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1.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol ; 182(10): 989-996, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1282178

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: There are a limited number of studies about the clinical findings of coronavirus infection in pediatric patients with asthma. We aimed to evaluate the clinical and laboratory characteristics of pediatric patients with asthma and healthy children without chronic disease who infected with SARS-CoV-2. METHODS: This is a retrospective, case-control study comparing the asthma diagnosed and healthy children who were diagnosed as COVID-19 in our hospital between March 11 and November 10, 2020. RESULTS: During the study period, 6,205 children were diagnosed with CO-VID-19 in our hospital. Only 54 (0.87%) patients had a diagnosis of asthma. The mean of the age was 10.5 years and 53.7% (n:29) of the patients with asthma were male. Cough, shortness of breath, emesis, and diarrhea were found to be significantly higher in asthma group than in the control group (respectively p = 0.002, 0.000, 0.002, 0.019, 0.015). Patients who were given SABA was significantly higher in asthma diagnosed patients (p = 0.000). Hospitalization was significantly higher in asthma group (p = 0.025), and the duration of hospitalization was significantly higher in control group (p = 0.034). There was no significant difference between the 2 groups in terms of requiring oxygen treatment and in laboratory findings between groups. CONCLUSION: This study revealed that pediatric patients diagnosed with asthma were in a mild clinic. According to these findings, asthma may not affect the course of the COVID-19 in children.


Subject(s)
Asthma/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Adolescent , Adrenergic beta-Agonists/therapeutic use , Anti-Asthmatic Agents/therapeutic use , Asthma/diagnosis , Asthma/therapy , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , Child , Cough/diagnosis , Cough/epidemiology , Cough/therapy , Diarrhea/diagnosis , Diarrhea/epidemiology , Diarrhea/therapy , Dyspnea/diagnosis , Dyspnea/epidemiology , Dyspnea/therapy , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy , Retrospective Studies , Vomiting/diagnosis , Vomiting/epidemiology , Vomiting/therapy
3.
Cold Spring Harb Mol Case Stud ; 7(2)2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1087882

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), which is caused by infection with SARS-CoV-2, presents with a broad constellation of both respiratory and nonrespiratory symptoms, although it is primarily considered a respiratory disease. Gastrointestinal symptoms-including nausea, abdominal pain, vomiting, and diarrhea-rank chief among these. When coupled with the presence of viral RNA in fecal samples, the presence of gastrointestinal symptoms raises relevant questions regarding whether SARS-CoV-2 can productively infect the upper or lower gastrointestinal tract. Despite the well-documented prevalence of gastrointestinal symptoms and the high rate of SARS-CoV-2 fecal RNA shedding, the biological, clinical, and epidemiological relevance of these findings is unclear. Furthermore, the isolation of replication-competent virus from fecal samples has not been reproducibly and rigorously demonstrated. Although SARS-CoV-2 shedding likely occurs in a high proportion of patients, gastrointestinal symptoms affect only a subset of individuals. Herein, we summarize what is known about gastrointestinal symptoms and fecal viral shedding in COVID-19, explore the role of the gut microbiome in other respiratory diseases, speculate on the role of the gut microbiota in COVID-19, and discuss potential future directions. Taking these concepts together, we propose that studying gut microbiota perturbations in COVID-19 will enhance our understanding of the symptomology and pathophysiology of this novel devastating disease.


Subject(s)
Abdominal Pain/etiology , COVID-19/complications , Diarrhea/etiology , Gastrointestinal Microbiome , Nausea/etiology , Vomiting/etiology , Abdominal Pain/diagnosis , Abdominal Pain/microbiology , Abdominal Pain/pathology , Animals , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/microbiology , COVID-19/pathology , Diarrhea/diagnosis , Diarrhea/microbiology , Diarrhea/pathology , Feces/microbiology , Feces/virology , Humans , Nausea/diagnosis , Nausea/microbiology , Nausea/pathology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Vomiting/diagnosis , Vomiting/microbiology , Vomiting/pathology
4.
Anticancer Drugs ; 32(5): 589-591, 2021 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1082921

ABSTRACT

Encorafenib (Braftovi) is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with unresectable or metastatic melanoma with a BRAF V600 mutation, in combination with binimetinib (Mektovi). According to the product label of encorafenib, there are no specific treatment recommendations in case of an overdose. We report on a 63-year-old man who ingested a double dose (900 mg) of encorafenib for 16 days. He developed overall minor chronic overdose symptoms such as nausea and vomiting grade 1 and muscle pain. Based on the most occurring adverse events of encorafenib, liver values, kidney function parameters and QTc interval were measured. Kidney function parameters were normal, whereas liver values were slightly increased (grade 1) and QTc slightly prolonged. The plasma concentration 3 h after the last dose was 2110 ng/mL. We describe the course of a case with a chronic overdose during 16 days of the double dose of encorafenib as well as the followed approach, which could be taken into account when observing an encorafenib overdose. Providing information in times of Covid-19 is challenging, but remains necessary for good clinical care.


Subject(s)
Carbamates , Drug Overdose , Liver Function Tests/methods , Long QT Syndrome , Medication Therapy Management/standards , Melanoma , Skin Neoplasms , Sulfonamides , Antineoplastic Agents/administration & dosage , Antineoplastic Agents/adverse effects , Antineoplastic Agents/blood , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/therapeutic use , Benzimidazoles/administration & dosage , Benzimidazoles/adverse effects , COVID-19/epidemiology , Carbamates/administration & dosage , Carbamates/adverse effects , Carbamates/blood , Communicable Disease Control , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Drug Monitoring/methods , Drug Overdose/blood , Drug Overdose/diagnosis , Drug Overdose/etiology , Drug Overdose/physiopathology , Humans , Long QT Syndrome/chemically induced , Long QT Syndrome/diagnosis , Male , Melanoma/drug therapy , Melanoma/genetics , Melanoma/pathology , Middle Aged , Mutation , Proto-Oncogene Proteins B-raf/antagonists & inhibitors , Proto-Oncogene Proteins B-raf/genetics , Skin Neoplasms/drug therapy , Skin Neoplasms/genetics , Skin Neoplasms/pathology , Sulfonamides/administration & dosage , Sulfonamides/adverse effects , Sulfonamides/blood , Vomiting/chemically induced , Vomiting/diagnosis
5.
Am J Gastroenterol ; 116(2): 306-310, 2021 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-809644

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The most typical presentation of COVID-19 is an acute respiratory syndrome whose most common symptoms include fever, cough, and dyspnea. However, gastrointestinal symptoms, such as diarrhea and nausea/vomiting, are increasingly reported in patients affected by COVID-19. This study aimed to describe the prevalence and time of onset of gastrointestinal symptoms in patients affected by COVID-19 and to find potential associations between gastrointestinal symptoms and clinical outcomes. METHODS: We performed a prospective single-center cohort study, enrolling patients who received diagnosis of COVID-19 at our institution between March 23, 2020, and April 5, 2020. We collected patient demographics and medical history, laboratory data, and clinical outcomes. Furthermore, we used a specifically designed questionnaire, administered to patients at time of diagnosis, to obtain data on the presence and time of onset of fever, typical respiratory symptoms, gastrointestinal symptoms, and other symptoms (fatigue, headache, myalgia/arthralgia, anosmia, ageusia/dysgeusia, sore throat, and ocular symptoms). RESULTS: In our cohort, 138 (69%) of 190 patients showed at least 1 gastrointestinal symptom at diagnosis; if excluding hyporexia/anorexia, 93 patients (48.9%) showed at least 1 gastrointestinal symptom. Gastrointestinal symptoms, in particular diarrhea, were associated with a lower mortality. At multivariate analysis, diarrhea was confirmed as independent predictive factor of lower mortality. DISCUSSION: Gastrointestinal symptoms are very frequent in patients with COVID-19 and may be associated with a better prognosis. These data suggest that, in some patients, the gastrointestinal tract may be more involved than the respiratory system in severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection, and this could account for the less severe course of disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Gastrointestinal Diseases/virology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19 Testing , Diarrhea/diagnosis , Diarrhea/epidemiology , Diarrhea/physiopathology , Diarrhea/virology , Female , Gastrointestinal Diseases/diagnosis , Gastrointestinal Diseases/epidemiology , Gastrointestinal Diseases/physiopathology , Humans , Italy , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Nausea/diagnosis , Nausea/epidemiology , Nausea/physiopathology , Nausea/virology , Prevalence , Prognosis , Prospective Studies , Time Factors , Vomiting/diagnosis , Vomiting/epidemiology , Vomiting/physiopathology , Vomiting/virology
6.
Adv Biol Regul ; 77: 100745, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-741319

