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2.
Psychiatr Clin North Am ; 45(4): 765-777, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2182473

ABSTRACT

The older adult population in the United States is poised to reach 83.7 million by 2050, and up to 20% will suffer from cognitive and mental illnesses. We do not have the workforce available to meet this need; therefore, general psychiatrists will care for many older psychiatric patients. Enhancing learning opportunities during general medical education and residency could improve the knowledge of general psychiatrists and encourage recruitment into geriatric psychiatry. This article outlines geriatric psychiatry education in medical school, residency, and geriatric psychiatry fellowship with suggestions for recruitment into the field, along with recommendations for enhanced learning for general psychiatrists.


Subject(s)
Internship and Residency , Psychiatry , Students, Medical , Humans , United States , Aged , Geriatric Psychiatry , Psychiatry/education , Workforce
4.
AORN J ; 115(4): 361-363, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2157690
5.
Big Data ; 10(S1): S25-S29, 2022 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2151806

ABSTRACT

Achieving a modern equity-oriented public health system requires the development of a public health workforce with the skills and competencies needed to generate findings and integrate knowledge using diverse data. Yet current workforce capabilities and infrastructure are misaligned with what is needed to harness both new and older forms of data and to translate them into information that is equity contextualized. As with other articles in this supplement, this article builds from a literature review, environmental scan, and deliberations from the National Commission to Transform Public Health Data Systems. The article summarizes some of the challenges around current workforce capabilities and pipeline. The article identifies where the technology and data sectors can contribute skills, expertise, and assets in support of innovative workforce models and augment the development of public health workforce competencies.


Subject(s)
Health Workforce , Public Health , Technology , Workforce
6.
JMIR Public Health Surveill ; 7(9): e31930, 2021 09 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2141353

ABSTRACT

This report aimed to provide an overview of the epidemiological situation of COVID-19 in Morocco and to review the actions carried out as part of the national response to this pandemic. The methodology adopted was based on literature review, interviews with officials and actors in the field, and remote discussion workshops with a multidisciplinary and multisectoral working group. Morocco took advantage of the capacities already strengthened within the framework of the application of the provisions of the International Health Regulations (IHR) of 2005. A SWOT analysis made it possible to note that an unprecedented political commitment enabled all the necessary means to face the pandemic and carry out all the response activities, including a campaign of relentless communication. Nevertheless, and despite the efforts made, the shortage of human resources, especially those qualified in intensive care and resuscitation, has been the main drawback to be addressed. The main lesson learned is a need to further strengthen national capacities to prepare for and respond to possible public health emergencies and to embark on a process overhaul of the health system, including research into innovative tools to ensure the continuity of the various disease prevention and control activities. In addition, response to a health crisis is not only the responsibility of the health sector but also intersectoral collaboration is needed to guarantee an optimal coordinated fight. Community-oriented approaches in public health have to be strengthened through more participation and involvement of nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) and civil society in operational and strategic planning.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Public Health/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Testing/methods , COVID-19 Testing/standards , Humans , Morocco/epidemiology , Public Health/statistics & numerical data , Quarantine/psychology , Quarantine/standards , Workforce/standards
7.
Am Soc Clin Oncol Educ Book ; 42: 1-10, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2140235

ABSTRACT

The conduct of clinical cancer research has faced considerable challenges in recent years, and the situation has only been exacerbated by the global pandemic. The growing complexity of clinical trials and rising administrative burdens had been causing greater expense and difficulty in recruiting and retaining an appropriately trained workforce even before the well-publicized increase in turnover caused by the pandemic. Longstanding issues such as restrictive inclusion criteria and complicated trial designs have negatively affected already low clinical trial accrual rates, limited sites capable of opening studies and enrolling patients, and worsened disparities in trial participation. Opposing these elements are efforts by ASCO and other organizations to increase affordability, access, and equity in clinical trial enrollment. To provide diverse perspectives on how these challenges are affecting cancer research as we emerge from the pandemic, we asked a panel of experienced clinical research leaders from both academic and community cancer centers to answer questions they felt most pressing about the business of conducting clinical research today and where they felt the field was moving in the near future.


Subject(s)
Financial Management , Neoplasms , Clinical Trials as Topic , Humans , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/therapy , Pandemics , Workforce
8.
Twin Res Hum Genet ; 25(3): 156-164, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2133125

ABSTRACT

Nature and nurture have always been a prerogative of evolutionary biologists. The environment's role in shaping an organism's phenotype has always intrigued us. Since the inception of humankind, twinning has existed with an unsettled parley on the contribution of nature (i.e. genetics) versus nurture (i.e. environment), which can influence the phenotypes. The study of twins measures the genetic contribution and that of the environmental influence for a particular trait, acting as a catalyst, fine-tuning the phenotypic trajectories. This is further evident because a number of human diseases show a spectrum of clinical manifestations with the same underlying molecular aberration. As of now, there is no definite way to conclude just from the genomic data the severity of a disease or even to predict who will get affected. This greatly justifies initiating a twin registry for a country as diverse and populated as India. There is an unmet need to set up a nationwide database to carefully curate the information on twins, serving as a valuable biorepository to study their overall susceptibility to disease. Establishing a twin registry is of paramount importance to harness the wealth of human information related to the biomedical, anthropological, cultural, social and economic significance.


Subject(s)
Diseases in Twins , Twins , Diseases in Twins/epidemiology , Diseases in Twins/genetics , Humans , India/epidemiology , Registries , Twins/genetics , Workforce
9.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(22)2022 Nov 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2116057

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a large and varying impact on primary care. This paper studies changes in the tasks of general practitioners (GPs) and associated staff during the COVID-19 pandemic. Data from the PRICOV-19 study of 5093 GPs in 38 countries were used. We constructed a scale for task changes and performed multilevel analyses. The scale was reliable at both GP and country level. Clustering of task changes at country level was considerable (25%). During the pandemic, staff members were more involved in giving information and recommendations to patients contacting the practice by phone, and they were more involved in triage. GPs took on additional responsibilities and were more involved in reaching out to patients. Problems due to staff absence, when dealt with internally, were related to more task changes. Task changes were larger in practices employing a wider range of professional groups. Whilst GPs were happy with the task changes in practices with more changes, they also felt the need for further training. A higher-than-average proportion of elderly people and people with a chronic condition in the practice were related to task changes. The number of infections in a country during the first wave of the pandemic was related to task changes. Other characteristics at country level were not associated with task changes. Future research on the sustainability of task changes after the pandemic is needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , General Practice , Humans , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Workforce , Primary Health Care
10.
J Perinat Neonatal Nurs ; 36(4): 335-336, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2114595
12.
N C Med J ; 83(6): 445-447, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2111225

ABSTRACT

North Carolina faces a significant health workforce shortage exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic. To meet this challenge, the Department of Commerce and the Department of Health and Human Services are prioritizing equity, creativity, and collaboration.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Humans , North Carolina , COVID-19/epidemiology , Workforce , Commerce
13.
N C Med J ; 83(6): 398-403, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2111224

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 exposed and exacerbated the historical shortages and maldistribution of the health workforce in North Carolina. This edition of the North Carolina Medical Journal highlights the work being done in our state to address these needs, and calls for an intentional and persistent approach to planning for and developing the workforce needed to produce health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , North Carolina , COVID-19/epidemiology , Workforce , Health Workforce
14.
Psychiatr Clin North Am ; 45(2): 283-295, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1849572

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic and murder of Mr George Floyd served as catalysts for examining antiracism efforts in psychiatry training programs and health care systems. Our recruitment and retention of Black, Indigenous, and other racial/ethnic minority psychiatry trainees has not met the demand for care and does not represent the communities served. Training directors at a critical juncture in creating systemic changes to recruitment, retention, policies, and curricular competencies to address ongoing inequities and disparities in health care. We describe several strategies and considerations for training directors in supporting a diverse psychiatric workforce.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Psychiatry , Ethnicity , Humans , Minority Groups , Pandemics , Psychiatry/education , Workforce
15.
BMJ Open ; 12(11): e056067, 2022 11 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2119487

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study sought to identify the epidemiological investigation challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic and offer insights into the underlying issues. DESIGN: An exploratory qualitative study used thematic analysis of semistructured and in-depth individual interviews. SETTING: This study was conducted in Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Guangdong Province. PARTICIPANTS: Twenty-four participants consented to participate in an in-depth interview. Transcribed recordings were managed using NVivo software and analysed using inductive thematic analysis. RESULTS: The qualitative analysis revealed five key themes: high-intensity epidemiological investigation task, emergency management requiring improvement in the early stage, respondent uncertainty, impact on work and social life and inadequate early-stage Joint Prevention and Control Mechanism. CONCLUSION: This survey focuses on the epidemiology workforce at the forefront of the COVID-19 pandemic and qualitatively describes their experiences, vocational issues and psychological stressors. We found that the problems of epidemiological investigation posed intense challenges to the epidemiology workforce. These findings highlight the epidemiological investigation challenges associated with this pandemic. We have provided some suggestions that may help improve the efficiency and quality of the epidemiology workforce in China.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , United States , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Qualitative Research , Workforce , Stress, Psychological
16.
BMJ ; 379: o2775, 2022 11 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2118547
17.
Ann Glob Health ; 88(1): 96, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2100230

ABSTRACT

Background: Education and capacity building in palliative care are greatly needed in Nigeria. Currently, two institutions integrate palliative care into the undergraduate medical curriculum and no post graduate training exists. A team from the University of Lagos in Nigeria and Northwestern University in the US collaborated to design, implement, and evaluate a 12-hour virtual palliative care training program for Nigerian health professionals. Objective: This study investigated the impact of the first session of the training program on healthcare professionals' knowledge, skills, attitudes, and confidence in palliative care. Methods: The Education in Palliative and End-of-Life (EPEC) curriculum and the Kenya Hospices and Palliative Care Association (KEHPCA) curriculum were used as foundations for the program and adapted for the Nigerian context. Delivered online, the training focused on goals of palliative care, whole patient assessment, communication skills, pain management, psychosocial issues, palliative care in COVID, oncology, and HIV. A mixed-methods evaluation based on Kirkpatrick's evaluation framework was used and data were gathered from surveys and focus groups. Findings: Thirty-five health professionals completed the training. The training had a positive impact on knowledge, skills, and attitudes. Confidence in providing end-of-life care increased from 27.3% to 92.9% while confidence in prescribing medication to relieve symptoms at the end of life increased from 42.9% to 92.0%. Performance on multiple-choice knowledge tests increased by 10% (p < 0.01). All participants stated that they would recommend the program to a peer while 96.4% reported the program was relevant to the Nigerian context. Qualitative analysis suggested that the training would help participants provide more holistic care for patients, communicate better, and change how they interacted with families. Topics to be addressed in future training were identified. Conclusions: This virtual training can be an important element in palliative care capacity building in Nigeria and represents a model for global health collaboration.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Humans , Palliative Care , Nigeria , Curriculum , Workforce
18.
Stud Health Technol Inform ; 299: 279-282, 2022 Nov 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2099075

ABSTRACT

The effectiveness of the health care system is largely dependent on the knowledge, skills, and motivation of health care workers, which was particularly evident during the COVID-19 pandemic. The systemic planning of human resources is therefore an important condition for ensuring the sustainability and efficiency of the health care system. This article focuses on outlining a basic model of human resource planning in health care and the investigation of related complexities. An in-depth analysis framework based on various materials and evidence is proposed in order to outline the factors that influence human resource planning in health care. In order to achieve greater credibility of the research results, the in-depth analytical process employs an extensive review of the literature and carries out an investigation of numerous sources and materials, in both the national and international contexts. The purpose of the human resource planning initiatives in health care is to calculate the needed number of health care workers in the future, on the basis of past and current data, and based on assumptions about future trends in supply and demand. The research findings reveal that this is a very challenging task, as there are typically many unknowns in future planning, and, in addition, planners often face a lack of reliable data and systemic deficiencies. Moreover, the study indicates that unplanned and delayed solutions concerning the human resource needs in health care can only alleviate problems, but in no way can they replace effective strategic measures and timely structural changes within the health care ecosystem.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Humans , Ecosystem , COVID-19/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care , Workforce
19.
J Health Organ Manag ; ahead-of-print(ahead-of-print)2022 Sep 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2097569

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This paper explores the role of hospital cleaners and their contribution to healthcare safety. Few studies have examined the activities and input of hospital cleaners, rendering them largely invisible in healthcare research. Yet, as coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has demonstrated, this sizeable workforce carries out tasks critical to healthcare facilities and wider health system functioning. DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: Drawing on the work of Habermas, the authors examine the literature surrounding cleaners and quality and safety in healthcare. The authors theorise cleaners' work as both instrumental and communicative and examine the perceptions of healthcare professionals and managers, as well as cleaners themselves, of healthcare professionals and managers' role and contribution to quality and safety. FINDINGS: Cleaners are generally perceived by the literature as performing repetitive - albeit important - tasks in isolation from patients. Cleaners are not considered part of the "healthcare team" and are excluded from decision-making and interprofessional communication. Yet, cleaners can contribute to patient care; ubiquity and proximity of cleaners to patients offer insights and untapped potential for involvement in hospital safety. ORIGINALITY/VALUE: This paper brings an overdue focus to this labour force by examining the nature and potential of their work. This paper offers a new application of Habermas' work to this domain, rendering visible how the framing of cleaners' role works to exclude this important workforce from participation in the patient safety agenda.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospitals , Humans , Patient Safety , Personnel, Hospital , Workforce
20.
J Infus Nurs ; 45(6): 299-305, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2097523

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic changed home infusion nursing dramatically by increasing demand for home infusion nurses while decreasing their availability. Home infusion of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) is an option for treatment of numerous conditions and requires considerable infusion time. Use of a higher-concentration IVIg product and shorter escalation increments may decrease required infusion time. The authors conducted a retrospective database analysis that identified 23 patients receiving IVIg before transitioning to a 10% IVIg product with a 15-minute rate escalation protocol (Gammaplex 10% IVIg) and evaluated the total infusion time before and after the transition. Among the 23 who received IVIg, the mean ± SD IVIg dose per dosing cycle before transitioning was 1.2 ± 0.7 g/kg given in 1 to 5 infusions per cycle. The mean ± SD time per infusion was 2.8 ± 0.8 hours before the transition and 2.6 ± 0.7 hours per infusion after the transition. The infusion time decreased after transition in 13 patients (56.5%), did not change in 5 patients (21.7%), and increased in 5 patients (21.7%). Nurse education on IVIg rate escalation may facilitate faster achievement of the maximum safe infusion rate and reduce infusion times. A trial transition to this 10% IVIg product with a 15-minute rate escalation protocol may also reduce infusion times.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Immunologic Deficiency Syndromes , Humans , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous , COVID-19/drug therapy , Retrospective Studies , Pandemics , Workforce
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