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2.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(11): e2134315, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1513768

ABSTRACT

Importance: The COVID-19 pandemic has placed increased strain on health care workers and disrupted childcare and schooling arrangements in unprecedented ways. As substantial gender inequalities existed in medicine before the pandemic, physician mothers may be at particular risk for adverse professional and psychological consequences. Objective: To assess gender differences in work-family factors and mental health among physician parents during the COVID-19 pandemic. Design, Setting, and Participants: This prospective cohort study included 276 US physicians enrolled in the Intern Health Study since their first year of residency training. Physicians who had participated in the primary study as interns during the 2007 to 2008 and 2008 to 2009 academic years and opted into a secondary longitudinal follow-up study were invited to complete an online survey in August 2018 and August 2020. Exposures: Work-family experience included 3 single-item questions and the Work and Family Conflict Scale, and mental health symptoms included the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) and Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 scale. Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary outcomes were work-to-family and family-to-work conflict and depressive symptoms and anxiety symptoms during August 2020. Depressive symptoms between 2018 (before the COVID-19 pandemic) and 2020 (during the COVID-19 pandemic) were compared by gender. Results: Among 215 physician parents who completed the August 2020 survey, 114 (53.0%) were female and the weighted mean (SD) age was 40.1 (3.57) years. Among physician parents, women were more likely to be responsible for childcare or schooling (24.6% [95% CI, 19.0%-30.2%] vs 0.8% [95% CI, 0.01%-2.1%]; P < .001) and household tasks (31.4% [95% CI, 25.4%-37.4%] vs 7.2% [95% CI, 3.5%-10.9%]; P < .001) during the pandemic compared with men. Women were also more likely than men to work primarily from home (40.9% [95% CI, 35.1%-46.8%] vs 22.0% [95% CI, 17.2%-26.8%]; P < .001) and reduce their work hours (19.4% [95% CI, 14.7%-24.1%] vs 9.4% [95% CI, 6.0%-12.8%]; P = .007). Women experienced greater work-to-family conflict (ß = 2.79; 95% CI, 1.00 to 4.59; P = .03), family-to-work conflict (ß = 3.09; 95% CI, 1.18-4.99; P = .02), and depressive (ß = 1.76; 95% CI, 0.56-2.95; P = .046) and anxiety (ß = 2.87; 95% CI, 1.49-4.26; P < .001) symptoms compared with men. We observed a difference between women and men in depressive symptoms during the COVID-19 pandemic (mean [SD] PHQ-9 score: 5.05 [6.64] vs 3.52 [5.75]; P = .009) that was not present before the pandemic (mean [SD] PHQ-9 score: 3.69 [5.26] vs 3.60 [6.30]; P = .86). Conclusions and Relevance: This study found significant gender disparities in work and family experiences and mental health symptoms among physician parents during the COVID-19 pandemic, which may translate to increased risk for suicide, medical errors, and lower quality of patient care for physician mothers. Institutional and public policy solutions are needed to mitigate the potential adverse consequences for women's careers and well-being.


Subject(s)
Mental Disorders/diagnosis , Parents , Sex Factors , Work-Life Balance/standards , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , Family Relations/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Psychometrics/instrumentation , Psychometrics/methods , Surveys and Questionnaires , Work-Life Balance/statistics & numerical data
3.
Neuron ; 109(20): 3196-3198, 2021 10 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1505578

ABSTRACT

Kay M. Tye shares how focusing on personal and team mental and physical health forms the necessary foundation for future success. In an interview with Neuron, she also discusses the need for better representation in STEM and how global lockdowns have reinvigorated her scientific interests in social homeostasis.


Subject(s)
Neurosciences , Women, Working , Work-Life Balance , COVID-19 , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Single Parent , Social Isolation , Travel , Videoconferencing
4.
Neuron ; 109(20): 3190-3192, 2021 10 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1505576

ABSTRACT

In Korea, the pandemic has elevated scientists as trusted sources for both policy decisions and dinner table conversation. In an interview with Neuron, Eunji Cheong discusses how we need to support future generations by fostering scientific thinking, patience, and flexibility.


Subject(s)
Neurosciences , Policy Making , Professional Role , Thinking , COVID-19 , Congresses as Topic , Humans , Republic of Korea , SARS-CoV-2 , Women, Working , Work-Life Balance
6.
Neuron ; 109(20): 3187-3189, 2021 10 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1471683

ABSTRACT

In an interview with Neuron, Ishmail Abdus-Saboor talks about the future of team science and how the pandemic has renewed faith in basic research, and he emphasizes the importance of humanity and diversity in science for fueling innovation and equal talent needing equal opportunity.


Subject(s)
Interdisciplinary Research , Neurosciences , COVID-19 , Cultural Diversity , Humans , Minority Groups , Pain , SARS-CoV-2 , Work-Life Balance
7.
Neuron ; 109(19): 3028-3030, 2021 10 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1457250

ABSTRACT

In an interview with Neuron, Inbal Goshen discusses a challenging year, managing a research program through her own serious health scare, and a global pandemic. She offers advice for young scientists and expresses admiration for a role model she never met in person.


Subject(s)
Neurosciences/trends , COVID-19 , History, 20th Century , History, 21st Century , Mentors , Pandemics , Teaching , Work-Life Balance
8.
Neuron ; 109(19): 3015-3017, 2021 10 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1457247

ABSTRACT

Indira Raman reflects on what science has offered through the pandemic and social upheaval of last year. In this Neuron Q&A, she highlights how the scientific method can enrich all aspects of our lives and inform our worldview.


Subject(s)
Neurosciences/education , Neurosciences/trends , COVID-19 , History, 21st Century , Humans , Pandemics , Research , Work-Life Balance
10.
J Healthc Manag ; 66(5): 325-327, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1434539

Subject(s)
Work-Life Balance
11.
PLoS One ; 16(3): e0249127, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1410564

ABSTRACT

The flexibility allowed by the mobilization of technology disintegrated the traditional work-life boundary for most professionals. Whether working from home is the key or impediment to academics' efficiency and work-life balance became a daunting question for both scientists and their employers. The recent pandemic brought into focus the merits and challenges of working from home on a level of personal experience. Using a convenient sampling, we surveyed 704 academics while working from home and found that the pandemic lockdown decreased the work efficiency for almost half of the researchers but around a quarter of them were more efficient during this time compared to the time before. Based on the gathered personal experience, 70% of the researchers think that in the future they would be similarly or more efficient than before if they could spend more of their work-time at home. They indicated that in the office they are better at sharing thoughts with colleagues, keeping in touch with their team, and collecting data, whereas at home they are better at working on their manuscript, reading the literature, and analyzing their data. Taking well-being also into account, 66% of them would find it ideal to work more from home in the future than they did before the lockdown. These results draw attention to how working from home is becoming a major element of researchers' life and that we have to learn more about its influencer factors and coping tactics in order to optimize its arrangements.


Subject(s)
Research Personnel/psychology , Work-Life Balance , Adaptation, Psychological , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Surveys and Questionnaires , Work Performance , Young Adult
13.
Trends Cancer ; 7(10): 879-882, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1373288

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has had a detrimental effect on research. However, little has been done to identify and solve the unique challenges faced by early career investigators (ECIs). As a group of American Cancer Society-funded ECIs, we provide recommendations for solving these challenges in the aftermath of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Career Mobility , Research Personnel , Work-Life Balance , Humans , Mentoring , Research Personnel/economics , Societies, Scientific
14.
PLoS One ; 16(8): e0256663, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1372019

