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1.
BMC Anesthesiol ; 22(1): 10, 2022 01 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1607079

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: ICU operational conditions may contribute to cognitive overload and negatively impact on clinical decision making. We aimed to develop a quantitative model to investigate the association between the operational conditions and the quantity of medication orders as a measurable indicator of the multidisciplinary care team's cognitive capacity. METHODS: The temporal data of patients at one medical ICU (MICU) of Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN between February 2016 to March 2018 was used. This dataset includes a total of 4822 unique patients admitted to the MICU and a total of 6240 MICU admissions. Guided by the Systems Engineering Initiative for Patient Safety model, quantifiable measures attainable from electronic medical records were identified and a conceptual framework of distributed cognition in ICU was developed. Univariate piecewise Poisson regression models were built to investigate the relationship between system-level workload indicators, including patient census and patient characteristics (severity of illness, new admission, and mortality risk) and the quantity of medication orders, as the output of the care team's decision making. RESULTS: Comparing the coefficients of different line segments obtained from the regression models using a generalized F-test, we identified that, when the ICU was more than 50% occupied (patient census > 18), the number of medication orders per patient per hour was significantly reduced (average = 0.74; standard deviation (SD) = 0.56 vs. average = 0.65; SD = 0.48; p < 0.001). The reduction was more pronounced (average = 0.81; SD = 0.59 vs. average = 0.63; SD = 0.47; p < 0.001), and the breakpoint shifted to a lower patient census (16 patients) when at a higher presence of severely-ill patients requiring invasive mechanical ventilation during their stay, which might be encountered in an ICU treating patients with COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: Our model suggests that ICU operational factors, such as admission rates and patient severity of illness may impact the critical care team's cognitive function and result in changes in the production of medication orders. The results of this analysis heighten the importance of increasing situational awareness of the care team to detect and react to changing circumstances in the ICU that may contribute to cognitive overload.


Subject(s)
Cognition , Intensive Care Units , Patient Care Team , Aged , COVID-19/therapy , Decision Making, Organizational , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Safety , SARS-CoV-2 , Workload
2.
BMC Fam Pract ; 22(1): 248, 2021 12 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1582112

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The novel coronavirus disease in 2019 (COVID-19) has placed unprecedented strain on healthcare providers, in particular, primary care services. General practitioners (GP) have to effectively manage patients remotely preserving social distancing. We aim to assess an app-based remote patient monitoring solution in reducing the workload of a clinician and reflect this as time-saved in an economic context. Primary care COVID patients in West London deemed medium risk were recruited into the virtual ward. Patients were monitored for 14 days by telephone or by both the Huma app and telephone. Information on number of phone calls, duration of phone calls and duration of time spent reviewing the app data was recorded. RESULTS: The amount of time spent reviewing one patient in the telephone only arm of the study was 490 min, compared with 280 min spent reviewing one patient who was monitored via both the Huma app and telephone. Based on employed clinicians monitoring patients, this equates to a 0.04 reduction of full-time equivalent staffing I.e. for every 100 patients, it would require 4 less personnel to remotely monitor them. There was no difference in mortality or adverse events between the two groups. CONCLUSION: App-based remote patient monitoring potentially holds large economic benefit to COVID-19 patients. In wake of further waves or future pandemics, and even in routine care, app-based remote monitoring patients could free up vital resources in terms of clinical team's time, allowing a better reallocation of services.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mobile Applications , Feasibility Studies , Humans , Monitoring, Physiologic , Pandemics , Primary Health Care , SARS-CoV-2 , Workload
3.
J Nurs Adm ; 52(1): 12-18, 2022 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1570150

ABSTRACT

A COVID19RNStories website allowed RNs in this integrated health system to "tell their stories" during the recent pandemic. From April to August 2020, approximately 100 items were posted with 4 themes emerging. COVID19RNStories had no preconceived hypotheses or specific questions to answer: RNs shared whatever they felt was relevant to their experiences. This approach provided real-time information on issues and concerns of RNs during the 1st wave of COVID-19. This article discusses the identified themes with recommendations for nursing leaders to support staff during the pandemic and future unexpected emergency situations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Internet , Nurse's Role/psychology , Workload/psychology , Humans , Nursing Staff, Hospital/organization & administration , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Qualitative Research , Quality of Health Care
4.
Work ; 70(2): 347-354, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1538353

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Due to the COVID-19 pandemic in Iran, the number of patients admitted to hospitals and the workload of nurses has increased. High workload can reduce efficiency and quality of life. In the meantime the percived social support may had a moderating role. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of workload and perceived social support on quality of life in nurses who work in COVID-19 inpatient wards. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional descriptive-analytic study. 336 nurses who worked in inpatient wards with COVID-19 patients were randomly selected and studied. NASA-TLX Workload Questionnaire, WHO Quality of Life Questionnaire and Multidimensional Social Support Perception Scale were used to data collection. Structural equation modelling in PLS software was used to modelling. RESULTS: The results showed that the average score of workload, perceived social support and quality of life were 80.87±20.17, 56.23±11.46 and 55.87±13.74, respectively. A significant inverse relationship was observed between workload and quality of life (P < 0.05). Also, perceived social support had a moderator effect on relationship between workload and quality of life (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: High workload can upset the balance between work and life that leads to decrease the quality of life. Perceived social support as a moderator can reduce the negative impact of workload on quality of life. In the COVID-19 pandemic where nurses' workload have increased, by increasing the perceived social support can manage the negative effect of workload.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Support , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workload
5.
Medicina (Kaunas) ; 57(11)2021 Nov 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1534177

ABSTRACT

Background and Objectives: Due to the unexpected spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), there was a serious crisis of emergency medical system collapse. Healthcare workers working in the emergency department were faced with psychosocial stress and workload changes. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional survey of healthcare workers in the emergency department in Daegu and Gyeongbuk, Korea, from November 16 to 25, 2020. In the survey, we assessed the general characteristics of the respondents; changes in the working conditions before and after the COVID-19 pandemic; and resulting post-traumatic stress disorder, depression and anxiety statuses using 49 questions. Results: A total of 529 responses were collected, and 520 responses were included for the final analyses. Changes in working conditions and other factors due to COVID-19 varied by emergency department level, region and disease group. Working hours, intensity, role changes, depression and anxiety scores were higher in the higher level emergency department. Isolation ward insufficiency and the risk of infection felt by healthcare workers tended to increase in the lower level emergency department. Treatment and transfer delay were higher in the fever and respiratory disease groups (M = 3.58, SD = 1.18; M = 4.08, SD = 0.95), respectively. In all the disease groups, both treatment and transfer were delayed more in Gyeongbuk than in Daegu. Conclusions: Different goals should be pursued by the levels and region of the emergency department to overcome the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic and promote optimal care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emergency Medical Services , Anxiety , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Emergency Service, Hospital , Health Personnel , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Workload
7.
J Healthc Manag ; 66(4): 304-322, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1475893

ABSTRACT

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: While the COVID-19 pandemic has added stressors to the lives of healthcare workers, it is unclear which factors represent the most useful targets for interventions to mitigate employee distress across the entire healthcare team. A survey was distributed to employees of a large healthcare system in the Southeastern United States, and 1,130 respondents participated. The survey measured overall distress using the 9-item Well-Being Index (WBI), work-related factors, moral distress, resilience, and organizational-level factors. Respondents were also asked to identify major work, clinical, and nonwork stressors. Multivariate regression was used to evaluate associations between employee characteristics and WBI distress score. Overall, 82% of employees reported high distress (WBI ≥ 2), with nurses, clinical support staff, and advanced practice providers reporting the highest average scores. Factors associated with higher distress included increased job demands or responsibilities, heavy workload or long hours, higher frequency of moral distress, and loneliness or social isolation. Factors associated with lower distress were perceived organizational support, work control, perceived fairness of salary cuts, and resilience. Most factors significantly associated with distress-heavy workloads and long hours, increased job demands, and moral distress, in particular-were work-related, indicating that efforts can be made to mitigate them. Resilience explained a small portion of the variance in distress relative to other work-related factors. Ensuring appropriate staffing levels may represent the single largest opportunity to significantly move the needle on distress. However, the financial impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the healthcare system may represent a barrier to addressing these stressors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Personnel/psychology , Job Satisfaction , Occupational Stress , Patient Care Team , Stress, Psychological , Workload/psychology , Adult , Female , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workload/statistics & numerical data
8.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(19)2021 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463653

