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1.
Hong Kong Med J ; 26(3): 171-173, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1468758
2.
Hong Kong Med J ; 26(4): 355-357, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1468755
4.
GMS J Med Educ ; 38(6): Doc110, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1435941

ABSTRACT

Objective: To avert staff shortages during the first wave of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic in spring 2020, the medical faculties of the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich (LMU) appealed to their students to volunteer for relief work. In this study, we examine the influence of psychological factors on the students' decisions to respond to this call or not. Methodology: We report on a cross-sectional study based on an online survey among medical students at the TUM and LMU. The survey consisted of a questionnaire containing items on motivation and other factors related to the decision for or against volunteering. Questions were also asked about anxieties regarding COVID-19 and the occurrence of depressive symptoms, as well as about resilience. Results: Responses from 244 participants were analysed. Students' decisions to volunteer revealed both altruistic and introjected motivations. For those students who did not volunteer, time overlaps and workload related to other activities played an important role. Between the two groups, no significant difference was detected in terms of their resilience and COVID-19-related anxieties. However, the non-volunteering students reported a significantly higher prevalence of depressive symptoms. Conclusion: Sense of duty and the desire to help were, according to the students, the most important reasons for volunteering. Depressive symptoms and lack of time made volunteering less likely. Resilience and COVID-19-related anxieties do not seem to have had any influence on the decision to volunteer or not.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Medical , Cross-Sectional Studies , Germany , Humans , Students, Medical/psychology , Volunteers/psychology
5.
PLoS One ; 16(9): e0256854, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1381286

ABSTRACT

Volunteers have played an important role by supporting essential services that have been overwhelmed during the most critical moments of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. Hence, nonprofit organizations may be interested in preventing negative consequences of these volunteers' exposure to potentially traumatic events. The aim of this cross-sectional study was twofold. First, to examine to what extent self-compassion and self-determination would contribute to differentiating between volunteers with different levels of compassion fatigue, compassion satisfaction, and post-traumatic growth. Second, to identify the best predictors of the most extreme levels of each outcome. Participants were 211 Spanish Red Cross volunteers (60.7% women), who completed a survey. They were separately classified into three groups (low, medium, and high) according to the 33rd and 66th percentile scores on each outcome (compassion fatigue, compassion satisfaction, and post-traumatic growth). Univariate analyses of variance and post-hoc comparisons revealed that self-compassion and self-determination contributed differently to distinguishing between levels of each outcome. Volunteers lowest in compassion fatigue stood out for showing fewer non-compassionate strategies and more mindfulness than the other groups. Moreover, those higher in satisfaction compassion also showed lower use of unhealthy strategies and higher scores in all other predictive variables. Volunteers highest in post-traumatic growth showed higher self-kindness and satisfaction of all psychological needs. Binary logistic regressions allowed for the identification of predictors of belonging to the most extreme groups. The protective factors may be useful to guide volunteers' self-care and help them thrive in the face of critical service demands.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Compassion Fatigue , Posttraumatic Growth, Psychological , Quarantine/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , Volunteers/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Compassion Fatigue/epidemiology , Compassion Fatigue/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Spain/epidemiology
7.
Appl Physiol Nutr Metab ; 46(9): 1147-1151, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1285092

ABSTRACT

We explored the views of older (≥65 years) past and potential volunteers in regard to participating in physiology research during the COVID-19 pandemic. Using an online questionnaire and focus groups, we found that past volunteers (n = 55) were more likely to take part in both acute (p < 0.05) and chronic (p < 0.05) physiology studies, compared with potential future volunteers (n = 57). Both cohorts demonstrated a positive attitude towards volunteering during the COVID-19 pandemic, although concern was evident. Novelty: Volunteers demonstrated a positive attitude and also concern towards participating in physiology research during COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Physiology , Research Subjects/psychology , Volunteers/psychology , Aged , Attitude , Female , Focus Groups , Humans , Male , Motivation , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
8.
PLoS One ; 16(5): e0251033, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1216959

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Contact tracing is an important tool for suppressing COVID-19 but has been difficult to adapt to the conditions of a public health emergency. This study explored the experiences and perspectives of volunteer contact tracers in order to identify facilitators, challenges, and novel solutions for implementing COVID-19 contact tracing. METHODS: As part of a study to evaluate an emergently established volunteer contact tracing program for COVID-19 in New Haven, Connecticut, April-June 2020, we conducted focus groups with 36 volunteer contact tracers, thematically analyzed the data, and synthesized the findings using the RE-AIM implementation framework. RESULTS: To successfully reach cases and contacts, participants recommended identifying clients' outreach preferences, engaging clients authentically, and addressing sources of mistrust. Participants felt that the effectiveness of successful isolation and quarantine was contingent on minimizing delays in reaching clients and on systematically assessing and addressing their nutritional, financial, and housing needs. They felt that successful adoption of a volunteer-driven contact tracing model depended on the ability to recruit self-motivated contact tracers and provide rapid training and consistent, supportive supervision. Participants noted that implementation could be enhanced with better management tools, such as more engaging interview scripts, user-friendly data management software, and protocols for special situations and populations. They also emphasized the value of coordinating outreach efforts with other involved providers and agencies. Finally, they believed that long-term maintenance of a volunteer-driven program requires monetary or educational incentives to sustain participation. CONCLUSIONS: This is one of the first studies to qualitatively examine implementation of a volunteer-run COVID-19 contact tracing program. Participants identified facilitators, barriers, and potential solutions for improving implementation of COVID-19 contact tracing in this context. These included standardized communication skills training, supportive supervision, and peer networking to improve implementation, as well as greater cooperation with outside agencies, flexible scheduling, and volunteer incentives to promote sustainability.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/transmission , Contact Tracing , Program Evaluation , Adult , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Female , Focus Groups , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Male , Public Health , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , United States , Volunteers/psychology
9.
J Appl Gerontol ; 40(9): 953-957, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1177693

ABSTRACT

This study explored older adults' technology use patterns and attitudes toward virtual volunteering during the COVID-19 pandemic. A 22-item survey was administered to 229 volunteers in the St. Louis region who tutor children through the Oasis Intergenerational Tutoring program. Although most respondents are familiar with technology and expressed that they are likely to volunteer virtually, their responses varied significantly by age, education, gender, income, and school districts. Some tutors expressed that virtual volunteering may eliminate barriers to in-person volunteering, while others were concerned with establishing a personal connection with students online. These findings suggest that tutors anticipate both benefits and challenges with virtual volunteering and that efforts to engage older adults during the pandemic should factor in prior use of technology and ensure that different subgroups are not marginalized.


Subject(s)
Attitude , COVID-19 , Computer Literacy , Education, Distance/methods , Educational Technology/methods , Social Participation/psychology , Teaching , Volunteers/psychology , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Female , Humans , Intergenerational Relations , Interpersonal Relations , Male , Missouri , Teaching/psychology , Teaching/statistics & numerical data , Videoconferencing/instrumentation
10.
J Gerontol Soc Work ; 64(6): 599-612, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1152958

ABSTRACT

Evidence about the association between volunteering and the mental health of older adults during COVID-19 remains underexplored. This study investigated (1) patterns of volunteering among older adults in Hong Kong during COVID-19; (2) associations between volunteering and mental health of older adults during COVID-19; and (3) associations between key psychological resources (e.g., self-efficacy and self-esteem) and volunteering among older adults during COVID-19. This study applied a cross-sectional design with data collected from 128 older adults in June 2020, who were trained as volunteers in a volunteer program that began before COVID-19. The study found that older adults continued to actively contribute to their communities by engaging in volunteering during COVID-19. The specific type of volunteering activities was linked to few depressive and anxiety symptoms. Older adults with increased self-esteem prior to COVID-19 were more likely to participate in volunteering activities related to COVID-19. Our study suggested that encouraging older adults to volunteer during the pandemic is a key pathway to maintain mental health. Social workers are encouraged to engage older adults in volunteerism regularly to offset the risk of depression and anxiety symptoms in times of crisis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Mental Health , Volunteers/psychology , Age Factors , Aged , Anxiety/psychology , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/psychology , Female , Hong Kong/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Concept , Self Efficacy , Sex Factors , Socioeconomic Factors
11.
Acad Med ; 96(7): 964-966, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1140014

ABSTRACT

As the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic hit the United States in March 2020, there was widespread disruption of clinical medical education: Hospital clerkships were suspended nationwide and students were moved out of the hospital and continued their studies remotely through virtual learning systems. Frustrated by not being able to directly care for patients, medical students across the country formed diverse volunteer initiatives to help frontline clinicians. In this article, the authors describe the essential role of medical students at Weill Cornell Medicine in quickly designing and building a large registry of COVID-19 patients who presented at 3 New York City hospitals. The Cornell COVID-19 Registry, which contains granular clinical information on more than 4,000 patients, informed hospital operations and guided clinical management during the first wave of the pandemic. One month after its creation, the registry led to the first published description of the clinical characteristics of a U.S.-based cohort of hospitalized COVID-19 patients. Using their experience as a model, the authors propose that students who cannot participate in their clinical clerkships because of the pandemic can augment their traditional medical education by contributing to COVID-19 research. In the case described in this article, students reviewed the management of COVID-19 patients, followed inpatients throughout their hospitalization (much like students would on clinical rotations), and refined their interpersonal skills through discussions with patients and patients' families during follow-up calls. The authors conclude that medical students who are displaced from their hospital rotations can further their education and provide an invaluable contribution to the fight against COVID-19 by serving as essential frontline researchers.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research/organization & administration , COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Professional Role , Registries , Students, Medical , Biomedical Research/methods , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/organization & administration , Humans , Leadership , New York City/epidemiology , Pandemics , Professional Role/psychology , Students, Medical/psychology , Volunteers/psychology
13.
Med Ref Serv Q ; 40(1): 90-102, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1099406

ABSTRACT

The Librarian Reserve Corps (LRC) is a volunteer network of medical, health sciences, and public health librarians who have responded to the urgent need for public health information during the early days of the COVID-19 crisis. The LRC was first formed to assist with the indexing of daily publication lists distributed within the World Health Organization's Global Outbreak Alert and Response Network (GOARN). With the explosion of information related to COVID-19 beginning in December 2019, librarians have brought critical skills and experience to the response, providing comprehensive literature searching and indexing to COVID-19 research publications. The evolution of this effort follows the trajectory of scientific publication trends and developments related to COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Abstracting and Indexing , COVID-19 , Civil Defense/organization & administration , Librarians/psychology , Libraries, Digital/organization & administration , Libraries, Medical/organization & administration , United States Public Health Service/organization & administration , Volunteers/psychology , Adult , Female , Humans , Libraries, Digital/statistics & numerical data , Libraries, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
14.
BMJ Open ; 11(2): e042910, 2021 02 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1090933

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study were to assess the volunteering of undergraduate health students and interns in the Ministry of Health (MOH) services in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) during the COVID-19 pandemic, its motivational factors and barriers, as well as their risk perception of COVID-19. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study. PARTICIPANTS: From 12 to 21 May 2020, an online survey was sent to all undergraduate health students and interns in the KSA. This included questions on demographics, volunteering status, risk perception of COVID-19, as well as motivations and barriers towards volunteering. RESULTS: In a convenience sample of 6016 students and interns across KSA, 1824 (30.31%) have volunteered with the MOH services during the COVID-19 pandemic. Volunteering was more likely among older participants, from the College of Medicine, those with self-perceived at risk of COVID-19 infection and those with self-perceived healthy participants. Females, those who did not think that students had moral duties to volunteer, those who were at risk of seasonal influenza and those with self-perceived at risk of hospitalisation from COVID-19 were less likely to volunteer. Patriotism, gaining experience, assisting when able and religious rewards all were reported as major motivators to volunteer. Non-volunteering participants reported that lack of interest, protocol and knowledge, as well as issues related to their personal health and transportation were the main barriers to volunteering. CONCLUSIONS: About one-third of undergraduate health students and interns volunteered during the first 2 months of the COVID-19 pandemic in KSA. Moral values were the most important motivations among volunteers. Efforts to encourage heath students and interns to volunteer and providing those with appropriate educational programmes are recommended.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Personnel , Pandemics , Volunteers/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Motivation , Risk Assessment , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
16.
BMJ Open ; 11(1): e042579, 2021 01 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1050400

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Voluntary organisations provide essential support to vulnerable populations and front-line health responders to the COVID-19 pandemic. The French Red Cross (FRC) is prominent among organisations offering health and support services in the current crisis. Comprised primarily of lay volunteers and some trained health workers, FRC volunteers in the Paris (France) region have faced challenges in adapting to pandemic conditions, working with sick and vulnerable populations, managing limited resources and coping with high demand for their services. Existing studies of volunteers focus on individual, social and organisational determinants of motivation, but attend less to contextual ones. Public health incertitude about the COVID-19 pandemic is an important feature of this pandemic. Whether and how uncertainty interacts with volunteer understandings and experiences of their work and organisational relations to contribute to Red Cross worker motivation is the focus of this investigation. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This mixed-methods study will investigate volunteer motivation using ethnographic methods and social network listening. Semi-structured interviews and observations will illuminate FRC volunteer work relations, experiences and concerns during the pandemic. A questionnaire targeting a sample of Paris region volunteers will allow quantification of motivation. These findings will iteratively shape and be influenced by a social media (Twitter) analysis of biomedical and public health uncertainties and debates around COVID-19. These tweets provide insight into a French lay public's interpretations of these debates. We evaluate whether and how socio-political conditions and discourses concerning COVID-19 interact with volunteer experiences, working conditions and organisational relations to influence volunteer motivation. Data collection began on 15 June 2020 and will continue until 15 April 2021. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The protocol has received ethical approval from the Institut Pasteur Institutional Review Board (no 2020-03). We will disseminate findings through peer-reviewed articles, conference presentations and recommendations to the FRC.


Subject(s)
Community Health Services/organization & administration , Motivation , Red Cross , Volunteers/psychology , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , France , Humans , Public Health , Qualitative Research , Research Design , Social Media
17.
Clin Gerontol ; 44(4): 430-438, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1010177

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Residents in nursing homes are being isolated to prevent exposure to COVID-19. Many are prone to depression, anxiety and loneliness, and extra isolation leaves them vulnerable to compromised mental health. In this study, trained volunteers providing befriending for residents with symptoms of depression, anxiety and loneliness switched to remote befriending during COVID-19. The purpose of this study was to gauge volunteer perceptions of the switch.Methods: A qualitative phenomenological approach was used to understand how switching to remote befriending impacted on volunteers and residents. A convenience sample of 18 participants responded to questions either in individual or group interviews.Results: Volunteers adapted their befriending visits, switching from face to face visits to remote options. The format was decided collaboratively. Hearing impairments hindered phone calls. Residents sometimes felt uncomfortable with digital technology but on the whole, the change to remote "visiting" was accepted.Conclusions: Further research is being conducted to gauge mental health outcomes for residents. Most volunteers and residents accepted the switch to remote befriending as better than no contact.Clinical implications: Volunteers can provide valuable support for residents living with social isolation during COVID-19. The format for social support needs to be decided collaboratively between volunteer and resident.


Subject(s)
Aged , COVID-19 , Loneliness/psychology , Mental Health , Telemedicine , Volunteers/psychology , Friends , Humans , Nursing Homes , Perception , Qualitative Research , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Säo Paulo med. j ; 138(5): 433-440, Sept.-Oct. 2020. tab
Article in English | LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-965341

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: The rapid spread of the COVID-19 epidemic has led to extraordinary measures taken worldwide, and has led to serious psychological disorders. Healthcare professionals face greater severity of stress burden, due both to their direct contact with patients with the virus and to the isolation dimension of this outbreak. OBJECTIVE: To examine psychiatric disorders such as anxiety, depression and sleep disorders among healthcare professionals working in an emergency department and a COVID-19 clinic. DESIGN AND SETTING: Cross-sectional study including healthcare professionals in the emergency department and other units serving patients with COVID-19, of a training and research hospital in Turkey. METHODS: 210 volunteers, including 105 healthcare professionals in the emergency department and 105 healthcare professionals working in other departments rendering services for COVID-19 patients, were included in this study. A sociodemographic data form and the Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HAD), Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), World Health Organization Quality of Life scale (WHOQOL-BREF-TR) and Religious Orientation Scale were applied to the volunteers. RESULTS: The perceived stress levels and PSQI subscores were found to be significantly higher among the volunteers working in the emergency department than among those in other departments. The risk of development of anxiety among women was 16.6 times higher than among men. CONCLUSIONS: Healthcare professionals on the frontline need systematic regular psychosocial support mechanisms. Anxiety due to fear of infecting family members can be prevented through precautions such as isolation. However, it should be remembered that loneliness and feelings of missing family members consequent to isolation may increase the risk of depression.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Personnel, Hospital/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral , Mental Health , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Quality of Life , Turkey/epidemiology , Volunteers/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Betacoronavirus , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19
20.
BMJ Open ; 10(9): e039082, 2020 09 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-772186

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To identify what motivates medical students to join a pandemic emergency healthcare workforce. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: Aalborg University, Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: All medical students. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Motivational points as perceived by the students to be important. Demographic characteristics and 11 motivational domains scored on a Visual Analog Scale from 0 (low) to 100 (high) responding to the question: 'To what degree are the following statements important for you to join a national emergency preparedness workforce?' The questionnaire was developed by an expert panel in a process of four iterations. RESULTS: A total of 486 students of 688 (70.6%) completed the survey within 7 days in March 2020. 80% had decided to join the pandemic emergency healthcare workforce. Ranked median scores for motivational statements in each domain were: care, 100; learn, 90; pride, 83; team, 77; needed, 75; safety, 75; supervision, 75; job, 73; duty, 66; salary, 62; historic, 50. Supervision (p<0.001), salary (p<0.001) and duty (p=0.001) were given increasing priority with advancing study years. Interestingly, students added that support by the university and clarification of study plans were priorities. CONCLUSIONS: Results guide decision-makers and colleagues on how to motivate or reinforce medical students in joining the pandemic emergency healthcare workforce. Importantly, students emphasised protection for themselves.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Health Workforce , Motivation , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Students, Medical/psychology , Volunteers/psychology , Adult , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Choice Behavior , Cross-Sectional Studies , Denmark/epidemiology , Education, Medical , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Salaries and Fringe Benefits , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
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