Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 91
Filter
1.
Rev. saúde pública (Online) ; 55: 01, 2021. tab
Article in English | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1818706

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT This study describes body weight changes among participants of the NutriNet Brasil cohort (n = 14,259) during the covid-19 pandemic. We analyzed data reported before the pandemic onset (01/26/2020 to 03/18/2020) and about six months after (09/14/2020 to 10/19/2020). Our results show that 19.7% of the participants gained ≥ 2 kg. Weight gain was directly associated with male gender, lower education, and previous presence of overweight, and inversely associated with age. In turn, 15.2% lost ≥ 2kg, being directly associated with male gender and previous presence of overweight and inversely associated with age.


RESUMO Este estudo descreve modificações no peso corporal de participantes da coorte NutriNet Brasil (n = 14.259) ocorridas durante a pandemia de covid-19. Foram analisados dados informados em período anterior ao início da pandemia (26/01/2020 a 18/03/2020) e cerca de 6 meses após (14/09/2020 a 19/10/2020). O ganho de peso ≥ 2 kg alcançou 19,7% dos participantes, mostrando-se diretamente associado ao sexo masculino, à menor escolaridade e à presença prévia de excesso de peso, sendo inversamente associado à idade. A perda de peso ≥ 2kg alcançou 15,2% dos participantes, mostrando-se diretamente associada ao sexo masculino e à presença prévia de excesso de peso, sendo inversamente associada à idade.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Body Weight , Pandemics , COVID-19 , Brazil/epidemiology , Weight Gain , Cohort Studies , Age Factors , Overweight
2.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev ; 10: CD006219, 2021 10 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1813435

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Most people who stop smoking gain weight. This can discourage some people from making a quit attempt and risks offsetting some, but not all, of the health advantages of quitting. Interventions to prevent weight gain could improve health outcomes, but there is a concern that they may undermine quitting. OBJECTIVES: To systematically review the effects of: (1) interventions targeting post-cessation weight gain on weight change and smoking cessation (referred to as 'Part 1') and (2) interventions designed to aid smoking cessation that plausibly affect post-cessation weight gain (referred to as 'Part 2'). SEARCH METHODS: Part 1 - We searched the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group's Specialized Register and CENTRAL; latest search 16 October 2020. Part 2 - We searched included studies in the following 'parent' Cochrane reviews: nicotine replacement therapy (NRT), antidepressants, nicotine receptor partial agonists, e-cigarettes, and exercise interventions for smoking cessation published in Issue 10, 2020 of the Cochrane Library. We updated register searches for the review of nicotine receptor partial agonists. SELECTION CRITERIA: Part 1 - trials of interventions that targeted post-cessation weight gain and had measured weight at any follow-up point or smoking cessation, or both, six or more months after quit day. Part 2 - trials included in the selected parent Cochrane reviews reporting weight change at any time point. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Screening and data extraction followed standard Cochrane methods. Change in weight was expressed as difference in weight change from baseline to follow-up between trial arms and was reported only in people abstinent from smoking. Abstinence from smoking was expressed as a risk ratio (RR). Where appropriate, we performed meta-analysis using the inverse variance method for weight, and Mantel-Haenszel method for smoking. MAIN RESULTS: Part 1: We include 37 completed studies; 21 are new to this update. We judged five studies to be at low risk of bias, 17 to be at unclear risk and the remainder at high risk.  An intermittent very low calorie diet (VLCD) comprising full meal replacement provided free of charge and accompanied by intensive dietitian support significantly reduced weight gain at end of treatment compared with education on how to avoid weight gain (mean difference (MD) -3.70 kg, 95% confidence interval (CI) -4.82 to -2.58; 1 study, 121 participants), but there was no evidence of benefit at 12 months (MD -1.30 kg, 95% CI -3.49 to 0.89; 1 study, 62 participants). The VLCD increased the chances of abstinence at 12 months (RR 1.73, 95% CI 1.10 to 2.73; 1 study, 287 participants). However, a second study  found that no-one completed the VLCD intervention or achieved abstinence. Interventions aimed at increasing acceptance of weight gain reported mixed effects at end of treatment, 6 months and 12 months with confidence intervals including both increases and decreases in weight gain compared with no advice or health education. Due to high heterogeneity, we did not combine the data. These interventions increased quit rates at 6 months (RR 1.42, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.96; 4 studies, 619 participants; I2 = 21%), but there was no evidence at 12 months (RR 1.25, 95% CI 0.76 to 2.06; 2 studies, 496 participants; I2 = 26%). Some pharmacological interventions tested for limiting post-cessation weight gain (PCWG) reduced weight gain at the end of treatment (dexfenfluramine, phenylpropanolamine, naltrexone). The effects of ephedrine and caffeine combined, lorcaserin, and chromium were too imprecise to give useful estimates of treatment effects. There was very low-certainty evidence that personalized weight management support reduced weight gain at end of treatment (MD -1.11 kg, 95% CI -1.93 to -0.29; 3 studies, 121 participants; I2 = 0%), but no evidence in the longer-term 12 months (MD -0.44 kg, 95% CI -2.34 to 1.46; 4 studies, 530 participants; I2 = 41%). There was low to very low-certainty evidence that detailed weight management education without personalized assessment, planning and feedback did not reduce weight gain and may have reduced smoking cessation rates (12 months: MD -0.21 kg, 95% CI -2.28 to 1.86; 2 studies, 61 participants; I2 = 0%; RR for smoking cessation 0.66, 95% CI 0.48 to 0.90; 2 studies, 522 participants; I2 = 0%). Part 2: We include 83 completed studies, 27 of which are new to this update. There was low certainty that exercise interventions led to minimal or no weight reduction compared with standard care at end of treatment (MD -0.25 kg, 95% CI -0.78 to 0.29; 4 studies, 404 participants; I2 = 0%). However, weight was reduced at 12 months (MD -2.07 kg, 95% CI -3.78 to -0.36; 3 studies, 182 participants; I2 = 0%). Both bupropion and fluoxetine limited weight gain at end of treatment (bupropion MD -1.01 kg, 95% CI -1.35 to -0.67; 10 studies, 1098 participants; I2 = 3%); (fluoxetine MD -1.01 kg, 95% CI -1.49 to -0.53; 2 studies, 144 participants; I2 = 38%; low- and very low-certainty evidence, respectively). There was no evidence of benefit at 12 months for bupropion, but estimates were imprecise (bupropion MD -0.26 kg, 95% CI -1.31 to 0.78; 7 studies, 471 participants; I2 = 0%). No studies of fluoxetine provided data at 12 months. There was moderate-certainty that NRT reduced weight at end of treatment (MD -0.52 kg, 95% CI -0.99 to -0.05; 21 studies, 2784 participants; I2 = 81%) and moderate-certainty that the effect may be similar at 12 months (MD -0.37 kg, 95% CI -0.86 to 0.11; 17 studies, 1463 participants; I2 = 0%), although the estimates are too imprecise to assess long-term benefit. There was mixed evidence of the effect of varenicline on weight, with high-certainty evidence that weight change was very modestly lower at the end of treatment (MD -0.23 kg, 95% CI -0.53 to 0.06; 14 studies, 2566 participants; I2 = 32%); a low-certainty estimate gave an imprecise estimate of higher weight at 12 months (MD 1.05 kg, 95% CI -0.58 to 2.69; 3 studies, 237 participants; I2 = 0%). AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Overall, there is no intervention for which there is moderate certainty of a clinically useful effect on long-term weight gain. There is also no moderate- or high-certainty evidence that interventions designed to limit weight gain reduce the chances of people achieving abstinence from smoking.