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in 2019, has shocked the entire world. As an effort to control the disease spread, the Indian government declared a nationwide lockdown on March 25th, 2020. As dental treatment was considered high risk in the spread of COVID-19, dentistry became one of the most vulnerable professions during this time. Dental professionals had to face job layoffs, salary cuts in professional colleges, closure of private clinics resulting in huge psychological, moral, and financial crises. Studies during the previous and present pandemics have shown mental issues among health care workers necessitating institutional reforms, along with early care and support. A balance in the work-life amongst professionals is the key to better efficiency and, was majorly affected during the COVID-19 pandemic lockdown due to sudden unexpected changes. Hence this study was conducted to understand the changes they underwent both at home and professional front with a hypothesis that physical and mental health, activities, relationship status, and workplace influence the work-life balance. METHODS: A pre-validated questionnaire survey was done on dentists across India. Structural Equation Modelling and path analysis were applied to the data collected. RESULTS: The results of the study supported the hypothesis that factors like physical and mental health, activities, relationship status, and workplace influenced the work-life balance directly. A significant imbalance was seen amongst the female dentists. CONCLUSION: The present study proved the unpreparedness among dental professionals. Hence an evolutionary phase in every field with better working protocols, robust mental health support, and a focus on strategies to face future such emergencies is required.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Dentists/psychology , Work-Life Balance , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , India , Male , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workplace/psychology
15.
J Occup Environ Med ; 63(6): 469-475, 2021 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1367066

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study sheds light on the pathways leading to an increase in workers stress levels and the resulting effects on job performance during a pandemic. METHODS: Path analyses were conducted on a sample of 459 Canadian workers using MPlus software. These analyses allowed us to determine whether the association between potential stressors during lockdown and job performance was mediated by workers' stress. RESULTS: The results revealed four significant indirect associations. Work-life balance dissatisfaction, gender (women), and marital tensions were indirectly associated with lower job performance because of their positive associations with stress. Teleworking was associated with higher job performance because of its negative association with stress. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that specific stressors are worth targeting with interventions to ensure job performance.


Subject(s)
Work Performance , Canada/epidemiology , Emotions , Female , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires , Work-Life Balance
16.
Int J Circumpolar Health ; 80(1): 1959700, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1352067

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study is to identify how managers of micro-sized enterprises experience the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on their business operations, work-life balance and well-being. Further, the study aims to make comparisons between managers of micro-sized businesses and managers of small-sized businesses. This mixed-method study is based on qualitative interviews with ten managers of micro-sized enterprises and a questionnaire answered by 95 managers of micro-sized and small-sized enterprises in regions in the north of Sweden. Managers of micro-sized enterprises reported significantly worse scores for mental well-being, job satisfaction and life satisfaction in comparison with managers of small-sized enterprises. Three themes emerged from the qualitative analysis: Changed leadership role, Impact on private life and Impact on well-being. In the interviews, the managers of micro-sized enterprises reported that the pandemic had increased their workload and forced them to mobilise strategies for enterprise survival. This study indicates that managers of micro-sized enterprises had changed their leadership role and increased their workload and number of work tasks, including supporting the employees, developing strategies for business survival and applying for governmental support. However, the managers demonstrated creativity in finding new solutions for their enterprises.


Subject(s)
Administrative Personnel/psychology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Entrepreneurship/statistics & numerical data , Small Business/organization & administration , Work-Life Balance , Workload/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Occupational Health/statistics & numerical data , Occupational Health Services/organization & administration , Sweden
17.
J Clin Nurs ; 30(21-22): 3153-3162, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1334485

ABSTRACT

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to determine the relationship of nurses' psychological well-being with their coronaphobia and work-life balance during the COVID-19 pandemic. BACKGROUND: COVID-19 is a global life-threatening disease. The COVID-19 pandemic negatively affects nurses' mental health. No studies have been conducted to determine the factors that affect nurses' psychological well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic in Turkey. If nurses' psychological well-being is impaired during the COVID-19 pandemic, the quality of nursing care and the nurses' performance may be negatively affected. DESIGN: This is a descriptive, correlational and cross-sectional study. The Strengthening the Reporting of Observational studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) reporting guideline checklist for cross-sectional studies was used for reporting in this study. METHODS: The study population consisted of the nurses working in a Health Application and Research Center in Turkey. Data were collected using Google forms between June-August 2020. The study sample consisted of 295 nurses who voluntarily agreed to participate in the study and used social media tools. The data were collected using a Sociodemographic Characteristics Form, the COVID-19 Phobia Scale (C19P-S), the Work-Life Balance (WLB) Scale and the Psychological Well-Being (PWB) Scale. The factors that affect psychological well-being were determined using the stepwise multiple linear regression analysis. RESULTS: The nurses' work-life balance and psychological well-being were negatively affected during the COVID-19 pandemic. Their COVID-19 phobia was mild-to-moderate level. The nurses' psychological well-being was significantly affected by the variable of neglecting life the most, followed by coronaphobia and work-life balance, which explain 75% of the variance. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that coronaphobia experienced by nurses and work-life balance was related to their psychological well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic. Managers should take measures (regulating the working hours) to decrease nurses' COVID-19 phobia (education, counselling or psychotherapy) and work-life imbalance. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Nurses' peers, managers and organisations need to take into account nurses' negative emotions and behaviours and organise training programmes to help them overcome their fears, communicate clearly and provide for their basic needs. Organisations, including managers and nurses, must recognise the distress being experienced by their nurses and create safe environments in which to have significant conversations. Nurses' mental health can be screened regularly by multidisciplinary teams, psychological support can be provided when required, and working hours can be regulated through appropriate shifts and breaks that will ensure work-life balance during and after the COVID-19 pandemic. Nurses receiving emotional support from their families and friends (via chatting and sharing troubles) can also contribute positively. These measures and regulations will positively affect nurses' psychological well-being and contribute to an increase in the quality of care and nurses' performance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Work-Life Balance
18.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(13)2021 Jul 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1299423

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic affected the relationship between work and life almost everywhere on the planet. Suddenly, remote work became the mainstream way of working for millions of workers. In this context, we explore how the relationship between remote work, work stress, and work-life developed during pandemic times in a Latin America context. In a sample of 1285 responses collected between April and May 2020, through a PLS-SEM model, we found that remote work in pandemic times increased perceived stress (ß = 0.269; p < 0.01), reduced work-life balance (ß = -0.225; p < 0.01) and work satisfaction (ß = -0.190; p < 0.01), and increased productivity (ß = 0.120; p < 0.01) and engagement (ß = 0.120; p < 0.01). We also found a partial moderating effect, competitive and complementary, of perceived stress, and one significant gender difference: when working remotely, perceived stress affects men's productivity more acutely than women's productivity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Female , Humans , Latin America/epidemiology , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Work-Life Balance
20.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(13)2021 06 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1295819

ABSTRACT

The participation of women with young children in the Japanese labor force has increased dramatically in recent years, bringing growing potential for conflict between work and family roles amid inadequate social systems, such as childcare support. Thus, work-life balance (WLB) of mothers may influence their children's mental health and lifestyle. This study aims to clarify the relationship between parents' WLB and children's mental health, as well as the underlying factors of parental stress and nurturing attitude. The study is based on a questionnaire survey administered in 2019 to fifth-grade elementary school students and their caregivers in Aichi Prefecture, Japan. The regression results indicated that the higher the work-family negative spillover, the higher the child's externalizing and internalizing problems, and the higher the positive spillover, the lower the problems and the higher the prosocial behaviors. Path analysis indicates that maternal WLB is negatively and positively related to children's behavior through maternal stress and parenting practices. The study suggests that maternal WLB is related to children's emotional and behavioral problems. WLB may impact children's emotional and behavioral problems through parents' mental health and involvement with their children, particularly because of work arrangements changing with the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Social Adjustment , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Japan , Mothers , Pandemics , Parenting , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Work-Life Balance
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