ABSTRACT

Occupational health and safety is experiencing a paradigm shift from focusing only on health at the workplace toward a holistic approach and worker well-being framework that considers both work and non-work factors. Aligned with this shift, the purpose of this pilot study was to examine how, within a person, frequencies of high-workload and recovery activities from both work and non-work periods were associated with same day well-being measures. We analyzed data on 45 workers with type 1 diabetes from whom we collected activity data 5-6 times daily over 14 days. More frequent engagement in high-workload activities was associated with lower well-being on multiple measures including higher stress. Conversely, greater recovery activity frequency was mostly associated with higher well-being indicated by lower stress and higher positive affect. Overall, our results provide preliminary validity evidence for measures of high-workload and recovery activity exposure covering both work and non-work periods that can inform and support evaluations of worker well-being.


Subject(s)
Occupational Health , Workload , Ecological Momentary Assessment , Humans , Pilot Projects , Workplace
9.
Work ; 70(2): 347-354, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463459

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Due to the COVID-19 pandemic in Iran, the number of patients admitted to hospitals and the workload of nurses has increased. High workload can reduce efficiency and quality of life. In the meantime the percived social support may had a moderating role. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of workload and perceived social support on quality of life in nurses who work in COVID-19 inpatient wards. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional descriptive-analytic study. 336 nurses who worked in inpatient wards with COVID-19 patients were randomly selected and studied. NASA-TLX Workload Questionnaire, WHO Quality of Life Questionnaire and Multidimensional Social Support Perception Scale were used to data collection. Structural equation modelling in PLS software was used to modelling. RESULTS: The results showed that the average score of workload, perceived social support and quality of life were 80.87±20.17, 56.23±11.46 and 55.87±13.74, respectively. A significant inverse relationship was observed between workload and quality of life (P < 0.05). Also, perceived social support had a moderator effect on relationship between workload and quality of life (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: High workload can upset the balance between work and life that leads to decrease the quality of life. Perceived social support as a moderator can reduce the negative impact of workload on quality of life. In the COVID-19 pandemic where nurses' workload have increased, by increasing the perceived social support can manage the negative effect of workload.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Support , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workload
10.
Work ; 70(2): 395-403, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463452

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Physicians are at higher risk for burnout than workers in other fields. Burnout negatively impacts physician health, care delivery and healthcare cost. Existing studies quantify the workforce affected by burnout whilst qualitative studies use specific specialty groups limiting generalisability of solutions. This is important given increased stress during the COVID-19 pandemic. OBJECTIVE: The study aimed to understand the causes of work-related burnout, identify what supportive resources physicians utilise, and to propose solutions. METHODS: A questionnaire was circulated between March and May 2019 via the 'Doctors' Association UK' website and social media. RESULTS: 721 responses were received. 94%of respondents worked in the NHS, with over half being either general practitioners (GPs) or consultants. One in two (53%) respondents felt unable to raise workplace concerns regarding wellbeing, stress or workload. Almost all respondents (97%) felt the NHS has a culture of viewing excessive stress and workload as the norm. Three themes emerged from qualitative analysis: negative workplace culture; high workload and lack of resources; and generational change. CONCLUSIONS: Respondents described system-level factors which negatively impacted their wellbeing whilst organisations focused on physician-level factors. The research literature supports multi-level change beyond the individual tackling work unit and organisational factors. These include providing infrastructure to allow delegation of administrative work and physical space for relaxation and flexible work with time for leave. At a national level, there is greater urgency for an increase in healthcare funding and resourcing especially during increased clinician workloads during a pandemic where burnout rates will increase.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , General Practitioners , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , State Medicine , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workload
11.
BMJ Open ; 11(9): e054284, 2021 09 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1443607

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of burnout and associated factors among nurses during COVID-19 in central Uganda. DESIGN: A cross-sectional design. SETTING: Nurse from one referral and four general hospitals. These were reception centres and cared for patients with COVID-19 in central Uganda. PARTICIPANTS: 395 nurses. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Burnout scores. RESULTS: Of the total 395 participants, 65.1% (n=257) were female; 40% (n=158) had a diploma; 47.1% (n=186) were single; and 39.2% (n=155) had worked for 11-15 years. The results show that 40% (n=158), 41.77% (n=165) and 18.23% (n=77) reported high, average and low levels of burnout, respectively. The results show that the predictors of nurses' burnout were personal protective equipment (PPE) (OR: 7.1, 95% CI 4.08 to 12.31) and increased workload (OR 4.3, 95% CI 2.43 to 7.93). CONCLUSION: This study of nurses working in hospitals dealing with patients with COVID-19 in central Uganda reported high rates of burnout, and it was associated with PPE and workload. Interventions like contracting new nurses to reduce workload, the WHO guidelines on PPE, adjusting working hours and ensuring hours of effective rest should be adapted.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Nurses , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Psychological , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Hospitals , Humans , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Uganda/epidemiology , Workload
12.
Aust J Rural Health ; 29(5): 753-767, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1443220

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the impact of COVID-19 on the mental health and well-being of rural paramedics, police, community nursing and child protection staff. METHOD: An online survey was distributed to investigate the sources of stress and support across individual, task and organisational domains. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: The survey was completed by 1542 paramedics, police, community nurses and child protection workers from all states and territories of Australia. This study describes the data for the 632 rural participants. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The main measures of well-being were the Public Health Questionnaire (PHQ9), the Generalised Anxiety Disorder (GAD7), the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), workplace engagement, intention to quit and COVID-19-related stress. RESULTS: The mean depression and anxiety scores were 8.2 (PHQ9) and 6.8 (GAD7). This is 2-3 times that found in the general community. Over half (56.1%) of respondents showed high emotional exhaustion (burnout). The emotional exhaustion, depersonalisation and personal accomplishment mean scores were 28.5, 9.3 and 34.2, respectively. The strongest associations with burnout and psychological distress were workload, provision of practical support, training and organisational communication. A significant proportion of respondents were seriously considering quitting (27.4%) or looking for a new job with a different employer (28.5%) in the next 12 months. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 has increased the workload and stress on rural front-line community staff. The major sources of stress were related to organisations' responses to COVID-19 and not COVID-19 per se. The data suggest the most effective mental health interventions are practical and preventive, such as firstly ensuring fair and reasonable workloads.


Subject(s)
Allied Health Personnel/psychology , Burnout, Professional , COVID-19/psychology , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Nurses/psychology , Police/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workload
13.
Melanoma Res ; 31(4): 389-392, 2021 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1434530

ABSTRACT

The Novel Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) first emerged in Wuhan province, China, in late November 2019 and changed public healthcare perception. It has caused a significant decline in attendance to outpatient clinics. However, other diseases have not stopped, including malignant melanoma. Survey of the number of visits to plastic surgery outpatient clinic during the first lockdown in Israel concerning malignant melanoma was compared to the same months in the previous years. We assessed the number of visits to the oncology department during 2020 compared to the number of visits and treatment protocols for malignant melanoma. During the first lockdown, the attendance at the plastic surgery outpatient clinic and ambulatory surgery decreased significantly (P = 0.002), both in excisions of suspected malignant melanoma and malignant melanoma follow-ups (P = 0.019 and P = 0.035, respectively). The last third of 2020 (from September to December) had shown a significant rise in new protocols commenced (P < 0.001). This rise in the final third of the year was not noted in 2018 or 2019. These data clearly show the rise in advanced and metastatic malignant melanoma cases due to refraining from medical follow-ups and treatments during the COVID-19 pandemic. Diseases other than COVID-19 have not vanished, and continue to treat those diseases. Ignoring malignant melanoma treatment because of COVID-19 and vice-versa will not benefit our patients.


Subject(s)
Appointments and Schedules , COVID-19/prevention & control , Melanoma/epidemiology , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Skin Neoplasms/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Humans , Israel/epidemiology , Melanoma/diagnosis , Melanoma/therapy , Skin Neoplasms/diagnosis , Skin Neoplasms/therapy , Time Factors , Workload
14.
Med Care ; 59(Suppl 5): S420-S427, 2021 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1410279

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: As coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) rapidly progressed throughout the United States, increased demand for health workers required health workforce data and tools to aid planning and response at local, state, and national levels. OBJECTIVE: We describe the development of 2 estimator tools designed to inform health workforce planning for COVID-19. RESEARCH DESIGN: We estimated supply and demand for intensivists, critical care nurses, hospitalists, respiratory therapists, and pharmacists, using Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation projections for COVID-19 hospital care and National Plan and Provider Enumeration System, Provider Enrollment Chain and Ownership System, American Hospital Association, and Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupation Employment Statistics for workforce supply. We estimated contact tracing workforce needs using Johns Hopkins University COVID-19 case counts and workload parameters based on expert advice. RESULTS: The State Hospital Workforce Deficit Estimator estimated the sufficiency of state hospital-based clinicians to meet projected COVID-19 demand. The Contact Tracing Workforce Estimator calculated the workforce needed based on the 14-day COVID-19 caseload at county, state, and the national level, allowing users to adjust workload parameters to reflect local contexts. CONCLUSIONS: The 2 estimators illustrate the value of integrating health workforce data and analysis with pandemic response planning. The many unknowns associated with COVID-19 required tools to be flexible, allowing users to change assumptions on number of contacts and work capacity. Data limitations were a challenge for both estimators, highlighting the need to invest in health workforce data and data infrastructure as part of future emergency preparedness planning.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Community Health Planning , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Health Workforce/statistics & numerical data , Models, Statistical , Regional Health Planning , Contact Tracing , Humans , United States/epidemiology , Workload
15.
BMC Public Health ; 21(1): 1635, 2021 09 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1398854

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Too long work hours of Japanese school teachers, along with an increasing number of teachers taking leave due to mental illness, are well known and recognized as a serious social problem. In order to prevent the spread of COVID-19 by reducing the density in the classroom, the Japanese government has decided to reduce the upper-limit of class size in primary schools after 2021, which is expected to result in lowering the student-teacher ratio. The aim of this study was to examine the association between student-teacher ratio, teacher work hours and teacher stress. METHODS: Data on student-teacher ratio, teacher work hours, and teacher stress were obtained from a large-scale international survey conducted by OECD. The number of teachers participated in the survey was 3308 (primary school) and 3555 (lower-secondary school). After excluding teachers with missing observations, the analytic sample consisted of 2761 (primary school) and 3006 (lower-secondary school) teachers. Multivariate regression analysis was performed. RESULTS: Regression results revealed that student-teacher ratio was positively correlated with total work hours and workload stress of teachers. In particular, teachers working in schools with high student-teacher ratio spent more time on time-consuming tasks such as marking/correcting student work and communication with parents or guardians. The coefficient estimates suggested that, on average, lowering the student-teacher ratio by five in lower-secondary school was associated with 2.8 hours shorter working hours per week (p<0.001). CONCLUSION: Our empirical results suggested that the class-size reduction policy starting in 2021 could reduce teacher stress and long work hours through the consequent decrease in student-teacher ratios.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Workload , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , School Teachers , Schools , Students
16.
Aust N Z J Public Health ; 45(5): 526-530, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1388133

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To conduct a real-time audit to assess a Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) activity to improve the quality of public health data in the Sydney Local Health District (SLHD) Public Health Unit during the first wave of COVID-19. METHODS: A real-time audit of the Notifiable Conditions Information Management System was conducted for positive cases of COVID-19 and their close contacts from SLHD. After recording missing and inaccurate data, the audit team then corrected the data. Multivariable regression models were used to look for associations with workload and time. RESULTS: A total of 293 cases were audited. Variables measuring completeness were associated with improvement over time (p<0.0001), whereas those measuring accuracy reduced with increased workload (p=0.0003). In addition, the audit team achieved 100% data quality by correcting data. CONCLUSION: Utilising a team, separate from operational staff, to conduct a real-time audit of data quality is an efficient and effective way of improving epidemiological data. Implications for public health: Implementation of CQI in a public health unit can improve data quality during times of stress. Auditing teams can also act as an intervention in their own right to achieve high-quality data at minimal cost. Together, this can result in timely and high-quality public health data.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Contact Tracing , Management Audit , Quality Improvement , Australia/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Data Accuracy , Humans , Management Information Systems , Public Health , Workload
19.
J Health Organ Manag ; ahead-of-print(ahead-of-print)2021 Aug 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1376367

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Nurses working during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic have reported elevated levels of anxiety, burnout and sleep disruption. Hospital administrators are in a unique position to mitigate or exacerbate stressful working conditions. The goal of this study was to capture the recommendations of nurses providing frontline care during the pandemic. DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: Semi-structured interviews were conducted during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, with 36 nurses living in Canada and working in Canada or the United States. FINDINGS: The following recommendations were identified from reflexive thematic analysis of interview transcripts: (1) The nurses emphasized the need for a leadership style that embodied visibility, availability and careful planning. (2) Information overload contributed to stress, and participants appealed for clear, consistent and transparent communication. (3) A more resilient healthcare supply chain was required to safeguard the distribution of equipment, supplies and medications. (4) Clear communication of policies related to sick leave, pay equity and workload was necessary. (5) Equity should be considered, particularly with regard to redeployment. (6) Nurses wanted psychological support offered by trusted providers, managers and peers. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: Over-reliance on employee assistance programmes and other individualized approaches to virtual care were not well-received. An integrative systems-based approach is needed to address the multifaceted mental health outcomes and reduce the deleterious impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the nursing workforce. ORIGINALITY/VALUE: Results of this study capture the recommendations made by nurses during in-depth interviews conducted early in the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/nursing , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Occupational Health Services , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Adult , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Canada , Communication , Female , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Leadership , Male , Needs Assessment , Organizational Policy , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment , SARS-CoV-2 , Sick Leave , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control , United States , Workload
20.
Ann Glob Health ; 87(1): 79, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1369873

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The mental health of people working in Covid-19 wards (nurses, doctors, etc.) may be compromised due to the specific conditions of the workplace and patients. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between mental burden and quality of work life in nurses in intensive care units of Covid-19 patients. Method: In this cross-sectional study, a sample of 200 people-100 nurses in care units for patients with COVID-19 (group 1) and 100 nurses in non-COVID-19 patient care units (group 2-in three university hospitals were obtained. These 200 samples were randomly extracted from the list of employees and selected. Data were collected using three questionnaires, including (1) a demographic, (2) the NASA-Task Load Index (1988) (Hart & Staveland, 1988) and (3) National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Quality of Life. Data were analyzed using SPSS-24 software and descriptive and analytical statistical methods. Results: The overall mean scores of nurses' quality of work life were significantly different between the two groups (P < 0.05). The average score of quality of life in nurses caring for patients with COVID-19 is 92.57, more than nurses caring for patients without COVID-19, 79.43. Among the dimensions of mental workload: Performance and efficiency, with an average score of 77.32 ± 15.85, had the highest score, while discouragement and failure, with an average score of 58.04 ± 26.72, had the lowest score of mental workload. There is a significant difference between the mental load of work in the two groups (P = 0.001). There is a significant inverse relationship between total quality of work life and total mental workload (r = -14 and P = 0.01). Conclusion: In this study, it was observed that nurses caring for Covid-19 patients are in a more unfavorable situation in terms of the studied characteristics. Due to the work period, these nurses have a high workload and a low quality of work life to compensate for the mental and physical deficiencies required by a long presence in the work environment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Quality of Life , Workload , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/nursing , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Iran/epidemiology , Male , Nurses/psychology , Nurses/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workload/psychology
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