Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 9 de 9
Filter
3.
HERD ; 15(4): 41-62, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1896302

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study investigates preference for five different seating arrangements (e.g., rows, clusters) in a doctor's office waiting room, whether these reduce stress and improve judgments of medical care, and how such choices may have changed over the pandemic (2013 vs. 2021). BACKGROUND: What is called the doctor's office layout, with chairs lining the perimeter of the waiting room, is criticized by designers, yet little empirical evidence exists to support that assessment. METHOD: Data collected in 2013 and 2021 used sketches of five different seating arrangements; people saw just one of these. The study examined the effect of time and seating arrangement on anxiety, need for privacy, situational awareness, evaluation of the environment, and perception of the doctor. RESULTS: There was no significant impact of the seating arrangement on any of the dependent variables, but ratings were higher for situational awareness, need for privacy, evaluation of the environment, and aspects related to the physician in 2021. In addition, seating preferences favored end, not middle seats, and chair selections with the chair back to a wall. CONCLUSION: In this study, no evidence exists that the doctor's office layout is less preferred than four other seating arrangements, but seat choice shows people prefer end seats (not middle seats) across arrangements. The doctor's office layout may offer a supportive familiarity to people; also, given the percentage of people who visit the doctor unaccompanied, layouts designed to encourage social interaction may not always be appropriate.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Physicians , Awareness , Humans , Waiting Rooms
4.
Food Environ Virol ; 14(2): 217-221, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1894679

ABSTRACT

Disinfection of hospital facilities and ambulances is an important issue for breaking the chain of transmission of viral pathogens. Hydrogen peroxide has provided promising results in laboratory assays. Here, we evaluate the efficacy of a hydrogen peroxide nebulizer for the inactivation of surrogate MS2 bacteriophage and murine norovirus (MNV) in a patient waiting room and the fully equipped cabin of a medical ambulance. We observed an average 3 log10 titer reduction in both settings, which represents the destruction of over 106 and 109 infectious particles of MNV and MS2 per cm2, respectively. The potential for viral exposure is high for health workers when disinfecting confined and cluttered spaces, so the use of a hydrogen peroxide mist might offer an affordable and efficient solution to minimize the risk of viral contaminations.


Subject(s)
Disinfection , Norovirus , Ambulances , Animals , Disinfection/methods , Hospitals , Humans , Hydrogen Peroxide/pharmacology , Mice , Nebulizers and Vaporizers , Norovirus/physiology , Waiting Rooms
5.
J Telemed Telecare ; 28(6): 452-457, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463095

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has presented pediatric emergency departments with unique challenges, resulting in a heightened demand for adapted clinical pathways. In response to this need, the Montreal Children's Hospital pediatric emergency department introduced the WAVE (Waiting Room Assessment to Virtual Emergency Department) pathway, a video-based telemedicine pathway for selected non-critical patients, aiming to reduce safety issues related to emergency department overcrowding, while providing timely care to all children presenting and registering at our emergency department. The objective of the WAVE pilot phase was to evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of telemedicine in our pediatric emergency department, which was previously unfamiliar with this mode of care delivery. During the six-week, three-evening per week deployment, we conducted 18 five-hour telemedicine shifts. In total, 27 patients participated in the WAVE pathway. Results from this pilot phase met four of five a priori feasibility and acceptability criteria. Overall, participating families were satisfied with this novel care pathway and reported no disruptive technological barriers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Child , Emergency Service, Hospital , Humans , Pandemics , Waiting Rooms
6.
Heart ; 107(20): 1607-1608, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1438102
7.
Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol ; 87(5): 603-610, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1222345

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is implicated in the ongoing pandemic across the globe since December 2019. It was first notified by China from Wuhan on 31 December 2020 and transmission to healthcare workers was first reported on 20 January 2020. Human-to-human transmission is mainly by droplet infection. At present no effective vaccine is available. Our speciality needs to collectively address the urgent issue of risk of transmission in dermatology practice. A case series of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) from Wuhan described that 41.3% of their patients may have acquired the infection from the hospital. Of all the infected health care workers, 77.5% worked in general wards and departments. These data highlight the significant risk of nosocomial transmission of COVID-19 and also the higher risk in general wards and departments compared to the emergency room or intensive care unit. Dermatology patients are generally seen in clinics and in outpatient departments in hospitals. Patients wait together in the waiting area, intermingle and then are seen by the physician in their chamber. This can cause transmission of the pathogen among patients and from patient to physician. Social distancing, hand hygiene and the use of personal protective equipment are important for preventing the spread of infection and dermatology practices also have to incorporate these aspects. Telemedicine is becoming an important tool for the management of dermatology patients in these times. At-risk patients in dermatology also need to be given priority care. Protocols for the use of immunosuppressants and biologics in dermatology during the pandemic are being developed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Dermatology/organization & administration , Skin Diseases/therapy , Ambulatory Care/methods , Ambulatory Care/organization & administration , Biological Products/therapeutic use , COVID-19/transmission , Cross Infection/transmission , Humans , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , India , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Skin Diseases/complications , Skin Diseases/diagnosis , Telemedicine/legislation & jurisprudence , Vaccination , Waiting Rooms
9.
Paediatr Respir Rev ; 36: 106-108, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-974487

ABSTRACT

The COVID pandemic has passed its first peak for now in many countries while some are still on the rise, with some facing a second wave of cases. Precautions and infection control measures for both pediatric and adult pulmonary function testing (PFT) have been a topic of debate during the pandemic. Many centers had to close their PFT laboratories during the initial periods of the pandemic and are reopening as the numbers of new cases are decreasing. This review aims to summarize different practices of PFT laboratory management in different countries, including patient appointments, personal protective equipment, testing room requirements and telemedicine during and immediately following the COVID pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Environment, Controlled , Personal Protective Equipment , Respiratory Function Tests/methods , Air Filters , Appointments and Schedules , COVID-19/transmission , Child , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Humans , Internationality , Parents , Pediatrics , Physical Distancing , Pulmonary Medicine , Telemedicine , Ventilation , Waiting Rooms
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL