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1.
J Heart Lung Transplant ; 41(11): 1547-1555, 2022 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2178981

ABSTRACT

The number of lung transplant procedures performed internationally is increasing but the donor organ pool is insufficient to meet demand and waiting list mortality is unacceptably high. As survival rates for patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome managed on extracorporeal life support (ECLS) have steadily improved, a potential role for ECLS to support critically ill patients awaiting a donor organ match has emerged. We explore the rapidly evolving landscape of ECLS as a bridge to lung transplantation with review of the patient selection criteria, predictors of survival, modes of pre and peri-transplant support, and the importance of a holistic multidisciplinary approach to care. Finally, we consider innovations that are envisaged to increase the accessibility, safety, and effectiveness of ECLS delivery for future lung transplant candidates.


Subject(s)
Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation , Lung Transplantation , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Humans , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/methods , Retrospective Studies , Waiting Lists
2.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 22(1): 1301, 2022 Oct 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2098340

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Breast cancer clinics across the UK have long been struggling to cope with high demand. Novel risk prediction tools - such as the PinPoint test - could help to reduce unnecessary clinic referrals. Using early data on the expected accuracy of the test, we explore the potential impact of PinPoint on: (a) the percentage of patients meeting the two-week referral target, and (b) the number of clinic 'overspill' appointments generated (i.e. patients having to return to the clinic to complete their required investigations). METHODS: A simulation model was built to reflect the annual flow of patients through a single UK clinic. Due to current uncertainty around the exact impact of PinPoint testing on standard care, two primary scenarios were assessed. Scenario 1 assumed complete GP adherence to testing, with only non-referred cancerous cases returning for delayed referral. Scenario 2 assumed GPs would overrule 20% of low-risk results, and that 10% of non-referred non-cancerous cases would also return for delayed referral. A range of sensitivity analyses were conducted to explore the impact of key uncertainties on the model results. Service reconfiguration scenarios, removing individual weekly clinics from the clinic schedule, were also explored. RESULTS: Under standard care, 66.3% (95% CI: 66.0 to 66.5) of patients met the referral target, with 1,685 (1,648 to 1,722) overspill appointments. Under both PinPoint scenarios, > 98% of patients met the referral target, with overspill appointments reduced to between 727 (707 to 746) [Scenario 1] and 886 (861 to 911) [Scenario 2]. The reduced clinic demand was sufficient to allow removal of one weekly low-capacity clinic [N = 10], and the results were robust to sensitivity analyses. CONCLUSION: The findings from this early analysis indicate that risk prediction tools could have the potential to alleviate pressure on cancer clinics, and are expected to have increased utility in the wake of heightened pressures resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic. Further research is required to validate these findings with real world evidence; evaluate the broader clinical and economic impact of the test; and to determine outcomes and risks for patients deemed to be low-risk on the PinPoint test and therefore not initially referred.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Humans , Female , Waiting Lists , Breast Neoplasms/diagnosis , Pandemics , Workflow , COVID-19/epidemiology , Referral and Consultation , Risk Assessment
3.
Ir Med J ; 115(7): 633, 2022 Aug 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2084081

ABSTRACT

Aim Emergency Departments (EDs) were impacted early in the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, with high attendance numbers. EDs relied upon SARS-CoV-2 reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) tests to triage patients and facilitate admission to appropriate wards, meaning positive patients were isolated as early as possible. In October 2020, we introduced a 24-hour SARS-CoV-2 testing service. We examined the impact of this on patient experience times (PETs) in the ED, and on healthcare-associated (HA) COVID-19 infections. Methods Data on PETs before and after the introduction of 24-hour testing were available from the ED. HA COVID-19 infections were reported weekly to the Health Services Executive as a key performance indicator. Results Mean PET prior to the pandemic was 20 hours and dropped to 10 and 13 hours respectively in the first and second wave. A surge in case numbers and ED attendances during the third wave was not reflected in a rise in PETs, with a mean PET of 11 hours, significantly below pre-pandemic levels. HA-COVID-19 infections remained stable between wave one and three (83 v 92). Conclusion The introduction of 24-hour SARS-CoV-2 testing in our ED contributed to a reduction in PETs, facilitated appropriate patient placement at ward level, and kept HA-COVID-19 infections at acceptably low levels.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Humans , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19 Testing , Waiting Lists , Emergency Service, Hospital
4.
Public Health Res Pract ; 32(3)2022 Oct 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2067393

ABSTRACT

Cataract surgery is a safe, effective and common elective procedure in Australia but access is inequitable. True waiting times for cataract care are undisclosed or inconsistently reported by governments. Estimates of true waiting times range from 4 to 30 months and have been extended during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Comparative analysis revealed that reducing waiting periods from 12 to 3 months would result in estimated public health system cost savings of $6.6 million by preventing 50 679 falls. Investment in public cataract services to address current unmet needs would prevent avoidable vision impairment and associated negative consequences.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cataract Extraction , Cataract , Australia/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cataract/epidemiology , Humans , Waiting Lists
5.
Health Care Manag Sci ; 25(4): 521-525, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2059936

ABSTRACT

The recovery of elective waiting lists represents a major challenge and priority for the health services of many countries. In England's National Health Service (NHS), the waiting list has increased by 45% in the two years since the COVID-19 pandemic was declared in March 2020. Long waits associate with worse patient outcomes and can deepen inequalities and lead to additional demands on healthcare resources. Modelling the waiting list can be valuable for both estimating future trajectories and considering alternative capacity allocation strategies. However, there is a deficit within the current literature of scalable solutions that can provide managers and clinicians with hospital and specialty level projections on a routine basis. In this paper, a model representing the key dynamics of the waiting list problem is presented alongside its differential equation based solution. Versatility of the model is demonstrated through its calibration to routine publicly available NHS data. The model has since been used to produce regular monthly projections of the waiting list for every hospital trust and specialty in England.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Waiting Lists , Humans , State Medicine , Pandemics , Health Services Accessibility , Hospitals , England
6.
JAMA Netw Open ; 5(10): e2234874, 2022 10 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2059197

ABSTRACT

This cohort study investigates the association between the COVID-19 pandemic and waiting list times among pediatric heart transplant recipients in the US.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heart Transplantation , Tissue and Organ Procurement , Child , Humans , Pandemics , Waiting Lists
7.
Anticancer Res ; 42(10): 4913-4919, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2056771

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIM: SARS-CoV-2 with a dramatical worldwide spread, impacted greatly daily life and healthcare. In order to avoid delay in cancer treatment, many strategies and measures were implemented. The Awake breast surgery was a strategy implemented in our Unit during the pandemic, aimed to reduce operatory room occupancy and increase the number of procedures performed during the daily surgical session. The aim of the study was to evaluate how the use of this strategy has changed before and after the advent of the COVID-19 pandemic, and its relative benefits. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This was a retrospective study analysing all patients subjected to breast conservative surgery for oncological disease from July 2018 to December 2021. RESULTS: Out of 498 patients enrolled in the study, 253 (50.8%) cases were treated before the pandemic and were designated as "pre-COVID-19" group. The remaining 245 (49.1%) cases were considered the "COVID-19" group. Cases of awake surgery in COVID-19 group were 141 (54.7%) vs. 84 (33.2%), p<0.001. Length of hospitalization and surgical time were comparable between the groups: relative p=0.188 and 0.264, respectively. Differently, operation room occupation was significantly shorter in the COVID-19 group, p<0.001; and number of outpatient surgical procedures was higher, p=0.0304. Multivariate analysis identified the period of surgery (OR=1.47) as a statistically significant factor, p=0.011, predictive of prolonged operatory room occupancy. CONCLUSION: Awake surgery was one of the strategies which made more operating rooms available and allowed avoiding further delays.


Subject(s)
Brain Neoplasms , COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Waiting Lists , Wakefulness
8.
Transplantation ; 106(12): 2416-2425, 2022 Dec 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2051795

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in worldwide kidney transplantation (KT) moratoriums. The impacts of these moratoriums on the life expectancy of KT candidates remain unclear. METHODS: We simulated the evolution of several French candidate populations for KT using a multistate semi-Markovian approach and according to moratorium durations ranging from 0 to 24 mo. The transition rates were modeled from the 63 927 French patients who began dialysis or were registered on the waiting list for KT between 2011 and 2019. RESULTS: Among the 8350 patients active on the waiting list at the time of the French KT moratorium decided on March 16, 2020, for 2.5 mo, we predicted 4.0 additional months (confidence interval [CI], 2.8-5.0) on the waiting list and 42 additional deaths (CI, -70 to 150) up to March 16, 2030, compared with the scenario without moratorium. In this population, we reported a significant impact for a 9-mo moratorium duration: 135 attributable deaths (CI, 31-257) up to March 16, 2030. Patients who became active on the list after March 2020 were less impacted; there was a significant impact for an 18-mo moratorium (175 additional deaths [CI, 21-359]) in the 10 862 prevalent end-stage renal disease patients on March 16, 2020 and for a 24-mo moratorium (189 additional deaths [CI, 10-367]) in the 16 355 incident end-stage renal disease patients after this date. CONCLUSION: The temporary moratorium of KT during a COVID-19 peak represents a sustainable decision to free up hospitals' resources if the moratorium does not exceed a prolonged period.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Kidney Failure, Chronic , Kidney Transplantation , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Kidney Failure, Chronic/surgery , Kidney Failure, Chronic/epidemiology , Renal Dialysis , Waiting Lists , France/epidemiology
9.
CMAJ Open ; 10(3): E789-E797, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2025440

