Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 45
Filter
1.
Am J Nurs ; 121(12): 18-28, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1506930

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: For nurses, the challenges posed by demanding work environments and schedules often lead to fatigue, and this can be exacerbated during crises like the COVID-19 pandemic. In this article, the authors discuss causes and challenges of nurse fatigue and consider several evidence-based strategies and solutions for individual nurses and organizations. Barriers to implementation, including a negative workplace culture and inadequate staffing, are also described, and several resources are presented.


Subject(s)
Fatigue/epidemiology , Fatigue/prevention & control , Nurses/psychology , COVID-19/nursing , Humans , Workforce/statistics & numerical data , Workplace/organization & administration , Workplace/psychology
2.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 17(22)2020 11 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1456323

ABSTRACT

Skill mix refers to the number and educational experience of nurses working in clinical settings. Authors have used several measures to determine the skill mix, which includes nurse-to-patient ratio and the proportion of baccalaureate-prepared nurses. Observational studies have tested the association between nursing skill mix and patient outcomes (mortality). To date, this body of research has not been subject to systematic review or meta-analysis. The aim of this study is to systematically review and meta-analyse observational and experimental research that tests the association between nursing skill mix and patient mortality in medical and surgical settings. We will search four key electronic databases-MEDLINE [OVID], EMBASE [OVID], CINAHL [EBSCOhost], and ProQuest Central (five databases)-from inception. Title, abstract, and full-text screening will be undertaken independently by at least two researchers using COVIDENCE review management software. We will include studies where the authors report an association between nursing skill mix and outcomes in adult medical and surgical inpatients. Extracted data from included studies will consist measures of nursing skill mix and inpatient mortality outcomes. A meta-analysis will be undertaken if there are at least two studies with similar designs, exposures, and outcomes. The findings will inform future research and workforce planning in health systems internationally.


Subject(s)
Nursing Staff, Hospital , Patients , Adult , Databases, Factual , General Surgery/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Nursing Staff, Hospital/standards , Nursing Staff, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Patients/statistics & numerical data , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling/statistics & numerical data , Workforce/statistics & numerical data
3.
BMJ Open ; 10(1): e034400, 2020 01 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455701

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The health workforce is an integral component of the healthcare system. Comprehensive, high-quality data on the health workforce are essential to identifying gaps in health service provision, as well as informing future health workforce and health services planning, and health policy. While many data sources are used in Australia for these purposes, the quality of the data sources with respect to relevance, accessibility and accuracy is not clear. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This scoping review aims to identify and appraise publicly available data sources describing the Australian health workforce. The review will include any data source (eg, registry, administrative database and survey) or document reporting a data source (eg, journal article, report) on the Australian health workforce, which is publicly available and describes the characteristics of the workforce. The search will be conducted in 10 bibliographic databases and the grey literature using an iterative process. Screening of titles and abstracts will be undertaken by two investigators, independently, using Covidence software. Any disagreement between investigators will be resolved by a third investigator. Documents/data sources identified as potentially eligible will be retrieved in full text and reviewed following the same process. Data will be extracted using a customised data extraction tool. A customised appraisal tool will be used to assess the relevance, accessibility and accuracy of included data sources. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The scoping review is a secondary analysis of existing, publicly available data sources and does not require ethics approval. The findings of this scoping review will further our understanding of the quality and availability of data sources used for health workforce and health services planning in Australia. The results will be submitted for publication in peer-reviewed journals and presented at conferences targeted at health workforce and public health topics.


Subject(s)
Delivery of Health Care/standards , Health Policy , Health Workforce/standards , Public Health , Workforce/statistics & numerical data , Australia , Humans , Peer Review
4.
J Nurs Adm ; 51(10): 488-494, 2021 Oct 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1406515

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to describe the relationships between perceptions of the pandemic impact on clinical nurses' and nurse leaders' intent to leave their current position and the profession and the differences in pandemic impact and intent to leave variables based on background factors. BACKGROUND: There is much discussion and concern about the COVID-19 pandemic impact on nurses' health and the nursing workforce. METHODS: More than 5000 nurses from a national sample participated in a cross-sectional, descriptive study. Participants rated their perceptions of the pandemic impact on their practice and their intent to leave their position and profession. RESULTS: Pandemic impact was rated high overall and was highest in nurses with 25+ years of experience and in managers/directors. Eleven percent of the total sample indicated they intended to leave their position, and 20% were undecided. Nurses who rated pandemic impact at the highest level had higher intent to leave their position. Of the respondents, less than 2% indicated they were leaving the nursing profession, whereas 8% were undecided. CONCLUSIONS: This is the 1st quantitative report of perceived level of pandemic impact on direct care nurses and nurse managers/directors at the time of this writing. The combination of those who intend to leave and those who are uncertain about leaving their positions could cause instability in the workforce if not reversed. Organizational attention to nurse well-being, work environment and staffing is imperative.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Intention , Nurses/psychology , Personnel Turnover , Workforce/statistics & numerical data , Workplace , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Report , United States
7.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 118(34)2021 08 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1360223

ABSTRACT

Essential worker absenteeism has been a pressing problem in the COVID-19 pandemic. Nearly 20% of US hospitals experienced staff shortages, exhausting replacement pools and at times requiring COVID-positive healthcare workers to remain at work. To our knowledge there are no data-informed models examining how different staffing strategies affect epidemic dynamics on a network in the context of rising worker absenteeism. Here we develop a susceptible-infected-quarantined-recovered adaptive network model using pair approximations to gauge the effects of worker replacement versus redistribution of work among remaining healthy workers in the early epidemic phase. Parameterized with hospital data, the model exhibits a time-varying trade-off: Worker replacement minimizes peak prevalence in the early phase, while redistribution minimizes final outbreak size. Any "ideal" strategy requires balancing the need to maintain a baseline number of workers against the desire to decrease total number infected. We show that one adaptive strategy-switching from replacement to redistribution at epidemic peak-decreases disease burden by 9.7% and nearly doubles the final fraction of healthy workers compared to pure replacement.


Subject(s)
Absenteeism , COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Pandemics , Quarantine , Shift Work Schedule , Workforce/statistics & numerical data
8.
PLoS One ; 16(8): e0255680, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1341508

ABSTRACT

New emerging infectious diseases are identified every year, a subset of which become global pandemics like COVID-19. In the case of COVID-19, many governments have responded to the ongoing pandemic by imposing social policies that restrict contacts outside of the home, resulting in a large fraction of the workforce either working from home or not working. To ensure essential services, however, a substantial number of workers are not subject to these limitations, and maintain many of their pre-intervention contacts. To explore how contacts among such "essential" workers, and between essential workers and the rest of the population, impact disease risk and the effectiveness of pandemic control, we evaluated several mathematical models of essential worker contacts within a standard epidemiology framework. The models were designed to correspond to key characteristics of cashiers, factory employees, and healthcare workers. We find in all three models that essential workers are at substantially elevated risk of infection compared to the rest of the population, as has been documented, and that increasing the numbers of essential workers necessitates the imposition of more stringent controls on contacts among the rest of the population to manage the pandemic. Importantly, however, different archetypes of essential workers differ in both their individual probability of infection and impact on the broader pandemic dynamics, highlighting the need to understand and target intervention for the specific risks faced by different groups of essential workers. These findings, especially in light of the massive human costs of the current COVID-19 pandemic, indicate that contingency plans for future epidemics should account for the impacts of essential workers on disease spread.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/transmission , Infection Control , Physical Distancing , Workforce , COVID-19/epidemiology , Epidemics/prevention & control , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/standards , Infection Control/statistics & numerical data , Models, Statistical , New York City/epidemiology , Occupations/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Quarantine/statistics & numerical data , Risk Factors , Vulnerable Populations/statistics & numerical data , Workforce/organization & administration , Workforce/statistics & numerical data
9.
PLoS One ; 16(7): e0255350, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1329137

ABSTRACT

The aims of this study are to evaluate and describe mental health workforce and capacity, and to describe the relationship between workforce capacity and patterns of care in local areas. We conducted a comparative demonstration study of the applicability of an internationally validated standardised service classification instrument-the Description and Evaluation of Services and Directories-DESDE-LTC) using the emerging mental health ecosystems research (MHESR) approach. Using DESDE-LTC as the framework, and drawing from international occupation classifications, the workforce was classified according to characteristics including the type of care provided and professional background. Our reference area was the Australian Capital Territory, which we compared with two other urban districts in Australia (Sydney and South East Sydney) and three benchmark international health districts (Helsinki-Uusima (Finland), Verona (Italy) and Gipuzkoa (Spain)). We also compared our data with national level data where available. The Australian and Finnish regions had a larger and more highly skilled workforce than the southern European regions. The pattern of workforce availability and profile varied, even within the same country, at the local level. We found significant differences between regional rates of identified rates of psychiatrists and psychologists, and national averages. Using a standardised classification instrument at the local level, and our occupational groupings, we were able to assess the available workforce and provide information relevant to planners about the actual capacity of the system. Data obtained at local level is critical to providing planners with reliable data to inform their decision making.


Subject(s)
Mental Health Services/statistics & numerical data , Workforce/statistics & numerical data , Australia , Humans , Nurses/statistics & numerical data , Psychiatry/statistics & numerical data , Social Workers/statistics & numerical data
10.
JAAPA ; 34(8): 1-3, 2021 Aug 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1328937

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The COVID-19 pandemic has been exceptionally disruptive to healthcare delivery, exposing the strengths and weaknesses of our healthcare system. Though systems will continue to improvise in the short term to provide essential patient care, thoughtful consideration should be given to a long-term approach to improve healthcare delivery. Policy makers, legislators, and healthcare system leaders have the opportunity to reflect on lessons learned during this time and update outdated and detrimental restrictions affecting healthcare providers who have been vital to the pandemic response. This article focuses on lessons learned about the use of physician assistants and NPs, who have been readily deployed during this time.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Health Workforce/statistics & numerical data , Nurse Practitioners/statistics & numerical data , Physician Assistants/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Primary Health Care/organization & administration , Workforce/statistics & numerical data
14.
Acad Med ; 96(6): 808-812, 2021 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1242112

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is a worldwide pandemic, with frontlines that look drastically different than in past conflicts: that is, women now make up a sizeable majority of the health care workforce. American women have a long history of helping in times of hardship, filling positions on the home front vacated by men who enlisted as soldiers during World War I and similarly serving in crucial roles on U.S. military bases, on farms, and in factories during World War II. The COVID-19 pandemic has represented a novel battleground, as the first in which women have taken center stage, not only in their roles as physicians, respiratory therapists, nurses, and the like, but also by serving in leadership positions and facilitating innovations in science, technology, and policy. Yet, the pandemic has exacerbated multiple pain points that have disproportionally impacted women in health care, including shortages in correctly sized personal protective equipment and uniforms, inadequate support for pregnant and breastfeeding providers, and challenges associated with work-life balance and obtaining childcare. While the pandemic has facilitated several positive advancements in addressing these challenges, there is still much work to be done for women to achieve equity and optimal support in their roles on the frontlines.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Workforce/statistics & numerical data , Women, Working/history , Workforce/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Empowerment , Female , Gender Equity , Health Personnel/trends , History, 20th Century , Humans , Leadership , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Women, Working/statistics & numerical data , World War I , World War II
15.
Nucl Med Commun ; 42(2): 138-149, 2021 Feb 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1236282

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: COVID-19 brought about unprecedented challenges to healthcare, with nuclear medicine (NM) being no exception. The British Nuclear Medicine Society (BNMS) COVID-19 survey assessed the impact of the first wave of pandemic on NM services in the UK. With COVID-19 resurge compounded by seasonal winter pressures, we reflect and share lessons learnt from the first wave of pandemic to guide future strategy. METHODS: A questionnaire consisting of 34 questions was sent out to all BNMS members over 2 weeks in May 2020, to evaluate the impact of 'lockdown'. RESULTS: One hundred thirty-eight members (92 sites) from a multidisciplinary background responded. There was a 65% reduction across all services; 97.6% of respondents reported some reduction in diagnostic procedures and 71.3% reduction in therapies; 85% worked with a reduced workforce. The North East of England, Greater London and South East and Wessex were most affected by staff absences. The North East reported the highest number of COVID-19 positive staff; London reported the greatest lack of testing. The reported time required to clear the backlog was 1-12 months. Seventy-one percent of participants used BNMS COVID-19 guidance. CONCLUSION: The first wave caused a major disruption of NM service delivery and impacted on the workforce. The departmental strategies should tailor services to evolving local and regional differences in prevalence of COVID-19. A blanket shutdown of services with a 'one size fits all' strategy would likely have a severe impact on future delivery of NM and health services in general. Timely testing of staff and patients remains of paramount importance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Nuclear Medicine/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , United Kingdom/epidemiology , Workforce/statistics & numerical data
16.
J Med Imaging Radiat Oncol ; 65(3): 374-383, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1205930

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic demanded a rapid response within Radiation Oncology services to minimise the risk of infection to patients and workforce. This study aimed to assess whether the operational changes put in place to reduce infection risks were effective in engaging and supporting staff. METHODS: Our service's response saw staff and patients split into morning or afternoon shifts without overlap. Changes included extended clinic hours, modified treatment regimens, expanded online/electronic communication and remote working. Staff were invited to respond to an electronic questionnaire in September 2020, just after the peak of the second COVID-19 wave in Victoria. Responses captured demographic data, parental status, profession, happiness levels, fear of COVID-19 and e-communication efficacy. RESULTS: A 57% response rate was achieved. 69% of respondents were female; 40% were aged 45+ and 35% had school-aged children. Staff aged 45+ showed a significantly greater fear of COVID-19 than younger staff. 36% of respondents reported feeling nervous or anxious watching news reports about COVID-19. 92% of staff were happy with their work arrangements; staff with children were happier than staff without children with their shifts. Online chat/channels were reported as the preferred e-communication method between colleagues. CONCLUSION: Staff provided predominantly positive feedback to the changes made in response to the pandemic, reporting high levels of happiness and willingness to continue with the changes implemented during COVID-19. The strategies adopted worked well and the overall high levels of staff satisfaction will allow our service to quickly pivot should further surges, or another pandemic, arise.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/prevention & control , Radiation Oncologists/psychology , Radiation Oncologists/statistics & numerical data , Workforce/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Victoria
17.
Workplace Health Saf ; 69(4): 154-160, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1159537

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Planning occupational health and wellness services and support directed toward low-wage, essential workers in the COVID-19 pandemic has posed a number of challenges across work settings. This article explores the concerns and needs of low-wage essential workers as understood by experts in the field. METHODS: Leading experts in the areas of occupational health and safety, risk management, insurance, and professional education/training were identified and invited to participate in a Round Table discussion. Questions posed to experts were based on literature that addressed COVID-19, essential workers, low-wage workers, infection transmission, education/training, and social justice. FINDINGS: Experts agreed that special considerations must be in place to address the concerns and needs of the low-wage essential worker. These special considerations should address not only the worker's occupational experience but their family and home environment, fears and anxieties, and the economic impact of the COVID-19 restrictions and requirements. CONCLUSION/APPLICATION TO PRACTICE: The occupational health professional is a key resource to employers charged with addressing the concerns and needs of low-wage, essential workers during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Income/statistics & numerical data , Occupational Exposure/adverse effects , Workforce/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/etiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Occupational Exposure/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data
18.
Public Health Rep ; 137(2): 301-309, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1125372

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Essential workers in the United States need access to health care services for preventive care and for diagnosis and treatment of illnesses (coronavirus disease 2019 [COVID-19] or other infectious or chronic diseases) to remain healthy and continue working during a pandemic. This study evaluated access to health care services among selected essential workers. METHODS: We used the most recent data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2017-2018, to estimate the prevalence of 4 measures of health care access (having health insurance, being able to afford to see a doctor when needed, having a personal health care provider, and having a routine checkup in the past year) by broad and detailed occupation group among 189 208 adults aged 18-64. RESULTS: Of all occupations studied, workers in farming, fishing, and forestry occupations were most likely to have no health insurance (46.4%). Personal care aides were most likely to have been unable to see a doctor when needed because of cost (29.3%). Construction laborers were most likely to lack a personal health care provider (51.1%) and to have not had a routine physical checkup in the past year (50.6%). Compared with workers in general, workers in 3 broad occupation groups-food preparation and serving; building and grounds cleaning and maintenance; and construction trades-had significantly lower levels of health care access for all 4 measures. CONCLUSION: Lack of health insurance and underinsurance were common among subsets of essential workers. Limited access to health care might decrease essential workers' access to medical testing and needed care and hinder their ability to address underlying conditions, thereby increasing their risk of severe outcomes from some infectious diseases, such as COVID-19. Improving access to health care for all workers, including essential workers, is critical to ensure workers' health and workforce stability.


Subject(s)
Health Services Accessibility , Occupations/classification , Workforce/classification , Adult , Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System , Humans , Insurance, Health/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Occupations/statistics & numerical data , United States , Workforce/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
19.
Transfusion ; 61(3): 722-729, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1084456

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Spikes in the demand for blood components represent a substantial challenge to transfusion services. Simple metrics for characterizing volatility in blood components within the hospital transfusion service have not been established. METHODS: We measured the volatility of demand for blood services at a large academic urban general hospital over a 6-month period from July 2019 to December 2019 prior to the SARS-CoV2 pandemic. RESULTS: Among 4416 consecutive hours assessed, there were 693 h (16%) with spikes in demand for blood components with a mean (sd) of 3.8 (2.7) spikes/day. Spikes in demand were frequently clustered. The median number of hours between spikes differed by shift (6 h for days; 3 h for evenings; 3 h for nights). The percentage of shift hours with demand spikes also differed (9% day; 19% evening; 18% night). During the study, 32,447 components were distributed to 19,431 patients. Of these, 11,819 components (36%) were distributed during hours of peak demand. Hours with a simultaneous spike in both component demand and patient demand occurred in 5% of hours or approximately once each day. CONCLUSION: Demand for transfusion services was highly volatile in an unpredictable fashion. We provide an approach that could be used to benchmark spikes in demand for blood services at hospitals. Consideration of the frequency, unpredictability, and magnitude of spikes in demand may be relevant for hemovigilance programs and for strategies to determine the laboratory staffing needed for good patient care.


Subject(s)
Blood Component Transfusion/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/therapy , Workforce/statistics & numerical data , Blood Safety , Blood Transfusion/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/complications , Hospitals , Humans , Time Factors , Volatilization
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL