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1.
Prof Inferm ; 74(4): 264, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1776582

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Workplace well-being has been defined as a state of pleasure in doing your own job. Work engagement is an effective indicator to measure workplace well-being. AIM: To investigate the level of work engagement among the Advanced Practice Nurses and describe patient outcomes. METHODS: A survey based on Utrecht Work Engagement Scale-17 (ranging 0-6) was administered to 11 Advanced Practice Nurses; data were collected in August 2021. Different outcomes were detected: incidence of pressure ulcers in COVID 19 patients; postoperative issues; number of cornea donations in eligible patients (from 2017 to 2020); number of preoperative stoma site marking. RESULTS: The results showed a median age of 48 [41-52] years, most of the partecipants were women (63.64%). Advanced Practice Nurses showed high levels of engagement as a whole (5.18 0.30) and on vigor (4.91 0.82), dedication (5.51 0.80) and absorption categories (5.12 0.68). 360 patients with COVID-19 were observed and only 17 of them (4,5%) had Pressure Ulcers (density incidence: 2,72ulcers/1000 patients day). Intervention by case manager completely solved the patient's problem in 10 cases (71.43%) during the postoperative period. A 13% increase in corneal donations was observed in eligible patients from 2017 to 2020. Preoperative stoma site marking was present in 103 (99.3%) of eligible patients. CONCLUSIONS: Advanced Practice Nurses present high levels of work engagement. Outcome results are coherent with the literature; a high level of work engagement seems to correlate with better patient outcomes. NURSING IMPLICATIONS: Postgraduate nursing training improves clinical outcomes for patients and process indicators. Healthcare organizations management should value workplace well-being of their Advanced Practice Nurses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Workplace , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Surveys and Questionnaires , Work Engagement
2.
J Contin Educ Nurs ; 53(4): 157-164, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1771301

ABSTRACT

Background There is a severe nursing shortage. Nurses are experiencing pressure, stress, and negative effects on their mental health from the ongoing pandemic. Understanding how their work engagement has been affected is essential. Method A descriptive, cross-sectional design was used. A survey plus the Fear of COVID-19 scale, the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale, and three open-ended questions were used. Results Participants (n = 107) were mostly female, had a bachelor degree or higher, worked full-time, had access to personal protective equipment, and followed Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines. Receiving education about COVID-19 and feeling that the hospital provided adequate education were correlated with engagement scores. The type of education significantly correlated with engagement scores, with in-service education having the highest scores. Conclusion Understanding the needs of nurses during a pandemic is critical to engaging and retaining them. This study provides information that may be beneficial in future health crises. [J Contin Educ Nurs. 2022;53(4):157-164.].


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Work Engagement , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Hospitals, Rural , Humans , Male , Surveys and Questionnaires
3.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(5)2022 02 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1715333

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has dramatically affected the mental health and work environment of the educational sector. Our primary aim was to investigate preschool teachers' psychological distress and work engagement during the COVID-19 outbreak, while examining the possible protective role of participating in a mindfulness-based intervention geared to foster compassion (Call2Care-Israel for Teachers; C2C-IT) and emotion regulation. The prevalence of emotional distress, work engagement, and COVID-19 concerns were evaluated in 165 preschool teachers in the early stages of the COVID-19 outbreak in Israel through questionnaires. The findings showed that preschool teachers experienced increased emotional distress. Teachers who had participated in the C2C-IT intervention six months before the pandemic outbreak (N = 41) reported lower emotional distress, higher use of adaptive emotion regulation strategies, and higher work engagement, compared to their counterparts that had not participated in the intervention (N = 124). Emotion regulation strategies mediated the link between participating in CTC-IT intervention and emotional distress and work engagement. Teaching is a highly demanding occupation, especially during a pandemic, thus making it important to invest resources in empowering this population. The findings here suggest that the implementation of a mindfulness-based intervention during the school year can enhance teachers' well-being, even during stressful events such as the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emotional Regulation , Mindfulness , Psychological Distress , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child, Preschool , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , School Teachers/psychology , Work Engagement
4.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(4)2022 Feb 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1699617

ABSTRACT

With the COVID-19 pandemic having disrupted economies, businesses, and individual activities, it is important to examine how different forms of work affect employee behaviour. This study applies work engagement (the key construct in organisational psychology) as the dependent variable and considers its determinants in the form of stress factors and attitudes toward remote work. A cross-sectional study was conducted. A total of 544 (Female = 58.5%) workers were surveyed: remote (n = 144), hybrid (n = 142), and on-site (n = 258). The selection for the study was purposive. Standardised survey questionnaires were used in the study: UWES-9, Stress Management Standards, and Attitudes toward Remote Work. The obtained results indicate that there were no significant differences between groups in terms of the intensity of work engagement, but work engagement was explained by other variables that are different in each of the studied groups. Relationships and use of social media were the most important factors among remote workers. For on-site workers, the most important factors were control and role definition. For practitioners, the results indicate which aspects of work should be considered in order to maintain high levels of work engagement when employees are transferring to other forms of work.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Work Engagement
5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(3)2022 01 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1650933

ABSTRACT

The ability to retain and engage employees is now, more than ever, a major strategic issue for organizations in the context of a pandemic paired with a persistent labor shortage. To this end, teleworking is among the work organization conditions that merit consideration. The purpose of this cross-sectional study is to examine the direct and indirect effects of teleworking on work engagement and intention to quit, as well as the potential moderating effect of organizational and individual characteristics on the relationship between teleworking, work engagement, and intention to quit during the COVID-19 pandemic, based on a sample of 254 Canadian employees from 18 small and medium organizations. To address these objectives, path analyses were conducted. Overall, we found that teleworking, use of emotion, skill utilization, and recognition appear to be key considerations for organizations that wish to increase work engagement and decrease intention to quit, in the context of a pandemic paired with a labor shortage. Our results extend the literature by revealing the pathways through which teleworking, use of emotion, skill utilization, and recognition are linked to work engagement and intention to quit, and by suggesting specific interventions and formation plans that are needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Work Engagement , Canada , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Intention , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Ships , Teleworking
6.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(1)2021 12 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580798

ABSTRACT

Since the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic, outpatient nurses have been exposed to a double burden of already known occupational and new pandemic-related stressors. Recent studies suggest that increased pandemic-related stress can affect mental health and promote the development of negative mental health outcomes for nurses. This includes a decrease in sleep quality and work engagement. In addition, certain groups appear to be particularly vulnerable to pandemic-related stress. The aim of this study was to investigate the stress perception of German outpatient nurses during the COVID-19 pandemic. The aim was to determine associations between their pandemic-related stress and variables such as sleep quality, work engagement, pandemic-related worries and concerns. For this purpose, a questionnaire was developed based on well-established measurement instruments such as the 10-item Perceived Stress Scale, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire to conduct a cross-sectional online survey among outpatient nurses from Germany. Participants (n = 166) showed rather moderate overall pandemic-related stress levels, good sleep quality, high work engagement, and moderate pandemic-related worries and concerns. Pandemic-related stress proved to be a predictor of decreased sleep quality and work engagement of outpatient nurses with weak effect sizes. Despite the surprisingly moderate stress levels, the effects of pandemic-related stress on selected aspects of participants' mental health could be demonstrated. Therefore, behavioural and organisational health promotion measures are recommended to support outpatient nurses during the pandemic. However, further research is needed to determine the causal relationships and long-term effects of pandemic-related stress on the mental health of outpatient caregivers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Outpatients , Perception , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Work Engagement
7.
Z Evid Fortbild Qual Gesundhwes ; 167: 57-67, 2021 Dec.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1586230

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Nurses are assigned a key role in pandemic response, with work engagement considered to be pivotal. The job demands-resources theory assumes that work engagement depends on job resources and job demands. Key job resources and demands have already been proposed for nurses. However, there is no evidence on their importance under pandemic conditions. Hence, the aim of this study was to investigate their relevance to nurses' work engagement during the second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: The study was carried out in a cross-sectional design and addressed nurses in direct health care settings in Germany. Data was collected administering a quantitative online survey using valid and reliable measures during the second wave of the pandemic. A convenience sample was obtained, including the use of social media, randomly selected health care facilities, and all universities with nursing-related programs in Germany. The dataset for analyses comprised a total of 1,027 cases. The sample included nurses of various educational levels and from different sectors. Multiple linear regression analysis after multiple imputation was used to examine the relevance of key resources and demands for work engagement. RESULTS: Key resources and demands explained 36% of the variance in nurses' work engagement during the COVID-19 pandemic. Positive associations were found between the key resources of autonomy (߯SP=0.072, 95% CI [0.011; 0.133]), professional resources (߯SP=0.204, 95% CI [0.124; 0.285]), and interpersonal relationships (߯SP=0.178, 95% CI [0.117; 0.240]) and nurses' work engagement. On the demands side, lack of formal rewards negatively (߯SP=-0.312, 95% CI [-0.380; -0.245]) affected work engagement, whereas work overload (߯SP=0.063, 95% CI [0.001; 0.126]) was positively associated with work engagement. DISCUSSION: The job demands-resources theory is suitable for explaining nurses' work engagement even in times of crisis. Taken together, key resources and demands have a significant influence on nurses' work engagement under pandemic conditions. However, not all so-called key resources and demands actually have a key status in a pandemic. CONCLUSION: Any lack of formal rewards should be countered, professional resources should be sustainably secured, and the autonomy of nurses and their interpersonal relationships should be strengthened. Nursing management decisions should be made not only with the current pandemic but also the post-pandemic period in mind.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Nurses , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Germany , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Work Engagement , Workload
8.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(23)2021 11 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1560098

ABSTRACT

The main goal of this research was to investigate the psychosocial aspects that influence the acceptance of innovative technology in maritime transport and its impact on employees' work-related wellbeing and absenteeism. In particular, this study focused on a device that had been introduced to sailors working in water public transportation in Venice. The theoretical framework included two integrated models: the TAM model, concerning acceptance of the technology, and the JD-R model, related to workers' well-being. A two-wave study was conducted; at T1, a self-report questionnaire was administered to 122 sailors. Four months after its first administration (T2), objective data related to days of absenteeism were collected. The study showed that the perceived ease of use and the usefulness of the device influenced the workers' intentions to use the technology and their motivational processes of work engagement, which was also related to social support. Work engagement impacted on work satisfaction and predicted the level of absenteeism (measured at Time 2). The implementation of a new technology may fail if transportation companies do not consider psychosocial factors that assist in the acceptance of such technology and promote the involvement of workers in the technological system.


Subject(s)
Absenteeism , Work Engagement , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Surveys and Questionnaires , Technology
9.
Ind Health ; 59(6): 341-342, 2021 Nov 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1542279
10.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(22)2021 11 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1523991

ABSTRACT

Although the COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in many health- and stress-related symptoms among employees, surprisingly few studies have assessed the effect of a health-promoting organizational climate or leadership on employee work outcomes. To fill this gap, our research proposed and tested a moderated mediation model involving perceived organizational health climate (POHC), leader health mindset (LHM), work engagement, and job crafting. Our propositions were tested using two-wave data collected from 301 South Korean employees. As predicted, POHC was positively related to employees' job crafting, and this relationship was mediated by work engagement. Moreover, the positive relationship between POHC and work engagement and the indirect effect of POHC on job crafting through work engagement were more pronounced when LHM was high than when it was low. These findings support the job demands-resources model and social exchange theory and have implications for helping employees maintain their work attitudes and behavior in times of crisis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Work Engagement , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Leadership , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(22)2021 11 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1512355

ABSTRACT

Employees' work-related well-being has become one of the most significant interests of researchers and organizations due to the COVID-19 pandemic. This study examines how job characteristics such as mental load and team support, and technology-related factors such as perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness, and technology acceptance, impact employees' work engagement as a dimension of work well-being. Data were collected through a sample of 610 academic employees from three Norwegian universities after COVID-19 restrictions were implemented. The structural model estimation showed that mental load, perceived team support, and technology acceptance were significantly related to work engagement. It also showed that perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, and mental load were significantly related to technology acceptance. Furthermore, the analysis showed that technology acceptance partially mediates the relationship between job characteristics and work engagement, and fully mediates the relationship between technology-related perceptions and work engagement. Building on the technology acceptance model (TAM) and job demands-resources (JD-R) theory, this study provides insights into the effects of job-related and technology-related factors on remote workers' well-being. By doing so, we contribute to the existing literature by demonstrating how remote working with the use of newly implemented technologies can be related to employees' well-being during a pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Technology , Work Engagement
12.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(19)2021 10 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1457555

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to identify factors influencing the work engagement of employees working from home during the COVID-19 pandemic in Japan. Employees' work engagement was examined using the following survey questions: "Do you feel energized when you are at work? (yes or no)" and "Do you take pride in your work? (yes or no)" After adjusting for potential confounders, Poisson regression was used to examine prevalence ratio and 95% confidence intervals for employees' work engagement. We analyzed 15,670 individuals (11,894 of whom did not work from home and 3776 of whom worked from home). Their mean age was 45.6 ± 13.8 years, and 58.3% were men. Those who worked from home were younger than those who did not (43.9 ± 13.1 vs. 46.1 ± 13.9, p < 0.001). About 44% of all employees reported high work engagement. Among the employees who worked from home, an increase in sleep hours, effective interactions with supervisors, and working hours of ≤40 h/week were associated with engagement. Sensitivity analysis showed similar results. Close communication with superiors, refraining from working long hours, and obtaining adequate sleep may boost the work engagement of employees working from home.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adult , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Work Engagement
13.
Front Health Serv Manage ; 38(1): 39-44, 2021 Oct 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455388

ABSTRACT

SUMMARY: Well-being, engagement, and burnout among clinicians are interconnected, and the common denominator is energy. Decades of research show that employees' energy is a decisive factor in achieving organizational outcomes. Knowing this, healthcare leaders can create well-being programs with measurable outcomes that make a positive impact on the bottom line. Just as important, leaders can avoid wasting money on fruitless efforts. How can clinician well-being be incorporated in organizational culture and strategic and operational plans? What are the special challenges to achieving clinician well-being? What key leadership actions promote and protect the well-being of clinicians? Which approaches are most effective during a crisis such as the COVID-19 pandemic? This article addresses those questions by presenting the rationale and methodology behind well-being programs that also address engagement and burnout so that clinicians can succeed in times of crisis and beyond.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/therapy , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Health Personnel/psychology , Health Promotion/organization & administration , Work Engagement , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Organizational Culture , Organizational Objectives , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Nurs Open ; 9(1): 377-384, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1439706

ABSTRACT

AIM: To assess the mattering perception, feelings of burnout and work engagement amongst nurses during coronavirus outbreak. DESIGN: Cross-sectional research design. METHODS: It conducted at Zagazig fever hospital and chest hospital on 280 nurses. A self-administered questionnaire containing four parts; characteristics, mattering at Work Scale, Burnout scale and Engagement scale. RESULTS: The present study reported that more than half of studied nurses had moderate mattering level and more than one-quarter of them had low mattering. More than two-fifth of studied nurses had moderate level and slight less than one-third of them had low engagement. More than two-fifth of studied nurses had moderate level of burnout, whilst slight less than one-third of them had high burnout, and one-quarter of them had low burnout.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , Coronavirus , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disease Outbreaks , Humans , Perception , Work Engagement
15.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(16)2021 08 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1376821

ABSTRACT

This study aims to review and quantify the value of several well-established positive leadership styles for employee work engagement in organizations. We perform both a quantitative and qualitative review (k = 86). Our (moderated) meta-analysis indicates that transformational, authentic, empowering, ethical, and servant leadership all share overlap in confidence and credibility intervals, and they may result in the same effect on work engagement (general r = 0.47). Additional theoretical analysis indicated a common ground within these positive leadership styles, i.e., having a moral perspective as a leader, role-modelling behaviour, follower self-determination, and positive social exchanges with employees. Based on the studies in the sample, we also build an integrative research model with several categories of mediators and moderators that have a well-established impact on work engagement. The moderator categories were follower characteristics and team- and organizational-level moderators. The mediator categories were psychological needs, trust, resources, and organizational-level variables. The combination of a meta-analysis with systematic review and research model can facilitate future research and supports practitioners to improve leadership.


Subject(s)
Leadership , Work Engagement , Morals , Personal Autonomy , Trust
16.
J Alzheimers Dis ; 83(4): 1841-1848, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1369637

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In a previous study, we assessed burnout in geriatric healthcare workers during the first lockdown that lasted from March to May 2020 in France, in response to the COVID-19 crisis. OBJECTIVE: We carried out a follow-up study to assess burnout in the same population during the second lockdown that was implemented at the end of October 2020. METHODS: We used an online survey to assess burnout in terms of exhaustion and disengagement in a sample of 58 geriatric healthcare workers. RESULTS: We found higher levels of exhaustion, disengagement, and burnout among geriatric healthcare workers during the second than during the first lockdown. We also found high levels of exhaustion but moderate disengagement and burnout during the second lockdown. CONCLUSION: The increased exhaustion, disengagement, and burnout during the second lockdown can be attributed to the increased workload in geriatric facilities throughout this crisis and during the second lockdown due to shortage in staff and increased number of shifts and allocated duties. The high levels of exhaustion reported among geriatric healthcare workers during the second lockdown can reflect their physical fatigue, as well as their feelings of being emotionally overextended and exhausted by their workload.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Caregiver Burden , Health Personnel/psychology , Health Services for the Aged , Work Engagement , Adult , Burnout, Professional/diagnosis , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/etiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Caregiver Burden/epidemiology , Caregiver Burden/psychology , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Female , Follow-Up Studies , France/epidemiology , Health Services Needs and Demand , Health Services for the Aged/organization & administration , Health Services for the Aged/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
17.
J Appl Psychol ; 106(7): 965-974, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1354075

ABSTRACT

As the result of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19), individuals have been inundated with constant negative news related to the pandemic. However, limited research examines how such news consumption impacts employees' work lives, including their ability to remain engaged with their work. Integrating conservation of resources theory and insights from the media psychology literature with research on occupational calling, we propose that weekly COVID-related news consumption heightens employees' anxiety levels, thereby frustrating their ability to remain engaged with work and that this process is differentially moderated by different facets of occupational calling. Specifically, we postulate that those who are called to their work primarily because it gives them personal meaning and purpose (i.e., higher in purposeful work) will remain more engaged with work in the face of the anxiety that arises from consuming COVID-related news, as their work may facilitate resource replenishment for these individuals. Conversely, we postulate that those who are drawn to their work primarily because it allows them to help others (i.e., higher in prosocial orientation) will experience the opposite effect, such that their inability to help others during the pandemic will strengthen the negative effect of anxiety on work engagement. Results from an 8-week weekly diary study with a sample of 281 Canadian employees during the pandemic provided support for our hypotheses. Implications are discussed for maintaining employee work engagement during the pandemic era, and beyond. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mass Media , Newspapers as Topic , Work Engagement , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Canada/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
18.
J Occup Environ Med ; 63(11): 907-912, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1337295

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The present study examined the relationship between the intensity of home-based telework and work engagement. METHODS: This cross-sectional study using a self-administrated questionnaire survey was conducted from December 22 to 25, 2020, in Japan. The subjects were asked single-item questions about the intensity of telework and three-item questions about work engagement using the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale. Coefficients were estimated using a multilevel regression model nested by the prefecture of residence and adjusted for covariates. RESULTS: High-intensity (4 or more days per week) telework was not associated with high work engagement for men or women. In contrast, low and moderate intensity (3 days per week to once per month) were associated with high work engagement. The results were consistent when stratified by sex. CONCLUSIONS: Reasonable-intensity telework may have beneficial effects on work engagement.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Teleworking , Work Engagement
19.
Psychol Health Med ; 27(2): 481-487, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1287918

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of COVID-19 undoubtedly aggravated the pressure and workload of nurses' work, which may bring new challenges to nurses' work engagement. This study aims to explore the factors of nurses' work engagement, and it may provide targeted references for clinical intervention. Convenience sampling was used, and 689 nurses from Hebei and Guangxi Province in China were investigated. The results indicated that both perceived organizational support and psychological safety have direct positive impacts on nurses' work engagement, and psychological safety mediates the relationship between perceived organizational support and work engagement. These findings provide new ideas to help nursing managers better understand how to improve work engagement.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Job Satisfaction , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Work Engagement
20.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(6): e29036, 2021 06 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1278307

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has changed work life profoundly and concerns regarding the mental well-being of employees' have arisen. Organizations have made rapid digital advancements and have started to use new collaborative tools such as social media platforms overnight. OBJECTIVE: Our study aimed to investigate how professional social media communication has affected work engagement before and during the COVID-19 pandemic and the role of perceived social support, task resources, and psychological distress as predictors and moderators of work engagement. METHODS: Nationally representative longitudinal survey data were collected in 2019-2020, and 965 respondents participated in all 4 surveys. Measures included work engagement, perceived social support and task resources, and psychological distress. The data were analyzed using a hybrid linear regression model. RESULTS: Work engagement remained stable and only decreased in autumn 2020. Within-person changes in social media communication at work, social support, task resources, and psychological distress were all associated with work engagement. The negative association between psychological distress and work engagement was stronger in autumn 2020 than before the COVID-19 outbreak. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic has exerted pressure on mental health at work. Fostering social support and task resources at work is important in maintaining work engagement. Social media communication could help maintain a supportive work environment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Social Media/statistics & numerical data , Work Engagement , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Finland/epidemiology , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Psychological Distress , Social Support , Workplace/psychology
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