Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 6 de 6
Filter
1.
Euro Surveill ; 27(17)2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1834262

ABSTRACT

IntroductionIn France, three complementary surveillance networks involving hospitals and paediatrician practices currently allow pertussis surveillance among infants (<1 year old) and children (1-12 years old). Data on incidences among adolescents (13-17 years old) and adults (≥ 18 years) are scarce. In 2017, a sentinel surveillance system called Sentinelles network, was implemented among general practitioners (GPs).AimThe purpose of Sentinelles network is to assess pertussis incidence, monitor the cases' age distribution and evaluate the impact of the country's vaccination policy. We present the results from the first 4 years of this surveillance.MethodsGPs of the French Sentinelles network reported weekly numbers of epidemiologically or laboratory-confirmed cases and their characteristics.ResultsA total of 132 cases were reported over 2017-2020. Estimated national incidence rates per 100,000 inhabitants were 17 (95% confidence interval (CI): 12-22) in 2017, 10 (95% CI: 6-14) in 2018, 15 (95% CI: 10-20) in 2019 and three (95% CI: 1-5) in 2020. The incidence rate was significantly lower in 2020 than in 2017-2019. Women were significantly more affected than men (83/132; 63% of women, p = 0.004); 66% (87/132) of cases were aged 15 years or over (median age: 31.5 years; range: 2 months-87 years). Among 37 vaccinated cases with data, 33 had received the recommended number of doses for their age.ConclusionsThese results concur with incidences reported in other European countries, and with studies showing that the incidences of several respiratory diseases decreased in 2020 during the COVID-19 pandemic. The results also suggest a shift of morbidity towards older age groups, and a rapid waning of immunity after vaccination, justifying to continue this surveillance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , General Practitioners , Whooping Cough , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , France/epidemiology , Humans , Infant , Male , Pandemics , Whooping Cough/diagnosis , Whooping Cough/epidemiology , Whooping Cough/prevention & control
2.
PLoS One ; 16(10): e0259318, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496537

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to characterize the nasopharyngeal microbiota of infants with possible and confirmed pertussis compared to healthy controls. METHODS: This prospective study included all infants <1 year with microbiologically confirmed diagnosis of pertussis attended at a University Hospital over a 12-month period. For each confirmed case, up to 2 consecutive patients within the same age range and meeting the clinical case definition of pertussis but testing PCR-negative were included as possible cases. A third group of asymptomatic infants (healthy controls) were also included. Nasopharyngeal microbiota was characterized by sequencing the V3-V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene. Common respiratory DNA/RNA viral co-infection was tested by multiplex PCR. RESULTS: Twelve confirmed cases, 21 possible cases and 9 healthy controls were included. Confirmed whooping cough was primarily driven by detection of Bordetella with no other major changes on nasopharyngeal microbiota. Possible cases had limited abundance or absence of Bordetella and a distinctive microbiota with lower bacterial richness and diversity and higher rates of viral co-infection than both confirmed cases and healthy controls. Bordetella reads determined by 16S rRNA gene sequencing were found in all 12 confirmed cases (100%), 3 out of the 21 possible cases (14.3%) but in any healthy control. CONCLUSION: This study supports the usefulness of 16S rRNA gene sequencing for improved sensitivity on pertussis diagnosis compared to real-time PCR and to understand other microbial changes occurring in the nasopharynx in children <1 year old with suspected whooping cough compared to healthy controls.


Subject(s)
Microbiota , Whooping Cough/microbiology , Bordetella/genetics , Bordetella/isolation & purification , Bordetella/pathogenicity , Case-Control Studies , Female , Humans , Infant , Male , Nasal Cavity/microbiology , Pharynx/microbiology , RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/genetics , Whooping Cough/diagnosis
3.
BMJ Case Rep ; 14(9)2021 Sep 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1398608

ABSTRACT

We report a case of a previously fit woman who presented at 26 weeks into her fourth pregnancy with a dry cough. Following a nasopharyngeal swab, she was diagnosed with a pertussis infection, and treated with antibiotics. A chest X-ray showed right atrial dilatation and an echocardiogram was scheduled outpatient. However, after re-presenting with worsening cough and dyspnoea, an inpatient echocardiogram was performed which suggested elevated pulmonary pressures with significant tricuspid regurgitation, as confirmed by subsequent cardiac catheterisation. She had an elective caesarean section at 34 weeks and underwent repeat right heart catheterisation which revealed persistent, and likely pre-existing, pulmonary arterial hypertension. This case highlights the importance of thorough assessment of non-obstetric symptoms in pregnancy in formulating alternative differentials, even after a diagnosis has been made, to prevent potentially life-threatening conditions from being missed. It also shows that although often associated, respiratory and cardiac causes may coexist separately.


Subject(s)
Hypertension, Pulmonary , Tricuspid Valve Insufficiency , Whooping Cough , Cesarean Section , Echocardiography , Female , Humans , Hypertension, Pulmonary/drug therapy , Hypertension, Pulmonary/etiology , Pregnancy , Whooping Cough/complications , Whooping Cough/diagnosis , Whooping Cough/drug therapy
4.
Emerg Med Clin North Am ; 39(3): 453-465, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1263258

ABSTRACT

The role of the emergency provider lies at the forefront of recognition and treatment of novel and re-emerging infectious diseases in children. Familiarity with disease presentations that might be considered rare, such as vaccine-preventable and non-endemic illnesses, is essential in identifying and controlling outbreaks. As we have seen thus far in the novel coronavirus pandemic, susceptibility, severity, transmission, and disease presentation can all have unique patterns in children. Emergency providers also have the potential to play a public health role by using lessons learned from the phenomena of vaccine hesitancy and refusal.


