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4.
J Med Imaging Radiat Sci ; 52(2): 156, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1313259
5.
J Bone Joint Surg Am ; 103(9): 840-847, 2021 05 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1207671

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: As the landscape of medical education evolves with emerging technologies and the COVID-19 pandemic, e-learning platforms continue to gain popularity. Orthopaedic podcasts, a burgeoning e-learning platform, continue to gain traction; however, there is a paucity of information regarding their coverage of topics and their distribution over time. Therefore, our analysis sought to (1) characterize podcast content related to orthopaedic surgery, and (2) evaluate the changes in the prevalence of orthopaedic podcasts over the past 15 years. METHODS: Three common podcasting platforms (Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, and Spotify) were queried using the key terms "orthopaedic," "orthopedic," and "ortho" in order to identify a list of podcasts that are related to orthopaedic surgery. For each unique orthopaedic podcast, the title, the show description, the number of episodes, the date of the first episode, the date of the most recent episode, and episode frequency were collected. Podcasts were then classified based on a predetermined list of podcast domains. The number of existing active (released within the last 3 months) orthopaedic podcasts was then trended on a monthly basis from 2011 to 2020. RESULTS: Ninety-four unique podcasts met inclusion criteria, 62 of which remained active as of October 25, 2020. The most common podcast domains were "general" (38 [40.4%]) and "clinical knowledge" (20 [21.3%]). Among the assessed podcasts, 90 (95.7%) utilized an exclusively audio format. The majority of podcasts were based in the United States (89.4%), included introductory music (72.3%), and included interviews (63.8%). Most podcast hosts were practicing orthopaedic surgeons (52.1%). Between January 2016 and October 2020, the number of active orthopaedic surgery podcasts grew more than twelvefold (1,240%) at an average rate of roughly 1 new podcast each month (average, 1.0 podcast; standard deviation, 1.8). DISCUSSION: The past decade has seen sizable growth in the number of readily available podcasts related to orthopaedic surgery. Additional research is required to independently assess the quality of these resources and their implications for remote trainee education.


Subject(s)
Orthopedic Procedures/education , Webcasts as Topic , COVID-19 , Forecasting , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
6.
J Surg Res ; 265: 95-99, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1203194

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic drastically reduced learning opportunities for medical students. We sought to determine the cost and success of implementation of a podcast for a surgical department in a large academic hospital. METHODS: We created a podcast series for Israeli medical students during the COVID-19 epidemic based on the Medical Student Core Curriculum of the American College of Surgeons / Association for Surgical Education. Episodes were available for free download or streaming on a designated website and popular podcast platforms. Podcast analytics were used to measure public listeners and uptake. RESULTS: Total development time was 90 hours at an estimated cost of $7091 USD. A total of 10 episodes were released between March 21, 2020 and August 31, 2020. An average of 9 ± 1.26 h (range 2-6) was required to generate each episode, including 3.4 ± 1.26 h (2-6) for content review and 5.6 ± 2 h (4-10) for audio production. An average episode ran for 35.9 ± 4.3 min (28-42). Podcasts recorded a total of 5678 downloads, with an average of 228 and 336 downloads per episode in the first 30 and 90 days, respectively. The average daily downloads before the students returned to clinical rotations (March 21-April 30) was 48 ± 58.3 (7-283;) compared to 16 ± 7.4 after their return (1-38; P< 0.01). Estimated costs to produce a video-based education series would have been significantly more. CONCLUSION: Podcasts can serve as a cost-effective and quickly produced instructional tool to supplement online learning. Further research is required to determine the efficacy of podcasts versus video-based education modules.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical , General Surgery/education , SARS-CoV-2 , Webcasts as Topic , Costs and Cost Analysis , Humans , Students, Medical
7.
World Neurosurg ; 148: 256-262, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1144984

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has disrupted lives and indelibly impacted the practice of medicine since emerging as a pandemic in March 2020. For neurosurgery departments throughout the United States, the pandemic has created unique challenges across subspecialties in devising methods of triage, workflow, and operating room safety. Located in New York City, at the early epicenter of the COVID-19 crisis, the Weill Cornell Medicine Department of Neurological Surgery was disrupted and challenged in many ways, requiring adaptations in clinical operations, workforce management, research, and education. Through our department's collective experience, we offer a glimpse at how our faculty and administrators overcame obstacles, and transformed in the process, at the height of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Delivery of Health Care , Education, Distance , Neurosurgery/organization & administration , Neurosurgical Procedures , Teleworking , Academic Medical Centers , Biomedical Research , Faculty, Medical , Health Personnel , Hospital Departments , Humans , Neurosurgery/education , Neurosurgery/methods , New York City , Operating Rooms , Personnel Management , SARS-CoV-2 , Triage , Webcasts as Topic , Workflow
8.
Indian J Ophthalmol ; 69(4): 951-957, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1138819