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated pre-existing challenges with respect to access to elective surgery across Canada, and a single-entry model (SEM) approach has been proposed as an equitable and efficient method to help manage the backlog. With Ontario's recent investment in centralized surgical wait-list management, we sought to understand the views of health system leaders on the role of SEMs in managing the elective surgery backlog. METHODS: We used the qualitative method of interpretive description to explore participant perspectives and identify practical strategies for policy-makers, administrators and clinical leaders. We conducted semistructured interviews with health system leaders from across Ontario on Zoom between March and June 2021. We used snowball and purposive sampling. Inclusion criteria included Ontario health care leaders, fluent in English or French, in positions relevant to managing the elective surgery backlog. Exclusion criteria were individuals who work outside Ontario, or do not hold relevant roles. RESULTS: Our interviews with 10 health system leaders - including hospital chief executive officers, surgeons, administrators and policy experts - resulted in 5 emergent domains: perceptions of the backlog, operationalizing and financing SEMs, barriers, facilitators, and equity and patient factors. All participants emphasized the need for clinical leaders to champion SEMs and the utility of SEMs in managing wait-lists for high-volume, low-acuity, low-complexity and low-variation surgeries. INTERPRETATION: Although SEMs are no panacea, the participants in our study stated that they believe SEMs can improve quality and reduce variability in wait times when SEMs are designed to address local needs and are implemented with buy-in from champions. Health care leaders should consider SEMs for improving surgical backlog management in their local jurisdictions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Elective Surgical Procedures , Humans , Ontario/epidemiology , Pandemics , Waiting Lists
10.
Asian Cardiovasc Thorac Ann ; 30(8): 912-915, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1993220

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since November 2020, all patients undergoing emergency surgery at our hospital have been subjected to preoperative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) screening to prevent nosocomial COVID-19 infection, with admission to the operating room requiring a negative result. Herein, we compared the pre- and postoperative outcomes of acute type A aortic dissection surgery before and after implementing the RT-PCR screening for all patients. METHODS: We compared the postoperative results of 105 patients who underwent acute type A aortic dissection emergency surgery from January 2019 to October 2020 (Group I) and 109 patients who underwent the surgery following RT-PCR screening from November 2020 to March 2022 (Group II). RESULTS: The average waiting time from arrival at the hospital to admission to the operating room was 36 and 81 min in Groups I and II, respectively. Ruptured cardiac tamponade was observed preoperatively in 26.6% and 21.1% of Groups I and II patients, respectively. The preoperative waiting time due to RT-PCR screening did not contribute to the cardiac tamponade. Surgical complications such as bleeding (reopened chest), respiratory failure, cerebral neuropathy, or mediastinitis did not increase significantly. The number of deaths 30 days after surgery (Group I = 13 and Group II = 3) showed no significant difference between the groups. There were no cases of nosocomial COVID-19 infections. CONCLUSIONS: Preoperative COVID-19 screening is an important method to prevent nosocomial infections. The associated waiting time did not affect the number of preoperative ruptures or affect postoperative complications or mortality.


Subject(s)
Aneurysm, Dissecting , COVID-19 , Cardiac Tamponade , Cross Infection , Aneurysm, Dissecting/complications , Aneurysm, Dissecting/diagnostic imaging , Aneurysm, Dissecting/surgery , COVID-19/diagnosis , Cardiac Tamponade/etiology , Cross Infection/complications , Humans , Postoperative Complications , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome , Waiting Lists
12.
Trials ; 22(1): 445, 2021 Jul 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1306565

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Delays in starting physical therapy after hospital discharge worsen deconditioning in older adults. Intervening quickly can minimize the negative effects of deconditioning. Telerehabilitation is a strategy that increases access to rehabilitation, improves clinical outcomes, and reduces costs. This paper presents the protocol for a pragmatic clinical trial that aims to determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a multi-component intervention offered by telerehabilitation for discharged older adults awaiting physical therapy for any specific medical condition. METHODS: This is a pragmatic randomized controlled clinical trial with two groups: telerehabilitation and control. Participants (n=230) will be recruited among individuals discharged from hospitals who are in the public healthcare system physical therapy waiting lists. The telerehabilitation group will receive a smartphone app with a personalized program (based on individual's functional ability) of resistance, balance, and daily activity training exercises. The intervention will be implemented at the individuals' homes. This group will be monitored weekly by phone and monthly through a face-to-face meeting until they start physical therapy. The control group will adhere to the public healthcare system's usual flow and will be monitored weekly by telephone until they start physical therapy. The primary outcome will be a physical function (Timed Up and Go and 30-s Chair Stand Test). The measurements will take place in baseline, start, and discharge of outpatient physical therapy. The economic evaluations will be performed from the perspective of society and the Brazilian public healthcare system. DISCUSSION: The study will produce evidence on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of multi-component telerehabilitation intervention for discharged older adult patients awaiting physical therapy, providing input that can aid the implementation of similar proposals in other patient groups. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Brazilian Registry of Clinical Trials (ReBEC), RBR-9243v7 . Registered on 24 August 2020.


Subject(s)
Patient Discharge , Telerehabilitation , Aged , Brazil , Hospitals , Humans , Physical Therapy Modalities , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Treatment Outcome , Waiting Lists
13.
CMAJ ; 192(37): E1079-E1080, 2020 Sep 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1383773
15.
Am J Transplant ; 22(11): 2694-2696, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1932268

ABSTRACT

The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has substantially impacted solid organ transplantation, including temporary inactivation of waitlist candidates with COVID-19 infection. We report two cases of liver transplantation (LT) in individuals with asymptomatic COVID-19 infection. The first patient is a 68-year-old female with decompensated cirrhosis complicated by worsening frailty and sarcopenia. The second patient is a 22-year-old female with acute liver failure likely secondary to drug/toxin exposure. Both patients were treated with COVID-19-directed therapies and neither patient developed symptomatic disease. These cases demonstrate that LT can be safely performed in select patients with asymptomatic COVID-19 infection at the time of transplant.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Liver Transplantation , Female , Humans , Aged , Young Adult , Adult , Liver Transplantation/adverse effects , SARS-CoV-2 , Pandemics , Waiting Lists
16.
Mymensingh Med J ; 31(3): 848-850, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1919027

ABSTRACT

To develop an efficient and practical pathway to reduce the waiting list for outpatient hysteroscopy in patients with post menopausal bleeding. The clinical data was retrospectively analysed in Welsh Clinical Portal of 1339 patients who were referred for hysteroscopy as urgent suspected cancer over a period of 12 months (1st January to 31st December 2019) in Hywel DDA University Health Board in Wales, United Kingdom. A total of 1339 patients were referred for hysteroscopy over 12 months. Among them 133 patients underwent hysteroscopy for evaluation of PMB despite ET being less than 4 mm; 1.50% patients were on tamoxifen and 16.45% were on HRT. Biopsy was taken for 86.00% of patients. Among them 1.50% were reported as malignant, 72.00% benign and 9.80% as insufficient sample. Patients with PMB and ET less than 4 mm and without suspicious features on ultrasound and who are without clinical risk factors can be reviewed virtually (in virtual clinics) by consultants or senior doctor and can be discharged. They should be instructed to report back if they experience persistent bleeding and then they would need hysteroscopy for further evaluation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hysteroscopy , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Postmenopause , Pregnancy , Retrospective Studies , Waiting Lists
17.
BMJ Open ; 12(6): e059309, 2022 06 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1902009

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To provide estimates for how different treatment pathways for the management of severe aortic stenosis (AS) may affect National Health Service (NHS) England waiting list duration and associated mortality. DESIGN: We constructed a mathematical model of the excess waiting list and found the closed-form analytic solution to that model. From published data, we calculated estimates for how the strategies listed under Interventions may affect the time to clear the backlog of patients waiting for treatment and the associated waiting list mortality. SETTING: The NHS in England. PARTICIPANTS: Estimated patients with AS in England. INTERVENTIONS: (1) Increasing the capacity for the treatment of severe AS, (2) converting proportions of cases from surgery to transcatheter aortic valve implantation and (3) a combination of these two. RESULTS: In a capacitated system, clearing the backlog by returning to pre-COVID-19 capacity is not possible. A conversion rate of 50% would clear the backlog within 666 (533-848) days with 1419 (597-2189) deaths while waiting during this time. A 20% capacity increase would require 535 (434-666) days, with an associated mortality of 1172 (466-1859). A combination of converting 40% cases and increasing capacity by 20% would clear the backlog within a year (343 (281-410) days) with 784 (292-1324) deaths while awaiting treatment. CONCLUSION: A strategy change to the management of severe AS is required to reduce the NHS backlog and waiting list deaths during the post-COVID-19 'recovery' period. However, plausible adaptations will still incur a substantial wait to treatment and many hundreds dying while waiting.