Subject(s)
Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems , Smoking Cessation , Humans , Nicotine , Tobacco Use Cessation Devices , Weight Gain
3.
J Korean Med Sci ; 37(12): e103, 2022 Mar 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1765659

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease pandemic is predicted to have adverse health effects on children and adolescents who are overweight or obese due to restricted school activity and stay-at-home orders. The purpose of this observational study was to determine the factors associated with weight gain in children and adolescents with overweight and obesity during coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) lockdown. METHODS: Ninety-seven participants (sex- and age-specific body mass index (BMI) ≥ 85th percentile) were included. A baseline examination was conducted pre-COVID-19 (August 2019 to January 2020), and re-examination was performed post-lockdown (June to September 2020) and the results were compared. Correlation and regression analyses were conducted to investigate the association among changes in cardiometabolic markers and lifestyle behaviors with changes in BMI z-score. RESULTS: During the COVID-19 pandemic, an increase in BMI z-score (2.56 [2.01-2.94] to 2.62 [2.03-3.18]) was noticed in children and adolescents with obesity. Changes in cardiometabolic markers including liver enzymes, triglycerides (r = 0.398), leptin (r = 0.578), and adiponectin (r = -0.326), as well as muscular strength (r = -0.212), were correlated with the increase in BMI z-score. According to a multivariate regression analysis, changes in sedentary time (B = 0.016; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.001-0.032) and fast-food consumption (B = 0.067; 95% CI, 0.013-0.122) were the lifestyle variables associated with BMI z-score increase. CONCLUSION: Changes in lifestyle behaviors including fast-food consumption and sedentary time during the COVID-19 pandemic may be associated with weight gain. In order to prevent health-related risks in children and adolescents with obesity during the pandemic, it is important to maintain the level of physical activity and healthy dietary habits.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Obesity/complications , Obesity/epidemiology , Overweight/epidemiology , Pandemics , Sedentary Behavior , Weight Gain
4.
Clin Nutr ESPEN ; 48: 329-335, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1693777

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND & AIMS: COVID-19 containment measures significantly impacted lifestyle of the general population, including physical activity. Although the older adults are particularly susceptible to the potential consequences of sedentary lifestyle and inactivity, few studies investigated pandemic effects in this segment of the population. We aimed to evaluate COVID-19 pandemic effects on weight gain and physical activity in the Italian older adults, and assess the impact of possible changes in physical activity on mental health wellbeing. METHODS: In November 2020, a cross-sectional survey was conducted on a representative sample of 4400 older adults (aged 65 or more) from the Lombardy region, Northern Italy. Changes in body mass index (BMI) and physical activity were assessed, compared to the previous year. Using unconditional multiple logistic models, we estimated the odds ratios (OR) and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) of a decrease in physical activity during COVID-19 pandemic and we evaluated if decreased physical activity was a determinant of a worsening in psychological wellbeing. RESULTS: Neither weight gain nor increase in obesity prevalence occurred during the pandemic. Mean time spent in physical activity significantly decreased, with 43.8% of participants reporting a decrease of 1 h/week or more during COVID-19 pandemic. A decreased physical activity was determinant of a worsening of selected mental health outcomes, such as: sleep quality (OR = 2.45; 95% CI: 1.91-3.15) and quantity (OR = 1.54; 95% CI: 1.18-2.02), anxiety (OR = 1.31; 95% CI: 1.14-1.52) and depressive symptoms (OR = 1.61; 95% CI: 1.38-1.88). CONCLUSION: During the COVID-19 pandemic, while no major changes in BMI were observed, physical activity significantly declined in the older adults. In this population, the lack of physical activity might have contributed to the observed worsening in mental health. During emergency periods, encouraging physical activity might be effective also to preserve psychological wellbeing.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Exercise , Humans , Pandemics , Weight Gain
5.
Diabetes Metab Syndr ; 16(1): 102392, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1683071

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has affected the lives of people in many ways. However, little is known about weight gain in American adults during the pandemic. AIMS AND METHODS: The purpose of this study was to conduct a national assessment of weight gain in adult Americans after the first year of the pandemic. An online questionnaire was employed to explore perceptions of adults regarding pandemic weight gain and the relationship between weight gain and sociodemographic characteristics, pre-pandemic weight status, and psychological distress. Multiple methods were used to assess the psychometric properties of the questionnaire (i.e., face validity, content validity, and internal consistency reliability testing). Chi-Square tests and logistic regression analysis were used to assess group differences and predictors of weight gain in the study participants. RESULTS: A total of 3,473 individuals participated in the study with weight changes distributed as: gained weight (48%), remained the same weight (34%), or lost weight (18%). Those who reported being very overweight before the pandemic were most likely to gain weight (65%) versus those who reported being slightly overweight (58%) or normal weight (40%) before the pandemic. Weight gain was statistically significantly higher in those with anxiety (53%), depression (52%), or symptoms of both (52%). The final multiple regression model found that the statistically significant predictors of pandemic weight gain were psychological distress, pre-pandemic weight status, having children at home; and time since last bodyweight check. CONCLUSIONS: Population health promotion strategies in the pandemic should emphasize stress reduction to help individuals manage body weight and avoid chronic diseases in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Weight Gain/physiology , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Life Style , Male , Obesity/epidemiology , Obesity/etiology , Overweight/epidemiology , Overweight/etiology , Pandemics , Psychological Distress , Risk Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States/epidemiology
6.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(3)2022 Jan 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1649778