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To ascertain ophthalmologist's perceptions about webinars as a method of continued medical education during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: In a cross-sectional study, a 21-question survey was circulated using digital media platform to approximately 1400 ophthalmologists in India between 16th August 2020 to 31st August 2020. The questionnaire focussed on the quality and usefulness of webinars based on the Bloom's taxonomy. The responses (on 4- or 5-point Likert scale) were analyzed among three professional groups- ophthalmologists in-training, consultants in public sector, and private practitioners. RESULTS: 393 ophthalmologists participated in the survey, with a response rate of 28%. The mean age was 34.6 ± 9.7 years, and males constituted 49.6% (199/393) of the respondents. Forty-seven percent of the respondents perceived the quality of webinars as good or excellent (185/393), 72.8% reported knowledge gain from webinars (286/393), and 63.9% felt that webinars are important in clinical practice and should continue post-COVID-19 pandemic (251/393), with distinct responses among the professional groups. The drawbacks perceived were overt number of webinars (371; 94.4%), confusion regarding which webinars to attend (313; 79.6%), repetition of the information (296; 75.3%), limited opportunity for participant interaction (146; 37.2%) and disparate weightage to the core disciplines of Ophthalmology. CONCLUSION: Most respondents had favorable perceptions of Ophthalmology webinars happening during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, there is need for improvisation in the volume of webinars, target-audience-based delivery, and participant interaction to add value to this new dimension of teaching-learning.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical, Continuing/methods , Ophthalmologists/psychology , Ophthalmology/education , SARS-CoV-2 , Webcasts as Topic , Adult , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Surveys , Humans , India/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
9.
Cytometry A ; 99(1): 51-59, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1086341

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has dramatically affected shared resource lab (SRL) staff in-person availability at institutions globally. This article discusses the challenges of ensuring reliable instrument performance and quality data output while facility staff and external service provider on-site presence is severely limited. Solutions revolve around the adoption of remote monitoring and troubleshooting platforms, provision of self-service troubleshooting resources specific to facility instruments and workflows, development of an assistance contact policy, and ensuring efficiency of limited in-person staff time. These solutions employ software and hardware tools that are already in use or readily available in the SRL community, such as remote instrument access tools, video hosting and conferencing platforms, and ISAC shared resources. © 2020 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Flow Cytometry/instrumentation , Flow Cytometry/standards , Laboratories/standards , Quality Control , Teleworking/standards , COVID-19/prevention & control , Flow Cytometry/trends , Humans , Laboratories/trends , Teleworking/trends , Webcasts as Topic/standards , Webcasts as Topic/trends , Workflow
10.
World Neurosurg ; 148: e415-e424, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1083702

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Continuing medical education and continuing professional development have been affected by the ongoing 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic. Therefore, we developed the 2020 International Web-Based Neurosurgery Congress (2020 IWBNC), which became the first successful virtual neurosurgical congress. The aim of this article was to describe the experience designing and organizing a web congress by the 2020 IWBNC method. METHODS: The 2020 IWBNC was organized by the Center for Research and Training in Neurosurgery (Centro de Investigación y Entrenamiento en Neurocirugía [CIEN]) in a record time of 4 weeks. Eight committees were created and assigned a specific task. The event followed a strict protocol based on the double-room method, which consisted of 2 virtual rooms (A and B) hosted from 4 different physical locations to avoid lecture overlapping and connection drops. Quality and impact were measured by a videoconferencing platform and social media parameters as well as an audience perception survey. RESULTS: High quality was achieved in academic standards, worldwide assistance, schedule adherence, and security. The 2020 IWBNC hosted 25 internationally renowned speakers and offered 30 top-of-the-line multidisciplinary conferences. There were 3096 participants from 125 countries, and 22,266 live-stream views were registered. No technical or cybersecurity-related issues occurred. CONCLUSIONS: Web-based academic meetings will continue to be a helpful educational tool for continuing medical education and continuing professional development. The 2020 IWBNC double-room method represents an alternative design that may be replicated by the academic community planning web congresses and similar events.


Subject(s)
Congresses as Topic , Internet , Neurosurgery , Webcasts as Topic , COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Continuing , Humans , Internationality , Neurosurgery/education , SARS-CoV-2 , Videoconferencing
11.
Ann Ig ; 33(6): 527-532, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1076849

ABSTRACT

Background: In the COVID-19 era, we designed the webinar "COVID-19: instructions for use" with the aim of providing clear and actionable information to school staff about the characteristics of the disease, the preventive measures to adopt and the path for early detection and control of COVID-19 in primary schools of Modena province. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional survey using a 7-item closed-ended satisfaction questionnaire self-administered to webinar participants among school staff of the Modena Municipality and neighbouring. Results: A total of 103 out of 152 (68%) participants delivered the questionnaires. The participating staff came from 29 schools. Most of respondents (83.5%) were primary school teachers following by kindergarten teachers and educators. The overall webinar assessment index was "very good" for 51% of attendees and "good" for the remaining. Nevertheless, 25.2% highlighted the need to have more time dedicated to the discussion. Conclusions: Our project promotes a virtuous circle between school-family and community; so that the benefits can be sustained and enhanced. This may improve the effectiveness of the preventive measures in terms of transmission of SARS-CoV-2 and other virus.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/prevention & control , Educational Personnel/education , Schools , Webcasts as Topic/organization & administration , Consumer Behavior/statistics & numerical data , Cross-Sectional Studies , Educational Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Italy , School Teachers/statistics & numerical data , Schools/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , Teacher Training
13.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(2): e23389, 2021 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1058354

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Government responses to managing the COVID-19 pandemic may have impacted the way individuals were able to engage in physical activity. Digital platforms are a promising way to support physical activity levels and may have provided an alternative for people to maintain their activity while at home. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to examine associations between the use of digital platforms and adherence to the physical activity guidelines among Australian adults and adolescents during the COVID-19 stay-at-home restrictions in April and May 2020. METHODS: A national online survey was distributed in May 2020. Participants included 1188 adults (mean age 37.4 years, SD 15.1; 980/1188, 82.5% female) and 963 adolescents (mean age 16.2 years, SD 1.2; 685/963, 71.1% female). Participants reported demographic characteristics, use of digital platforms for physical activity over the previous month, and adherence to moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity (MVPA) and muscle-strengthening exercise (MSE) guidelines. Multilevel logistic regression models examined differences in guideline adherence between those who used digital platforms (ie, users) to support their physical activity compared to those who did not (ie, nonusers). RESULTS: Digital platforms include streaming services for exercise (eg, YouTube, Instagram, and Facebook); subscriber fitness programs, via an app or online (eg, Centr and MyFitnessPal); facilitated online live or recorded classes, via platforms such as Zoom (eg, dance, sport training, and fitness class); sport- or activity-specific apps designed by sporting organizations for participants to keep up their skills (eg, TeamBuildr); active electronic games (eg, Xbox Kinect); and/or online or digital training or racing platforms (eg, Zwift, FullGaz, and Rouvy). Overall, 39.5% (469/1188) of adults and 26.5% (255/963) of adolescents reported using digital platforms for physical activity. Among adults, MVPA (odds ratio [OR] 2.0, 95% CI 1.5-2.7), MSE (OR 3.3, 95% CI 2.5-4.5), and combined (OR 2.7, 95% CI 2.0-3.8) guideline adherence were higher among digital platform users relative to nonusers. Adolescents' MVPA (OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.3-4.3), MSE (OR 3.1, 95% CI 2.1-4.4), and combined (OR 4.3, 95% CI 2.1-9.0) guideline adherence were also higher among users of digital platforms relative to nonusers. CONCLUSIONS: Digital platform users were more likely than nonusers to meet MVPA and MSE guidelines during the COVID-19 stay-at-home restrictions in April and May 2020. Digital platforms may play a critical role in helping to support physical activity engagement when access to facilities or opportunities for physical activity outside the home are restricted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Exercise , Guideline Adherence , Resistance Training , Social Media , Video Games , Webcasts as Topic , Adolescent , Adult , Australia , Female , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Mobile Applications , Multilevel Analysis , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
14.
J Contin Educ Health Prof ; 41(1): 70-74, 2021 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-990832

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The COVID-19 pandemic is forcing society to re-evaluate how it educates learners of all levels, from medical students to faculty. Travel restrictions and limits on large public gatherings have necessitated the cancelling of numerous regional and national conferences as well as local grand rounds at many academic centers. Podcasting provides a potential solution for providing CME in a safe, socially distant way as an alternative to these more traditional CME sources for health care professionals. Using a popular CME podcast for pediatric hospitalists as an example, this article describes the many advantages that podcasting poses over more traditional CME methods, outlines some of the methodological and technological considerations that go into creating a high-quality podcast, and describes how podcasting can be leveraged during a global pandemic. Finally, we identify areas for further research regarding podcasting, including effective ways to virtually replace the more social and community building aspects of traditional conferences and grand rounds.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical, Continuing/methods , Pediatrics/education , Physical Distancing , Webcasts as Topic , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Cytometry A ; 99(1): 51-59, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-942343

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has dramatically affected shared resource lab (SRL) staff in-person availability at institutions globally. This article discusses the challenges of ensuring reliable instrument performance and quality data output while facility staff and external service provider on-site presence is severely limited. Solutions revolve around the adoption of remote monitoring and troubleshooting platforms, provision of self-service troubleshooting resources specific to facility instruments and workflows, development of an assistance contact policy, and ensuring efficiency of limited in-person staff time. These solutions employ software and hardware tools that are already in use or readily available in the SRL community, such as remote instrument access tools, video hosting and conferencing platforms, and ISAC shared resources. © 2020 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Flow Cytometry/instrumentation , Flow Cytometry/standards , Laboratories/standards , Quality Control , Teleworking/standards , COVID-19/prevention & control , Flow Cytometry/trends , Humans , Laboratories/trends , Teleworking/trends , Webcasts as Topic/standards , Webcasts as Topic/trends , Workflow
17.
Actas Urol Esp (Engl Ed) ; 45(1): 39-48, 2021.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-917182

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The COVID-19 outbreak has substantially altered residents' training activities. While several new virtual learning programs have been recently implemented, the perspective of urology trainees regarding their usefulness still needs to be investigated. METHODS: A cross-sectional, 30-item, web-based Survey was conducted through Twitter from April 4th, 2020 to April 18th, 2020, aiming to evaluate the urology residents' perspective on smart learning (SL) modalities (pre-recorded videos, webinars, podcasts, and social media [SoMe]), and contents (frontal lessons, clinical case discussions, updates on Guidelines and on clinical trials, surgical videos, Journal Clubs, and seminars on leadership and non-technical skills). RESULTS: Overall, 501 urology residents from 58 countries completed the survey. Of these, 78.4, 78.2, 56.9 and 51.9% of them considered pre-recorded videos, interactive webinars, podcasts and SoMe highly useful modalities of smart learning, respectively. The contents considered as highly useful by the greatest proportion of residents were updates on guidelines (84.8%) and surgical videos (81.0%). In addition, 58.9 and 56.5% of responders deemed seminars on leadership and on non-technical skills highly useful smart learning contents. The three preferred combinations of smart learning modality and content were: pre-recorded surgical videos, interactive webinars on clinical cases, and pre-recorded videos on guidelines. CONCLUSION: Our study provides the first global «big picture¼ of the smart learning modalities and contents that should be prioritized to optimize virtual Urology education. While this survey was conducted during the COVID-19 outbreak, our findings might have even more impact in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Distance/methods , Internship and Residency , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Urology/education , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , General Surgery/education , Humans , Internationality , Internship and Residency/statistics & numerical data , Male , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , Urology/statistics & numerical data , Webcasts as Topic
19.
Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol ; 130(3): 262-272, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-653207

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To report experience with a global multidisciplinary tracheostomy e-learning initiative. METHODS: An international multidisciplinary panel of experts convened to build a virtual learning community for tracheostomy care, comprising a web-based platform, five distance learning (interactive webinar) sessions, and professional discourse over 12 months. Structured pre- and post-webinar surveys were disseminated to global participants including otolaryngologists, intensivists, nurses, allied health professionals, and patients/caregivers. Data were collected on audio-visual fidelity, demographics, and pre- and post-tutorial assessments regarding experience and skill acquisition. Participants reported confidence levels for NICU, pediatric, adult, and family care, as well as technical skills, communication, learning, assessment, and subdomains. RESULTS: Participants from 197 institutions in 22 countries engaged in the virtual education platform, including otolaryngologists, speech pathologists, respiratory therapists, specialist nurses, patients, and caregivers. Significant improvements were reported in communication (P < .0001), clinical assessments (P < .0001), and clinical governance (P < .0001), with positive impact on pediatric decannulation (P = .0008), adult decannulation (P = .04), and quality improvement (P < .0001). Respondents reported enhanced readiness to integrate knowledge into practice. Barriers included time zones, internet bandwidth, and perceived difficulty of direct clinical translation of highly technical skills. Participants rated the implementation highly in terms of length, ability for discussion, satisfaction, applicability to professional practice, and expertise of discussants (median scores: 4, 4, 4, 4 and 5 out of 5). CONCLUSIONS: Virtual learning has dominated the education landscape during COVID-19 pandemic, but few data are available on its effectiveness. This study demonstrated feasibility of virtual learning for disseminating best practices in tracheostomy, engaging a diverse, multidisciplinary audience. Learning of complex technical skills proved a hurdle, however, suggesting need for hands-on experience for technical mastery. While interactive videoconferencing via webinar affords an engaging and scalable strategy for sharing knowledge, further investigation is needed on clinical outcomes to define effective strategies for experiential online learning and virtual in-service simulations.


Subject(s)
Education, Distance , Interprofessional Education , Quality Improvement , Tracheostomy/education , Webcasts as Topic , Adult , Aged , COVID-19 , Caregivers/education , Female , Humans , Internationality , Male , Middle Aged , Nurse Specialists/education , Otolaryngology/education , Patient Education as Topic , Respiratory Therapy/education , SARS-CoV-2 , Speech-Language Pathology/education , Tracheostomy/nursing , Young Adult
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