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1.
J Nurs Adm ; 52(1): 12-18, 2022 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1570150

ABSTRACT

A COVID19RNStories website allowed RNs in this integrated health system to "tell their stories" during the recent pandemic. From April to August 2020, approximately 100 items were posted with 4 themes emerging. COVID19RNStories had no preconceived hypotheses or specific questions to answer: RNs shared whatever they felt was relevant to their experiences. This approach provided real-time information on issues and concerns of RNs during the 1st wave of COVID-19. This article discusses the identified themes with recommendations for nursing leaders to support staff during the pandemic and future unexpected emergency situations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Internet , Nurse's Role/psychology , Workload/psychology , Humans , Nursing Staff, Hospital/organization & administration , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Qualitative Research , Quality of Health Care
2.
J Healthc Manag ; 66(4): 304-322, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1475893

ABSTRACT

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: While the COVID-19 pandemic has added stressors to the lives of healthcare workers, it is unclear which factors represent the most useful targets for interventions to mitigate employee distress across the entire healthcare team. A survey was distributed to employees of a large healthcare system in the Southeastern United States, and 1,130 respondents participated. The survey measured overall distress using the 9-item Well-Being Index (WBI), work-related factors, moral distress, resilience, and organizational-level factors. Respondents were also asked to identify major work, clinical, and nonwork stressors. Multivariate regression was used to evaluate associations between employee characteristics and WBI distress score. Overall, 82% of employees reported high distress (WBI ≥ 2), with nurses, clinical support staff, and advanced practice providers reporting the highest average scores. Factors associated with higher distress included increased job demands or responsibilities, heavy workload or long hours, higher frequency of moral distress, and loneliness or social isolation. Factors associated with lower distress were perceived organizational support, work control, perceived fairness of salary cuts, and resilience. Most factors significantly associated with distress-heavy workloads and long hours, increased job demands, and moral distress, in particular-were work-related, indicating that efforts can be made to mitigate them. Resilience explained a small portion of the variance in distress relative to other work-related factors. Ensuring appropriate staffing levels may represent the single largest opportunity to significantly move the needle on distress. However, the financial impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the healthcare system may represent a barrier to addressing these stressors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Personnel/psychology , Job Satisfaction , Occupational Stress , Patient Care Team , Stress, Psychological , Workload/psychology , Adult , Female , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workload/statistics & numerical data
3.
Ann Glob Health ; 87(1): 79, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1369873

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The mental health of people working in Covid-19 wards (nurses, doctors, etc.) may be compromised due to the specific conditions of the workplace and patients. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between mental burden and quality of work life in nurses in intensive care units of Covid-19 patients. Method: In this cross-sectional study, a sample of 200 people-100 nurses in care units for patients with COVID-19 (group 1) and 100 nurses in non-COVID-19 patient care units (group 2-in three university hospitals were obtained. These 200 samples were randomly extracted from the list of employees and selected. Data were collected using three questionnaires, including (1) a demographic, (2) the NASA-Task Load Index (1988) (Hart & Staveland, 1988) and (3) National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Quality of Life. Data were analyzed using SPSS-24 software and descriptive and analytical statistical methods. Results: The overall mean scores of nurses' quality of work life were significantly different between the two groups (P < 0.05). The average score of quality of life in nurses caring for patients with COVID-19 is 92.57, more than nurses caring for patients without COVID-19, 79.43. Among the dimensions of mental workload: Performance and efficiency, with an average score of 77.32 ± 15.85, had the highest score, while discouragement and failure, with an average score of 58.04 ± 26.72, had the lowest score of mental workload. There is a significant difference between the mental load of work in the two groups (P = 0.001). There is a significant inverse relationship between total quality of work life and total mental workload (r = -14 and P = 0.01). Conclusion: In this study, it was observed that nurses caring for Covid-19 patients are in a more unfavorable situation in terms of the studied characteristics. Due to the work period, these nurses have a high workload and a low quality of work life to compensate for the mental and physical deficiencies required by a long presence in the work environment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Quality of Life , Workload , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/nursing , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Iran/epidemiology , Male , Nurses/psychology , Nurses/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workload/psychology
5.
J Occup Health ; 63(1): e12247, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1347383

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence of burnout according to job category after the first wave of COVID-19 in Japan and to explore its association with certain factors. METHODS: An online cross-sectional survey of health care workers (HCWs) from June 15 to July 6, 2020, was conducted at a tertiary hospital in Tokyo, Japan. Demographic characteristics, results of the Japanese version of the Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey, types of anxiety and stress, changes in life and work after the peak of the pandemic, and types of support aimed at reducing the physical or mental burden, were determined. RESULTS: Of 672 HCWs, 149 (22.6%) met the overall burnout criteria. Burnout was more prevalent in women (OR, 3.11; 95% CI, 1.45-6.67, P = .003), anxiety due to unfamiliarity with personal protective equipment (PPE) (OR, 1.98; 95% CI, 1.20-3.27, P = .007), and decreased sleep duration (OR, 1.96; 95% CI, 1.20-3.20, P = .008). Conversely, participants who felt that the delivery of COVID-19-related information (OR, .608; 95% CI, .371-.996, P = .048) and PPE education opportunities (OR, .484; 95% CI, .236-.993, P = .048) and messages of encouragement at the workplace (OR, .584; 95% CI, .352-.969; p = .037) was helpful experienced less burnout. CONCLUSIONS: There is a need to focus on the above factors to maintain the mental health of HCWs. The delivery of COVID-19-related information and educational interventions for PPE and messages of encouragement at the workplace may be needed to reduce the mental burden.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Psychological/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Health Personnel/psychology , Workload/psychology , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Tokyo/epidemiology , Young Adult
6.
World Neurosurg ; 151: e857-e870, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1297240

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has led to a significant transformation in medical practice and training. This nationwide survey study aims to evaluate the 1-year impact of the pandemic on training of neurosurgical residents. METHODS: A 38-question Web-based survey was sent to 356 neurosurgery residents. Two hundred and thirty-five participated in the study (66% response rate), representing more than half of all neurosurgical residents in the country. RESULTS: Assignment to direct COVID-19 medical care was common (85.5%). Many of the neurosurgery residents (37.9%) were tested positive for COVID-19. Almost half of the respondents reported a decrease in work hours. Most participants (84.3%) reported a decline in total operative case volume (mean change, -29.1% ± 1.6%), largely as a result of a decrease in elective (-33.2% ± 1.6%) as opposed to emergency cases (-5.1% ± 1.8%). For theoretic education, most respondents (54.9%) indicated a negative impact, whereas 25.1% reported a positive impact. For practical training, most respondents (78.7%) reported an adverse effect. A decrease in elective surgical case volume predicted a positive impact on theoretic training but a negative impact on practical training. Research productivity was reported by 33.2% to have decreased and by 23% to have increased. Forty-two percent indicated an increase in concerns about their training and career, with a negative impact on practical training being the most important predictor. Most (57.4%) had considered extending residency training to overcome negative effects of the pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 has had a significant impact on neurosurgical practice and training. Effective measures should be used to mitigate these effects and better prepare for the future challenges.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Internship and Residency/trends , Neurosurgery/education , Neurosurgery/trends , Surveys and Questionnaires , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Neurosurgery/psychology , Time Factors , Turkey/epidemiology , Workload/psychology
7.
Ann Glob Health ; 87(1): 51, 2021 06 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1296121

ABSTRACT

Background: Nurses working in treating patients with COVID-19 are exposed to various stressors, such as fear of COVID-19, stress, and high workload, leading to burnout. Objectives: This study aimed to identify the level of burnout and its predictors in nurses working in hospitals for COVID-19 patients. Methods: Participants in this study were nurses working in 11 hospitals for COVID-19 patients in the Fars province of Iran. The Maslach burnout and the UK Health and Safety stress questionnaires were used to assess burnout and stress, respectively. Analysis, using multiple regression in the SPSS21 software, aimed to identify the factors affecting burnout. Findings: The mean level of burnout in the nurses at the COVID-19 hospitals was 57 out of 120, and burnout was affected by workload (ß = 0.69, p < 0.001), job stress (ß = 0.25, p < 0.001) and inadequate hospital resources for the prevention of COVID-19 (ß = -0.16, p < 0.001). These three variables explained 87% of the variance in burnout. Conclusions: The burnout of nurses directly exposed to COVID-19 patients is more than nurses in other wards, and workload is the most significant cause of burnout in them. Therefore, necessary measures such as hiring more nurses, reducing working hours and increasing rest periods are necessary to reduce workload. In addition, the job stress of these nurses should be managed and controlled, and the hospital resources needed to prevent this disease should be provided.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Nurses , Occupational Stress , Work Schedule Tolerance/psychology , Workload , Adult , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/nursing , COVID-19/psychology , Fear/psychology , Female , Health Services Needs and Demand , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Iran/epidemiology , Male , Nurses/psychology , Nurses/supply & distribution , Occupational Stress/complications , Occupational Stress/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Workload/psychology , Workload/standards , Workload/statistics & numerical data
8.
Healthc Manage Forum ; 34(4): 200-204, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1269848

ABSTRACT

Every year around Nurses Week, Dr. Rhonda Collins, DNP, RN, FAAN, Chief Nursing Officer for Vocera Communications, publishes a report examining important issues that impact the nursing profession worldwide. Her 2021 CNO report examines how the COVID-19 pandemic put a spotlight on the realities of the nursing profession and how the lack of resources, infrastructure, and policies impact nurses' work and lives. Dr. Collins addresses the toll of mental, emotional, and physical fatigue and outlines steps to help leaders create environments that protect the well-being of nurses and their patients. Dr. Collins closes the report by asking nurses to participate in a study to measure the mental, emotional, and physical burden nurses experience during communication. The study will use the NASA Task Load Index, a tool that has been used to measure the task load of workers in high-intensity jobs, such as pilots and air traffic controllers. The objective is to gain insight and a body of knowledge toward reducing nurses' cognitive burden going forward.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/nursing , Safety Management , Adult , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Female , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Male , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Task Performance and Analysis , Workload/psychology , Workplace Violence/prevention & control , Workplace Violence/psychology
9.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(21): e25945, 2021 May 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1269619

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: To investigate the prevalence of anxiety and depressive symptoms and the associated risk factors among first-line medical staff in Wuhan during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) epidemic.From March 5 to 15, 2020, the Hamilton Anxiety Scale and Hamilton Depression scale were used to investigate the anxiety and depression status of medical staff in Wuhan Cabin Hospital (a Hospital). Two hundred seventy-six questionnaires were received from 96 doctors and 180 nurses, including 79 males and 197 females.During the COVID-19 epidemic, the prevalence rate of anxiety and depression was 27.9% and 18.1%, respectively, among 276 front-line medical staff in Wuhan. The prevalence rate of anxiety and depression among doctors was 19.8% and 11.5%, respectively, and the prevalence rate of anxiety and depression among nurses was 32.2% and 21.7%, respectively. Females recorded higher total scores for anxiety and depression than males, and nurses recorded higher scores for anxiety and depression than doctors.During the COVID-19 epidemic, some first-line medical staff experienced mental health problems such as depression and anxiety. Nurses were more prone to anxiety and depression than doctors. Effective strategies toward to improving the mental health should be provided to first-line medical staff, especially female medical staff and nurses.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Medical Staff/psychology , Mobile Health Units/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/transmission , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/psychology , Fear , Female , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional , Male , Medical Staff/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Prevalence , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Self Report/statistics & numerical data , Sex Factors , Workload/psychology
10.
Health Care Women Int ; 41(11-12): 1255-1272, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1263588

ABSTRACT

In December, 2019, a pathogen was identified and named as 2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV). To prevent its spread, lockdowns were announced and working women had to perform dual roles: work from home and work for home. In the present study researchers aimed to assess mental and physical load on Indian women professionals during lockdown due to COVID-19. An online cross-sectional survey was carried out using a Google form. The questionnaire consisted of queries based on following domains: demographic details, awareness of COVID-19 pandemic, analysis of mental health of participants during lockdown, estimate of physical load for work from home, physical load due to house hold chores and overall effect on health. The sample was collected from 28th April to 12th May 2020 and 537 responses were recorded from women working from home as well as working for home through snowball sampling technique. Mental health was moderately and severely affected in 27.5% and 27% of participants respectively. 34.3% experienced great increase in physical load due to house hold chores during lockdown. 45.81% reported pain in neck and back region with 36.31% participants reported strain in their eyes sometimes. 15.08% and 8.37% had a tendency to over react in the present situation often and always respectively. The women performing work from home and work for home during the lock down are going through moderately increased physical and mental load. Their health is also affected by development of musculoskeletal problems.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Health , Workload/psychology , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , India , Middle Aged , Quarantine/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological , Surveys and Questionnaires
11.
Intensive Crit Care Nurs ; 65: 103059, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1188596

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Burnout is a global work-related phenomenon. Intensive care unit (ICU) nurses are at risk of burnout and the COVID-19 pandemic may increase this risk. The objectives of this study were to assess the prevalence of burnout risk and identify risk factors among ICU nurses during the COVID-19 pandemic. RESEARCH METHODOLOGY: Web-based survey performed during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in French speaking Belgium. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Risk of burnout was assessed with the Maslach Burnout Inventory scale. RESULTS: A total of 1135 ICU nurses responded to the questionnaire. The overall prevalence of burnout risk was 68%. A total of 29% of ICU nurses were at risk of depersonalisation (DP), 31% of reduced personal accomplishment (PA), and 38% of emotional exhaustion (EE). A 1:3 nurse-to-patient ratio increased the risk of EE (OR = 1.77, 95% CI: 1.07-2.95) and DP (OR = 1.38, 95% CI: 1.09-2.40). Those who reported having a higher perceived workload during the COVID-19 pandemic were at higher risk for all dimensions of burnout. Shortage of personal protective equipment increased the risk of EE (OR = 1.78, 95% CI: 1.35-3.34) and nurses who reported having symptoms of COVID-19 without being tested were at higher risk of EE (OR = 1.40, 95% CI: 1.68-1.87). CONCLUSIONS: Two-thirds of ICU nurses were at risk of burnout and this risk was associated with their working conditions during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. We recommend monitoring the risk of burnout and implementing interventions to prevent and manage it, taking into account the factors identified in this study.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/diagnosis , COVID-19/complications , Adult , Belgium , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Occupational Stress/complications , Occupational Stress/etiology , Occupational Stress/psychology , Prevalence , Psychometrics/instrumentation , Psychometrics/methods , Risk Assessment/methods , Risk Assessment/statistics & numerical data , Risk Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workload/psychology , Workload/standards
12.
Anxiety Stress Coping ; 34(5): 530-544, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1152995

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: After the worldwide outbreak of COVID-19 in 2020, many employees transitioned from in-office work to telework to slow down the spread of the virus. Building on the Job Demands-Resources model, we examined day-level relationships between job demands, home demands and emotional exhaustion during telework. Moreover, we tested if leisure crafting (i.e., the proactive pursuit and enactment of leisure activities targeted at goal setting, socializing, growth and development) is negatively related to emotional exhaustion. We expected that proactive personality would be positively related to leisure crafting. Finally, emotional exhaustion was predicted to relate negatively to job performance. METHODS: We tested our assumptions using a daily diary study on seven consecutive days with 178 employees (964 observations in total). RESULTS: Multilevel path analysis supports the assumptions that daily job demands as well as daily home demands during telework are positively related to emotional exhaustion. As predicted, we found leisure crafting to be negatively related to emotional exhaustion, and proactive personality to be positively related to leisure crafting. Finally, emotional exhaustion was negatively related to job performance. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, our study supports a health-promoting role of leisure crafting above the unfavorable relationships between job demands and home demands with emotional exhaustion.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Leisure Activities , Teleworking , Adult , Burnout, Professional/etiology , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Female , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Leisure Activities/psychology , Male , Rumination, Cognitive , Surveys and Questionnaires , Work Performance , Work-Life Balance , Workload/psychology , Workload/statistics & numerical data
14.
Appl Nurs Res ; 59: 151416, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1141611

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Covid-19 has brought healthcare workers in general and nurses in particular into the limelight as never before. It is important to study the intensity of the impact of this pandemic on the profession. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to assess the occupational satisfaction during the pandemic of Covid-19 among the nurses in Israel, to shed light on conditions of work and to identify factors associated with low occupational satisfaction. METHODS: Cross-sectional study of 130 Israeli nurses. Minnesota Satisfaction and Measure of Job Satisfaction questionnaire with 28 items was used to assess occupational satisfaction. RESULTS: In the multivariable model, nurses working in the community had higher occupational satisfaction than those working in hospitals (ß = 0.24, p = .032); nurses who took care of patients who tested positive for Covid-19 had significantly lower occupational satisfaction than others (ß = -0.48, p = .009). Most of the sample reported lack of personal protective equipment (PPE). Nurses who experienced lack of PPE reported lower occupational satisfaction than those who did not (3.4 vs. 3.8, p = .039). Occupational satisfaction was mainly based on the component, built by the intrinsic characteristics of the occupation related to the personal accomplishment. Most of nurses had to increase their workload as a result of staff shortages, but the elevation of the workload was not associated with lower occupational satisfaction. CONCLUSION: Even under the circumstances of the pandemic, the most important nurses` occupational values are worthwhile accomplishments, importance of professional challenge, diversity and interest in the job, personal growth and development and independence in their practice.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/nursing , Job Satisfaction , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Personal Satisfaction , Personnel Turnover/statistics & numerical data , Workload/psychology , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Israel , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
16.
Health Care Women Int ; 42(3): 323-334, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1109019

ABSTRACT

Women, who are "supposed" to do all their official and household work are now required to do all of it simultaneously because of lockdown amid covid-19. I did this study to analyze the perceived stress and depressive tendencies among the non-clinical population of employed women residing in Delhi-NCR and whether work from-for home is acting as a mediator between the two. Further, marital status and family status were also taken into consideration. A sample of two-hundred-three responses depicted that there is a significant and positive correlation between perceived stress and depressive tendencies. Further, working from-for home significantly acts as a mediator between the two variables. Moreover, there is no significant interaction between family status and working from-for home on depressive tendencies. However, there is a significant interaction between marital status and working from-for home on depressive tendencies. The implications, limitations, and future suggestions are discussed in the end.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Mental Health , Women, Working/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Depression/epidemiology , Family Characteristics , Female , Humans , India/epidemiology , Marital Status , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Workload/psychology , Young Adult
18.
Int J Psychol ; 56(4): 532-550, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1092528

ABSTRACT

Many governments react to the current coronavirus/COVID-19 pandemic by restricting daily (work) life. On the basis of theories from occupational health, we propose that the duration of the pandemic, its demands (e.g., having to work from home, closing of childcare facilities, job insecurity, work-privacy conflicts, privacy-work conflicts) and personal- and job-related resources (co-worker social support, job autonomy, partner support and corona self-efficacy) interact in their effect on employee exhaustion. We test the hypotheses with a three-wave sample of German employees during the pandemic from April to June 2020 (Nw1  = 2900, Nw12  = 1237, Nw123  = 789). Our findings show a curvilinear effect of pandemic duration on working women's exhaustion. The data also show that the introduction and the easing of lockdown measures affect exhaustion, and that women with children who work from home while childcare is unavailable are especially exhausted. Job autonomy and partner support mitigated some of these effects. In sum, women's psychological health was more strongly affected by the pandemic than men's. We discuss implications for occupational health theories and that interventions targeted at mitigating the psychological consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic should target women specifically.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Occupational Health/trends , Workload/psychology , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Communicable Disease Control/trends , Female , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Self Efficacy , Social Support
19.
J Appl Psychol ; 106(2): 199-213, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1087415

ABSTRACT

The global COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted personal and work lives and created great uncertainty and stress, especially for frontline health care professionals like doctors and nurses who risk personal health while facing increased workloads and new COVID-related tasks. People can passively respond to this disruption, or they can be more active and choose to shape the conditions surrounding their work during the crisis. We designed a multiwave, multisource study examining whether a proactive orientation is a key resource for frontline health care professionals in the COVID-19 pandemic. Drawing from proactive and conservation of resources theories, we studied a sample of 408 doctors and nurses at a COVID-19 hospital in the locked-down area surrounding Wuhan City, China during the first wave of the virus. Our aim is to examine how personal agency contributes to health care professionals' performance and well-being when combating COVID-19. Proactive personality as a dispositional resource was associated with higher levels of perceived strengths use, a job-related motivational resource. This effect was jointly moderated by routine disruption and perceived organizational support. Proactive personality was indirectly associated with performance and two indicators of well-being (resilience and thriving) through perceived strengths use. More frequent physical exposure to the virus magnified the effects of perceived strengths use on an archival indicator of performance during the first wave of the pandemic. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Personality , Adult , China , Female , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Mental Health , Middle Aged , Motivation , Resilience, Psychological , SARS-CoV-2 , Workload/psychology
20.
Curr Med Sci ; 41(1): 31-38, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1084475

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) posed an unprecedented threat to health care providers (HCPs) in Wuhan, China, especially for nurses who were frequently exposed to infected or suspected patients. Limited information was available about the working experience of nurses in fighting against the pandemic. To learn the physical and psychological responses of nurses during the pandemic and explore the potential determinants, we conducted a large-scale survey in Wuhan. This multicenter cross-sectional study enrolled 5521 nurses who worked in designated hospitals, mobile cabins, or shelters during the pandemic. A structured online questionnaire was distributed to assess the physical discomforts, emotional distress and cognitive reactions of nurses at work, and the log-binomial regression analysis was performed to explore potential determinants. A considerable proportion of nurses had symptoms of physical discomforts [3677 (66.6%)] and emotional distress [4721 (85.5%)]. Nurses who were directly involved in the care of patients (i.e., care for severe patients: RR, 2.35; 95% CI, 1.95-2.84), with irregular work schedules (RR, 2.36; 95% CI, 1.95-2.87), and working overtime (RR, 1.34; 95% CI, 1.08-1.65) were at a higher risk for physical discomforts. Nurses who were directly involved in the care of patients (i.e., care for severe patients: RR, 1.78; 95% CI, 1.40-2.29), with irregular work schedules (RR, 3.39; 95% CI, 2.43-4.73), and working overtime (RR, 1.51; 95% CI, 1.12-2.04) were at a higher risk for emotional distress. Therefore, formulating reasonable work schedules and improving workforce systems are necessary to alleviate the physical and emotional distress of nurses during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Nurses/psychology , Occupational Stress/psychology , Workload/psychology , Adult , COVID-19/psychology , China , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Surveys and Questionnaires
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