Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 67
Filter
Add filters

Document Type
Year range
1.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0260613, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1581780

ABSTRACT

There is widespread recognition that stressors related to Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) jeopardize the development of emerging adults, more particularly those living in disadvantaged communities. What is less well understood is what might support emerging adult resilience to COVID-19-related stressors. In response, this article reports a 5-week qualitative study with 24 emerging adults (average age: 20) living in a South African township. Using digital diaries and repeated individual interviews, young people shared their lived experiences of later (i.e., month 4 and 7) lockdown-related challenges (i.e., contagion fears; livelihood threats; lives-on-hold) and how they managed these challenges. An inductive thematic analysis showed that personal and collective compliance, generous ways-of-being, and tolerance-facilitators enabled emerging adult resilience to said challenges. Importantly, these resilience-enablers drew on resources associated with multiple systems and reflected the situational and cultural context of the township in question. In short, supporting emerging adult resilience to COVID-19-related stressors will require contextually aligned, multisystemic responses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Resilience, Psychological , Adolescent , COVID-19/economics , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Male , Medicine, African Traditional , South Africa/epidemiology , Vulnerable Populations/psychology , Young Adult
2.
Lancet Public Health ; 7(1): e86-e92, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1562177

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic is unprecedented. The pandemic not only induced a public health crisis, but has led to severe economic, social, and educational crises. Across economies and societies, the distributional consequences of the pandemic have been uneven. Among groups living in vulnerable conditions, the pandemic substantially magnified the inequality gaps, with possible negative implications for these individuals' long-term physical, socioeconomic, and mental wellbeing. This Viewpoint proposes priority, programmatic, and policy recommendations that governments, resource partners, and relevant stakeholders should consider in formulating medium-term to long-term strategies for preventing the spread of COVID-19, addressing the virus's impacts, and decreasing health inequalities. The world is at a never more crucial moment, requiring collaboration and cooperation from all sectors to mitigate the inequality gaps and improve people's health and wellbeing with universal health coverage and social protection, in addition to implementation of the health in all policies approach.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Public Policy , Universal Health Insurance , Vulnerable Populations/psychology , Global Health , Humans , Public Health
3.
Lancet Psychiatry ; 8(5): 444-450, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1537216

ABSTRACT

Psychiatric disorders, and especially severe mental illness, are associated with an increased risk of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection and COVID-19-related morbidity and mortality. People with severe mental illness should therefore be prioritised in vaccine allocation strategies. Here, we discuss the risk for worse COVID-19 outcomes in this vulnerable group, the effect of severe mental illness and psychotropic medications on vaccination response, the attitudes of people with severe mental illness towards vaccination, and, the potential barriers to, and possible solutions for, an efficient vaccination programme in this population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Immunization Programs , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Immunization Programs/ethics , Immunization Programs/methods , Immunization Programs/organization & administration , Mental Disorders/psychology , Risk Assessment , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination Coverage , Vulnerable Populations/psychology
4.
PLoS One ; 16(3): e0249098, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477519

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Nursing homes (NH) for the elderly have been particularly affected by the Covid-19 pandemic mainly due to their hosted vulnerable populations and poor outbreak preparedness. In Belgium, the medical humanitarian organization Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) implemented a support project for NH including training on infection prevention and control (IPC), (re)-organization of care, and psychosocial support for NH staff. As psychosocial and mental health needs of NH residents in times of Covid-19 are poorly understood and addressed, this study aimed to better understand these needs and how staff could respond accordingly. METHODS: A qualitative study adopting thematic content analysis. Eight focus group discussions with direct caring staff and 56 in-depth interviews with residents were conducted in eight purposively and conveniently selected NHs in Brussels, Belgium, June 2020. RESULTS: NH residents experienced losses of freedom, social life, autonomy, and recreational activities that deprived them of their basic psychological needs. This had a massive impact on their mental well-being expressed in feeling depressed, anxious, and frustrated as well as decreased meaning and quality of life. Staff felt unprepared for the challenges posed by the pandemic; lacking guidelines, personal protective equipment and clarity around organization of care. They were confronted with professional and ethical dilemmas, feeling 'trapped' between IPC and the residents' wellbeing. They witnessed the detrimental effects of the measures imposed on their residents. CONCLUSION: This study revealed the insights of residents' and NH staff at the height of the early Covid-19 pandemic. Clearer outbreak plans, including psychosocial support, could have prevented the aggravated mental health conditions of both residents and staff. A holistic approach is needed in NHs in which tailor-made essential restrictive IPC measures are combined with psychosocial support measures to reduce the impact on residents' mental health impact and to enhance their quality of life.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Nursing Staff/psychology , Quality of Life , Vulnerable Populations/psychology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/virology , Depression/etiology , Female , Focus Groups , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Male , Middle Aged , Nursing Homes , Personal Autonomy , Protective Devices/supply & distribution , Quarantine , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Psychiatriki ; 32(3): 219-223, 2021 Sep 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1357715

ABSTRACT

People with mental illness are known to have poorer physical health outcomes. Among them, patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders are disproportionately burdened. A number of recent studies have highlighted that patients with schizophrenia are particularly at risk from COVID-19. The aim of this systematic review is to clarify whether patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders are at greater risk for poor COVID-19 outcomes. We conducted a systematic review of the literature following the PRISMA guidelines, using PubMed, PsycINFO (via Ovid) and Scopus as databases, to identify all studies which investigated infection and/or mortality rate from SARS-CoV-2 in patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Following a formal screening process, seven studies met our inclusion criteria. The results of these seven studies were reported using odds ratios or adjusted odds ratios. The collective results indicated a moderate, but statistically significant effect for higher infection rates, and a strong statistically significant effect for higher mortality rates in patients with schizophrenia. Our findings indicate that people with schizophrenia have a high risk of being infected by the new coronavirus and have a significantly higher mortality rate than the general population. There are contradictory findings concerning other outcomes, including the frequency of intensive care unit admissions for this group. Collectively, these results indicate that people with schizophrenia spectrum disorders may be more vulnerable to being infected and more likely to die due to COVID-19, and yet their access to Intensive Care Units does not seem to be higher. We conclude that patients with schizophrenia constitute a vulnerable group for COVID-19 related infection and mortality, consequently there is a necessity for this vulnerable group of people to have better access to healthcare, including priority in nationwide COVID-19 vaccination programs and expedited intensive care treatment. Our conclusion adds to the ongoing debate arguing for equitable access to healthcare for people with schizophrenia spectrum disorders.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Schizophrenia , Vulnerable Populations , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19/therapy , Causality , Healthcare Disparities , Humans , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Mortality , SARS-CoV-2 , Schizophrenia/epidemiology , Schizophrenia/physiopathology , Vulnerable Populations/psychology , Vulnerable Populations/statistics & numerical data
9.
PLoS One ; 16(8): e0254821, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1341500

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Although most countries and healthcare systems worldwide have been affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, some groups of the population may be more vulnerable to detrimental effects of the pandemic on mental health than others. The aim of this systematic review was to synthesise evidence currently available from systematic reviews on the impact of COVID-19 and other coronavirus outbreaks on mental health for groups of the population thought to be at increased risk of detrimental mental health impacts. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted a systematic review of reviews on adults and children residing in a country affected by a coronavirus outbreak and belonging to a group considered to be at risk of experiencing mental health inequalities. Data were collected on symptoms or diagnoses of any mental health condition, quality of life, suicide or attempted suicide. The protocol for this systematic review was registered in the online PROSPERO database prior to commencing the review (https://www.crd.york.ac.uk/prospero/display_record.php?RecordID=194264). RESULTS: We included 25 systematic reviews. Most reviews included primary studies of hospital workers from multiple countries. Reviews reported variable estimates for the burden of symptoms of mental health problems among acute healthcare workers, COVID-19 patients with physical comorbidities, and children and adolescents. No evaluations of interventions were identified. Risk- and protective factors, mostly for healthcare workers, showed the importance of personal factors, the work environment, and social networks for mental health. CONCLUSIONS: This review of reviews based on primary studies conducted in the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic shows a lack of evidence on mental health interventions and mental health impacts on vulnerable groups in the population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Health Personnel , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Vulnerable Populations , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/psychology , Child , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Disease Outbreaks , Health Personnel/psychology , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Mental Disorders/etiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Socioeconomic Factors , Vulnerable Populations/psychology , Vulnerable Populations/statistics & numerical data
10.
PLoS One ; 16(6): e0253648, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1280639

ABSTRACT

AIM: This study aimed to assess the fear of COVID-19 and its associates among older Rohingya (Forcibly Displaced Myanmar Nationals or FDMNs) in Bangladesh. METHOD: We conducted a cross-sectional survey among 416 older FDMNs aged 60 years and above living in camps of Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh. A semi-structured questionnaire was used to collect information on participants' socio-demographic and lifestyle characteristics, pre-existing non-communicable chronic conditions, and COVID-19 related information. Level of fear was measured using the seven-item Fear of COVID-19 Scale (FCV-19S) with the cumulative score ranged from 7 to 35. A multiple linear regression examined the factors associated with fear. RESULTS: Among 416 participants aged 60 years or above, the mean fear score was 14.8 (range 8-28) and 88.9% of the participants had low fear score. Participants who were concerned about COVID-19 (ß: 0.63, 95% CI: -0.26 to 1.53) and overwhelmed by COVID-19 (ß: 3.54, 95% CI: 2.54 to 4.55) were significantly more likely to be fearful of COVID-19. Other factors significantly associated with higher level of fear were lesser frequency of communication during COVID-19, difficulty in obtaining food during COVID-19, perception that older adults are at highest risk of COVID-19 and receiving COVID-19 related information from Radio/television and friends/family/neighbours. CONCLUSIONS: Our study highlighted that currently there little fear of COVID-19 among the older Rohingya FDMNs. This is probably due to lack of awareness of the severity of the disease in. Dissemination of public health information relevant to COVID-19 and provision of mental health services should be intensified particularly focusing on the individual who were concerned, overwhelmed or fearful of COVID-19. However, further qualitative research is advised to find out the reasons behind this.


Subject(s)
Attitude to Health , COVID-19/psychology , Fear , Refugees/psychology , Aged , Bangladesh , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Myanmar , Socioeconomic Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vulnerable Populations/psychology
11.
J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci ; 76(9): 1904-1912, 2021 10 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1258772

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Media sources have consistently described older adults as a medically vulnerable population during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, yet a lack of concern over their health and safety has resulted in dismissal and devaluation. This unprecedented situation highlights ongoing societal ageism and its manifestations in public discourse. This analysis asks how national news sources performed explicit and implicit ageism during the first month of the pandemic. METHOD: Using content and critical discourse analysis methods, we analyzed 287 articles concerning older adults and COVID-19 published between March 11 and April 10, 2020, in 4 major U.S.-based newspapers. RESULTS: Findings indicate that while ageism was rarely discussed explicitly, ageist bias was evident in implicit reporting patterns (e.g., frequent use of the term "elderly," portrayals of older adults as "vulnerable"). Infection and death rates and institutionalized care were among the most commonly reported topics, providing a limited portrait of aging during the pandemic. The older "survivor" narrative offers a positive alternative by suggesting exceptional examples of resilience and grit. However, the survivor narrative may also implicitly place blame on those unable to survive or thrive in later life. DISCUSSION: This study provides insight for policy makers, researchers, and practitioners exploring societal perceptions of older adults and how these perceptions are disseminated and maintained by the media.


Subject(s)
Ageism , Aging , COVID-19 , Information Dissemination/ethics , Social Media , Social Perception , Aged , Ageism/ethics , Ageism/legislation & jurisprudence , Ageism/prevention & control , Ageism/psychology , Aging/ethics , Aging/physiology , Aging/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Data Mining/ethics , Data Mining/statistics & numerical data , Geriatrics/trends , Humans , Newspapers as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Environment , Social Media/ethics , Social Media/trends , Social Perception/ethics , Social Perception/psychology , United States , Vulnerable Populations/psychology
12.
J Psychosom Res ; 146: 110504, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1219301

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study is to provide information on changes in mental health among disadvantaged immigrants from Sub-Saharan Africa in the Greater Paris area and their level of information about Covid-19. METHODS: Prior to the Covid-19 epidemic, the Makasi community-based cohort followed 850 immigrants from sub-Saharan Africa in the Greater Paris area. Between the 1st of April and the 7th of June 2020, all participants scheduled for a follow-up survey were systematically included into an additional COVID-19-related wave of data collection (N = 100). We compared participants' type of housing, level of food insecurity, work and mental health (PHQ9) before and during the first COVID-19-related lockdown, using paired-Mc Nemar chi-2 tests. We next described their level of information on Covid-19 and policy measures, broken down by sex. RESULTS: Among the 100 participants, 68% had no legal residence permit. Food insecurity was more often reported during lockdown than before (62% vs 52%). 9% of participants had a score indicative of severe depression (PHQ9) before lockdown and 17% afterwards (p = 0.17). Only 51% knew about the possibility of asymptomatic transmission of the COVID-19 virus. CONCLUSIONS: This study brings original information on a hard-to-reach population group. Our results suggest that the lockdown had a detrimental impact on various economic and mental health aspects among disadvantaged migrants residing in the Greater Paris area.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Consumer Health Information/statistics & numerical data , Emigrants and Immigrants/psychology , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Vulnerable Populations/psychology , Adult , Africa South of the Sahara/ethnology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Emigrants and Immigrants/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Male , Paris/epidemiology , Quarantine/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vulnerable Populations/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
14.
J Agromedicine ; 25(4): 357-361, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1174758

ABSTRACT

Objectives: This paper seeks to: provide an overview of the impacts of and responses to the spread of COVID-19 in Ireland; assess the vulnerability of the population living in rural areas to COVID-19; compare the health status of male farmers to underlying medical conditions frequently associated with those experiencing the worst impacts of the illness; and assess the implications of COVID-19 for farmers living alone and farm households with children. Methods: We present an overview of the impact and response to COVID-19 through the use of public health statistics and reference to policy documents. We subsequently draw on the results of ongoing geographic and health research to present an overview of the impacts and potential implications of COVID-19. Results: The population of many rural areas and farmers in particular are highly vulnerable to adverse outcomes to COVID-19 infection. Single person farm households are at particular risk of isolation, whilst those families with children are at increased risk of stress. Conclusions: There is an urgent need to address both COVID-19 challenges and the health and wellbeing issues confronting farmers and farm families arising out of the current pandemic by supporting these populations adopt and sustain health behaviour changes, improve their wellbeing and develop the resources that support resilience.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Farmers/psychology , Vulnerable Populations/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Farmers/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Ireland/epidemiology , Pandemics , Public Health , Vulnerable Populations/statistics & numerical data
15.
PLoS One ; 16(3): e0248702, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1148245

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Socially vulnerable communities may be at higher risk for COVID-19 outbreaks in the US. However, no prior studies examined temporal trends and differential effects of social vulnerability on COVID-19 incidence and death rates. Therefore, we examined temporal trends among counties with high and low social vulnerability to quantify disparities in trends over time. METHODS: We conducted a longitudinal analysis examining COVID-19 incidence and death rates from March 15 to December 31, 2020, for each US county using data from USAFacts. We classified counties using the Social Vulnerability Index (SVI), a percentile-based measure from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, with higher values indicating more vulnerability. Using a Bayesian hierarchical negative binomial model, we estimated daily risk ratios (RRs) comparing counties in the first (lower) and fourth (upper) SVI quartiles, adjusting for rurality, percentage in poor or fair health, percentage female, percentage of smokers, county average daily fine particulate matter (PM2.5), percentage of primary care physicians per 100,000 residents, daily temperature and precipitation, and proportion tested for COVID-19. RESULTS: At the outset of the pandemic, the most vulnerable counties had, on average, fewer cases per 100,000 than least vulnerable SVI quartile. However, on March 28, we observed a crossover effect in which the most vulnerable counties experienced higher COVID-19 incidence rates compared to the least vulnerable counties (RR = 1.05, 95% PI: 0.98, 1.12). Vulnerable counties had higher death rates starting on May 21 (RR = 1.08, 95% PI: 1.00,1.16). However, by October, this trend reversed and the most vulnerable counties had lower death rates compared to least vulnerable counties. CONCLUSIONS: The impact of COVID-19 is not static but can migrate from less vulnerable counties to more vulnerable counties and back again over time.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Status Disparities , Vulnerable Populations/statistics & numerical data , Bayes Theorem , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/psychology , Databases, Factual , Female , Humans , Incidence , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Socioeconomic Factors , United States/epidemiology , Vulnerable Populations/psychology
16.
Curr Opin Psychiatry ; 34(4): 351-356, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1142747

