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1.
J Nurs Adm ; 52(4): 222-227, 2022 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1764705

ABSTRACT

Workplace violence, including verbal and physical abuse, is escalating nationwide. As healthcare workers try to enforce COVID-19 prevention policies and practices, this phenomenon is exacerbated. De-escalation training is a method to prepare nurses through increased situational awareness, leading to early recognition and improved coping and confidence in dealing with aggression. Outcomes are presented, suggesting education of nurses may have a positive influence on the number of security calls and incident reports.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Workplace Violence , Adaptation, Psychological , Aggression , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Personnel , Humans , Workplace Violence/prevention & control
2.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(5)2022 02 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1736899

ABSTRACT

Nurses received the highest rate of workplace violence due to their close interaction with clients and the nature of their work. There have been relatively few qualitative studies focus on nurses' perceptions of and experiences with the antecedents, dilemma and repercussions of the patient and visitor violence (PVV), leaving a considerable evidence gap. The aim of this study was to explore nurses' experience of PVV in emergency department, the impact of PVV on quality of care, and supports needed after exposure to such incidents. We conducted semi-structured interviews with a purposive and snowball sample of nurses, and analyzed the content of the interview transcripts. A total of 10 nurses were approached and agreed to participate. Those participants ranged in age from 24 to 41 years old, eight female and two male nurses, and the majority of them (80%) held a university Bachelor degree in nursing. The average time in nursing practice was 7.2 years. We conceptualized five analytical themes, which comprised: (1) multifaceted triggers and causes of PVV; (2) experiences following PVV; (3) tangled up in thoughts and struggle with the professional role; (4) self-reflexivity and adjustment; and, (5) needs of organizational efforts and support following PVV. This paper provides compelling reasons to look beyond solely evaluating the existence of workplace, and considering the perceived professional inefficacy, impacts of being threatened or assaulted in nurses. There are also urgent needs in provision of prevention and management of workplace training programs to ensure the high-quality nursing care.


Subject(s)
Crime Victims , Nurses , Workplace Violence , Adult , Emergency Service, Hospital , Female , Humans , Male , Qualitative Research , Workplace , Workplace Violence/prevention & control , Young Adult
4.
PLoS One ; 16(6): e0253398, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1278193

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The increase in violence against health professionals in the COVID-19 pandemic makes it necessary to identify the predictors of violence, in order to prevent these events from happening. OBJECTIVE: Evaluating the prevalence and analyzing the variables involved in the occurrence of violence against health professionals during the COVID-19 pandemic in Brazil. METHOD: This is a cross-sectional study conducted online involving Brazilian health professionals during the COVID-19 pandemic. The data were collected through a structured questionnaire (Google Online Form) sent to health professionals on social networks and analyzed through logistic regression by using sociodemographic variables. The set of grouped variables was assigned to the final model when p <0.05. A network was built using the Mixed Graph Models (MGM) approach. A centrality measurement chart was constructed to determine which nodes have the greatest influence, strength and connectivity between the nodes around them. RESULTS: The predictors of violence in the adjusted regression model were the following: being a nursing technician / assistant; having been working for less than 20 years; working for over 37 hours a week; having suffered violence before the pandemic; having been contaminated with COVID-19; working in direct contact with patients infected by the virus; and having family members who have suffered violence. The network created with professionals who suffered violence demonstrated that the aggressions occurred mainly in the workplace, with an indication of psycho-verbal violence. In cases in which the aggressors were close people, aggressions were non-verbal and happened both in public and private places. The assaults practiced by strangers occurred in public places. CONCLUSIONS: Violence against health professionals occurs implicitly and explicitly, with consequences that can affect both their psychosocial well-being and the assistance given to their patients and families.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workplace Violence/statistics & numerical data , Workplace/psychology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Brazil/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Prevalence , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Workplace Violence/prevention & control , Young Adult
5.
Healthc Manage Forum ; 34(4): 200-204, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1269848

ABSTRACT

Every year around Nurses Week, Dr. Rhonda Collins, DNP, RN, FAAN, Chief Nursing Officer for Vocera Communications, publishes a report examining important issues that impact the nursing profession worldwide. Her 2021 CNO report examines how the COVID-19 pandemic put a spotlight on the realities of the nursing profession and how the lack of resources, infrastructure, and policies impact nurses' work and lives. Dr. Collins addresses the toll of mental, emotional, and physical fatigue and outlines steps to help leaders create environments that protect the well-being of nurses and their patients. Dr. Collins closes the report by asking nurses to participate in a study to measure the mental, emotional, and physical burden nurses experience during communication. The study will use the NASA Task Load Index, a tool that has been used to measure the task load of workers in high-intensity jobs, such as pilots and air traffic controllers. The objective is to gain insight and a body of knowledge toward reducing nurses' cognitive burden going forward.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/nursing , Safety Management , Adult , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Female , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Male , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Task Performance and Analysis , Workload/psychology , Workplace Violence/prevention & control , Workplace Violence/psychology
7.
Med Leg J ; 89(4): 260-263, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1236507

ABSTRACT

During the past 10 years, the "Prevention of Violence Against Medicare Persons and Institutions Act" has failed to achieve its object. With the advent of the pandemic, stricter measures were taken and on 22 April 2020, all acts of violence against healthcare personnel confronting the Covid-19 pandemic became "cognizable and non-bailable offences" by means of the Epidemic Diseases (Amendment) Ordinance, a direct statement from the Government of India that there would be zero tolerance for violence against its health care workers. The Amendment aims to fill gaps in the previous law which did not protect healthcare workers against occupational violence at the workplace and at home. The amendment of the Ordinance will have a positive impact on the medical community which is much needed, particularly during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Workplace Violence , Aged , Delivery of Health Care , Health Personnel , Humans , Medicare , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , United States , Workplace Violence/prevention & control
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