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1.
Appl Ergon ; 111: 104056, 2023 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2328212

ABSTRACT

Little research exists on how home care nursing personnel have experienced the Covid-19 pandemic. This qualitative study explores the work environment related challenges nurses and managers in home care faced during the pandemic. We discuss these challenges in relation to the Demand-Control-Support Model and reflect on how the organizational dynamics associated with them can be understood using the competing pressures model. During the pandemic, home care nurses and managers experienced both an increased workload and psychosocial strain. For managers, the increased complexity of work was a major problem. We identify three key takeaways related to sustainable crisis management: 1) to support managers' ability to provide social support to their personnel, 2) to increase crisis communication preparedness, and 3) to apply a holistic perspective on protective gear use. We also conclude that the competing pressures model is useful when exploring the dynamics of the work environment in complex organizational contexts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Home Care Services , Nurses , Humans , Workload/psychology , Working Conditions , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology
2.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Oct 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2284277

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 pandemic brings many challenges to the daily work of nurses. While carrying out professional tasks for patients infected with the SARS-CoV-2 virus, nurses experience tremendous psychological pressure due to their workload in a high-risk environment. This causes severe stress and leads to occupational burnout. The purpose of this study was to assess the level of stress and occupational burnout among surveyed nurses working with patients with COVID-19. A total of 118 nurses working with patients infected with SARS-CoV-2 virus participated in the study. Among the respondents, there were 94.9% women and 5.1% men. The average age of the respondents was 38.1 +/- 2.1. The survey was conducted between April and May 2022. The research tool was a survey questionnaire, consisting of three parts: sociodemographic data and self-administered survey questionnaire containing questions about the specifics of working with COVID-19 patients. The third part was a standardized tool: the MBI Burnout Questionnaire by Christina Maslach. Participation in the study was anonymous and voluntary. Statistical analysis for independence of variables used the Chi-square test. On the other hand, coefficients based on the Phi test and Kramer's V test, as well as non-parametric Mann-Whitney U-test (for 2 samples) and Kruskal-Wallis test (for more than 2 samples) were used to determine the strength of the relationship. During these analyses, in addition to standard statistical significance, the corresponding "p" values were calculated using the Monte Carlo method. The results obtained allow us to conclude that surveyed nurses working with COVID-19 patients are exposed to various stressors leading to occupational burnout. The vast majority of respondents, i.e., 90.7%, believe that stress is an integral part of the nursing profession and the average of MBI burnout among respondents was 55.67 +/- 9.77 pts., emotional exhaustion 24.74 +/- 6.11, depersonalization 12.42 +/- 2.99 and a sense of personal achievement 18.52 +/- 4.50 which means that only slightly more than half of the nurses surveyed noticed symptoms of occupational burnout themselves. The research has revealed that working with a patient who is positive for COVID-19 is a cause of stress and is related to experiencing symptoms of burnout in the group of surveyed nurses.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Nurses , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workload/psychology
3.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(5)2023 03 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2283981

ABSTRACT

Ambulance services are changing, and the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has been a major challenge in the past three years. Job satisfaction and work engagement are important characteristics for a healthy organization and success in one's profession. The purpose of the current systematic review was to evaluate the predictors of job satisfaction and work engagement in prehospital emergency medical service personnel. Electronic databases, such as PubMed, Ovid Medline, Cochrane Library, Scopus, Web of Science, PsycINFO, PSYNDEX, and Embase, were utilized in this review. Predictors (ß coefficient, odds ratio, rho) of higher job satisfaction and work engagement were examined. Only prehospital emergency medical service personnel were considered. The review included 10 studies worldwide with 8358 prehospital emergency medical service personnel (24.9% female). The main predictor for job satisfaction was supervisors' support. Other predictors were younger or middle age and work experience. Emotional exhaustion and depersonalization, as burnout dimensions, were negative predictors for higher job satisfaction or work engagement. Quality demands for health care systems are a significant challenge for future emergency medical services. The psychological and physical strengthening of employees is necessary and includes constant supervision of managers or facilitators.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Middle Aged , Humans , Female , Male , Work Engagement , Job Satisfaction , SARS-CoV-2 , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Ambulances , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workload/psychology
4.
Gac Sanit ; 37: 102296, 2023.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2264273

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To explore experiences related to health-oriented behaviours during lockdown in the Spanish resident population from a gender perspective. METHOD: Qualitative research with a critical and feminist approach. Twenty-nine semi-structured interviews (17 women and 12 men) were conducted between June and July 2020 via telephone with people who had previously answered an online survey. The interviews were transcribed and a thematic content analysis was carried out, differentiating between the experiences of women and men. The data were triangulated by the research team. RESULTS: Among women, greater diversity emerged in terms of health behaviours. Among them, the difficult experiences related to COVID-19, the complexity of living together and doing unpaid care work, as well as the importance of support networks, stood out. Among men, there were different attitudes towards sport, self-care and having time for healthy eating were positively valued, and there was a good assessment of coexistence and organisation in household chores. In both men and women, work overload and economic problems were related to emotional distress and difficulties in carrying out healthy activities. CONCLUSIONS: Health-oriented behaviours during lockdown differed according to gender. They were mostly limited to COVID-19 experiences, socio-economic conditions and burden of care. It is essential to tailor public health and primary care programmes according to people's life moments, taking into account their social context and questioning traditional gender roles.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Behavior , Quarantine , Stress, Physiological , Humans , Male , Female , Spain/epidemiology , Quarantine/psychology , Quarantine/statistics & numerical data , Sex Factors , Qualitative Research , Telephone , Interviews as Topic , COVID-19/epidemiology , Diet, Healthy/psychology , Self Care/psychology , Sports/psychology , Workload/psychology , Financial Stress/psychology , Public Health , Psychosocial Support Systems
5.
Health Care Manage Rev ; 48(1): 61-69, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2244075

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Existing studies that seek to understand nurses' experiences of burnout are dominated by cross-sectional, quantitative survey designs employing predetermined measures, often overlooking important job-related stressors that can be highly dependent on industry and professional contexts. Cancer nurses are a group of professionals who warrant special attention, as burnout in this profession is often attributed to high job demands and the challenge of caring for a vulnerable cohort of patients. A deeper understanding of the job demands associated with cancer nursing is required to provide insights about the work experiences of cancer nurses and identify aspects that mitigate burnout and stress. PURPOSE: This study describes the antecedents of burnout among Australian cancer nurses by focusing on the demands and resources inherent in their work. We aim to build on the existing literature by identifying job resources that may serve to mitigate the antecedents of burnout. METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: An in-depth interview study of cancer nurses across a spectrum of age and experience in Australian metropolitan public health care services was conducted over a 2-year period that coincided with the COVID-19 pandemic. The job demands and resources model framed this study of job-related factors associated with burnout and conversely job resources that may foster work engagement. RESULTS: Patient aggression, workload, emotional demands, and abusive peers and managers were reported as distinct job demands, whereas job significance and supportive peers who demonstrated leadership, along with task variety, were identified as job resources. CONCLUSION: Australian cancer nurses work in an environment where job demands are increasingly disproportionate to job resources, leading to significant risk of burnout. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Our study identifies modifiable strategies for improving work conditions for this group who play a critical role in the health care system.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Nurses , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , Australia , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Workload/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
6.
Front Public Health ; 10: 1048358, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2230560

ABSTRACT

The Omicron wave of the COVID-19 pandemic significantly affected Shanghai, China, from March to June 2022. Numbers of Fangcang Shelter Hospitals (FSHs) were conversed from stadiums and exhibition centers to tackle the pandemic. This study aimed to identify the stress load profiles of nurses working in FSHs and explore the characteristics and factors influencing stress load profiles. Totally, 609 out of 700 FSH nurses (with an effective response rate of 87%) participated in an online survey investigating their socio-demographic information, work-related stressors, and stress load. Results of the latent profile analysis identified four classes of stress load, which were labeled as the low (Class 1), mild (Class 2), moderate (Class 3), and high (Class 4) stress load class. Maternity status and self-perceived health condition were significantly different between the four stress load classes by comparisons using the Chi-square test and the Kruskal-Wallis test. The contributors to the stress load profiles were determined by the multinomial logistic regression analysis, including age, education, maternity status, self-perceived health condition, working time in FSHs, and the four dimensions of work-related stressors. Participants who were less healthy (OR = 0.045, 95% CI:0.012,0.171), worked longer time in FSHs (OR = 40.483, 95% CI: 12.103,135.410), faced with more workload (OR = 3.664, 95% CI: 1.047,12.815), and worse working environment (OR = 12.274, 95% CI: 3.029,49.729) were more likely to be classified to the high stress load class. The task arrangement and working environment for FSH nurses should be optimized, and psychological training should be conducted routinely.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , East Asian People , Hospitals , Nurses , Stress, Psychological , Female , Humans , China/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , East Asian People/psychology , Follicle Stimulating Hormone , Hospitals/statistics & numerical data , Hospitals, Special/statistics & numerical data , Mobile Health Units/statistics & numerical data , Nurses/psychology , Nurses/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Workload/psychology , Workload/statistics & numerical data , Working Conditions/psychology , Working Conditions/statistics & numerical data , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Occupational Stress/psychology
7.
PLoS One ; 18(2): e0277489, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2224456

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Physicians increasingly show symptoms of burnout due to the high job demands they face, posing a risk for the quality and safety of care. Job and personal resources as well as support interventions may function as protective factors when demands are high, specifically in times of crisis such as the COVID-19 pandemic. Based on the Job Demands-Resources theory, this longitudinal study investigated how monthly fluctuations in job demands and job and personal resources relate to exhaustion and work engagement and how support interventions are associated with these outcomes over time. METHODS: A longitudinal survey consisting of eight monthly measures in the period 2020-2021, completed by medical specialists and residents in the Netherlands. We used validated questionnaires to assess job demands (i.e., workload), job resources (e.g., job control), personal resources (e.g., psychological capital), emotional exhaustion, and work engagement. Additionally, we measured the use of specific support interventions (e.g., professional support). Multilevel modeling and longitudinal growth curve modeling were used to analyze the data. RESULTS: 378 medical specialists and residents were included in the analysis (response rate: 79.08%). Workload was associated with exhaustion (γ = .383, p < .001). All job resources, as well as the personal resources psychological capital and self-judgement were associated with work engagement (γs ranging from -.093 to .345, all ps < .05). Job control and psychological capital attenuated the workload-exhaustion relationship while positive feedback and peer support strengthened it (all ps < .05). The use of professional support interventions (from a mental health expert or coach) was related to higher work engagement (estimate = .168, p = .032) over time. Participation in organized supportive group meetings was associated with higher exhaustion over time (estimate = .274, p = .006). CONCLUSIONS: Job and personal resources can safeguard work engagement and mitigate the risk of emotional exhaustion. Professional support programs are associated with higher work engagement over time, whereas organized group support meetings are associated with higher exhaustion. Our results stress the importance of professional individual-level interventions to counteract a loss of work engagement in times of crisis.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Physicians , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Pandemics , Work Engagement , COVID-19/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Workload/psychology , Job Satisfaction
8.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(21): e25945, 2021 May 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2191011

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: To investigate the prevalence of anxiety and depressive symptoms and the associated risk factors among first-line medical staff in Wuhan during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) epidemic.From March 5 to 15, 2020, the Hamilton Anxiety Scale and Hamilton Depression scale were used to investigate the anxiety and depression status of medical staff in Wuhan Cabin Hospital (a Hospital). Two hundred seventy-six questionnaires were received from 96 doctors and 180 nurses, including 79 males and 197 females.During the COVID-19 epidemic, the prevalence rate of anxiety and depression was 27.9% and 18.1%, respectively, among 276 front-line medical staff in Wuhan. The prevalence rate of anxiety and depression among doctors was 19.8% and 11.5%, respectively, and the prevalence rate of anxiety and depression among nurses was 32.2% and 21.7%, respectively. Females recorded higher total scores for anxiety and depression than males, and nurses recorded higher scores for anxiety and depression than doctors.During the COVID-19 epidemic, some first-line medical staff experienced mental health problems such as depression and anxiety. Nurses were more prone to anxiety and depression than doctors. Effective strategies toward to improving the mental health should be provided to first-line medical staff, especially female medical staff and nurses.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Medical Staff/psychology , Mobile Health Units/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/transmission , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/psychology , Fear , Female , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional , Male , Medical Staff/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Prevalence , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Self Report/statistics & numerical data , Sex Factors , Workload/psychology
9.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(23)2022 11 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2123637

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic put a lot of strain on healthcare organizations. Nurses account for over 50% of healthcare staff, and how nurses perform in their work is influenced by a number of human and work environmental factors. However, to our knowledge, there has not been a previous study with the intention to look at all areas that affect a sustainable working life and how these impact nurses' mental well-being. The aim of this study is to investigate the association between, and the effect of, different factors in nurses' work situations associated with nurses' work-related mental-health diagnoses, before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. A questionnaire was sent out to all 9219 nurses in the Swedish county of Skane in the spring of 2017 and during wave two of the COVID-19 pandemic in the fall of 2020. The data were analyzed through logistic regression analysis. The results showed that lack of joy in the daily work, an increased workload and lack of support from co-workers had an increased association with work-related mental-health diagnoses. Future research regarding the long-term impact of COVID-19 on all areas of nurses' professional and personal lives is needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Follow-Up Studies , Mental Health , Pandemics , Workload/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
10.
Asian Pac J Cancer Prev ; 23(10): 3265-3271, 2022 Oct 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2100938

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study aims to measure the occupational fatigue level and describe the sources and consequences of occupational fatigue among middle and higher management at an international specialized cancer center during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A mixed-method design was used in this study. A convenience sampling technique was utilized to select the participants from King Hussein Cancer Center, Amman, Jordan. The data was collected through a self-administered questionnaire. This questionnaire included both quantitative and qualitative sections. We utilized Fatigue Risk Assessment and Management in High-Risk Environments (FRAME)-26 items scale for the quantitative section. Two main questions were included in the survey to identify the sources and consequences of occupational fatigue. RESULTS: The results show that the average mean of occupational fatigue was 2.95/5 (SD=0.70). The level of changes in fatigue levels after the COVID-19 pandemic increased by 0.87/3 (SD=1.45). The sources of occupational fatigue could be categorized into five themes: workload, work environment, staffing, psychological, and physical sources. There are four themes categorizing occupational fatigue: social, economic, health, and daily activity and lifestyle. CONCLUSION: This study affords valuable insight into the level, source, and consequences of occupational fatigue among middle and higher management at an international specialized cancer hospital in developing countries. The results indicate that the occupational fatigue level was moderate, and the fatigue level was negatively impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Fatigue/epidemiology , Fatigue/etiology , Workplace , Workload/psychology , Neoplasms/epidemiology
11.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(21)2022 Oct 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2090151

ABSTRACT

Psychosocial job stressors increase the risk of mental health problems for the workers in health and social services (HSS). Although previous studies suggest that the accumulation of two or more stressors is detrimental to mental health, few studies have examined the synergistic interaction of accumulating job stressors. We examined survey responses from 9855 Finnish HSS workers in a cross-sectional study design from 2021. We conducted an interaction analysis of high job demands, low rewards and low workplace social capital on psychological distress, focusing on the relative excess risk due to interaction (RERI). Additionally, we analysed the interaction of job demands, low rewards and COVID-19 burden (extra workload and emotional load). Our analysis showed that the total RERI for the job stressors on psychological distress was considerable (6.27, 95% CI 3.14, 9.39). The total excess risk was caused by two-way interactions, especially between high demands and low rewards and by the three-way interaction of all stressors. The total RERI for job demands, low reward and COVID-19 burden (3.93, 95% CI 1.15, 6.72), however, was caused entirely by two-way interaction between high demands and low rewards. Mental health interventions tackling high demands, low rewards and low social capital are jointly needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Psychological Distress , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Pandemics , Workplace/psychology , Workload/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Job Satisfaction
12.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(18)2022 Sep 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2032947

ABSTRACT

Although previous studies have focused on the adverse effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on various professional groups (particularly in the health and nursing care sector), this study aims to close a research gap by assessing perspectives of students and young professionals in epidemiology and public health in Germany in terms of shifts in workload, work content, and related challenges caused by the pandemic. We conducted a cross-sectional survey between mid-February and mid-March 2022. Quantitative data were analyzed via standardized mean differences. Qualitative data based on answers to open-ended questions were analyzed via a qualitative content analysis. Overall, 172 individuals participated in this survey. Results indicate that students felt burdened the most by lack of exchange with other students and lecturers. Study participants employed in public health experienced changes in their employment because they had changes in their work content- and administration, which was accompanied by a high burden due to the workload. Multiple demands that can have an impact on both acquired skills and mental health during the professional qualification phase were mentioned by the participants. Therefore, more in-depth analyses are needed to investigate the impact the pandemic will have on the (future) public health workforce in the long run.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Germany/epidemiology , Health Workforce , Humans , Public Health , Students , Workload/psychology
13.
Respir Care ; 67(12): 1578-1587, 2022 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1975121

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Burnout is a major challenge in health care and is associated with poor overall well-being, increased medical errors, worse patient outcomes, and low job satisfaction. There is scant literature focused on the respiratory therapist's (RT) experience of burnout, and a thorough exploration of RTs' perception of factors associated with burnout has not been reported. The aim of this qualitative study was to understand the factors associated with burnout as experienced by RTs amid the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: We performed a post hoc, qualitative analysis of free-text responses from a survey of burnout prevalence in RTs. RESULTS: There were 1,114 total and 220 free-text responses. Five overarching themes emerged from the analysis: staffing, workload, physical/emotional consequences, lack of effective leadership, and lack of respect. Respondents discussed feelings of anxiety, depression, and compassion fatigue as well as concerns that lack of adequate staffing, high workload assignments, and inadequate support from leadership contributed to feelings of burnout. Specific instances of higher patient acuity, surge in critically ill patients, rapidly evolving changes in treatment recommendations, and minimal training and preparation for an extended scope of practice were reported as stressors that led to burnout. Some respondents stated that they felt a lack of respect for both the RT profession and the contribution of RTs to patient care. CONCLUSIONS: Themes associated with burnout in RTs included staffing, workload, physical and emotional exhaustion, lack of effective leadership, and lack of respect. These results provide potential targets for interventions to combat burnout among RTs.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Job Satisfaction , Workload/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
14.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 22(1): 949, 2022 Jul 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1962837

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The Covid-19 pandemic led to increased work-related strain and psychosocial burden in nurses worldwide, resulting in high prevalences of mental health problems. Nurses in long-term care facilities seem to be especially affected by the pandemic. Nevertheless, there are few findings indicating possible positive changes for health care workers. Therefore, we investigated which psychosocial burdens and potential positive aspects nurses working in long-term care facilities experience during the Covid-19 pandemic. METHODS: We conducted a mixed-methods study among nurses and nursing assistants working in nursing homes in Germany. The survey contained the third German version of the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire (COPSOQ III). Using Welch's t-tests, we compared the COPSOQ results of our sample against a pre-pandemic reference group of geriatric nurses from Germany. Additionally, we conducted semi-structured interviews with geriatric nurses with a special focus on psychosocial stress, to reach a deeper understanding of their experiences on work-related changes and burdens during the pandemic. Data were analysed using thematic coding (Braun and Clarke). RESULTS: Our survey sample (n = 177) differed significantly from the pre-pandemic reference group in 14 out of 31 COPSOQ scales. Almost all of these differences indicated negative changes. Our sample scored significantly worse regarding the scales 'quantitative demands', 'hiding emotions', 'work-privacy conflicts', 'role conflicts', 'quality of leadership', 'support at work', 'recognition', 'physical demands', 'intention to leave profession', 'burnout', 'presenteeism' and 'inability to relax'. The interviews (n = 15) revealed six main themes related to nurses' psychosocial stress: 'overall working conditions', 'concern for residents', 'management of relatives', 'inability to provide terminal care', 'tensions between being infected and infecting others' and 'technicisation of care'. 'Enhanced community cohesion' (interviews), 'meaning of work' and 'quantity of social relations' (COPSOQ III) were identified as positive effects of the pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: Results clearly illustrate an aggravation of geriatric nurses' situation and psychosocial burden and only few positive changes due to the Covid-19 pandemic. Pre-existing hardships seem to have further deteriorated and new stressors added to nurses' strain. The perceived erosion of care, due to an overemphasis of the technical in relation to the social and emotional dimensions of care, seems to be especially burdensome to geriatric nurses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Nursing Homes , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workload/psychology
15.
Front Public Health ; 10: 852629, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1952790

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The pandemic has intensified physical and psychological work demands experienced by nurses in a hospital environment. The purpose of this study was to examine personal and work environmental risk factors associated with occupational burnout among hospital nurses. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional from April to November 2020. Data from 831 nurses who worked professionally in four educational hospitals were compiled through survey questionnaires to report the prevalence of burnout, occupational and individual factors. Independent t-test and Mann-Whitney test measured the link between the scopes of occupational burnout and risk factors. Results: About half of the participants indicated moderate symptoms of burnout. The fear of the nurses correlated significantly with emotional exhaustion (r = 0.71, p = 0.001), depersonalization (r = 0.67, p = 0.02), and personal accomplishment (r = 0.63, p = 0.05). Mental demand (r = 0.74, p = 0.01) and effort at work (r = 0.68, 0.001) correlated significantly with emotional exhaustion (r = 0.51, p = 0.03). Conclusion: The findings indicated a high prevalence of burnout symptoms, particularly emotional exhaustion, among hospital nursing professionals. Occupational health services should consider burnout as an occupational-related condition and provide interventions to reduce workplace chronic stressors and burnout in hospitals.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Fear , Hospitals , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Workload/psychology
16.
Bundesgesundheitsblatt Gesundheitsforschung Gesundheitsschutz ; 65(7-8): 776-783, 2022 Jul.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1894640

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly changed the everyday professional life of teaching staff. The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of the pandemic on teachers' emotional exhaustion and job satisfaction. METHODS: A sample of 2531 school administrators and teachers from North Rhine-Westphalia was recruited in October 2020. Changes in emotional exhaustion during the pandemic were directly measured with nine items of the Maslach Burnout Inventory and changes in job satisfaction with six items. Adjusted regression models were used to determine risk and protective factors associated with changes in emotional exhaustion and job satisfaction. RESULTS: Risk factors associated with both more frequently perceived symptoms of exhaustion and reduced job satisfaction were as follows: the additional workload during the pandemic, the stress of uncertainty, the perceived change in workload, concerns about the students, and being employed at an elementary school. A supportive school environment was associated with both fewer perceived symptoms of exhaustion and stable job satisfaction. DISCUSSION: From the perspective of the teaching staff, the COVID-19 pandemic was related to subjective changes in emotional exhaustion and job satisfaction. The COVID-19 pandemic was associated with higher emotional exhaustion for more than half of the teaching staff and with reduced job satisfaction for one in five teachers. Due to the study design, causal conclusions are not possible.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workload/psychology
17.
Scand J Psychol ; 63(5): 449-461, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1807267

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 crisis has had severe adverse psychological effects on people globally. Although previous research has shown that mindfulness helps people cope with stressful situations, we do not know whether mindfulness can help people cope with the effects of the pandemic. This research examined the effect mindfulness has on emotional exhaustion on the part of employees who work at private international universities in Thailand that are affected by COVID-19. Grounded in the Conservation of Resources (COR) theory, this research proposed that the level of psychological hardiness mindful employees have mediates the effect of mindfulness in reducing emotional exhaustion. The Job Demands-Resource (JD-R) model was used as an additional theory to test the moderating effect of workload, which may reduce the benefit mindfulness has in alleviating emotional exhaustion. Questionnaire survey data were collected from 300 employees at two universities. Data analysis was conducted using partial least squares structural equation modeling, and the model showed that psychological hardiness mediated the effect mindfulness has on emotional exhaustion fully. Further, the analysis supported the moderating role workload plays in suppressing the effect of psychological hardiness on emotional exhaustion significantly. A simple slope analysis indicated as well that the negative association between psychological hardiness and emotional exhaustion was present only in employees with light workloads. By integrating the principle of COR theory with the JD-R model, this research extended previous research by showing that mindfulness may not help employees cope with stress during an organizational crisis like COVID-19 when they have to manage a heavy workload.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Mindfulness , Adaptation, Psychological , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Burnout, Professional/therapy , Humans , Surveys and Questionnaires , Universities , Workload/psychology
18.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 26(4): 1403-1413, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1732623

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study was planned to determine the burnout levels of physicians during the COVID-19 pandemic, and to contribute to taking the necessary measures by determining the associated factors. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This research was designed via Google Online Form as an online survey with questions of Sociodemographic Data Form, Maslach Burnout Inventory and Beck Anxiety Inventory and was conducted with 40 specialist physicians actively working at the Sakarya University Training and Research Hospital. The same questionnaire was re-applied online after two months, and 24 out of 40 physicians were accessed. The SPSS 25 (IBM, Armonk, NY, USA) program was used for the analysis of the data. RESULTS: According to the Maslach Burnout Inventory applied in the pre-test, it was found that the feeling of personal accomplishment was high, emotional burnout was normal, and depersonalization was low. Anxiety and burnout were found to be positively correlated, and there were no statistically significant differences in the average values of the pre-and post-test Maslach Burnout Inventory and Beck Anxiety Inventory scores. CONCLUSIONS: Detecting possible burnout in physicians working in a pandemic, identifying associated factors and taking required measures can be beneficial both for physicians and society from a biopsychosocial perspective.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Physicians/psychology , Workload/psychology , Adult , Anxiety , Correlation of Data , Female , Hospitals, University , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Social Conditions , Sociodemographic Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires , Turkey/epidemiology
19.
Endocr Metab Immune Disord Drug Targets ; 21(12): 2238-2252, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1714873

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Some endocrinologists were involved in the management of patients with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 during the first wave of the pandemic. This study aims to analyze burnout levels among the Association of Medical Endocrinologists (AME) members before and during the pandemic. METHODS: We recruited two AME members samples at two different times: before COVID-19 (n = 811) and during the first wave of the ongoing pandemic (n = 579). Both the samples filled the Maslach Burnout Inventory. We performed MANOVAs to evaluate demographic and COVID-19 related differences in burnout levels and Pearson's Chi-square test to compare burnout severity before and during the pandemic. RESULTS: Women reported higher Emotional Exhaustion and reduced Professional Accomplishment than men. The oldest physicians had lower levels of Emotional Exhaustion and Depersonalization and higher Professional Accomplishment than younger workers. Independent contractors displayed lower levels of burnout compared to established contractors. Finally, the pandemic, per se, did not lead to changes in burnout levels. DISCUSSION: Women and young physicians are at higher risk of burnout. It is also possible that front- line professionals are at higher risk during a health care crisis. Moreover, it is likely that the length of exposure to the pandemic has not been sufficient to impact burnout levels. CONCLUSION: Short-term exposure to pandemic-related activities seemed to have a low impact on burnout severity, except for physicians directly involved in managing COVID-19 cases. It is strongly recommended the availability of psychological support in public hospitals.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Endocrinologists/psychology , Occupational Health , Psychological Distress , Workload/psychology , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Burnout, Professional/diagnosis , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Physicians, Women/psychology , Prevalence , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Severity of Illness Index , Sex Factors , Time Factors , Women, Working/psychology
20.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(4)2022 02 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1690247

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Compared to healthcare workers and teleworkers, occupational wellbeing of employees who continued or suddenly returned to work during the COVID-19 pandemic have received less attention thus far. Using the Job Demand-Resource model as a framework, the present study aimed at evaluating the role of job demands and job and personal resources in affecting emotional exhaustion among university administrative staff. METHODS: This cross-sectional study analyzed data collected through an online questionnaire completed by 364 administrative employees that continued working in presence (WP) and 1578 that continued working blended (WB), namely, partly remotely and partly in presence. RESULTS: Among job demands, quantitative job demand overloads and perceived risk of being infected were positively associated with higher levels of emotional exhaustion. Among job resources, colleague support was significantly associated with lower emotional exhaustion for both WB and WP, whereas supervisor support and fatigue management were salient only for WB. Among personal resources, personal contribution in managing COVID-19-related risk at work emerged as a protective factor for emotional exhaustion. CONCLUSION: Insights for the development of targeted preventive measure for a more psychologically safe and productive return to work can be derived from these results.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Pandemics , Return to Work , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Universities , Workload/psychology
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