ABSTRACT

The way that COVID-19 has been handled since its inception in 2019 has had a significant impact on lifestyle-related behaviors, such as physical activities, diet, and sleep patterns. This study measures lifestyle-related behavior during the COVID-19 pandemic lockdown using a 22-item questionnaire. The responses were collected from March 2021 to September 2021. A total of four hundred and sixty-seven Jordanian participants were engaged in assessing the changes caused by the pandemic and their effect on BMI. The validity and reliability of the questionnaire were tested for 71 participants. Cronbach's alpha values for the questionnaire exceeded 0.7, demonstrating good reliability and internal consistency. The effect of each question regarding physical activity and dietary habits over the BMI difference was studied using ANOVA. The study shows that more than half of the participants reported snacking more between meals and increased their sitting and screen time, while 74% felt more stressed and anxious. BMI difference among the individuals throughout the lockdown was significantly associated with these variables. In contrast, 62% of the participants showed more awareness about their health by increasing the intake of immunity-boosting foods, and 56% of the participants showed an increase in the consumption of nutrition supplements. Females and married individuals tended to be healthier. Therefore, their BMI showed stability compared to others based on their gender and marital status. Exercise, sleep, and avoiding 'junk' food, which contributes to weight gain and COVID-19 vulnerability, are strongly recommended.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adult , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Diet , Exercise , Feeding Behavior , Female , Humans , Life Style , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Weight Gain
7.
PLoS One ; 17(1): e0262332, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1631123

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic lockdowns have affected daily lives of the communities worldwide. This study aims to determine the lifestyle behaviours and their associations with body weight changes among Malaysian adults during the Movement Control Order (MCO) due to COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A total of 1319 Malaysian adults participated in this cross-sectional online survey. Information on anthropometric data including body weight and height, and lifestyle behaviours including eating pattern, physical activity, and sleep pattern were self-reported by the respondents. A multivariable generalised linear mixed model was used to assess the associations between lifestyle behaviours and body weight changes with adjustment of confounding factors; namely, age, sex, ethnicity, and body weight status before MCO. RESULTS: During MCO, 41.2% of the respondents perceived that their eating patterns were healthier, but 36.3% reduced their physical activities, and 25.7% had a poorer sleep quality. Further, the proportion of adults who reported having lose weight (32.2%) was almost similar to those who reported having gained weight (30.7%). Lifestyle behaviours including less frequent practice of healthy cooking methods and lunch skipping were associated with weight gain, while less frequent consumption of high fat foods, more frequent physical activity, and good sleep latency were associated with lower risk of weight gain. In contrast, practicing healthy eating concept, skipped lunch, and more frequent physical activity were significantly associated with weight loss. CONCLUSION: Lifestyle behaviours were associated with body weight changes during MCO. While the COVID-19 pandemic lockdown is necessary to prevent further spread of the disease, promoting healthy lifestyle practices during lockdown should be implemented for a healthy weight and better health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Exercise , Feeding Behavior , Life Style , Pandemics/prevention & control , Quarantine , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Media , Weight Gain , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Malaysia/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Self Report
8.
Hepatol Commun ; 6(5): 1045-1055, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1605813

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has impacted health-related behaviors that influence fatty liver disease (FLD) management. We evaluated the impact of the pandemic on FLD management and satisfaction with care delivery in this population. In the San Francisco safety-net hepatology clinics, we evaluated health-related behaviors and factors associated with self-reported weight gain during the COVID-19 pandemic as well as satisfaction with telemedicine in adults with FLD by using multivariable modeling. From June 1, 2020, to May 5, 2021, 111 participants were enrolled. Median age was 52 years, 30% were men, 63% were Hispanic, 21% were Asian/Pacific Islander, and 9% were White. Eating habits were unchanged or healthier for 80%, physical activity decreased in 51%, 34% reported weight gain, and 5% reported increased alcohol intake. Forty-five percent had severe depressive symptoms, 38% in those without diagnosed depression and 60% of individuals with heavy alcohol use. On multivariable analysis, decreased physical activity (odds ratio [OR], 4.8) and heavy alcohol use (OR, 3.4) were associated with weight gain (all P < 0.05). Among those with telemedicine visits (n = 66), 62% reported being very satisfied. Hispanic ethnicity was associated with a 0.8-unit decrease in the telemedicine satisfaction score (P = 0.048) when adjusting for sex, age, and pandemic duration. Conclusion: During the pandemic, decreased physical activity and heavy alcohol use were most influential on self-reported weight gain in FLD. Maintenance of healthy eating and increased physical activity, alcohol cessation counseling, and mental health services are critical in preventing poor FLD-associated outcomes during the pandemic recovery. Dissatisfaction with telemedicine should be explored further to ensure equitable care, especially among the vulnerable Hispanic population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Fatty Liver , Telemedicine , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Fatty Liver/epidemiology , Female , Health Behavior , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Personal Satisfaction , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Behavior , Vulnerable Populations , Weight Gain
9.
J Obes ; 2021: 4881430, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1595062

ABSTRACT

Objective: To examine the associations between patient struggles, health, and weight management changes during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: 585 patients attending a publicly funded clinical weight management program responded to an electronic survey. Results: Over half of the patients reported worsened overall health, mental health, physical activity, or diet during the pandemic. Approximately 30% of patients lost ≥3% of their body weight and 21% gained ≥3% of their body weight between March and July of the pandemic. Reports of social isolation was associated with increased odds for weight loss in women (OR = 2.0, 1.2-3.3), while low motivation (OR = 1.9, 1.0-3.7), depression (OR = 2.5, 1.0-6.3), and struggles with carbohydrate intake (OR = 2.1, 1.0-4.3) were associated with weight gain. Cooking more at home/eating less take out was associated with increased likelihood of weight loss (OR = 2.1, 1.1-3.9) and lower odds for weight gain (OR = 0.2, 0.1 to 0.97). Working from home was not associated with weight loss or weight gain (P > 0.6). Conclusion: The COVID-19 pandemic is associated with certain factors that may facilitate weight loss and other factors that promote weight gain. Thus, depending on the patient experience during the pandemic, prevention of weight gain may be more appropriate than weight loss.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Female , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Weight Gain , Weight Loss
11.
J Pediatr Endocrinol Metab ; 35(3): 297-302, 2022 Mar 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1561349

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has changed everyday life. The Korean government urged schools to close as a measure of social distancing, and children and adolescents seemed to gain weight due to home confinement. We aimed to investigate the trends in weight changes in children during the pandemic period. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This retrospective study included 139 children aged between 6 and 12 years who visited the pediatric endocrine clinic for regular growth follow-up for 1 year during the COVID-19 pandemic. We analyzed changes in the body mass index (BMI), BMI z-score, and proportion of children who were overweight or obese over a period of 1 year. RESULTS: The BMI and BMI z-scores of the 139 children increased significantly over the year. The increase was maximum during the first three months of the COVID-19 pandemic, with little change between the third and sixth month of the pandemic. The proportion of children who were overweight or obese increased over time, from 24.5% at the COVID-19 pandemic baseline to 38.1% 1 year later (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19-related lockdown resulted in significant weight gain in Korean children. Changes in BMI showed different trends depending on the degree of school closure. An overall shift from normal weight to overweight or obesity was observed during the pandemic period.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Pediatric Obesity/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Body Mass Index , Child , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Female , Humans , Male , Overweight/epidemiology , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Schools , Weight Gain
12.
Enferm Clin ; 31: 597-600, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1520892

