Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 33
Filter
1.
J Nurs Adm ; 52(4): 222-227, 2022 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1764705

ABSTRACT

Workplace violence, including verbal and physical abuse, is escalating nationwide. As healthcare workers try to enforce COVID-19 prevention policies and practices, this phenomenon is exacerbated. De-escalation training is a method to prepare nurses through increased situational awareness, leading to early recognition and improved coping and confidence in dealing with aggression. Outcomes are presented, suggesting education of nurses may have a positive influence on the number of security calls and incident reports.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Workplace Violence , Adaptation, Psychological , Aggression , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Personnel , Humans , Workplace Violence/prevention & control
2.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(5)2022 02 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1736899

ABSTRACT

Nurses received the highest rate of workplace violence due to their close interaction with clients and the nature of their work. There have been relatively few qualitative studies focus on nurses' perceptions of and experiences with the antecedents, dilemma and repercussions of the patient and visitor violence (PVV), leaving a considerable evidence gap. The aim of this study was to explore nurses' experience of PVV in emergency department, the impact of PVV on quality of care, and supports needed after exposure to such incidents. We conducted semi-structured interviews with a purposive and snowball sample of nurses, and analyzed the content of the interview transcripts. A total of 10 nurses were approached and agreed to participate. Those participants ranged in age from 24 to 41 years old, eight female and two male nurses, and the majority of them (80%) held a university Bachelor degree in nursing. The average time in nursing practice was 7.2 years. We conceptualized five analytical themes, which comprised: (1) multifaceted triggers and causes of PVV; (2) experiences following PVV; (3) tangled up in thoughts and struggle with the professional role; (4) self-reflexivity and adjustment; and, (5) needs of organizational efforts and support following PVV. This paper provides compelling reasons to look beyond solely evaluating the existence of workplace, and considering the perceived professional inefficacy, impacts of being threatened or assaulted in nurses. There are also urgent needs in provision of prevention and management of workplace training programs to ensure the high-quality nursing care.


Subject(s)
Crime Victims , Nurses , Workplace Violence , Adult , Emergency Service, Hospital , Female , Humans , Male , Qualitative Research , Workplace , Workplace Violence/prevention & control , Young Adult
3.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(5)2022 02 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1715367

ABSTRACT

Patient and visitor violence (PVV), the most prevalent source of workplace violence, is largely ignored, underreported, and a persistent problem in emergency departments. It is associated with physical injuries, psychological distress, and occupational stress in nurses. A randomized controlled trial was conducted in Taiwan from January to December 2020. This study aimed to test the efficacy of an integrated Workplace Violence Prevention and Management Training Program on PVV in 75 emergency department (ED) nurses from a hospital. Cluster sampling was used because the policy of subdivision strategy was enforced during the COVID-19 pandemic. ED nurses received either the intervention or 1-hour in-service class. Data were collected from questionnaires. Data were analyzed mainly by the repeated measure analysis of variance and generalized estimating equations. The intervention had positive effects on developing stronger goal commitment, improving occupational coping self-efficacy, increasing confidence in ability to deal with violent situations, and modifying attitudes toward the causes and management of PVV in ED nurses (p < 0.05). The marginal R2 of the generalized estimating equation model for goal commitment, occupational coping self-efficacy, confidence, attitudes toward aggression in ED and aggressive behavior variables was high as 0.54 (p < 0.001), 0.45 (p < 0.001), 0.58 (p < 0.001), 0.29 (p < 0.05), and 0.72 (p < 0.001), respectively. These study models could effectively predict changes in the mean values. The benefit was driven by the effect of the intervention in ED nurses. Thus, the intervention, when applied in conjunction with routine in-service class, could exert synergistic improvements on outcomes measured in nurses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Workplace Violence , Adaptation, Psychological , Attitude , Emergency Service, Hospital , Goals , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Efficacy
4.
BMJ Open ; 12(2): e055788, 2022 02 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1685595