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 caused by SARS-CoV-2 originated from China and spread across every corner of the world. The scientific interest on COVID-19 increased after WHO declared it a pandemic in the early February of 2020. In fact, this pandemic has had a worldwide impact on economy, health, and lifestyle like no other in the last 100 years. SARS-CoV-2 belongs to Coronaviridae family and causes the deadliest clinical manifestations when compared to other viruses in the family. COVID-19 is an emerging zoonotic disease that has resulted in over 383,000 deaths around the world. Scientists are scrambling for ideas to develop treatment and prevention strategies to thwart the disease condition. In this review, we have attempted to summarize the latest information on the virus, disease, prevention, and treatment strategies. The future looks promising.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control/organization & administration , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Ataxia/diagnosis , Ataxia/physiopathology , Ataxia/virology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/transmission , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Nausea/diagnosis , Nausea/physiopathology , Nausea/virology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Physical Distancing , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Quarantine/methods , Quarantine/organization & administration , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Vomiting/diagnosis , Vomiting/physiopathology , Vomiting/virology
11.
Microbes Infect ; 22(9): 481-488, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-599130

ABSTRACT

Clinical descriptions about influenza-like illnesses (ILI) in COVID-19 seem non-specific. We aimed to compare the clinical features of COVID-19 and influenza. We retrospectively investigated the clinical features and outcomes of confirmed cases of COVID-19 and influenza in Nord Franche-Comté Hospital between February 26th and March 14th 2020. We used SARS-CoV-2 RT-PCR and influenza virus A/B RT-PCR in respiratory samples to confirm the diagnosis. We included 124 patients. The mean age was 59 (±19 [19-98]) years with 69% female. 70 patients with COVID-19 and 54 patients with influenza A/B. Regarding age, sex and comorbidities, no differences were found between the two groups except a lower Charlson index in COVID-19 group (2 [±2.5] vs 3 [±2.4],p = 0.003). Anosmia (53% vs 17%,p < 0.001), dysgeusia (49% vs 20%,p = 0.001), diarrhea (40% vs 20%,p = 0.021), frontal headache (26% vs 9%,p = 0.021) and bilateral cracklings sounds (24% vs 9%,p = 0.034) were statistically more frequent in COVID-19. Sputum production (52% vs 29%,p = 0.010), dyspnea (59% vs 34%,p = 0.007), sore throat (44% vs 20%,p = 0.006), conjunctival hyperhemia (30% vs 4%,p < 0.001), tearing (24% vs 6%,p = 0.004), vomiting (22% vs 3%,p = 0.001) and rhonchi sounds (17% vs 1%,p = 0.002) were more frequent with influenza infection. We described several clinical differences which can help the clinicians during the co-circulation of influenza and SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Influenza A virus/pathogenicity , Influenza B virus/pathogenicity , Influenza, Human/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Diagnosis, Differential , Diarrhea/diagnosis , Diarrhea/physiopathology , Diarrhea/virology , Dysgeusia/diagnosis , Dysgeusia/physiopathology , Dysgeusia/virology , Dyspnea/diagnosis , Dyspnea/physiopathology , Dyspnea/virology , Female , France , Headache/diagnosis , Headache/physiopathology , Headache/virology , Humans , Influenza, Human/physiopathology , Influenza, Human/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Olfaction Disorders/diagnosis , Olfaction Disorders/physiopathology , Olfaction Disorders/virology , Pandemics , Pharyngitis/diagnosis , Pharyngitis/physiopathology , Pharyngitis/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Vomiting/diagnosis , Vomiting/physiopathology , Vomiting/virology
12.
J Med Virol ; 92(7): 786-790, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-102134

ABSTRACT

An outbreak of a novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) infection has recently emerged and rapidly spreading in humans causing a significant threat to international health and the economy. Rapid assessment and warning are crucial for an outbreak analysis in response to serious public health. SARS-CoV-2 shares highly homological sequences with SARS-CoVs causing highly lethal pneumonia with respiratory distress and clinical symptoms similar to those reported for SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV infections. Notably, some COVID-19 patients also expressed neurologic signs like nausea, headache, and vomiting. Several studies have reported that coronaviruses are not only causing respiratory illness but also invade the central nervous system through a synapse-connected route. SARS-CoV infections are reported in both patients and experimental animals' brains. Interestingly, some COVID-19 patients have shown the presence of SARS-CoV-2 virus in their cerebrospinal fluid. Considering the similarities between SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2 in various aspects, it remains to clarify whether the potent invasion of SARS-CoV-2 may affect in COVID-19 patients. All these indicate that more detailed criteria are needed for the treatment and the prevention of SARS-CoV-2 infected patients. In the absence of potential interventions for COVID-19, there is an urgent need for an alternative strategy to control the spread of this disease.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Central Nervous System/virology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/epidemiology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus/genetics , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Central Nervous System/drug effects , Central Nervous System/pathology , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/methods , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Headache/diagnosis , Headache/physiopathology , Headache/virology , Humans , Lung/drug effects , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/genetics , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/pathogenicity , Nausea/diagnosis , Nausea/physiopathology , Nausea/virology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Public Health/methods , SARS Virus/genetics , SARS Virus/pathogenicity , SARS-CoV-2 , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/diagnosis , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/prevention & control , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/virology , Viral Vaccines/biosynthesis , Viral Vaccines/therapeutic use , Vomiting/diagnosis , Vomiting/physiopathology , Vomiting/virology
13.
J Med Virol ; 92(6): 552-555, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-12499

ABSTRACT

Following the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), another highly pathogenic coronavirus named SARS-CoV-2 (previously known as 2019-nCoV) emerged in December 2019 in Wuhan, China, and rapidly spreads around the world. This virus shares highly homological sequence with SARS-CoV, and causes acute, highly lethal pneumonia coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) with clinical symptoms similar to those reported for SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV. The most characteristic symptom of patients with COVID-19 is respiratory distress, and most of the patients admitted to the intensive care could not breathe spontaneously. Additionally, some patients with COVID-19 also showed neurologic signs, such as headache, nausea, and vomiting. Increasing evidence shows that coronaviruses are not always confined to the respiratory tract and that they may also invade the central nervous system inducing neurological diseases. The infection of SARS-CoV has been reported in the brains from both patients and experimental animals, where the brainstem was heavily infected. Furthermore, some coronaviruses have been demonstrated able to spread via a synapse-connected route to the medullary cardiorespiratory center from the mechanoreceptors and chemoreceptors in the lung and lower respiratory airways. Considering the high similarity between SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV2, it remains to make clear whether the potential invasion of SARS-CoV2 is partially responsible for the acute respiratory failure of patients with COVID-19. Awareness of this may have a guiding significance for the prevention and treatment of the SARS-CoV-2-induced respiratory failure.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Central Nervous System/virology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Headache/virology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , SARS Virus/pathogenicity , Betacoronavirus/physiology , COVID-19 , Central Nervous System/physiopathology , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Headache/diagnosis , Headache/physiopathology , Humans , Lung/physiopathology , Lung/virology , Mechanotransduction, Cellular , Nausea/diagnosis , Nausea/physiopathology , Nausea/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Respiratory Insufficiency/diagnosis , Respiratory Insufficiency/physiopathology , Respiratory Insufficiency/virology , SARS Virus/physiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/epidemiology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/physiopathology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/transmission , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/virology , Vomiting/diagnosis , Vomiting/physiopathology , Vomiting/virology
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