Subject(s)
Aortic Valve Stenosis , COVID-19 , Aortic Valve Stenosis/surgery , Humans , Models, Theoretical , State Medicine , Waiting Lists
18.
Transplant Proc ; 54(5): 1221-1223, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1860125

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has affected donation and transplantation activities in São Paulo, Brazil, as well as the patients receiving these organs. In this study, information from the database of the São Paulo Organ Allocation System was analyzed and compared 2 periods-before the pandemic and during the pandemic-to identify this effect. The COVID-19 pandemic interfered in the mortality rate and the time on the waiting list for heart, liver, pancreas, lung, and kidney transplants; the number of effective donors; and the use or disposal of available organs from deceased donors. It also reduced the transplant activity with living donors. Regarding the activity of eye tissue transplantation, the time on the waiting list increased and the number of transplant procedures decreased. The kidney transplant program was the most affected in our study. There was an increase in waiting time and mortality in the waiting list for this organ and also a decrease in kidney utilization rates.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Organ Transplantation , Tissue and Organ Procurement , Brazil/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Living Donors , Pandemics , Tissue Donors , Waiting Lists
19.
Front Public Health ; 10: 874758, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1847242

ABSTRACT

Introduction: COVID-19 impacted healthcare systems worldwide, and elective surgical activity was brought to a minimum. Although children were not primarily affected by the disease, pediatric urology was halted by clinical closedown and staff allocation. We aimed to document how these prioritizations affected waiting lists, and to investigate how European centers dealt with the challenge of these logistical and financial prioritizations. Materials and Methods: This was a 1-year prospective study, starting March 2020. Participants were surveyed at 3-month intervals about waiting lists for several common procedures as well as OR capacity and funding. Further, centers retrospectively reported on surgical and outpatient activity rates during 2019-2021. Waiting list tendencies were evaluated in relation to study baseline. Results: A marked decrease in surgical and outpatient activity was seen in the spring of 2020. Some included pediatric urology centers were able to increase their budget (15%) and staff working hours (20%) during part of the study period. Still, at the end of the study, the centers had increased the total number of patients on waiting lists with 11%, whereas the average days on waiting lists had accumulated with 73%, yielding a total of 6,102 accumulated waiting days in the study population. Centers with decreased resources had markedly negative effects on waiting lists. Conclusions: Correlations between COVID-19 derived burdening of healthcare systems and the availability of pediatric urology greatly depends on the prioritizations made at individual centers. Ongoing monitoring of these correlations is warranted to safely avoid unnecessary negative impact on the pediatric population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Urology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Prospective Studies , Retrospective Studies , Waiting Lists
20.
Ulster Med J ; 91(1): 19-25, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1824461

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The delivery of cataract surgery during the COVID-19 pandemic is challenging because of the risk of nosocomial SARS-CoV-2 infection when patients attend hospital for elective care. In order to ascertain the risk to patients awaiting cataract surgery, this study aimed to identify the presence of systemic comorbidities that are associated with a high risk of severe disease or death due to COVID-19. METHODS: A prospective study of 315 patients (630 eyes) was conducted from 3rd June to 31st July 2020. An electronic health record was used to identify any systemic comorbidities that would render a patient 'clinically extremely vulnerable' to COVID-19, as outlined by the Department of Health for Northern Ireland. Patient demographics, best-corrected visual acuity (VA) and risk of postoperative anisometropia were also recorded. RESULTS: The median age of patients awaiting cataract surgery was 76 years (range 22-97). Of the 315 patients, 72% were aged over 70 and 16% were aged over 85. A systemic comorbidity that would confer high risk status was identified in 21% of patients. This high risk status was attributable to severe respiratory disease, cancer, and immunosuppression therapies in the majority of cases. The high risk group were younger than those deemed non-high risk, but there were no significant differences with respect to gender, anticipated degree of surgical difficulty, VA, or whether the patient was undergoing first or second eye surgery. Of those patients awaiting first eye cataract surgery, the mean VA in the listed eye was 0.84 logMAR and 39% (70/179) had a VA <0.3 logMAR (6/12 Snellen acuity) in their fellow eye. 57% of patients were awaiting first eye surgery, and 32% of those patients would be at risk of symptomatic anisometropia postoperatively. CONCLUSION: One-fifth of patients awaiting cataract surgery were found to be at high risk of severe disease or death from COVID-19 and these patients may experience delays in their surgical care. Additional planning is required in order to minimise the morbidity associated with delayed cataract surgery.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cataract Extraction , Cataract , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Cataract/epidemiology , Humans , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Waiting Lists , Young Adult
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