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The COVID-19 pandemic and associated restrictions have uniquely and disproportionately affected vulnerable populations. This review summarizes recent evidence on the relationship between psychiatric disorders, substance use disorders and COVID-19, highlighting acute and long-term risks, pharmacotherapy interactions and implications regarding appropriate and timely evidence-based treatment. RECENT FINDINGS: Evidence points to a complex relationship between psychiatric and substance use disorders and COVID-19. A range of risk factors associated with psychiatric and substance use disorders increases the risk of exposure to, and complications arising from, the COVID-19 virus. COVID-19 infection has been indicated as having acute and potential long-term impacts on both psychiatric and substance use disorders. Social disruption associated with restrictions imposed to curb transmission has also been identified as a risk factor for new onset of disorders and recurrence and exacerbation of existing conditions. SUMMARY: Early recognition and intervention are key to preventing chronic disability associated with psychiatric disorders, substance use disorders, and their co-occurrence. It is critical that those most in need of services do not fall through the cracks of our healthcare systems. The pandemic has fast tracked the opportunity for widespread implementation of digital health interventions but ensuring these are accessible and available to all, including our most vulnerable, will be a critical task for our future health and social ecosystems.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/psychology , Mental Disorders/complications , Mental Disorders/psychology , Substance-Related Disorders/complications , Substance-Related Disorders/psychology , Drug Interactions , Humans , Mental Disorders/drug therapy , Pandemics , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Vulnerable Populations/psychology
19.
BMC Public Health ; 21(1): 314, 2021 02 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1069557

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Impacts of the Covid-19 pandemic and its public health measures go beyond physical and mental health and incorporate wider well-being impacts in terms of what people are free to do or be. We explored the impacts of the Covid-19 lockdown and relevant vulnerabilities on capability well-being, mental health and social support in Austria. METHODS: Adult Austrian residents (n = 560) provided responses to a cross-sectional online survey about their experiences during Covid-19 lockdown (15 March-15 April 2020). Instruments measuring capabilities (OxCAP-MH), depression and anxiety (HADS), social support (MSPSS) and mental well-being (WHO-5) were used in association with six pre-defined vulnerabilities using multivariable linear regression. RESULTS: 31% of the participants reported low mental well-being and only 30% of those with a history of mental health treatment received treatment during lockdown. Past mental health treatment had a significant negative effect across all outcome measures with an associated capability well-being score reduction of - 6.54 (95%CI, - 9.26, - 3.82). Direct Covid-19 experience and being 'at risk' due to age and/or physical health conditions were also associated with significant capability deprivations. When adjusted for vulnerabilities, significant capability reductions were observed in association with increased levels of depression (- 1.77) and anxiety (- 1.50), and significantly higher capability levels (+ 3.75) were associated with higher levels of social support. Compared to the cohort average, individual capability impacts varied between - 9% for those reporting past mental health treatment and + 5% for those reporting one score higher on the social support scale. CONCLUSIONS: Our study is the first to assess the capability limiting aspects of lockdown and relevant vulnerabilities alongside their impacts on mental health and social support. The negative capability well-being, mental health and social support impacts of the Covid-19 lockdown were strongest for people with a history of mental health treatment. Future public health policies concerning lockdowns should pay special attention to improve social support levels in order to increase public resilience.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Depression/epidemiology , Quarantine/psychology , Social Support , Vulnerable Populations/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Austria/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Risk Assessment , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vulnerable Populations/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
20.
Front Public Health ; 8: 589264, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1069766

ABSTRACT

Lebanon's management of the COVID-19 pandemic is largely being maneuvered amid the country's escalating triple fold crisis. As the country continues to grapple with political stagnation, a dwindling economy and currency, all while working through an ongoing refugee crisis, mental health in times of Coronavirus in Lebanon remains unaddressed. This piece explores the effects of this triple fold crisis upon the mental health of the country's refugees and most vulnerable groups, and provides room for discussions on the potential benefits of telemental health as an intervention in low-income and conflict settings. Although the implementation of TMH services in Lebanon among vulnerable communities in times of COVID-19 is not a priority, this piece insists it would ultimately fill a substantial mental health gap during the country's ongoing difficult transitory period.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/transmission , Mental Health , Refugees/psychology , Vulnerable Populations/psychology , Health Policy , Humans , Lebanon , Politics , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...