectively. The analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was used to adjust the effect of baseline variables on the outcomes. P<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: After baseline adjustment, there was a significant improvement in homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (P=0.04) and serum insulin (P<0.001) in the atorvastatin with vitamin E group compared to the atorvastatin with the placebo group. In addition, co-administration of vitamin E with atorvastatin significantly upregulated PPAR-γ expression (OR=5.4, P=0.04) in the PBMCs of T2DM patients. Conclusion: Co-administration of vitamin E and atorvastatin reduced insulin resistance and improved PPAR-γ mRNA expression. Further studies are required to substantiate our findings. Trial registration number: IRCT 20170918036256N.


Subject(s)
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Insulin Resistance , Atorvastatin/metabolism , Atorvastatin/pharmacology , Atorvastatin/therapeutic use , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/drug therapy , Double-Blind Method , Female , Humans , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/metabolism , PPAR gamma/genetics , PPAR gamma/metabolism , Vitamin E/metabolism , Vitamin E/pharmacology , Vitamin E/therapeutic use
2.
Bratisl Lek Listy ; 122(10): 732-738, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1441311

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The use of acetaminophen (APAP) is increasing recently, especially with COVID-19 outbreaks. APAP is safe at therapeutic levels, however, an overdose can cause severe liver injury. This study aims to explore possible mechanisms involved in APAP­induced hepatotoxicity and compare different hepatoprotective agents, namely vitamin E, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and necrostatin-1 (NEC-1). METHODS: Adult male albino rats were divided into groups: Control group, APAP­induced hepatotoxicity group, Vitamin E­treated group, H2S­treated group and NEC-1­treated group. Serum levels for aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), interleukin-33 (IL-33), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), reduced glutathione (GSH) and lipid profile were measured. Histopathological examinations of liver tissue with H(et)E stain and immunohistochemistry for activated caspase-3 were also done. RESULTS: APAP­treated group showed elevated liver transaminases, hyperlipidemia, and deficient liver anti-oxidative response together with disturbed hepatic architecture and increased immune-expression of activated caspase-3 in hepatic tissue. Pretreatment with vitamin E, H2S or NEC-1 reversed the affected parameters. Vitamin E and H2S showed greater improvement when compared to NEC-1. CONCLUSION: Vitamin E, H2S and NEC-1 showed protective effects against APAP-induced hepatotoxicity, thus they may be used as an adjuvant therapy when APAP is indicated for long periods as is the case in COVID-19 patients (Tab. 2, Fig. 2, Ref. 45). Text in PDF www.elis.sk Keywords: acetaminophen, hepatotoxicity, apoptosis, necrostatin-1, vitamin E, H2S.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chemical and Drug Induced Liver Injury , Hydrogen Sulfide , Acetaminophen/toxicity , Alanine Transaminase/metabolism , Animals , Aspartate Aminotransferases/metabolism , Chemical and Drug Induced Liver Injury/drug therapy , Chemical and Drug Induced Liver Injury/metabolism , Chemical and Drug Induced Liver Injury/prevention & control , Humans , Hydrogen Sulfide/metabolism , Imidazoles , Indoles , Liver/metabolism , Male , Oxidative Stress , Rats , SARS-CoV-2 , Vitamin E/pharmacology
3.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(4)2021 Feb 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1085070

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2/COVID-19), is a worldwide pandemic, as declared by the World Health Organization (WHO). It is a respiratory virus that infects people of all ages. Although it may present with mild to no symptoms in most patients, those who are older, immunocompromised, or with multiple comorbidities may present with severe and life-threatening infections. Throughout history, nutraceuticals, such as a variety of phytochemicals from medicinal plants and dietary supplements, have been used as adjunct therapies for many disease conditions, including viral infections. Appropriate use of these adjunct therapies with antiviral proprieties may be beneficial in the treatment and/or prophylaxis of COVID-19. In this review, we provide a comprehensive summary of nutraceuticals, such as vitamins C, D, E, zinc, melatonin, and other phytochemicals and function foods. These nutraceuticals may have potential therapeutic efficacies in fighting the threat of the SARS-CoV-2/COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Dietary Supplements , Melatonin/therapeutic use , Vitamins/therapeutic use , Zinc/therapeutic use , Animals , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Ascorbic Acid/pharmacology , Ascorbic Acid/therapeutic use , Dietary Supplements/analysis , Functional Food/analysis , Humans , Melatonin/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Vitamin D/pharmacology , Vitamin D/therapeutic use , Vitamin E/pharmacology , Vitamin E/therapeutic use , Vitamins/pharmacology , Zinc/pharmacology
4.
Aging Clin Exp Res ; 32(10): 2115-2131, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-738008

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In December 2019, a novel human-infecting coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, had emerged. The WHO has classified the epidemic as a "public health emergency of international concern". A dramatic situation has unfolded with thousands of deaths, occurring mainly in the aged and very ill people. Epidemiological studies suggest that immune system function is impaired in elderly individuals and these subjects often present a deficiency in fat-soluble and hydrosoluble vitamins. METHODS: We searched for reviews describing the characteristics of autoimmune diseases and the available therapeutic protocols for their treatment. We set them as a paradigm with the purpose to uncover common pathogenetic mechanisms between these pathological conditions and SARS-CoV-2 infection. Furthermore, we searched for studies describing the possible efficacy of vitamins A, D, E, and C in improving the immune system function. RESULTS: SARS-CoV-2 infection induces strong immune system dysfunction characterized by the development of an intense proinflammatory response in the host, and the development of a life-threatening condition defined as cytokine release syndrome (CRS). This leads to acute respiratory syndrome (ARDS), mainly in aged people. High mortality and lethality rates have been observed in elderly subjects with CoV-2-related infection. CONCLUSIONS: Vitamins may shift the proinflammatory Th17-mediated immune response arising in autoimmune diseases towards a T-cell regulatory phenotype. This review discusses the possible activity of vitamins A, D, E, and C in restoring normal antiviral immune system function and the potential therapeutic role of these micronutrients as part of a therapeutic strategy against SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/immunology , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/diet therapy , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Cytokines/immunology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/diet therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Vitamins/immunology , Vitamins/therapeutic use , Aged , Ascorbic Acid/immunology , Ascorbic Acid/pharmacology , Ascorbic Acid/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Th17 Cells/drug effects , Th17 Cells/immunology , Vitamin A/immunology , Vitamin A/pharmacology , Vitamin A/therapeutic use , Vitamin D/immunology , Vitamin D/pharmacology , Vitamin D/therapeutic use , Vitamin E/immunology , Vitamin E/pharmacology , Vitamin E/therapeutic use , Vitamins/pharmacology
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