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9.
J Cosmet Dermatol ; 21(2): 429-430, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1570866
14.
J Autoimmun ; 125: 102738, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1466582

ABSTRACT

Autoimmune diseases, including autoimmune endocrine diseases (AIED), are thought to develop following environmental exposure in patients with genetic predisposition. The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and vaccines against it could represent new environmental triggers for AIED. We report a patient, with history of vitiligo vulgaris and 8 years of type 2 diabetes, who came to our institution because of fever, weight loss, asthenia and thyrotoxicosis occurred 4 weeks later the administration of BNT162B2 (Pfizer-BioNTech) SARS-CoV-2 vaccine. Clinical, biochemical and instrumental work-up demonstrated Graves' disease and autoimmune diabetes mellitus. The occurrence of these disorders could be explained through different mechanism such as autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA syndrome), mRNA "self-adjuvant" effect, molecular mimicry between human and viral proteins and immune disruption from external stimuli. However further studies are needed to better understand the underlying pathogenesis of AIED following SARS-CoV-2 vaccine.


Subject(s)
/adverse effects , COVID-19/prevention & control , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/etiology , Graves Disease/etiology , Molecular Mimicry/immunology , Adjuvants, Immunologic/adverse effects , Autoantibodies/blood , C-Peptide/blood , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/drug therapy , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/drug therapy , Glycated Hemoglobin A/analysis , Glycemic Control , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Thyrotoxicosis/pathology , Vitiligo/pathology
17.
Photochem Photobiol Sci ; 20(9): 1239-1242, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1375868

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In March 2020, social isolation measures were imposed in Brazil to contain the spread of the novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2), requiring health services to implement contingency plans. The main objective of the study was to verify the status of the disease, self-reported by patients who discontinued phototherapy, during a period of social isolation. METHODS: All patients receiving phototherapy at the Santa Casa de Porto Alegre, Brazil, prior to the implementation of social distancing measures were eligible for inclusion in the study. 86 patients answered a questionnaire during a medical evaluation. RESULTS: 95% of patients who stopped phototherapy reported a worsening of disease status. Only 19% of patients continued to attend phototherapy sessions during the social isolation period. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic led most patients to stop phototherapy, resulting in the perception of increased disease severity in an outpatient sample in southern Brazil.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Phototherapy , Treatment Refusal , Brazil/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Lymphoma, T-Cell, Cutaneous/epidemiology , Lymphoma, T-Cell, Cutaneous/therapy , Male , Psoriasis/epidemiology , Psoriasis/therapy , Severity of Illness Index , Social Isolation , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vitiligo/epidemiology , Vitiligo/therapy
19.
Exp Dermatol ; 30(9): 1254-1257, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1255381

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has evolved to a global health problem with a dramatic morbidity and mortality rate impacting our daily life and those of many patients. While there is evidence that some diseases are associated with an increased risk for development of a more severe course of COVID-19, little is known on protective conditions. Importantly, clearance of viral infection and protection against disease manifestation crucially depends on functional innate and adaptive immunity and the interferon signalling axis. Here, we hypothesize that patients with non-segmental vitiligo (NSV), an autoimmune skin (and mucosal) disorder, may clear SARS-CoV-2 infection more efficiently and have a lower risk of COVID-19 development. Conversely, in case of COVID-19 development, vitiligo autoimmunity may influence the cytokine storm-related disease burden. In addition, immune activation during SARS-CoV-2 infection or COVID-19 disease might increase vitiligo disease activity. Our hypothesis is based on the shift of the immune system in NSV towards adaptive type 1 (IFNγ and CD8 T cells) and innate immune responses. Identified susceptibility genes of NSV patients may further confer increased antiviral activity. To validate our hypothesis, we suggest an international consortium to perform a retrospective data registry and patient-reported study on a large number of NSV patients worldwide during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Autoimmune Diseases/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Vitiligo/epidemiology , Autoimmune Diseases/genetics , Autoimmune Diseases/immunology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Protective Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Vitiligo/genetics , Vitiligo/immunology
20.
Dermatol Ther ; 34(4): e15014, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1255374

ABSTRACT

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, routine treatments are delayed to some extent and their negative impacts have been widely reported. However, virtually nothing is known about vitiligo in the context of COVID-19. Therefore, we analyzed treatment delays and its impact on vitiligo, aiming to provide suggestions on vitiligo management within this special period. We performed a retrospective cohort study on 322 patients who visited our clinics at least 2 times from January to December 2020, and their medical records and photographs were reviewed. Patients were divided into normal (n = 155) and late group (n = 167) based on whether experienced treatment delays. As for the active cases, the late group showed higher progression rate than normal group (35 of 86 [40.7%] vs. 10 of 81 [12.3%]; p = 0.002). Moreover, we observed higher recurrence rate in delay group than those of normal group (26 of 81[32.1%] vs. 9 of 74 [12.2%]; p = 0.018) among stable cases. Further univariate and multivariate analysis determined treatment delays as the most important independent risk factor for disease progression and recurrence, and maintenance therapy (>2 years) as a protective factor against recurrence. This study, for the first time, revealed the independent adverse impact of treatment delays on the progression and recurrence of vitiligo and indicated the significance of continuous treatment for halting progression and long-term maintenance therapy for preventing recurrence for vitiligo, which should be highly valued in the management of vitiligo during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vitiligo , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Time-to-Treatment , Vitiligo/diagnosis , Vitiligo/epidemiology , Vitiligo/therapy
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