Subject(s)
Communicable Diseases, Emerging/epidemiology , Pediatrics , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/transmission , Chickenpox/diagnosis , Chickenpox/therapy , Chickenpox/transmission , Chikungunya Fever/diagnosis , Chikungunya Fever/therapy , Chikungunya Fever/transmission , Child , Communicable Diseases, Emerging/immunology , Decision Trees , Dengue/diagnosis , Dengue/therapy , Dengue/transmission , Emergency Medicine , Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola/diagnosis , Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola/therapy , Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola/transmission , Humans , Incidence , Malaria/diagnosis , Malaria/therapy , Malaria/transmission , Measles/diagnosis , Measles/therapy , Measles/transmission , Physician's Role , Public Health , SARS-CoV-2 , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome , Travel-Related Illness , Vaccination , Vaccination Refusal , Whooping Cough/diagnosis , Whooping Cough/therapy , Whooping Cough/transmission , Zika Virus Infection/diagnosis , Zika Virus Infection/therapy , Zika Virus Infection/transmission
5.
J Infect Chemother ; 27(3): 497-502, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-958900

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: There is some evidence that Bordetella pertussis (B. pertussis) can co-infect with viral respiratory infections in young infants. METHODS: B. pertussis infection was studied by culture, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) from nasopharyngeal swabs (NPSs) in 49 infants < 12 months of age, who were admitted for lower respiratory tract infections during the winter season. Seven other possible viral pathogens were documented by antigen detection or PCR in NPSs. The clinical feature of infants with mixed infection of B. pertussis and respiratory viruses were examined. RESULTS: Overall, B. pertussis infection was found in 10 (20.4%) cases, nine were less than 6 months of age and seven were unvaccinated. Viral etiology was found in 41 (84%) cases and pertussis-viral co-infection was present in eight patients, five of whom had mixed infection with respiratory syncytial virus. Only the presence of staccato coughing, cyanosis, and lymphocytosis were significantly different in B. pertussis-positive cases compared with B. pertussis-negative cases. Of the 10 pertussis cases, only the culture-positive cases showed the typical symptoms and laboratory findings of pertussis in addition to virus-associated respiratory symptoms with severe hospital course, whereas cases identified as DNA-positive lacked the characteristics of pertussis and their clinical severities were the same as B. pertussis-negative cases. CONCLUSION: In the absence of typical paroxysmal cough and lymphocytosis, we should carefully consider diagnosis of pertussis in young children hospitalized for presumed viral respiratory illness according to local epidemiological surveillance.


Subject(s)
Respiratory Tract Infections , Whooping Cough , Bordetella pertussis/genetics , Child , Child, Preschool , Humans , Infant , Molecular Diagnostic Techniques , Nucleic Acid Amplification Techniques , Respiratory Tract Infections/diagnosis , Respiratory Tract Infections/epidemiology , Seasons , Whooping Cough/diagnosis , Whooping Cough/epidemiology
6.
Turk J Pediatr ; 62(5): 726-733, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-892559

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Pertussis is a disease leading to high morbidity and mortality in neonates and infants. Bronchiolitis is the most common cause of hospitalization especially in children < 2 year-old. Although the clinical findings are different in these two diseases, it is sometimes difficult to make this distinction in partially or fully vaccinated children. This study aimed to identify the incidence, clinical and laboratory effects of B. pertussis as a causative agent in hospitalized children with acute bronchiolitis. METHODS: The study included patients diagnosed with acute bronchiolitis and admitted to the Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases from January 2012 to December 2015, aged 24 months or younger, evaluated for viruses and bacteria with polymerase chain reaction in respiratory tract secretions. RESULTS: The study included 380 patients hospitalized with acute bronchiolitis. Of these patients, 85.8% were identified to be positive for at least one respiratory pathogen. The most commonly identified pathogens were respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) A/B, rhinovirus, parainfluenza virus, adenovirus, bocavirus and metapneumovirus A/B. B. pertussis was only detected in 5 patients (1.5%). In the patients with B. pertussis identified, coinfection with another virus was observed including rhinovirus (n= 2), influenza A virus (n= 1), coronavirus OC43 (n= 1) and RSV A/B (n= 1). The presence of B. pertussis did not appear to cause any significant clinical or laboratory differences in patients. CONCLUSIONS: B. pertussis is a rare pathogen in patients admitted to hospital for acute bronchiolitis. However, in patients who do not respond to standard bronchiolitis treatment, B. pertussis should be considered as a causative agent. Early identification of this pathogen is important in terms of quarantining the patient, administering appropriate antimicrobial treatment, and prophylactic treatment to household and other close contacts.


Subject(s)
Bordetella pertussis , Bronchiolitis/virology , Hospitalization , Whooping Cough/epidemiology , Bronchiolitis/diagnosis , Bronchiolitis/therapy , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Incidence , Infant , Male , Whooping Cough/diagnosis , Whooping Cough/therapy
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL