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1.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 22(1): 698, 2022 May 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1862128

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Many risk factors related to altered circadian rhythms impact the health of night-shift hospital workers (NSHW), resulting in mental and somatic disorders. Easy access to psychoactive substances (PS) may facilitate addictive behaviors in NSHW. They are also exposed to a stressful work environment, which may further affect sleep quality. This study aimed to explore the link between sleep deprivation, work-related psychosocial stress and psychoactive substance use as a self-medication response in NSHW. METHODS: Qualitative study to verify the plausibility of the self-medication theory applied to addictive behaviors. Semi-structured interviews (N = 18 NSHW) and thematic analysis, following consolidated criteria for reporting qualitative research recommendations. RESULTS: Stigma against NSHW was a primary element of a stressful work environment. The stressful and stigmatizing environment, together with night-shift work, further affected NSHW sleep and their mental and physical health. The use of PS appeared to be for self-medication, encouraged by social and professional environments, source(s) of stress, discrimination, and isolation. The work environment, through aggravated sleep disorders, led NSHW to use non-prescribed sleeping pills. Alcohol after work and smoking were used as a social break but also as a means to reduce stress. CONCLUSION: Anti-stigma interventions in the healthcare setting and screening of mental/somatic disorders in NSHW can help reduce harmful self-medication behaviors and improve hospital care in the COVID-19 era.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Self Medication , Social Stigma , Substance-Related Disorders , Delivery of Health Care , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Qualitative Research , Substance-Related Disorders/epidemiology , Work Schedule Tolerance
2.
Aerosp Med Hum Perform ; 93(5): 433-441, 2022 May 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1847145

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: COVID-19 has had a significant impact on the aviation industry. While reduced flying capacity may intuitively translate to reduced fatigue risk by way of fewer flights and duty hours, the actual impact of the pandemic on pilot fatigue is unknown.METHODS: We surveyed U.S. commercial airline pilots in late 2020 (N = 669) and early 2021 (N = 156) to assess the impact of COVID-19 on schedules and fatigue during the pandemic.RESULTS: Overall, pilots reported reduced flight and duty hours compared to prepandemic. Average sleep on workdays was slightly shorter in late 2020 (6.87 ± 1.14 h) and recovered to prepandemic levels in early 2021 (6.95 ± 1.11 h). Similarly, the frequency of sleepiness on days off and in-flight increased in late 2020, with 54% of pilots reporting an increase in in-flight sleepiness, then returned to prepandemic levels in early 2021. The use of in-flight sleepiness countermeasures remained the same across assessed time points. Pilots highlighted several factors which impacted their sleep and job performance, including limited access to nutritional food during duty days and layovers, reduced access to exercise facilities during layovers, increased stress due to job insecurity and health concerns, increased distractions and workload, and changes to scheduling.DISCUSSION: Despite a reduction in flights and duty days, COVID-19 led to increased sleepiness on days off and in flight, potentially due to the negative impact of lack of access to essential needs and heightened stress on sleep. Operators need to monitor the change in these COVID-19 related risks as the industry returns to full service.Hilditch CJ, Flynn-Evans EE. Fatigue, schedules, sleep, and sleepiness in U.S. commercial pilots during COVID-19. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2022; 93(5):433-441.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pilots , COVID-19/epidemiology , Fatigue/epidemiology , Humans , Sleep , Sleepiness , Work Schedule Tolerance
3.
Chronobiol Int ; 39(8): 1100-1109, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1819675

ABSTRACT

Night-shift workers experience disturbances of their circadian rhythm and sleep, which may make them more susceptible to infectious diseases. Therefore, we studied whether night-shift workers are at higher risk of testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 infection than day workers. In this prospective study, data were used from 20 questionnaire rounds of the Dutch Lifelines COVID-19 cohort that was initiated in March 2020. In the different questionnaire rounds, 2285 night-shift workers and 23,766 day workers reported whether they had tested positive for SARS-CoV-2. Cox proportional hazards regression models adjusted for demographic, work, and health covariates were used to compare SARS-CoV-2 incidence between night-shift and day workers. From March 2020-January 2021, 3.4% of night-shift workers and 2.2% of day workers reported to have tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 (p < .001). After adjustment for covariates, night-shift workers had a 37% higher risk of testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 (hazard ratio: 1.37, 95% confidence interval: 1.05-1.77). In this study, we show that night-shift workers were more likely to test positive for SARS-CoV-2 than day workers, which adds to the growing evidence that night-shift work may influence the complex processes involved in infection susceptibility. Further mechanistic insight is needed to understand the relation between night-shift work and (SARS-CoV-2) infection susceptibility.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Shift Work Schedule , Circadian Rhythm , Humans , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Work Schedule Tolerance
4.
Front Public Health ; 9: 751579, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775937

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Night shift work is common in the current working environment and is a risk factor for many diseases. The study aimed to explore the relationship between night shift work with chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU), and the modification effect of circadian dysfunction on it. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among Chinese workers. Exposure was measured by night work history and duration. Circadian dysfunction was characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS). The diagnosis of CSU was made by dermatologists who were investigating on the spot. The effect size was expressed as odds ratios (ORs). Results: A total of 8,057 participants were recruited, and 7,411 (92%) with complete information were included in the final analyses. The prevalence rates of CSU for workers without night shift and those with night shift history were 0.73 and 1.28%, respectively. Compared with workers who never worked night shifts, the risk of CSU increased with the length of night shift work: OR = 1.55 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.78-3.06) for duration <5 years and OR = 1.91 (95% CI: 1.12-3.26) for duration ≥5 years. EDS s EDS has been shown to modify this combination. Among workers without EDS, there was no association between night shift and CSU (OR = 0.94; 95% CI: 0.49-1.79). Whereas, in participants with EDS, the correlation was significant (OR = 3.58; 95% CI: 1.14-11.20). However, the effect modification by sleep disturbance was not observed. Conclusions: Night shift work is a risk factor for CSU, and there is a dose-response relationship between night shift work hours and the risk of CSU. This connection may be modified by circadian dysfunction.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chronic Urticaria , Shift Work Schedule , Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Shift Work Schedule/adverse effects , Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm/epidemiology , Work Schedule Tolerance
5.
Am J Nurs ; 122(2): 60-61, 2022 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1672279

ABSTRACT

Updated several times a week with posts by a wide variety of authors, AJN's blog Off the Charts allows us to provide more timely-and often more personal-perspectives on professional, policy, and clinical issues. Best of the Blog is a regular column to draw the attention of AJN readers to posts we think deserve a wider audience. To read more, please visit: www.ajnoffthecharts.com.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Critical Care Nursing , Nurse's Role , Organizational Innovation , Work Schedule Tolerance , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Humans
6.
Aerosp Med Hum Perform ; 93(1): 4-12, 2022 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1643487

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Biomathematical modeling software like the Sleep, Activity, Fatigue, and Task Effectiveness (SAFTE) model and Fatigue Avoidance Scheduling Tool (FAST) help carriers predict fatigue risk for planned rosters. The ability of a biomathematical model to accurately estimate fatigue risk during unprecedented operations, such as COVID-19 humanitarian ultra-long-range flights, is unknown. Azul Cargo Express organized and conducted five separate humanitarian missions to China between May and July 2020. Prior to conducting the missions, a sleep-prediction algorithm (AutoSleep) within SAFTE-FAST was used to predict in-flight sleep duration and pilot effectiveness. Here we compare AutoSleep predictions against pilots' sleep diary and a sleep-tracking actigraphy device (Zulu watch, Institutes for Behavior Resources) from Azul's COVID-19 humanitarian missions.METHODS: Pilots wore Zulu watches throughout the mission period and reported sleep duration for their in-flight rest periods using a sleep diary. Agreement between AutoSleep, diary, and Zulu watch measures was compared using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC). Goodness-of-fit between predicted effectiveness distribution between scenarios was evaluated using the R² statistic.RESULTS: A total of 20 (N = 20) pilots flying across 5 humanitarian missions provided sleep diary and actigraphy data. ICC and R² values were >0.90, indicating excellent agreement between sleep measures and predicted effectiveness distribution, respectively.DISCUSSION: Biomathematical predictions of in-flight sleep during unprecedented humanitarian missions were in agreement with actual sleep patterns during flights. These findings indicate that biomathematical models may retain accuracy even under extreme circumstances. Pilots may overestimate the amount of sleep that they receive during extreme flight-duty periods, which could constitute a fatigue risk.Devine JK, Garcia CR, Simoes AS, Guelere MR, de Godoy B, Silva DS, Pacheco PC, Choynowski J, Hursh SR. Predictive biomathematical modeling compared to objective sleep during COVID-19 humanitarian flights. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2022; 93(1):4-12.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pilots , Fatigue , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep , Work Schedule Tolerance
7.
Lancet ; 398(10303): 920-930, 2021 09 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1593950

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has heightened interest in how physician mental health can be protected and optimised, but uncertainty and misinformation remain about some key issues. In this Review, we discuss the current literature, which shows that despite what might be inferred during training, physicians are not immune to mental illness, with between a quarter and a third reporting increased symptoms of mental ill health. Physicians, particularly female physicians, are at an increased risk of suicide. An emerging consensus exists that some aspects of physician training, working conditions, and organisational support are unacceptable. Changes in medical training and health systems, and the additional strain of working through a pandemic, might have amplified these problems. A new evidence-informed framework for how individual and organisational interventions can be used in an integrated manner in medical schools, in health-care settings, and by professional colleagues is proposed. New initiatives are required at each of these levels, with an urgent need for organisational-level interventions, to better protect the mental health and wellbeing of physicians.


Subject(s)
Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Physicians/psychology , Suicide/statistics & numerical data , Burnout, Professional , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Disorders/prevention & control , Pandemics , Physicians, Women/psychology , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Substance-Related Disorders/epidemiology , Suicide/prevention & control , Work Schedule Tolerance
8.
Front Public Health ; 9: 785518, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1581105

ABSTRACT

Background: Nurses have a high incidence of shift work sleep disorder, which places their health and patient safety in danger. Thus, exploring the factors associated with shift work sleep disorder in nurses is of great significance in improving their sleep health, nursing personnel staffing, and scheduling during the COVID-19 pandemic. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the incidence of shift work sleep disorder during the COVID-19 pandemic and explore the factors associated with shift work sleep disorder in Chinese nurses. Methods: This was a multicenter cross-sectional study using an online survey. Stratified cluster sampling was used to include 4,275 nurses from 14 hospitals in Shandong, China from December 2020 to June 2021. Stepwise multivariate logistic regression analysis and random forest were used to identify the factors associated with shift work sleep disorder. Results: The prevalence of shift work sleep disorder in the sampled shift nurses was 48.5% during the COVID-19 pandemic. Physical fatigue, psychological stress, shift work more than 6 months per year, busyness during night shift, working more than 40 h per week, working more than four night shifts per month, sleeping more than 8 h before night shift, using sleep medication, irregular meals, and high-intensity physical activity were associated with increased odds of shift work sleep disorder. Good social support, good work-family balance, napping two or three times per week, resting more than one day after shifts, intervals of 8 days or more between shifts, and taking turns to rest during the night shift were associated with decreased odds of shift work sleep disorder. Conclusions: Shift work sleep disorder may be associated with scheduling strategies and personal behavior during the COVID-19 pandemic. To reduce the incidence of shift work sleep disorders in nurses, nursing managers should increase night shift staffing, extend rest days after shift, increase night shift spacing, and reduce overtime, and nurses need to seek more family and social support and control their sleep schedules and diet.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm/epidemiology , Work Schedule Tolerance
9.
Ind Health ; 59(5): 285-292, 2021 Oct 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1363587