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Workplace violence (WPV) against Healthcare Workers (HCWs) has emerged as a global issue. Emergency Department (ED) HCWs as front liners are more vulnerable to it due to the nature of their work and exposure to unique medical and social situations. COVID-19 pandemic has led to a surge in the number of cases of WPV against HCWs, especially against ED HCWs. In most cases, the perpetrators of these acts of violence are the patients and their attendants as families. The causes of this rise are multifactorial; these include the inaccurate spread of information and rumours through social media, certain religious perspectives, propaganda and increasing anger and frustration among the general public,ED overcrowding, staff shortages etc. We aim to conduct a qualitative exploratory study among the ED frontline care providers at the two major EDs of Karachi city. The purpose of this study is to determine the perceptions, challenges and experiences regarding WPV faced by ED healthcare providers during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: For this research study, a qualitative exploratory research design will be employed using in-depth interviews and a purposive sampling approach. Data will be collected using in-depth interviews from study participants working at the EDs of Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre (JPMC) and the Aga Khan University Hospital(AKUH) Karachi, Pakistan. Thestudy data will be analysed thematically using NVivo V.12 Plus software. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The ethical approval for this study was obtained from the Aga Khan University Ethical Review Committee and from Jinnah postgraduate Medical Center (JPMC). The results of the study will be disseminated to the scientific community and to the research subjects participating in the study.The findings of this study will help to explore the perceptions of ED healthcare providers regarding WPV during the COVID-19 pandemic and provide a better understanding of study participant's' challenges concerning WPV during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Workplace Violence , Developing Countries , Emergency Service, Hospital , Health Personnel , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Am J Nurs ; 122(1): 14, 2022 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1584034

ABSTRACT

Workplace violence, domestic abuse, and firearm-related deaths are on the rise.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Intimate Partner Violence/psychology , Intimate Partner Violence/trends , Workplace Violence/psychology , Workplace Violence/trends
6.
CMAJ Open ; 9(4): E998-E1004, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1524570

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Asian Canadians and Asian Americans face COVID-19-related discrimination. The objective of this qualitative study was to explore the experiences of Asian health care workers dealing with discrimination, with a focus on racial micro-agressions, in Canada and the United States during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: We adopted a qualitative descriptive approach. We used convenience and snowball sampling strategies to recruit participants. We conducted individual, in-depth semistructured interviews with Asian health care workers in Canada and the US via videoconferencing between May and September 2020. Eligible participants had to self-identify as Asian and be currently employed as a health care worker with at least 1 year of full-time employment. We used an inductive thematic approach to analyze the data. RESULTS: Thirty participants were recruited. Fifteen (50%) were Canadians and 15 (50%) were Americans; there were 18 women (60%), 11 men (37%) and 1 nonbinary person. Most of the participants were aged 25-29 years (n = 16, 53%). More than half were nurses (n = 16, 53%); the other participants were attending physicians (n = 5), physiotherapists (n = 3), resident physicians (n = 2), a midwife, a paramedic, a pharmacist and a physician assistant. Two themes emerged from the data: a surge of racial microaggressions related to COVID-19 and a lack of institutional and public acknowledgement. Participants noted that they have experienced an increase in racial microaggressions during the COVID-19 pandemic. They have also experienced threats of violence and actual violence. The largely silent organizational response to the challenges being faced by people of Asian descent and the use of disparaging terms such as "China virus" in the early stages of the pandemic were a substantial source of frustration. INTERPRETATION: Asian health care workers have experienced challenges in dealing with racial microaggressions related to COVID-19 in the US and Canada. More research should be done on the experiences of Asian Americans and Asian Canadians, both during and after the pandemic, and supportive measures should be put in place to protect Asian health care workers.


Subject(s)
Asian Americans/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Racism/psychology , Adult , Canada , Female , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Male , Pandemics , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2 , United States , Workplace Violence/psychology , Xenophobia/psychology
8.
BMC Emerg Med ; 21(1): 124, 2021 10 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1486055

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The goal of every emergency department is to provide the highest quality services in the shortest time using limited resources. However, occupational violence is so prevalent among pre-hospital paramedic personnel that some experts claim that it is impossible to find pre-hospital personnel without an experience of violence in the workplace. Therefore, it seems necessary to investigate the causes of violence among this population group and find ways to control it. AIM: The present study aimed to investigate the Violence and influencing factors among paramedic pre-hospital personnel. METHOD: This qualitative study was conducted to explore the views of a group of pre-hospital paramedic personnel (n = 45) selected through purposive sampling. The data was collected through in-depth and semi-structured interviews and analyzed using Graneheim and Lundman's conventional content analysis methods. The trial version of MAXQDA 16 software was used to manage the coding process. RESULTS: Based on the results of the analysis of data collected from prehospital paramedic personnel, three main categories including: human factors, organizational factors, and environmental factors and 20 subcategories were detected. CONCLUSION: If authorities neglect violence in the workplace and do not take serious actions to prevent it, violence and, more importantly, "hostility" will gradually prevail in the workplace. It also increases the stress and anxiety of staff and consequently severely deteriorates their job performance. Hence, authorities are strongly recommended not to ignore this issue and, instead, take measures, for instance hold workshops, to train personnel about the techniques of anger and violence control.


Subject(s)
Workplace Violence , Allied Health Personnel , Hospitals , Humans , Iran , Personnel, Hospital
9.
PLoS One ; 16(10): e0259014, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1480466

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Violence against medical staff has been prevalent in China over the past two decades. Although Chinese authorities have released many laws and regulations to protect medical staff from violence since 2011, the legal approach alone is unlikely to resolve this complex issue. In particular, several cases of violence against medical staff in China have caused great media sensation. METHOD: This paper proposes an integrated model that combines the environmental stimuli theory, broken windows theory, and rational choice theory. It adopts the fuzzy set qualitative comparative analysis (fsQCA) to untangle the causal relationship between violence against medical staff, media sensation, and judicial judgment. We examined reports of medical violence on media and news websites from January 1, 2010, to January 31, 2020, and selected 50 cases with detailed information for this study. RESULTS: The results show that each condition is not sufficient for the absence of judicial judgment, but when combined, they are conducive to the outcome. The conditions of hospital level, medical cost, and media sensation play important roles. The providers, patients, and environmental factors are indicators of inadequate or lack of judicial judgment, which corresponds to previous expectations. CONCLUSIONS: The integrated model greatly enriches the extant theories and literature, and also yields implications for preventing violence against medical staff in China. We suggest that sustainable and innovative healthcare reform should be initiated. For example, public hospitals should remain the cornerstone of national public health security. Medical staff in public hospitals must be regarded as "civil servants". Therefore, the current legal system should be improved. The media should objectively report events concerning medical staff and improve public healthcare knowledge.


Subject(s)
Criminal Law , Mass Media , Medical Staff , Workplace Violence/legislation & jurisprudence , China , Humans
11.
Am J Emerg Med ; 53: 285.e1-285.e5, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1432719

ABSTRACT

STUDY OBJECTIVES: COVID-19 brought unique challenges; however, it remains unclear what effect the pandemic had on violence in healthcare. The objective of this study was to identify the impact of the pandemic on workplace violence at an academic emergency department (ED). METHODS: This mixed-methods study involved a prospective descriptive survey study and electronic medical record review. Within our hospital referral region (HRR), the first COVID-19 case was documented on 3/11/2020 and cases peaked in mid-November 2020. We compared the monthly HRR COVID-19 case rate per 100,000 people to the rate of violent incidents per 1000 ED visits. Multidisciplinary ED staff were surveyed both pre/early-pandemic (April 2020) and mid/late-pandemic (December 2020) regarding workplace violence experienced over the prior 6-months. The study was deemed exempt by the Mayo Clinic Institutional Review Board. RESULTS: There was a positive association between the monthly HRR COVID-19 case rate and rate of violent ED incidents (r = 0.24). Violent incidents increased overall during the pandemic (2.53 incidents per 1000 visits) compared to the 3 months prior (1.13 incidents per 1000 visits, p < .001), as well as compared to the previous year (1.24 incidents per 1000 patient visits, p < .001). Survey respondents indicated a higher incidence of assault during the pandemic, compared to before (p = .019). DISCUSSION: Incidents of workplace violence at our ED increased during the pandemic and there was a positive association of these incidents with the COVID-19 case rate. Our findings indicate health systems should prioritize employee safety during future pandemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Workplace Violence/statistics & numerical data , Academic Medical Centers/organization & administration , Academic Medical Centers/statistics & numerical data , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Chi-Square Distribution , Crime Victims/rehabilitation , Data Mining/statistics & numerical data , Emergency Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Female , Health Personnel/psychology , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workplace Violence/trends
12.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(17)2021 08 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1403589

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Workplace violence is a growing social problem among many professions, but it particularly affects the health sector. Studies have mainly focused on evaluating user violence toward health professionals, with less attention being paid to other sources of conflict, such as co-workers themselves. There are different manifestations of this violence in what has been called a context of tolerated or normalized violence among co-workers. However, its effects are far from being tolerable, as they have an impact on general health and job satisfaction and contribute to burnout among professionals. Based on this idea, and following the line of the previous literature, nursing staff are a population at high risk of exposure to workplace violence. For this reason, the present study aims to evaluate exposure to lateral violence or violence among co-workers in nursing staff in public health services and the relationship of this exposure with some of the most studied consequences. (2) Methods: A cross-sectional associative study was carried out in which scales of workplace violence (HABS-CS), burnout (MBI-GS), job satisfaction (OJS), and general health (GHQ-28) were applied to a sample of 950 nursing staff from 13 public hospitals located in the southeast of Spain. (3) Results: The results show that nursing staff have a high exposure to violence from their co-workers, which is more common in male nurses. Greater exposure is observed in professionals with between 6 and 10 years of experience in the profession, and it is not characteristic of our sample to receive greater violence when they have less experience or are younger. A positive correlation is observed with high levels of burnout and a negative correlation with general health and job satisfaction. (4) Conclusions: The results of this work contribute to increasing the scientific evidence of the consequences of a type of workplace violence frequent among nursing staff and to which less attention has been paid in relative terms to other types of prevalent violence. Organizations should be aware of the importance of this type of workplace violence, its frequency and impact, and implement appropriate prevention policies that include the promotion of a culture that does not reward violence or minimize reporting. A change of mentality in the academic environment is also recommended in order to promote a more adequate training of nursing staff in this field.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , Nurses , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Workplace Violence , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Hospitals, Public , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Male , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workplace
13.
PLoS One ; 16(8): e0254401, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1346327

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study assessed patterns in reported violence against doctors working in 11 Baghdad hospitals providing care for patients with COVID-19 and explored characteristics of hospital violence and its impact on health workers. METHODS: Questionnaires were completed by 505 hospital doctors (38.6% male, 64.4% female) working in 11 Baghdad hospitals. No personal or identifying information was obtained. FINDINGS: Of 505 doctors, 446 (87.3%) had experienced hospital violence in the previous 6 months. Doctors reported that patients were responsible for 95 (21.3%) instances of violence, patient family or relatives for 322 (72.4%), police or military personnel for 19 (4.3%), and other sources for 9 (2%). The proportion of violent events reported did not differ between male and female doctors, although characteristics varied. There were 415 of the 505 doctors who reported that violence had increased since the beginning of the pandemic, and many felt the situation would only get worse. COVID-19 has heightened tensions in an already violent health workplace, further increasing risks to patients and health providers. INTERPRETATION: During the COVID-19 epidemic in Iraq an already violent hospital environment in Baghdad has only worsened. The physical and emotional toll on health workers is high which further threatens patient care and hospital productivity. While more security measures can be taken, reducing health workplace violence requires other measures such as improved communication, and addressing issues of patient care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Physicians , Workplace Violence , Adult , Aggression , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Health Personnel , Humans , Iraq/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
14.
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int ; 28(43): 61441-61449, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1281323

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic, significant cases of violence, intimidation, or stigmatization were targeted at healthcare workers (HCWs), patients, and medical infrastructure. These occurrences were most likely just the "tip of the iceberg," with much more remaining unnoticed. The present study's purpose was to assess the frequency, characteristics, effects, and contributing factors of workplace violence (WPV) committed against HCWs in AlKarak Governmental Hospital (KGH), South Jordan, during the COVID-19 pandemic. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 382 HCWs (170 physicians and 212 nurses) working in the KGH, Jordan, during January and February 2021, using a semi-structured questionnaire. The current study showed that most participants (65.5%) reported exposure to WPV, mainly verbal violence (52.0%), and patients' relatives were the principal perpetrators in most incidents. The regular reporting of these incidents is deficient. The victims suffered psychological and physical effects. These assaults on healthcare facilities highlight the importance of effective risk communication at all levels of society to minimize anxiety, stigma, and, eventually, WPV. The way we communicate about COVID-19 is vital in motivating people to take proactive steps to fight the disease and safeguard healthcare.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Workplace Violence , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Personnel , Hospitals , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
15.
PLoS One ; 16(6): e0253398, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1278193

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The increase in violence against health professionals in the COVID-19 pandemic makes it necessary to identify the predictors of violence, in order to prevent these events from happening. OBJECTIVE: Evaluating the prevalence and analyzing the variables involved in the occurrence of violence against health professionals during the COVID-19 pandemic in Brazil. METHOD: This is a cross-sectional study conducted online involving Brazilian health professionals during the COVID-19 pandemic. The data were collected through a structured questionnaire (Google Online Form) sent to health professionals on social networks and analyzed through logistic regression by using sociodemographic variables. The set of grouped variables was assigned to the final model when p <0.05. A network was built using the Mixed Graph Models (MGM) approach. A centrality measurement chart was constructed to determine which nodes have the greatest influence, strength and connectivity between the nodes around them. RESULTS: The predictors of violence in the adjusted regression model were the following: being a nursing technician / assistant; having been working for less than 20 years; working for over 37 hours a week; having suffered violence before the pandemic; having been contaminated with COVID-19; working in direct contact with patients infected by the virus; and having family members who have suffered violence. The network created with professionals who suffered violence demonstrated that the aggressions occurred mainly in the workplace, with an indication of psycho-verbal violence. In cases in which the aggressors were close people, aggressions were non-verbal and happened both in public and private places. The assaults practiced by strangers occurred in public places. CONCLUSIONS: Violence against health professionals occurs implicitly and explicitly, with consequences that can affect both their psychosocial well-being and the assistance given to their patients and families.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workplace Violence/statistics & numerical data , Workplace/psychology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Brazil/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Prevalence , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Workplace Violence/prevention & control , Young Adult
16.
Isr J Health Policy Res ; 10(1): 36, 2021 06 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1277972

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 outbreak, (March 1 - June 15, 2020) citizens expressed sympathy and gratitude towards medical staff through the media, while the entire hospital staff faced the same danger of infection as other citizens. This might have made hospital staff develop sympathy, understanding for the patients` and family's needs, and a better communication. OBJECTIVES: To investigate if there is a relation between the mutual change in attitude between citizens and hospital staff during the first COVID-19 outbreak, and the incidence of violence cases. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This is a cross sectional study conducted at Rambam Medical Center (RMC) in Israel. The data about the number of violence cases were collected from the security department, and the data about hospital wards activity were collected from the hospital Business Intelligence (BI) software. The number of violence cases in relation to the number of Emergency Department (ED) visits, admissions to hospital wards, and length of stay (LOS) were compared during the COVID-19 outbreak to the corresponding period in 2019 using the T- test. The difference in the incidence of violence between general population and people with a psychiatric or social disorder (like drug abuse and criminal background) in both periods were also compared using the Fisher exact test. RESULTS: During the first COVID-19 outbreak, there were 6 violence cases against medical staff out of 24,740 visits to the ED, vs. 21 cases out of 30,759 visits during the same periods in 2019 (P < 0.05). There were 19 violence cases in the whole hospital with 14,482 admissions in 2020 vs. 51 violence cases of 17,599 admissions in 2019 (P < 0.05). Violence against security guards in the entire hospital dropped from 20 to 11 cases, and in the set of the ED, from 13 to 4 cases in both periods respectively. A 20 % decrease in the number of visits to the ED, might have influenced the average LOS during the study period, 2020 compared to 2019 (4.4 + 0.45 vs. 5.4 + 0.36 h. (P < 0.001). The ratio of violence among general population vs. people with a psychiatric or social background revealed a non-significant change in both periods (P = 0.75 and P = 0.69) respectively. DISCUSSION: The COVID-19 outbreak supplied some evidence that a change in environmental conditions, trust, waiting time, personal attitude and communication might have reduced violence against hospital staff. CONCLUSIONS: Except for violence coming from patients with psychiatric or social disorders, most other violence cases might be reduced if the environment conditions and attitudes of both citizens and staff are improved.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Personnel, Hospital , Workplace Violence/statistics & numerical data , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disease Outbreaks , Humans , Israel , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Patient Admission/statistics & numerical data
17.
Healthc Manage Forum ; 34(4): 200-204, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1269848

ABSTRACT

Every year around Nurses Week, Dr. Rhonda Collins, DNP, RN, FAAN, Chief Nursing Officer for Vocera Communications, publishes a report examining important issues that impact the nursing profession worldwide. Her 2021 CNO report examines how the COVID-19 pandemic put a spotlight on the realities of the nursing profession and how the lack of resources, infrastructure, and policies impact nurses' work and lives. Dr. Collins addresses the toll of mental, emotional, and physical fatigue and outlines steps to help leaders create environments that protect the well-being of nurses and their patients. Dr. Collins closes the report by asking nurses to participate in a study to measure the mental, emotional, and physical burden nurses experience during communication. The study will use the NASA Task Load Index, a tool that has been used to measure the task load of workers in high-intensity jobs, such as pilots and air traffic controllers. The objective is to gain insight and a body of knowledge toward reducing nurses' cognitive burden going forward.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/nursing , Safety Management , Adult , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Female , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Male , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Task Performance and Analysis , Workload/psychology , Workplace Violence/prevention & control , Workplace Violence/psychology
18.
Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf ; 47(10): 637-645, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1267734

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic is an unprecedented challenge to health systems that has revealed shortcomings and increased unmet demands. Such situations might exacerbate workplace violence (WPV) against physicians, as has been reported in several parts of the world. METHODS: To identify the frequency and characteristics of WPV suffered by physicians attending COVID-19 patients in Peru, a descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted with an online survey of 200 physicians. RESULTS: Of the survey respondents, 84.5% had suffered some type of WPV; 97.6% of these suffered nonphysical violence. Suffering more than one incident of violence was reported by 75.7% of respondents. The primary aggressor was a patient's family member or caregiver. Violence occurred most frequently in critical areas inside the health service facility, such as COVID-19 triage, tents, and hospital units, although it also occurred during teleconsultations. Multiple shortcomings of the health services were perceived as the main trigger of violence. Being a female physician (odds ratio [OR] = 2.48, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.06-5.83) and working in a COVID-19 ICU (OR = 5.84, 95% CI = 1.60-21.28) were the main factors associated with WPV. CONCLUSION: Violence against physicians attending COVID-19 patients in Peru is common. The perceived factors that contribute most to violence are linked to deficiencies in health services.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Physicians , Workplace Violence , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Peru/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Indian J Med Ethics ; VI(1): 1-5, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1257354

ABSTRACT

Violence against medical professionals and destruction of hospital property by frustrated patients and their relatives occur frequently in India (1) and in other countries (2, 3). However, harassment of healthcare workers by the police has, so far, not been an issue in the Indian healthcare system. Now, cases of harassment of medical professionals by the police have emerged during the Covid-19 pandemic. Ironically, both doctors and police personnel have been considered "frontline heroes" against the pandemic in India. We present some cases of such attacks.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Patients/psychology , Police/psychology , Workplace Violence/psychology , Adult , Female , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Humans , India , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Police/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Workplace Violence/statistics & numerical data
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL