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2.
South Med J ; 115(3): 175-180, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1718124

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has resulted in unprecedented hospitalizations, ventilator use, and deaths. Because of concerns for resource utilization and surges in hospital capacity use, Texas Executive Order GA-29 required statewide mask wear beginning July 3, 2020. Our objective was to compare COVID-19 case load, hospital bed use, and deaths before and after implementation of this mask order. METHODS: This was a retrospective observational study using publicly reported statewide data to perform a mixed-methods interrupted time series analysis. We compared outcomes before and after the statewide mask wear mandate per Executive Order GA-29. The preorder period was from June 19 to July 2, 2020. The postorder period was July 17 to September 17, 2020. Outcomes included daily COVID-19 case load, hospitalizations, and mortality. RESULTS: The daily case load before the mask order per 100,000 individuals was 187.5 (95% confidence interval [CI] 157.0-217.0) versus 200.7 (95% CI 179.8-221.6) after GA-29. The number of daily hospitalized patients with COVID-19 was 171.4 (95% CI 143.8-199.0) before GA-29 versus 225.1 (95% CI 202.9-247.3) after. Daily mortality was 2.4 (95% CI 1.9-2.9) before GA-29 versus 5.2 (95% CI 4.6-5.8). There was no material impact on our results after controlling for economic activity. CONCLUSIONS: In both adjusted and unadjusted analyses, we were unable to detect a reduction in case load, hospitalization rates, or mortality associated with the implementation of an executive order requiring a statewide mask order. These results suggest that during a period of rapid virus spread, additional public health measures may be necessary to mitigate transmission at the population level.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Mandatory Programs , Masks , Workload/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/prevention & control , Facilities and Services Utilization , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Interrupted Time Series Analysis , Retrospective Studies , Survival Rate , Texas
3.
Int Immunopharmacol ; 102: 108392, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1608746

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) poses a great stress to frontline medical workers. Our previous study indicated that immune cells in the peripheral blood of frontline medical workers changed significantly. However, the dynamic changes of immune cells of frontline medical workers remain unclear. Here, we reported the dynamic changes of lymphocyte subsets in the peripheral blood of 51 frontline medical worker. The frontline medical workers struggling with COVID-19 from February 8 to March 31, 2020. Demographic and clinical data, including routine blood test data were extracted from the electronic health examination record and retrospectively analyzed. The lymphocyte (LYM) count and LYM ratio increased while the monocyte (MONO) ratio, neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR), monocyte to lymphocyte ratio (MLR) and neutrophil (NEUT) ratio in the peripheral blood of frontline medical workers decreased 10 days after struggling with COVID-19. Interestingly, the differences of LYM count, LYM ratio, MONO ratio, NLR, NEUT ratio were more significantly in nurse than doctor. The differences of LYM ratio, NLR and NEUT ratio were more significantly in female than male. However, the changes of LYM count, LYM ratio, MONO ratio, NLR, MLR, NEUT ratio returned to the baseline 10 months after struggling with COVID-19. Together, these data indicated that immune cells in the peripheral blood changed significantly 10 days after struggling with COVID-19, but returned to normal after 10 months. Those maybe caused by psychological stress and we recommend to pay more attention to mental health and immune response of frontline medical workers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Immunity, Cellular , Stress, Psychological/immunology , Workload/psychology , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Female , Humans , Lymphocyte Count , Lymphocytes , Male , Monocytes , Neutrophils , Occupational Exposure , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Sex Factors , Stress, Psychological/blood , Workload/statistics & numerical data
4.
Ann Vasc Surg ; 80: 104-112, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1596282

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to examine the COVID-19 pandemic and its associated impact on the provision of vascular services, and the pattern of presentation and practice in a tertiary referral vascular unit. METHODS: This is a retrospective observational study from a prospectively maintained data-base comparing two time frames, Period 1(15th March-30th May 2019-P1) and Period 2(15th March-30th May 2020-P2)All the patients who presented for a vascular review in the 2 timeframes were included. Metrics of service and patient care episodes were collected and compared including, the number of emergency referrals, patient encounters, consultations, emergency admissions and interventions. Impact on key hospital resources such as critical care and imaging facilities during the two time periods were also examined. RESULTS: There was an absolute reduction of 44% in the number of patients who required urgent or emergency treatment from P1 to P2 (141 vs 79). We noted a non-significant trend towards an increase in the proportion of patients presenting with Chronic Limb Threatening Ischaemia (CLTI) Rutherford 5&6 (P=0.09) as well as a reduction in the proportion of admissions related to Aortic Aneurysm (P=0.21). There was a significant absolute reduction of 77% in all vascular interventions from P1 to P2 with the greatest reductions noted in Carotid (P=0.02), Deep Venous (P=0.003) and Aortic interventions (P=0.016). The number of lower limb interventions also decreased though there was a significant increase as a relative proportion of all vascular interventions in P2 (P=0.001). There was an absolute reduction in the number of scans performed for vascular pathology; Duplex scans reduced by 86%(P<0.002), CT scans by 68%(P<0.003) and MRIs by 74%(P<0.009). CONCLUSION: We report a decrease in urgent and emergency vascular presentations, admissions and interventions. The reduction in patients presenting with lower limb pathology was not as significant as other vascular conditions, resulting in a significant rise in interventions for CLTI and DFI as a proportion of all vascular interventions. These observations will help guide the provision of vascular services during future pandemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospital Units/statistics & numerical data , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Tertiary Healthcare/statistics & numerical data , Vascular Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Workload/statistics & numerical data , Ambulatory Care/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Critical Care/statistics & numerical data , Facilities and Services Utilization , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging/statistics & numerical data , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/statistics & numerical data , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/statistics & numerical data , United Kingdom
7.
Am J Nurs ; 121(8): 24-34, 2021 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1532551

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Poor well-being among health care workers, often observed as professional burnout, is a well-documented phenomenon. The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has further stressed the health care workforce, but its specific effects on this workforce remain unknown. This study examined well-being and resilience among health care workers during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: The study used a cross-sectional survey design. Data collection took place through anonymous surveys of nurses (LPNs and RNs), advanced practice providers (NPs, physician assistants, and certified nurse midwives), certified registered nurse anesthetists, respiratory therapists, health care technicians, and therapy service professionals (physical, occupational, and speech therapists). Of the 6,120 health care workers recruited to participate in the study, data from 2,459 participants were analyzed using logistic regression and linear regression. RESULTS: The study found that several factors significantly increased the likelihood of at-risk well-being. These included having a lower level of resilience, using support resources, feeling the organization lacked understanding of the emotional support needs of health care workers during the pandemic, believing the workload had increased, believing there was insufficient personal protective equipment, believing there was inadequate staffing to safely care for patients, and having a lower degree of psychological safety. After controlling for health care workers' role and employment location, several factors were found to be significantly associated with higher levels of resilience. These included having positive perceptions about the organization's understanding of the emotional support needs of health care workers during the pandemic, believing sufficient educational resources were available regarding the care of COVID-19 patients, having positive perceptions of leadership support from direct managers, having positive perceptions of the redeployment policy, and having a higher degree of psychological safety. CONCLUSIONS: This study identified several work environment factors that have significantly affected health care workers' well-being and resilience during the COVID-19 pandemic. This knowledge has practical relevance for health care leaders who aim to better understand and address the well-being and resilience of the health care workforce during this pandemic and beyond.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Health Personnel/psychology , Health Status , Resilience, Psychological , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Logistic Models , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workload/psychology , Workload/standards , Workload/statistics & numerical data , Workplace/psychology , Workplace/standards , Workplace/statistics & numerical data
8.
J Healthc Manag ; 66(4): 304-322, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1475893

ABSTRACT

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: While the COVID-19 pandemic has added stressors to the lives of healthcare workers, it is unclear which factors represent the most useful targets for interventions to mitigate employee distress across the entire healthcare team. A survey was distributed to employees of a large healthcare system in the Southeastern United States, and 1,130 respondents participated. The survey measured overall distress using the 9-item Well-Being Index (WBI), work-related factors, moral distress, resilience, and organizational-level factors. Respondents were also asked to identify major work, clinical, and nonwork stressors. Multivariate regression was used to evaluate associations between employee characteristics and WBI distress score. Overall, 82% of employees reported high distress (WBI ≥ 2), with nurses, clinical support staff, and advanced practice providers reporting the highest average scores. Factors associated with higher distress included increased job demands or responsibilities, heavy workload or long hours, higher frequency of moral distress, and loneliness or social isolation. Factors associated with lower distress were perceived organizational support, work control, perceived fairness of salary cuts, and resilience. Most factors significantly associated with distress-heavy workloads and long hours, increased job demands, and moral distress, in particular-were work-related, indicating that efforts can be made to mitigate them. Resilience explained a small portion of the variance in distress relative to other work-related factors. Ensuring appropriate staffing levels may represent the single largest opportunity to significantly move the needle on distress. However, the financial impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the healthcare system may represent a barrier to addressing these stressors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Personnel/psychology , Job Satisfaction , Occupational Stress , Patient Care Team , Stress, Psychological , Workload/psychology , Adult , Female , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workload/statistics & numerical data
10.
J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg ; 75(2): 831-839, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1458688

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: In March 2020, South Wales experienced the most significant COVID-19 outbreak in the UK outside of London. We share our experience of the rapid redesign and subsequent change in activity in one of the busiest supra-regional burns and plastic surgery services in the UK. METHODS: A time-matched retrospective service evaluation was completed for a 7-week "COVID-19" study period and the equivalent weeks in 2018 and 2019. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate plastic surgery theatre use and the impact of service redesign. Comparison between study periods was tested for statistical significance using two-tailed t-tests. RESULTS: Operation numbers reduced by 64% and total operating time by 70%. General anaesthetic cases reduced from 41% to 7% (p<0.0001), and surgery was mainly carried out in ringfenced daycase theatres. Emergency surgery decreased by 84% and elective surgery by 46%. Cancer surgery as a proportion of total elective operating increased from 51% to 96% (p<0.0001). The absolute number of cancer-related surgeries undertaken was maintained despite the pandemic. CONCLUSION: Rapid development of COVID-19 SOPs minimised inpatient admissions. There was a significant decrease in operating while maintaining emergency and cancer surgery. Our ringfenced local anaesthetic Plastic Surgery Treatment Centre was essential in delivering a service. COVID-19 acted as a catalyst for service innovations and the uptake of activities such as telemedicine, virtual MDTs, and online webinars. Our experiences support the need for a core burns and plastic service during a pandemic, and show that the service can be effectively redesigned at speed.


Subject(s)
Burns/surgery , COVID-19 , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Workload/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Retrospective Studies , United Kingdom/epidemiology
12.
Int J Circumpolar Health ; 80(1): 1959700, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1352067

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study is to identify how managers of micro-sized enterprises experience the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on their business operations, work-life balance and well-being. Further, the study aims to make comparisons between managers of micro-sized businesses and managers of small-sized businesses. This mixed-method study is based on qualitative interviews with ten managers of micro-sized enterprises and a questionnaire answered by 95 managers of micro-sized and small-sized enterprises in regions in the north of Sweden. Managers of micro-sized enterprises reported significantly worse scores for mental well-being, job satisfaction and life satisfaction in comparison with managers of small-sized enterprises. Three themes emerged from the qualitative analysis: Changed leadership role, Impact on private life and Impact on well-being. In the interviews, the managers of micro-sized enterprises reported that the pandemic had increased their workload and forced them to mobilise strategies for enterprise survival. This study indicates that managers of micro-sized enterprises had changed their leadership role and increased their workload and number of work tasks, including supporting the employees, developing strategies for business survival and applying for governmental support. However, the managers demonstrated creativity in finding new solutions for their enterprises.


Subject(s)
Administrative Personnel/psychology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Entrepreneurship/statistics & numerical data , Small Business/organization & administration , Work-Life Balance , Workload/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Occupational Health/statistics & numerical data , Occupational Health Services/organization & administration , Sweden
14.
Br J Nurs ; 30(14): 840-844, 2021 Jul 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1319860

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic relapsing and remitting condition. The COVID-19 pandemic has severely disrupted provision of medical care across the world. IBD clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) played a pivotal role in the care of children with IBD during the pandemic national lockdown and in the recovery phase. This article aims to look at the impact of COVID-19 on the paediatric IBD service in one children's hospital and the effect on the IBD CNSs' workload. METHOD: A retrospective review of clinical notes and the service's IBD database from January 2019 to September 2020. RESULTS: There was a significant increase in the number of email and telephone contacts to the IBD CNS team during lockdown. There was an increase in virtual clinics, and an increase in new IBD patients coming to the service, but a reduction in the number of face-to-face consultant clinics. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 has disrupted medical services to children with IBD and led to a reduction in face-to-face activities but has also led to a significant increase in virtual activities. CNSs have taken up a wider role to cover patient care during a time of both medical and nursing redeployment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Inflammatory Bowel Diseases , Nurse Clinicians , Nurse's Role , Child , Hospitals, Pediatric , Humans , Inflammatory Bowel Diseases/nursing , Retrospective Studies , United Kingdom/epidemiology , Workload/statistics & numerical data
15.
Ann Glob Health ; 87(1): 51, 2021 06 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1296121

ABSTRACT

Background: Nurses working in treating patients with COVID-19 are exposed to various stressors, such as fear of COVID-19, stress, and high workload, leading to burnout. Objectives: This study aimed to identify the level of burnout and its predictors in nurses working in hospitals for COVID-19 patients. Methods: Participants in this study were nurses working in 11 hospitals for COVID-19 patients in the Fars province of Iran. The Maslach burnout and the UK Health and Safety stress questionnaires were used to assess burnout and stress, respectively. Analysis, using multiple regression in the SPSS21 software, aimed to identify the factors affecting burnout. Findings: The mean level of burnout in the nurses at the COVID-19 hospitals was 57 out of 120, and burnout was affected by workload (ß = 0.69, p < 0.001), job stress (ß = 0.25, p < 0.001) and inadequate hospital resources for the prevention of COVID-19 (ß = -0.16, p < 0.001). These three variables explained 87% of the variance in burnout. Conclusions: The burnout of nurses directly exposed to COVID-19 patients is more than nurses in other wards, and workload is the most significant cause of burnout in them. Therefore, necessary measures such as hiring more nurses, reducing working hours and increasing rest periods are necessary to reduce workload. In addition, the job stress of these nurses should be managed and controlled, and the hospital resources needed to prevent this disease should be provided.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Nurses , Occupational Stress , Work Schedule Tolerance/psychology , Workload , Adult , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/nursing , COVID-19/psychology , Fear/psychology , Female , Health Services Needs and Demand , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Iran/epidemiology , Male , Nurses/psychology , Nurses/supply & distribution , Occupational Stress/complications , Occupational Stress/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Workload/psychology , Workload/standards , Workload/statistics & numerical data
17.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 21(1): 416, 2021 Jun 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1259189

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: On the 27th of March 2020 the Zimbabwean government declared the Covid-19 pandemic a 'national disaster'. Travel restrictions and emergency regulations have had significant impacts on maternity services, including resource stock-outs, and closure of antenatal clinics during the lockdown period. Estimates of the indirect impact of Covid-19 on maternal and perinatal mortality was expected it to be considerable, but little data was yet available. This study aimed to examine the impact of Covid-19 and lockdown control measures on non-Covid outcomes in a government tertiary level maternity unit in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe, by comparing maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality before, and after the lockdown was implemented. METHODS: This was a retrospective, observational study, using a cross-sectional design to compare routine monthly maternal and perinatal statistics three months before and after Covid-19 emergency measures were implemented at Mpilo Central Hospital. RESULTS: Between January-March and April-June 2020, the mean monthly deliveries reduced from 747.3 (SD ± 61.3) in the first quarter of 2020 to 681.0 (SD ± 17.6) during lockdown, but this was not statistically significant, p = 0.20. The Caesarean section rates fell from a mean of 29.8% (SD ± 1.7) versus 28.0% (SD ± 1.7), which was also not statistically significant, p = 0.18. During lockdown, the percentage of women delivering at Mpilo Central Hospital who were booked at the hospital fell from a mean of 41.6% (SD ± 1.1) to 35.8% (SD ± 4.3) which was statistically significant, p = 0.03. There was no significant change, however, in maternal mortality or severe maternal morbidity (such as post-partum haemorrhage (PPH), uterine rupture, and severe preeclampsia/eclampsia), stillbirth rate or special care baby unit admission. There was an increase in the mean total number of early neonatal deaths (ENND) (mean 18.7 (SD ± 2.9) versus 24.0 (SD ± 4.6), but this was not statistically significant, p = 0.32. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, maternity services at Mpilo showed resilience during the lockdown period, with no significant change in maternal and perinatal adverse outcomes, with the same number of man-hours worked before and during the lockdown Maternal and perinatal outcomes should continue to be monitored to assess the impact of Covid-19 and the lockdown measures as the pandemic in Zimbabwe unfolds. Further studies would be beneficial to explore women's experiences and understand how bookings and deliveries at local clinics changed during this time.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Maternal Health Services/statistics & numerical data , Tertiary Care Centers/statistics & numerical data , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Maternal Health Services/trends , Maternal Mortality , Morbidity , Perinatal Mortality , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Outcome , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Tertiary Care Centers/trends , Workload/statistics & numerical data , Zimbabwe/epidemiology
18.
Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis ; 101(2): 115426, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1230428

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To quantify the workload and cost overload that the COVID-19 pandemic has meant for a Clinical Microbiology laboratory in a real-life scenario. METHODS: We compared the number of samples received, their distribution, the human resources, and the budget of a Microbiology laboratory in the COVID pandemic (March-December 2020) with the same months of the previous year. RESULTS: the total number of samples processed in the Clinical Microbiology laboratory in March to December 2020 increased 96.70% with respect to 2019 (from 246,060 to 483,993 samples), reflecting an increment of 127.50% when expressed as samples/1000 admissions (from 6057 to 13,780). The increase in workload was mainly at the expense of the virology (+2058%) and serology (+86%) areas. Despite additional personnel hiring, the samples processed per technician increased 12.5%. The extra cost attributed to Microbiology amounts to 6,616,511 euros (114.8%). CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study to provide quantitative figures about workload and cost increase caused by the COVID-19 in a Microbiology laboratory.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Laboratories, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/economics , COVID-19 Testing/economics , COVID-19 Testing/statistics & numerical data , Clinical Laboratory Services/economics , Clinical Laboratory Services/statistics & numerical data , Costs and Cost Analysis , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Laboratories, Hospital/economics , Medical Laboratory Personnel/economics , Medical Laboratory Personnel/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Spain/epidemiology , Tertiary Care Centers , Workload/statistics & numerical data
19.
Lab Med ; 52(4): e115-e124, 2021 Jul 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1214641

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To explore the experiences of medical laboratory professionals (MLPs) and their perceptions of the needs of clinical laboratories in response to COVID-19. METHODS: We surveyed laboratory professionals working in United States clinical laboratories during the initial months of the pandemic. RESULTS: Overall clinical laboratory testing and overtime work for laboratorians decreased during the first months of the pandemic. Laboratory professionals reported better or unchanged job satisfaction, feelings toward their work, and morale in their workplace, which were related to healthcare facility and laboratory leadership response. They reported receiving in-kind gifts, but no hazard pay, for their essential work. Important supply needs included reagents and personal protective equipment (PPE). CONCLUSION: The response by healthcare facilities and laboratory leadership can influence MLPs job satisfaction, feelings toward their work, and laboratory morale during a pandemic. Current COVID-19 laboratory testing management, in the absence of sufficient reagents and supplies, cannot fully address the needs of clinical laboratories.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Laboratories , Medical Laboratory Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Occupational Health , Adult , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Laboratories/organization & administration , Laboratories/statistics & numerical data , Laboratories/supply & distribution , Male , Middle Aged , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States , Workload/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
20.
J Nurs Scholarsh ; 53(3): 333-342, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1159166

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To explore how big data can be used to identify the contribution or influence of six specific workload variables: patient count, medication count, task count call lights, patient sepsis score, and hours worked on the occurrence of a near miss (NM) by individual nurses. DESIGN: A correlational and cross-section research design was used to collect over 82,000 useable data points of historical workload data from the three unique systems on a medical-surgical unit in a midsized hospital in the southeast United States over a 60-day period. Data were collected prior to the start of the Covid-19 pandemic in the United States. METHODS: Combined data were analyzed using JMP Pro version 12. Mean responses from two groups were compared using a t-test and those from more than two groups using analysis of variance. Logistic regression was used to determine the significance of impact each workload variable had on individual nurses' ability to administer medications successfully as measured by occurrence of NMs. FINDINGS: The mean outcome of each of the six workload factors measured differed significantly (p < .0001) among nurses. The mean outcome for all workload factors except the hours worked was found to be significantly higher (p < .0001) for those who committed an NM compared to those who did not. At least one workload variable was observed to be significantly associated (p < .05) with the occurrence or nonoccurrence of NMs in 82.6% of the nurses in the study. CONCLUSIONS: For the majority of the nurses in our study, the occurrence of an NM was significantly impacted by at least one workload variable. Because the specific variables that impact performance are different for each individual nurse, decreasing only one variable, such as patient load, will not adequately address the risk for NMs. Other variables not studied here, such as education and experience, might be associated with the occurrence of NMs. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: In the majority of nurses, different workload variables increase their risk for an NM, suggesting that interventions addressing medication errors should be implemented based on the individual's risk profile.


Subject(s)
Big Data , Near Miss, Healthcare/statistics & numerical data , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Workload/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Risk Factors , Southeastern United States
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