ABSTRACT

Objective: This study aimed to explore the characteristics of hemodialysis patients during the COVID-19 pandemic. Method: This descriptive study employed a cross-sectional approach using 30 participants purposively selected from two hemodialysis centers in Riau Province, Indonesia. A personal information form and observation sheets were used for data collection. This study was conducted in May and June 2020. Distribution frequency and Pearson Correlation tests were applied during analysis. Results: A total of 16 (53.3%) patients were female, and most respondents (90%) were married. In addition, the predominant occupation was employees (40%), and the majority has graduated from Senior High School (43.3%). The Mean, Median, and Standard Deviation (SD) of age were 49.9, 50.5, and 11.24. These parameters were respectively 37.88, 29.5, and 34.06 months for the duration from the first dialysis, while 2.04, 2, and 0.24 were correspondingly reported in terms of dialysis adequacy. The Mean, Median, and SD of Inter-dialytic weight gain were 2.25, 2.61, and 0.65, respectively. A correlation was established between age and IDWG (p value = 0.047) with r score = -0.50, and also between IDWD and dialysis adequacy (p value = 0.014) at r score = -0.60. Conclusion: The study identified the need for nurses to carefully consider IDWG and dialysis adequacy while caring for hemodialysis patients. This approach is expected to facilitating survival during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Female , Humans , Renal Dialysis , SARS-CoV-2 , Weight Gain
13.
Haemophilia ; 28(1): 91-96, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1511310

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in lifestyle changes for children. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of the pandemic on weight/BMI in children with severe bleeding disorders. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective review of patients age 3-18 years with severe bleeding disorders on prophylactic therapy treated at SickKids Hospital (Toronto, Canada) between February 01, 2018 and March 31, 2021. We evaluated the following pre- and post-COVID variables: weight (kg), weight percentile, BMI (kg/m2 ), BMI percentile, HJHS score, and prophylactic dosing (units/kg). RESULTS: One hundred and four patients were included in the final analysis. Diagnoses were as follows:  haemophilia A (n = 92; 70.8%), haemophilia B (n = 17; 13.1%), type 3 von Willebrand disease (n = 11; 8.5%), the remainder were diagnosed with rare factor deficiencies.  Median interval time from pre-COVID measurements to latest follow-up was 12.4 months (IQR 10.32-14.52 months) during which there was a statistically significant increase in median weight percentile +5.75 centiles (from 63rd centile to 68.75th centile). There was a statistically significant increase in mean BMI of +1.03 kg/m2 (P = < .001) while median BMI percentile increased +8.82 centiles (from 53.9th centile to 62.72nd centile) and mean BMI percentile increased 3.42 centiles (from 57.5 centile to 60.9 centile). The group that gained the most weight centiles, BMI and BMI centiles were 5-14 years old. CONCLUSION: There was a trend to weight gain over the study period. More long-term data is required to evaluate the impact of this increase in weight and BMI on children with bleeding disorders.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adolescent , Body Mass Index , Child , Child, Preschool , Humans , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Weight Gain
15.
Nutrients ; 13(11)2021 Oct 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1480896

ABSTRACT

Stay-at-home orders have abruptly altered food purchasing behaviour, dietary habits, and food choice motives. Therefore, this study aims to investigate the trajectory of food choice motives and their associations with the weight status of Malaysian youths in the time of COVID-19. Socio-demographic information and anthropometric measurements were self-reported by the respondents, while the food choice motives were assessed using a validated 38-item food choice questionnaire (FCQ). Of the 1013 Malaysian youths, 48.6% gained weight due to the confinement, with an average weight gain of 3.90 ± 2.92 kg. On the other hand, 47.0% to 73.0% of the youths changed their food choice motives in the time of COVID-19. Of the 10 motives, convenience (48.5%) had the largest percentage increase, followed by weight control (47.0%) and health (45.3%). Moreover, the mean scores of health (t = -3.324, p = 0.001), convenience (t = -5.869, p < 0.001), weight control (t = -7.532, p < 0.001), natural content (t = -5.957, p < 0.001), ethical concern (t = -4.419, p < 0.001) and price (t = -3.737, p < 0.001) were significantly higher during the pandemic compared to pre-pandemic. Findings from the multinomial regression model revealed that youths highly concerned for weight control were more likely to be in the weight loss category (Adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 1.633, Confidence Interval (CI) = 1.230-2.168, p = 0.001). Conversely, those who gained weight due to the pandemic confinement highly valued natural content in foods (AOR = 0.653, CI = 0.481-0.886, p = 0.006) when making their food choices in this unprecedented pandemic. In conclusion, Malaysian youths made healthier food choices to mitigate the risk of COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
Adolescent Behavior , Body-Weight Trajectory , COVID-19 , Choice Behavior , Diet, Healthy , Feeding Behavior , Health Behavior , Adolescent , Adult , Age Factors , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Food Preferences , Humans , Male , Motivation , Nutritive Value , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires , Weight Gain , Weight Loss , Young Adult
16.
Nutrients ; 13(10)2021 Oct 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477978

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Lockdown is an effective nonpharmaceutical intervention to reduce coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) transmission, but it restricts daily activity. We aimed to investigate the impact of lockdown on pediatric body weight and body mass index (BMI). METHODS: The systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analysis (PRISMA) statement. Four online databases (EMBASE, Medline, the Cochrane Library and CINAHL) were searched. RESULTS: The pooled results showed that lockdown was associated with significant body weight gain (MD 2.67, 95% CI 2.12-3.23; p < 0.00001). The BMI of children with comorbidities or obesity did not change significantly. The BMI of general population was significantly higher during lockdown than before the pandemic (MD 0.94, 95% CI 0.32-1.56; p = 0.003). However, heterogeneity was high (I2 = 84%). Among changes in weight classification, increases in the rates of obesity (OR 1.23, 95% CI 1.10-1.37; p = 0.0002) and overweight (OR 1.17, 95% CI 1.06-1.29; p = 0.001) were reported. CONCLUSIONS: Our meta-analysis showed significant increases in body weight and BMI during lockdown among school-age children and adolescents. The prevalence of obesity and overweight also increased. The COVID-19 pandemic worsened the burden of childhood obesity.


Subject(s)
Body Mass Index , COVID-19/prevention & control , Pediatric Obesity/epidemiology , Quarantine/methods , Social Isolation , Weight Gain , Adolescent , Child , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
17.
BMC Public Health ; 21(1): 1521, 2021 08 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477368

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 outbreak holds public health concerns. The stay-at-home increases sedentary behavior, with unintended adverse outcomes. Since organized recreation and sports facilities were closed, we aimed to study how the crisis of closure affected exercise habits and weight gain among the trainee population in Israel. We examined differences in weight gain among individuals with different PA activities and assessed their ability to adapt to digital media as an alternative training structure. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey consisted of a multiple-choice questionnaire obtained using a web-based survey application. Trainees (1202) who exercised steadily anonymously answered the questionnaire sent by their coaches regarding their activity and weight gain during lockdown times. RESULTS: Results confirmed that 70% of Israelis trained less than their usual routine, 60% used digital media for training, 55% gained weight. Half of the respondents gained more than 2 kg, with an average increase of 1.2 kg. However, those who exhibited a higher physical activity level gained less weight. Using digital media for training was associated with higher physical activity levels. The aged population was less likely to use digital media. CONCLUSIONS: Since increased sedentary behavior could increase the risk for potential worsening of health conditions, health agencies should look for strategies, including digital remote media training to promote physical activity and subsequently, preventing the increased burden of future comorbidities worsening by a sedentary lifestyle. Approval: by the Helsinki ethics committee of Sheba Medical Center (6504-19-SMC).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Aged , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Exercise , Humans , Internet , Israel/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Weight Gain
18.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 19984, 2021 10 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1462035

ABSTRACT

The influence of the confinement on the changes of eating behaviors in men and women in Poland and between groups were assessed. Results were obtained for 112 men and 200 women. An anonymous questionnaire available on-line from 29 April to 19 May 2020 was the research tool. It contained questions about the frequency of consumption "before" and "during" confinement. Additionally, anthropometric measurements were declared by the respondents. An increase in the number of meals and an improvement in their regularity were observed in both groups. However, the frequency of snacking also increased. During lockdown women consumed potatoes, sweets, canned meat and eggs and men consumed canned meat more frequently. Products consumed less frequently were: fast food, instant soups and energy drinks (women), and white bread and fast food (men). The frequency of alcohol consumption also increased during lockdown. Average body weight and BMI increased significantly during social isolation. Body weight increase was declared by almost half of women and 40% of men. During the blockade period caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, changes in the dietary behavior of the study group of women and men were found. The nature of these changes varied according to gender and the dietary parameters analyzed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Feeding Behavior , Adult , Alcohol Drinking/epidemiology , Body Mass Index , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Diet , Female , Humans , Male , Nutritional Status , Physical Distancing , Poland/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Weight Gain
19.
Child Obes ; 18(2): 143-146, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455214

ABSTRACT

Pandemic mitigation measures may lead to excess weight gain in children. Our objective was to assess weight gain during the COVID-19 pandemic in children of ages 4-12 years with overweight and obesity in San Francisco, CA. Children with BMI ≥85th percentile measured at a clinic visit from January to March 2020 were recruited. Follow-up BMI measurements were obtained between October 2020 and March 2021 from the electronic medical record or through a video study visit. Pre- and post-BMI measurements were obtained on n = 91 participants. The majority were Latino (85%) and publicly insured (91%). Mean monthly weight gain was 0.73 kg [standard deviation (SD) 0.47], equivalent to yearly weight gain of 8.8 kg. Mean monthly change in BMI z-score was 0.02 (SD 0.04) equivalent to yearly increase in BMI-z of 0.24. Weight gain among children in San Francisco with overweight and obesity during the COVID-19 pandemic far exceeded healthy weight gain for this age group.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pediatric Obesity , Body Mass Index , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , Humans , Overweight/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pediatric Obesity/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , San Francisco/epidemiology , Weight Gain
20.
Int J Obes (Lond) ; 46(1): 144-152, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1437658

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: There is a concern that measures aiming to limit a further spread of COVID-19, e.g., school closures and social distancing, cause an aggravation of the childhood obesity epidemic. Therefore, we compared BMI trends during the 15 years before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. SUBJECTS/METHODS: To assess the change in weight dynamics during the first months of COVID-19, we compared the trends of 3-month change in BMI-SDS (ΔBMI-SDS) and the proportions of children showing a high positive (HPC) or high negative (HNC) weight change between 2005 and 2019 and the respective changes from 2019 (pre-pandemic) to 2020 (after the onset of anti-pandemic measures) in more than 150,000 children (9689 during the pandemic period). The period of 3 months corresponds approximately to the first lockdown period in Germany. RESULTS: During the COVID-19 pandemic, we found a substantial weight gain across all weight and age groups, reflected by an increase in the 3-month change in BMI-SDS (ß = 0.05, p < 0.001), an increase in the proportion of children showing HPC (OR = 1.4, p < 0.001), and a decrease in the proportion of children showing HNC (OR = 0.7, p < 0.001). Besides, we found the same trends since 2005 on a low but stable level with a yearly increase of ΔBMI-SDS by ß = 0.001 (p < 0.001), the odds of HPC increased by ORhigh_pos = 1.01 (p < 0.001), and the odds of HNC decreased by ORhigh_neg = 0.99 (p < 0.001). These rather small effects accumulated to ß = 0.02, ORhigh_pos = 1.14, and ORhigh_pos = 0.85 over the whole period 2005-2019. Alarmingly, both the long-term and the short-term effects were most pronounced in the obese subgroup. CONCLUSIONS: There are positive dynamics in different measures of weight change, indicating a positive trend in weight gain patterns, especially within the group of children with obesity. These dynamics are likely to be escalated by COVID-19-related measures. Thus, they may lead to a significant further aggravation of the childhood obesity pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Pediatric Obesity/epidemiology , Weight Gain , Adolescent , Body Mass Index , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Infant , Male , Quarantine , Registries , Risk Factors
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL