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1.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 23(1): 538, 2023 May 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20241383

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Respectful maternity care is an approach that involves respecting women's belief, choices, emotions, and dignity during the childbirth process. As the workload among maternity care workforce affects intrapartum quality care, respectful maternity care might have also been affected, particularly during the pandemic. Thus, this study was conducted to examine the association between workload among healthcare providers and their practice of respectful maternity care, before and during the early phase of pandemic. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted in South Western Nepal. A total of 267 healthcare providers from 78 birthing centers were included. Data collection was done through telephone interviews. The exposure variable was workload among the healthcare providers, and the outcome variable was respectful maternity care practice before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. Multilevel mixed-effect linear regression was used to examine the association. RESULTS: The median client-provider ratio before and during the pandemic was 21.7 and 13.0, respectively. The mean score of respectful maternity care practice was 44.5 (SD 3.8) before the pandemic, which was decreased to 43.6 (SD 4.5) during the pandemic. Client-provider ratio was negatively associated with respectful maternity care practice for both times; before (Coef. -5.16; 95% CI -8.41 to -1.91) and during (Coef. -7.47; 95% CI -12.72 to -2.23) the pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: While a higher client-provider was associated with a lower respectful maternity care practice score both before and during the COVID-19 pandemic, the coefficient was larger during the pandemic. Therefore, workload among the healthcare providers should be considered before the implementation of respectful maternity care, and more attention should be given during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Maternal Health Services , Pregnancy , Humans , Female , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Workload , Nepal/epidemiology , Pandemics , Respect , Health Personnel
2.
Appl Ergon ; 111: 104056, 2023 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2328212

ABSTRACT

Little research exists on how home care nursing personnel have experienced the Covid-19 pandemic. This qualitative study explores the work environment related challenges nurses and managers in home care faced during the pandemic. We discuss these challenges in relation to the Demand-Control-Support Model and reflect on how the organizational dynamics associated with them can be understood using the competing pressures model. During the pandemic, home care nurses and managers experienced both an increased workload and psychosocial strain. For managers, the increased complexity of work was a major problem. We identify three key takeaways related to sustainable crisis management: 1) to support managers' ability to provide social support to their personnel, 2) to increase crisis communication preparedness, and 3) to apply a holistic perspective on protective gear use. We also conclude that the competing pressures model is useful when exploring the dynamics of the work environment in complex organizational contexts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Home Care Services , Nurses , Humans , Workload/psychology , Working Conditions , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology
3.
Emerg Med Australas ; 35(3): 483-488, 2023 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2315503

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To examine workload, thermal discomfort and heat-related symptoms among healthcare workers (HCWs) in an Australian ED during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A cross-sectional study design was employed among HCWs in an ED at a metropolitan hospital in Brisbane, Australia. Respondents provided demographic information including their self-reported age, sex, height, weight, role (e.g. doctor, nurse), and whether they wore personal protective equipment (PPE) during their shift, rated as either Full PPE, Partial PPE, or usual uniform or scrubs. The workload of HCWs was assessed with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's task load index (NASA-TLX). Thermal discomfort was evaluated using scales from the International Organisation for Standardisation. Responders rated their subjective heat illness using the Environmental Symptoms Questionnaire. RESULTS: Fifty-nine HCWs completed the survey (27 male, 31 female, one prefer not to answer). Overall workload from the NASA-TLX was 64.6 (interquartile range [IQR] 56.5-73.3) for doctors, 72.5 (IQR 63.3-83.3) for nurses and 66.7 (IQR 58.3-74.17) for other staff, representing moderate to high ratings. Eighty-one percent reported thermal sensation to be slightly warm, warm, or hot, and 88% reported being uncomfortable, ranging from slightly to extremely. Ninety-seven percent reported at least one heat-strain symptom. More than 50% reported light-headedness or headache and approximately 30% reported feeling dizzy, faint, or weak. CONCLUSIONS: ED HCWs experience thermal discomfort when wearing PPE. Combined with their workloads, HCWs experienced symptoms related to heat strain. Therefore, careful consideration should be given to managing heat strain among HCWs when wearing PPE in an ED.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Male , Humans , Female , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Workload , Hot Temperature , Pandemics/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Australia/epidemiology , Personal Protective Equipment , Health Personnel , Surveys and Questionnaires , Emergency Service, Hospital
4.
J Nurs Adm ; 53(5): 277-283, 2023 May 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2318815

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This cross-sectional study aimed to explore the characteristics, content, and context of rest breaks taken by hospital nurses. BACKGROUND: Nurses often miss, skip, or take interrupted breaks. To improve the quality of breaks and promote within-shift recovery, it is important to understand current rest break practices including break activities and contextual challenges around them. METHODS: Survey data from 806 nurses were collected between October and November 2021. RESULTS: Most nurses did not take regular breaks. Rest breaks were often interrupted, spent being worried about work, and rarely resulted in a relaxed state. Common break activities were having a meal or a snack, and browsing the Internet. Regardless of workload, nurses considered patient acuity, staffing, and unfinished nursing tasks when deciding to take breaks. CONCLUSION: Rest break practices are of poor quality. Nurses mainly consider workload-related factors when taking breaks, which warrants the attention of nursing administration.


Subject(s)
Nursing Staff, Hospital , Workload , Humans , United States , Cross-Sectional Studies , Surveys and Questionnaires , Rest , Hospitals
5.
Disaster Med Public Health Prep ; 17: e348, 2023 03 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2313906

ABSTRACT

This research aims to explore the factors affecting the intervention of health-care professionals regarding a radiological event and to determine what actions they cause. In line with the keywords determined, a search was conducted on Cochrane, Scopus, Web of Science, and PubMed until March 2022. Eighteen peer-reviewed articles that met the inclusion criteria were reviewed. This systematic review was conducted using the PICOS and PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses)guidelines. Of the 18 studies included in the study, 8 were cross-sectional studies, 7 were descriptive studies, 2 were interventional studies, and 1 was a systematic review. As a result of the qualitative analysis, 7 factors affecting the intervention of health-care professionals in a radiological event were identified as follows: rarity of the event; inadequacy of health-care professionals against the radiological event; sensory responses; dilemma and ethical concern; communication, workload; and other factors. The most important factor affecting the intervention of health-care professionals in a radiological event is inadequate education about a radiological event, which influences the formation of other factors. These and other factors cause actions such as delayed treatment, death, and disruption of health services. Further studies are needed on the factors affecting the intervention of health-care professionals.


Subject(s)
Communication , Health Personnel , Humans , Peer Review , Workload
6.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Oct 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2284277

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 pandemic brings many challenges to the daily work of nurses. While carrying out professional tasks for patients infected with the SARS-CoV-2 virus, nurses experience tremendous psychological pressure due to their workload in a high-risk environment. This causes severe stress and leads to occupational burnout. The purpose of this study was to assess the level of stress and occupational burnout among surveyed nurses working with patients with COVID-19. A total of 118 nurses working with patients infected with SARS-CoV-2 virus participated in the study. Among the respondents, there were 94.9% women and 5.1% men. The average age of the respondents was 38.1 +/- 2.1. The survey was conducted between April and May 2022. The research tool was a survey questionnaire, consisting of three parts: sociodemographic data and self-administered survey questionnaire containing questions about the specifics of working with COVID-19 patients. The third part was a standardized tool: the MBI Burnout Questionnaire by Christina Maslach. Participation in the study was anonymous and voluntary. Statistical analysis for independence of variables used the Chi-square test. On the other hand, coefficients based on the Phi test and Kramer's V test, as well as non-parametric Mann-Whitney U-test (for 2 samples) and Kruskal-Wallis test (for more than 2 samples) were used to determine the strength of the relationship. During these analyses, in addition to standard statistical significance, the corresponding "p" values were calculated using the Monte Carlo method. The results obtained allow us to conclude that surveyed nurses working with COVID-19 patients are exposed to various stressors leading to occupational burnout. The vast majority of respondents, i.e., 90.7%, believe that stress is an integral part of the nursing profession and the average of MBI burnout among respondents was 55.67 +/- 9.77 pts., emotional exhaustion 24.74 +/- 6.11, depersonalization 12.42 +/- 2.99 and a sense of personal achievement 18.52 +/- 4.50 which means that only slightly more than half of the nurses surveyed noticed symptoms of occupational burnout themselves. The research has revealed that working with a patient who is positive for COVID-19 is a cause of stress and is related to experiencing symptoms of burnout in the group of surveyed nurses.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Nurses , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workload/psychology
7.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(5)2023 03 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2283981

ABSTRACT

Ambulance services are changing, and the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has been a major challenge in the past three years. Job satisfaction and work engagement are important characteristics for a healthy organization and success in one's profession. The purpose of the current systematic review was to evaluate the predictors of job satisfaction and work engagement in prehospital emergency medical service personnel. Electronic databases, such as PubMed, Ovid Medline, Cochrane Library, Scopus, Web of Science, PsycINFO, PSYNDEX, and Embase, were utilized in this review. Predictors (ß coefficient, odds ratio, rho) of higher job satisfaction and work engagement were examined. Only prehospital emergency medical service personnel were considered. The review included 10 studies worldwide with 8358 prehospital emergency medical service personnel (24.9% female). The main predictor for job satisfaction was supervisors' support. Other predictors were younger or middle age and work experience. Emotional exhaustion and depersonalization, as burnout dimensions, were negative predictors for higher job satisfaction or work engagement. Quality demands for health care systems are a significant challenge for future emergency medical services. The psychological and physical strengthening of employees is necessary and includes constant supervision of managers or facilitators.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Middle Aged , Humans , Female , Male , Work Engagement , Job Satisfaction , SARS-CoV-2 , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Ambulances , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workload/psychology
8.
Curr Oncol ; 30(3): 3149-3159, 2023 03 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2281084

ABSTRACT

(1) Background: Cancer is the leading cause of death in Canada, with significant resource limitation impacting the delivery of cancer care nationwide. The onset of the COVID-19 pandemic forced additional resource restriction and diversion, further impacting care delivery. Our intention is to analyze the impact COVID-19 on a provincial medical oncology workload and bring attention to the limitations of the current workload metric for oncologists. (2) Methods: All medical oncology patient encounters were extracted and compared, collected by year and encounter type, from April 2014 through March 2022. (3) Results: There was an increase in all patient encounters by an average of 9.5% per year, including during the strictest COVID-19 restrictions. There was an increase in virtual care encounters from 37.9% to 52.1%. (4) Conclusions: Medical Oncology workloads have increased over time and estimates suggest growing demand. Little data exist to inform workforce requirements and actual workload is not captured by the current metric. Though volume of new consults continues to increase, COVID-19 has highlighted additional changes in the delivery of care, likely with lasting impact, little of which are included in the current workload metric.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Medical Oncology , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/therapy , Pandemics , Workload
10.
BMC Prim Care ; 24(1): 23, 2023 01 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2259314

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Electronic clinical decision support tools (eCDS) are increasingly available to assist General Practitioners (GP) with the diagnosis and management of a range of health conditions. It is unclear whether the use of eCDS tools has an impact on GP workload. This scoping review aimed to identify the available evidence on the use of eCDS tools by health professionals in general practice in relation to their impact on workload and workflow. METHODS: A scoping review was carried out using the Arksey and O'Malley methodological framework. The search strategy was developed iteratively, with three main aspects: general practice/primary care contexts, risk assessment/decision support tools, and workload-related factors. Three databases were searched in 2019, and updated in 2021, covering articles published since 2009: Medline (Ovid), HMIC (Ovid) and Web of Science (TR). Double screening was completed by two reviewers, and data extracted from included articles were analysed. RESULTS: The search resulted in 5,594 references, leading to 95 full articles, referring to 87 studies, after screening. Of these, 36 studies were based in the USA, 21 in the UK and 11 in Australia. A further 18 originated from Canada or Europe, with the remaining studies conducted in New Zealand, South Africa and Malaysia. Studies examined the use of eCDS tools and reported some findings related to their impact on workload, including on consultation duration. Most studies were qualitative and exploratory in nature, reporting health professionals' subjective perceptions of consultation duration as opposed to objectively-measured time spent using tools or consultation durations. Other workload-related findings included impacts on cognitive workload, "workflow" and dialogue with patients, and clinicians' experience of "alert fatigue". CONCLUSIONS: The published literature on the impact of eCDS tools in general practice showed that limited efforts have focused on investigating the impact of such tools on workload and workflow. To gain an understanding of this area, further research, including quantitative measurement of consultation durations, would be useful to inform the future design and implementation of eCDS tools.


Subject(s)
Decision Support Systems, Clinical , General Practice , General Practitioners , Humans , Family Practice , Referral and Consultation , Workload , Workflow
11.
Br J Gen Pract ; 73(728): 122-123, 2023 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2266140
12.
Anaesthesia ; 78(6): 701-711, 2023 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2265396

ABSTRACT

Detailed contemporary knowledge of the characteristics of the surgical population, national anaesthetic workload, anaesthetic techniques and behaviours are essential to monitor productivity, inform policy and direct research themes. Every 3-4 years, the Royal College of Anaesthetists, as part of its National Audit Projects (NAP), performs a snapshot activity survey in all UK hospitals delivering anaesthesia, collecting patient-level encounter data from all cases under the care of an anaesthetist. During November 2021, as part of NAP7, anaesthetists recorded details of all cases undertaken over 4 days at their site through an online survey capturing anonymous patient characteristics and anaesthetic details. Of 416 hospital sites invited to participate, 352 (85%) completed the activity survey. From these, 24,177 reports were returned, of which 24,172 (99%) were included in the final dataset. The work patterns by day of the week, time of day and surgical specialty were similar to previous NAP activity surveys. However, in non-obstetric patients, between NAP5 (2013) and NAP7 (2021) activity surveys, the estimated median age of patients increased by 2.3 years from median (IQR) of 50.5 (28.4-69.1) to 52.8 (32.1-69.2) years. The median (IQR) BMI increased from 24.9 (21.5-29.5) to 26.7 (22.3-31.7) kg.m-2 . The proportion of patients who scored as ASA physical status 1 decreased from 37% in NAP5 to 24% in NAP7. The use of total intravenous anaesthesia increased from 8% of general anaesthesia cases to 26% between NAP5 and NAP7. Some changes may reflect the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the anaesthetic population, though patients with confirmed COVID-19 accounted for only 149 (1%) cases. These data show a rising burden of age, obesity and comorbidity in patients requiring anaesthesia care, likely to impact UK peri-operative services significantly.


Subject(s)
Anesthetics , COVID-19 , Humans , Child, Preschool , Workload , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Anesthesia, General/methods , United Kingdom/epidemiology
13.
J Long Term Eff Med Implants ; 33(3): 31-33, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2285309

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has led to important restrictions in social life of civilians worldwide and there were lower admission rates mainly in surgical departments in many hospitals. This study presents how COVID-19 pandemic affected admissions at the orthopaedic and trauma surgery department of a major trauma center. A retrospective study was conducted that recorded all patients examined at the outpatient orthopaedic clinic and the emergency orthopaedic department, as well as patients admitted to the orthopaedic surgery clinic and patients that underwent operative procedures between March 23 and May 4, 2020 (first lockdown period) and between March 23 and May 4, 2019 (control period). In addition, all patients with hip fractures that required hospitalization and underwent hip surgery were identified during the same time periods. During lockdown period 1 compared with the lock-down period 2 were observed: 70% and 61% decrease in the number of patients examined at the outpatient clinic and the emergency orthopaedic department respectively. The number of patients admitted to the orthopaedic surgery clinic declined by 41%, whereas operative procedures decreased by 22%. Regarding hip fractures timing to surgery during the first period was significantly less compared with second lockdown period, however, hospitalization days remained almost unchanged over the two time lockdown periods. Restrictions during the first lockdown period due to COVID-19 pandemic caused an important decrease in the number of patients and theaters in all orthopaedic departments in one of the major trauma centers in Athens. However, the incidence of hip fractures in elderly was not significantly decreased. Further similar studies are needed to identify variations and patterns of these parameters in other trauma centers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hip Fractures , Orthopedic Procedures , Orthopedics , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Trauma Centers , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Workload , Retrospective Studies , Communicable Disease Control , Hospitalization , Hospitals
14.
Gac Sanit ; 37: 102296, 2023.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2264273

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To explore experiences related to health-oriented behaviours during lockdown in the Spanish resident population from a gender perspective. METHOD: Qualitative research with a critical and feminist approach. Twenty-nine semi-structured interviews (17 women and 12 men) were conducted between June and July 2020 via telephone with people who had previously answered an online survey. The interviews were transcribed and a thematic content analysis was carried out, differentiating between the experiences of women and men. The data were triangulated by the research team. RESULTS: Among women, greater diversity emerged in terms of health behaviours. Among them, the difficult experiences related to COVID-19, the complexity of living together and doing unpaid care work, as well as the importance of support networks, stood out. Among men, there were different attitudes towards sport, self-care and having time for healthy eating were positively valued, and there was a good assessment of coexistence and organisation in household chores. In both men and women, work overload and economic problems were related to emotional distress and difficulties in carrying out healthy activities. CONCLUSIONS: Health-oriented behaviours during lockdown differed according to gender. They were mostly limited to COVID-19 experiences, socio-economic conditions and burden of care. It is essential to tailor public health and primary care programmes according to people's life moments, taking into account their social context and questioning traditional gender roles.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Behavior , Quarantine , Stress, Physiological , Humans , Male , Female , Spain/epidemiology , Quarantine/psychology , Quarantine/statistics & numerical data , Sex Factors , Qualitative Research , Telephone , Interviews as Topic , COVID-19/epidemiology , Diet, Healthy/psychology , Self Care/psychology , Sports/psychology , Workload/psychology , Financial Stress/psychology , Public Health , Psychosocial Support Systems
16.
Epidemiol Prev ; 44(5-6 Suppl 2): 113-118, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2243433

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: ethics committees (ECs) protect the rights, safety, and well-being of research participants and ensure the scientific correctness of clinical research. COVID-19 pandemic and the lockdown from 9 March to 16 May 2020 have potentially influenced several activities, including ECs. OBJECTIVES: to assess the impact of COVID-19 outbreak on Italian ECs and their performance during the lockdown. DESIGN: cross-sectional survey. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: the survey was conducted in mid-June 2020 in Italy contacting all the 90 local ECs. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: amount and kind of activities performed during the lockdown, characteristics of submitted studies and adoption of standard protocols of evaluation of research applications during the pandemic. Chi-square test was used to estimate the differences between territories with higher incidence (HI) and lower incidence (LI) of COVID-19. RESULTS: 258 questionnaires were collected from 46 ECs that participated in the study. Ten were excluded due to missing substantial data. Responses were divided into two groups according to location of EC: the HI (125 responses) and the LI (123 responses). Seventy-five percent of the HI describe an increase in the number of studies submitted, while 53% of the LI does not (p=0.001). Due to the pandemic and its effects on research, the 15% of participants belonging to HI territories reported that consideration and respect of research-related and general ethical principles could have decreased, as well the adoption of standard protocols of evaluation of research applications. EC secretariats located in HI Regions moved to smart working more than in LI ones (75% vs 59%; p=0.001). Where the EC workload increased significantly, it was reported that it was impossible to perform an accurate analysis of the submitted documentation, with the effect of providing a favorable opinion to studies of not excellent quality, though always ensuring the respect of ethical principles and patients' safety. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 impact on ECs has been heavier in HI territories, but smart working has been effective in ensuring EC activities and the subsequent activation of clinical studies potentially useful to face the pandemic. Clear differences arise between ECs belonging to the Italian Regions that have recorded a HI of COVID-19 cases compared to those located in Regions with a LI of cases. In some EC members' perception, the high number of studies in the most affected Regions together with the emergency experienced during the lockdown may have exposed ECs to the risk of decreasing the adoption of ethical principles and standard protocols of evaluation of research applications.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ethics Committees , Pandemics , Quarantine , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Ethics Committees/statistics & numerical data , Ethics Committees, Research , Ethics, Research , Health Care Surveys , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Physical Distancing , Workload
17.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(1)2022 12 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2238427

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has caused a major crisis all over the world. To manage this crisis, a fixed shift system was applied to nursing home staff in Turkey to protect nursing home residents from the COVID-19 pandemic. Staff were not allowed to leave the institution during fixed shifts. It is thought that this practice for the COVID-19 outbreak, while protecting nursing home residents on the one hand, increased the workload and related stress of nursing home staff on the other hand. To the best of our knowledge, there is no study examining the workload and stress caused by the COVID-19 pandemic for nursing home staff in Turkey. The aim of this study was to examine the level of workload and work stress experienced by staff working in nursing homes during the COVID-19 pandemic in Turkey. METHODS: A cross-sectional research design was used in the study. The sample of the study consisted of nursing home personnel working in nursing homes in the provinces of Istanbul, Ankara, Izmir and Antalya between October 2021 and January 2022. A personal information form and a workload and stress scale were used for collecting the data. Cluster analysis was performed with SPSS software. RESULTS: In total, 154 nursing home personnel participated in the study. A statistically significant difference was found between the mean age of the two clusters. The first cluster was described as "old" and the second as "young". Statistically significant and high values were found in the quantitative workload, qualitative workload, job organization, social work area and fatigue factors in the nursing home staff in the older participant cluster. CONCLUSION: The results of this study provide new information about the concepts of workload and work stress experienced during the COVID-19 pandemic in Turkey, which will serve as a guide for the management of future pandemics. Therefore, this study will contribute to the strategies to be followed in future pandemics in Turkey.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Occupational Stress , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Workload , Turkey/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Nursing Homes , Occupational Stress/epidemiology
18.
Health Care Manage Rev ; 48(1): 61-69, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2244075

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Existing studies that seek to understand nurses' experiences of burnout are dominated by cross-sectional, quantitative survey designs employing predetermined measures, often overlooking important job-related stressors that can be highly dependent on industry and professional contexts. Cancer nurses are a group of professionals who warrant special attention, as burnout in this profession is often attributed to high job demands and the challenge of caring for a vulnerable cohort of patients. A deeper understanding of the job demands associated with cancer nursing is required to provide insights about the work experiences of cancer nurses and identify aspects that mitigate burnout and stress. PURPOSE: This study describes the antecedents of burnout among Australian cancer nurses by focusing on the demands and resources inherent in their work. We aim to build on the existing literature by identifying job resources that may serve to mitigate the antecedents of burnout. METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: An in-depth interview study of cancer nurses across a spectrum of age and experience in Australian metropolitan public health care services was conducted over a 2-year period that coincided with the COVID-19 pandemic. The job demands and resources model framed this study of job-related factors associated with burnout and conversely job resources that may foster work engagement. RESULTS: Patient aggression, workload, emotional demands, and abusive peers and managers were reported as distinct job demands, whereas job significance and supportive peers who demonstrated leadership, along with task variety, were identified as job resources. CONCLUSION: Australian cancer nurses work in an environment where job demands are increasingly disproportionate to job resources, leading to significant risk of burnout. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Our study identifies modifiable strategies for improving work conditions for this group who play a critical role in the health care system.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Nurses , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , Australia , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Workload/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
19.
Rev Gaucha Enferm ; 44: e20210334, 2023.
Article in English, Portuguese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2232544

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To compare the nursing workload in an oncology intensive care unit according to the condition of COVID-19 infection. METHOD: A retrospective cohort study. The Nursing Activities Score was used to measure the workload and document analysis for data extraction. The medical records were divided into a group of patients with COVID-19 and another group of patients without the infection. RESULTS: The values of the Nursing Activities Score were not different depending on the sociodemographic variables, but the average of this score was statistically different depending on whether the patient had the diagnosis of COVID-19 or not, being higher in those who had the disease. CONCLUSION: It was proved that the nursing workload is high in the context of the oncology intensive care unit. However, COVID-19 increased this score even more, with the Nursing Activities Score being an important tool to size the team in this context.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Humans , Retrospective Studies , Workload , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Critical Care , Intensive Care Units
20.
Jpn J Nurs Sci ; 20(3): e12529, 2023 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2232346

ABSTRACT

AIM: This study aimed to construct and evaluate prediction models using deep learning to explore the impact of attributes and lifestyle factors on research activities of nursing researchers during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A secondary data analysis was conducted from a cross-sectional online survey by the Japanese Society of Nursing Science at the inception of the COVID-19 pandemic. A total of 1089 respondents from nursing faculties were divided into a training dataset and a test dataset. We constructed two prediction models with the training dataset using artificial intelligence (AI) predictive analysis tools; motivation and time were used as predictor items for negative impact on research activities. Predictive factors were attributes, lifestyle, and predictor items for each other. The models' accuracy and internal validity were evaluated using an ordinal logistic regression analysis to assess goodness-of-fit; the test dataset was used to assess external validity. Predicted contributions by each factor were also calculated. RESULTS: The models' accuracy and goodness-of-fit were good. The prediction contribution analysis showed that no increase in research motivation and lack of increase in research time strongly influenced each other. Other factors that negatively influenced research motivation and research time were residing outside the special alert area and lecturer position and living with partner/spouse and associate professor position, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Deep learning is a research method enabling early prediction of unexpected events, suggesting new applicability in nursing science. To continue research activities during the COVID-19 pandemic and future contingencies, the research environment needs to be improved, workload corrected by position, and considered in terms of work-life balance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Deep Learning , Nursing Research , Humans , Artificial Intelligence , Cross-Sectional Studies , East Asian People , Pandemics , Research Design , Work-Life Balance , Workload
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