ABSTRACT

It is important to track the trends of future working hours, since working hours have strong associations to everyday life and work-life interaction, but also to health. In this paper we aim to track the current and future trends in working hours. We discuss the trends through the key dimensions of working hours: the length, timing, tempo and autonomy. We also consider the role of current trends of spatial changes of work. Changes in working time patterns are fostered by several driving factors: globalization and business restructuring challenging the current work organizations, new information technologies, demographic and climate change and the current and future pandemics. The past and current tremendous changes in working hours indicate that changes in working hours will continue. The contemporary trends in future working hours pose risks for personal, family and social life, material well-being and health. At its best, however, the new post-industrial working time regime may provide more autonomy and time for recovery to employees as new technologies and changes in business structures release opportunities for greater individual autonomy over how, where, and for how long paid work is performed.


Subject(s)
Work Schedule Tolerance , Humans
10.
J Occup Health ; 63(1): e12267, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1355861

ABSTRACT

Fatigue in resident physicians has been identified as a factor that contributes to burnout and a decline in overall wellbeing. Fatigue risk exists because of poor sleep habits and demanding work schedules that have only increased due to the COVID-19 pandemic. At this time, it is important not to lose sight of how fatigue can impact residents and how fatigue risk can be mitigated. While fatigue mitigation is currently addressed by duty hour restrictions and education about fatigue, Fatigue Risk Management Systems (FRMSs) offer a more comprehensive strategy for addressing these issues. An important component of FRMS in other shiftwork industries, such as aviation and trucking, is the use of biomathematical models to prospectively identify fatigue risk in work schedules. Such an approach incorporates decades of knowledge of sleep and circadian rhythm research into shift schedules, taking into account not just duty hour restrictions but the temporal placement of work schedules. Recent research has shown that biomathematical models of fatigue can be adapted to a resident physician population and can help address fatigue risk. Such models do not require subject matter experts and can be applied in graduate medical education program shift scheduling. It is important for graduate medical education program providers to consider these alternative methods of fatigue mitigation. These tools can help reduce fatigue risk and may improve wellness as they allow for a more precise fatigue management strategy without reducing overall work hours.


Subject(s)
Education, Medical, Graduate , Fatigue/prevention & control , Internship and Residency , Work Schedule Tolerance , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
11.
Br J Community Nurs ; 26(8): 384-389, 2021 Aug 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1339725

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has increased workload demands for many NHS staff including those working in the community. Nurse managers can make a difference by being authentic leaders, nurturing a supportive organisation where the workload is managed participatively and self-kindness is legitimate. Unfortunately some staff may experience burnout and this article presents a personal management plan to address the symptoms of burnout and aid recovery, although it cannot promote a total recovery if the cause of the symptoms remains unaddressed.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , COVID-19/epidemiology , Nurses, Community Health/psychology , Occupational Stress/prevention & control , Pandemics , Community Health Nursing/organization & administration , Humans , Leadership , Models, Psychological , Psychosocial Support Systems , SARS-CoV-2 , United Kingdom , Work Schedule Tolerance , Workload
12.
BJS Open ; 5(4)2021 07 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1331540

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Core surgical training programmes are associated with a high risk of burnout. This study aimed to assess the influence of a novel enhanced stress-resilience training (ESRT) course delivered at the start of core surgical training in a single UK statutory education body. METHOD: All newly appointed core surgical trainees (CSTs) were invited to participate in a 5-week ESRT course teaching mindfulness-based exercises to develop tools to deal with stress at work and burnout. The primary aim was to assess the feasibility of this course; secondary outcomes were to assess degree of burnout measured using Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) scoring. RESULTS: Of 43 boot camp attendees, 38 trainees completed questionnaires, with 24 choosing to participate in ESRT (63.2 per cent; male 13, female 11, median age 28 years). Qualitative data reflected challenges delivering ESRT because of arduous and inflexible clinical on-call rotas, time pressures related to academic curriculum demands and the concurrent COVID-19 pandemic (10 of 24 drop-out). Despite these challenges, 22 (91.7 per cent) considered the course valuable and there was unanimous support for programme development. Of the 14 trainees who completed the ESRT course, nine (64.3 per cent) continued to use the techniques in daily clinical work. Burnout was identified in 23 trainees (60.5 per cent) with no evident difference in baseline MBI scores between participants (median 4 (range 0-11) versus 5 (1-11), P = 0.770). High stress states were significantly less likely, and mindfulness significantly higher in the intervention group (P < 0.010); MBI scores were comparable before and after ESRT in the intervention cohort (P = 0.630, median 4 (range 0-11) versus 4 (1-10)). DISCUSSION: Despite arduous emergency COVID rotas ESRT was feasible and, combined with protected time for trainees to engage, deserves further research to determine medium-term efficacy.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Curriculum , General Surgery/education , Resilience, Psychological , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control , Surgeons/psychology , Adult , Anxiety/prevention & control , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression/prevention & control , Feasibility Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Mindfulness , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires , United Kingdom , Work Schedule Tolerance
13.
J Occup Health ; 63(1): e12254, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1321673

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has forced many employees to alter both their work style and lifestyle. This study aimed to examine how the combination of changes in overtime working hours and social interaction affects the full-time employees' mental well-being, focusing on the difference in household composition. METHODS: In November 2020, we conducted a cross-sectional Internet survey that included 4388 Japanese men and women aged 25-64 years, who continued the same full-time job during the pandemic. We performed a logistic regression analysis using a combination of the changes in overtime working hours and social interaction as an independent variable, and the presence/absence of deterioration of mental well-being as the dependent variable. RESULTS: Overall, 44% of participants reported the deterioration of mental well-being compared to before the outbreak. The multivariate analysis revealed that the participants coded as "increased overtime/decreased interaction" were significantly associated with the deterioration of mental well-being compared to those with "unchanged overtime/unchanged interaction" (odds ratio [OR] 2.14, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.59-2.89). Moreover, this association was relatively stronger among single-person households (OR 2.66, 95% CI 1.50-4.69). CONCLUSIONS: The negative combination of increasing overtime working hours and decreasing social interaction may have an impact on the deterioration of mental well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic, and this association was comparably strong among single-person households. In the pandemic, it is necessary to pay close attention to both overtime working hours and the presence of social interaction to address the mental well-being among employees.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Emotional Adjustment , Social Interaction , Social Isolation/psychology , Work Schedule Tolerance/psychology , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Family Characteristics , Female , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Models, Theoretical , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling/statistics & numerical data , Single Person/psychology , Single Person/statistics & numerical data
14.
World Neurosurg ; 154: e283-e291, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1305325

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic has placed tremendous strain on the national health care systems throughout Europe. As a result, there has been a significant influence on residents' education. We surveyed European neurosurgery residents to estimate the magnitude of the pandemic's impact on neurosurgical training. METHODS: An anonymous, voluntary, 44-question, web-based survey was administered to European neurosurgical residents from November 2, 2020, to January 15, 2021, by e-mail invitation. Close-ended, multiple-choice questions were used to examine the perspectives of neurosurgical trainees of different training programs in Europe regarding the pandemic's impact on education, as well as to evaluate the online webinars as a sufficient alternative educational tool, and their future role. RESULTS: The total number of participants was 134 from 22 European countries. Nearly 88.8 % of respondents reported that the pandemic had a negative influence on their education. A statically significant decrease in surgical exposure, outpatient clinic involvement, and working hours was observed (P < 0.05). Webinars, although widely disseminated, were not considered as a sufficient training alternative. CONCLUSIONS: The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic had a significant impact on neurosurgical training. During the last year, with the outbreak of the pandemic, formal training education was heavily compromised. Online webinars do not seem to be a sufficient alternative, and some trainees estimate that a whole year of training has been compromised. Our current data have to be cautiously considered for possibly reorganizing the whole training experience. The pandemic may well function as a stimulus for optimizing neurosurgical training.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Neurosurgery/education , Pandemics , Education, Distance , Europe , Humans , Outpatient Clinics, Hospital , Surveys and Questionnaires , Training Support , Work Schedule Tolerance , Workload
15.
Ann Glob Health ; 87(1): 51, 2021 06 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1296121

ABSTRACT

Background: Nurses working in treating patients with COVID-19 are exposed to various stressors, such as fear of COVID-19, stress, and high workload, leading to burnout. Objectives: This study aimed to identify the level of burnout and its predictors in nurses working in hospitals for COVID-19 patients. Methods: Participants in this study were nurses working in 11 hospitals for COVID-19 patients in the Fars province of Iran. The Maslach burnout and the UK Health and Safety stress questionnaires were used to assess burnout and stress, respectively. Analysis, using multiple regression in the SPSS21 software, aimed to identify the factors affecting burnout. Findings: The mean level of burnout in the nurses at the COVID-19 hospitals was 57 out of 120, and burnout was affected by workload (ß = 0.69, p < 0.001), job stress (ß = 0.25, p < 0.001) and inadequate hospital resources for the prevention of COVID-19 (ß = -0.16, p < 0.001). These three variables explained 87% of the variance in burnout. Conclusions: The burnout of nurses directly exposed to COVID-19 patients is more than nurses in other wards, and workload is the most significant cause of burnout in them. Therefore, necessary measures such as hiring more nurses, reducing working hours and increasing rest periods are necessary to reduce workload. In addition, the job stress of these nurses should be managed and controlled, and the hospital resources needed to prevent this disease should be provided.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Nurses , Occupational Stress , Work Schedule Tolerance/psychology , Workload , Adult , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/nursing , COVID-19/psychology , Fear/psychology , Female , Health Services Needs and Demand , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Iran/epidemiology , Male , Nurses/psychology , Nurses/supply & distribution , Occupational Stress/complications , Occupational Stress/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Workload/psychology , Workload/standards , Workload/statistics & numerical data
16.
Behav Neurol ; 2021: 6655103, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1286758

ABSTRACT

This study is aimed at assessing differences in basic attentional functioning between substantial and minimal work-related exposure to COVID-19 patients in professionals working in a tertiary referral hospital in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Therefore, hospital employees performed a Continuous Visual Attention Test. This test consisted of a 90-second Go/No-Go task with 72 (80%) targets and 18 (20%) nontargets. For each participant, reaction time and intraindividual variability of reaction times of all correct target responses, as well as the number of omission and commission errors, were evaluated. Participants were divided into 2 groups based on their exposure to COVID-19 patients (substantial versus minimal exposure). The substantial exposure group consisted of participants with 24 hours/week or more direct contact with COVID-19 patients. This cut-off was based on the clear division between professionals working and not working with COVID-19 patients and considered that 12-hour and 24-hour daily shifts are common for hospital employees in Brazil. A MANCOVA was performed to examine between-group differences, using age, sleep quality, sex, education level, previous COVID-19 infection, and profession as covariates. Of 124 participants, 80 had substantial exposure and 44 had minimal exposure to COVID-19. The overall MANCOVA reached statistical significance (P = 0.048). Post hoc ANCOVA analysis showed that the substantial exposure group had a statistically significantly higher intraindividual variability of reaction time of all correct target responses (P = 0.017, Cohen's δ = -0.55). This result remained after removing those with a previous COVID-19 infection (P = 0.010, Cohen's δ = -0.64) and after matching groups for sample size (P = 0.004, Cohen's δ = -0.81). No other variables reached statistical significance. Concluding, hospital professionals with a substantial level of exposure to patients with COVID-19 show a significant attention decrement and, thus, may be at a higher risk of accidental SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
Attention , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/transmission , Health Personnel/psychology , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional , Tertiary Care Centers , Adult , Brazil/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Reaction Time , SARS-CoV-2 , Work Schedule Tolerance , Young Adult
17.
Inquiry ; 58: 469580211022909, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1285150

ABSTRACT

Nurses may experience cumulative sleep deprivation in the current epidemiological situation, which is the COVID-19 disease. Lack of rest leads to decreased concentration. The research topic is important for improving patient safety in hospitals. Assessment and analysis of the level of sleepiness of nurses after 3 consecutive night shifts and its impact on functioning in social life. The study adopted the diagnostic survey method, which was conducted using a survey technique. The questionnaire consisted of 3 parts: personal particulars, the survey and the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS) version A. After the research, 164 correctly completed questionnaires were obtained. The level of somnolence in individual measurements after a night shift significantly increased among the nurses examined (P < .0001). Respondents who felt a higher level of drowsiness after a night shift thought that their work definitely influenced contact with their friends or family and had difficulty in performing household duties. There is no statistically significant relationship between the level of sleepiness and sociodemographic factors. After each night shift, the level of drowsiness in nurses increases. This may result in reduced alertness and attention levels on subsequent working days. Shift work has negative consequences in the form of depleted personal life. Further research into the effects of insufficient sleep among nurses should be conducted. This may be necessary for patient safety in healthcare centers. The awareness on the subject of healthy sleep among shift nurses should be raised. It is advisable to conduct research in order to assess the effectiveness of various therapies in dealing with sleep disorders among shift nurses. The interventions taken should be adapted to the current epidemiological situation, which is the COVID-19 disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Work Schedule Tolerance , Female , Humans , Male , Poland , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleepiness , Surveys and Questionnaires
18.
Front Public Health ; 8: 552409, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1207723
19.
Anesth Analg ; 132(5): 1338-1343, 2021 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1186597

ABSTRACT

The negative impacts of sleep deprivation and fatigue have long been recognized. Numerous studies have documented the ill effects of impaired alertness associated with the disruption of the sleep-wake cycle; these include an increased incidence of human error-related accidents, increased morbidity and mortality, and an overall decrement in social, financial, and human productivity. While there are multiple studies on the impact of sleep deprivation and fatigue in resident physicians, far fewer have examined the effects on attending physicians, and only a handful addresses the accumulated effects of chronic sleep disturbances on acute sleep loss during a night call-shift. Moreover, the rapid and unprecedented spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic significantly increased the level of anxiety and stress on the physical, psychological, and the economic well-being of the entire world, with heightened effect on frontline clinicians. Additional studies are necessary to evaluate the emotional and physical toll of the pandemic in clinicians, and its impact on sleep health, general well-being, and performance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Clinical Competence/standards , Sleep Deprivation/epidemiology , Sleep Deprivation/psychology , Work Schedule Tolerance/psychology , COVID-19/therapy , Fatigue/epidemiology , Fatigue/psychology , Humans
20.
Saudi Med J ; 42(3): 306-314, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1125359

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To estimate the prevalence of burnout among health care workers (HCWs) who are working in Saudi Arabia during the Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, and explore individual and work-related factors associated with burnout in this population. METHODS: In this cross-sectional study conducted between June to August of 2020, we invited HCWs through social channels to complete a questionnaire. The questionnaire inquired about demographics, factors related to burnout, and used the Copenhagen Burnout Inventory scale to indicate burnout. A total of 646 HCWs participated. RESULTS: The mean (SD) age of participants was 34.1 (9.5) years. Sixty-one percent were female. The prevalence of burnout among HCWs was 75%. Significant factors associated with burnout were age, job title, years of experience, increased working hours during the pandemic, average hours of sleep per day, exposure to patients with COVID-19, number of times tested for COVID-19, and perception of being pushed to deal with COVID-19 patients. CONCLUSION: Health care workers as frontline workers, face great challenges during this pandemic, because of the nature of their work. Efforts should be made to promote psychological resilience for HCWs during pandemics. This study points out the factors that should be invested in and the factors that may not be influential.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Medical Staff, Hospital/psychology , Pandemics , Adult , Age Factors , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19 Testing , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Marital Status , Prevalence , Psychological Distance , Resilience, Psychological , SARS-CoV-2 , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Sleep Deprivation , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Work Schedule Tolerance
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