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1.
Am J Nurs ; 122(1): 14, 2022 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1584034

ABSTRACT

Workplace violence, domestic abuse, and firearm-related deaths are on the rise.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Intimate Partner Violence/psychology , Intimate Partner Violence/trends , Workplace Violence/psychology , Workplace Violence/trends
2.
CMAJ Open ; 9(4): E998-E1004, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1524570

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Asian Canadians and Asian Americans face COVID-19-related discrimination. The objective of this qualitative study was to explore the experiences of Asian health care workers dealing with discrimination, with a focus on racial micro-agressions, in Canada and the United States during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: We adopted a qualitative descriptive approach. We used convenience and snowball sampling strategies to recruit participants. We conducted individual, in-depth semistructured interviews with Asian health care workers in Canada and the US via videoconferencing between May and September 2020. Eligible participants had to self-identify as Asian and be currently employed as a health care worker with at least 1 year of full-time employment. We used an inductive thematic approach to analyze the data. RESULTS: Thirty participants were recruited. Fifteen (50%) were Canadians and 15 (50%) were Americans; there were 18 women (60%), 11 men (37%) and 1 nonbinary person. Most of the participants were aged 25-29 years (n = 16, 53%). More than half were nurses (n = 16, 53%); the other participants were attending physicians (n = 5), physiotherapists (n = 3), resident physicians (n = 2), a midwife, a paramedic, a pharmacist and a physician assistant. Two themes emerged from the data: a surge of racial microaggressions related to COVID-19 and a lack of institutional and public acknowledgement. Participants noted that they have experienced an increase in racial microaggressions during the COVID-19 pandemic. They have also experienced threats of violence and actual violence. The largely silent organizational response to the challenges being faced by people of Asian descent and the use of disparaging terms such as "China virus" in the early stages of the pandemic were a substantial source of frustration. INTERPRETATION: Asian health care workers have experienced challenges in dealing with racial microaggressions related to COVID-19 in the US and Canada. More research should be done on the experiences of Asian Americans and Asian Canadians, both during and after the pandemic, and supportive measures should be put in place to protect Asian health care workers.


Subject(s)
Asian Americans/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Racism/psychology , Adult , Canada , Female , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Male , Pandemics , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2 , United States , Workplace Violence/psychology , Xenophobia/psychology
3.
Healthc Manage Forum ; 34(4): 200-204, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1269848

ABSTRACT

Every year around Nurses Week, Dr. Rhonda Collins, DNP, RN, FAAN, Chief Nursing Officer for Vocera Communications, publishes a report examining important issues that impact the nursing profession worldwide. Her 2021 CNO report examines how the COVID-19 pandemic put a spotlight on the realities of the nursing profession and how the lack of resources, infrastructure, and policies impact nurses' work and lives. Dr. Collins addresses the toll of mental, emotional, and physical fatigue and outlines steps to help leaders create environments that protect the well-being of nurses and their patients. Dr. Collins closes the report by asking nurses to participate in a study to measure the mental, emotional, and physical burden nurses experience during communication. The study will use the NASA Task Load Index, a tool that has been used to measure the task load of workers in high-intensity jobs, such as pilots and air traffic controllers. The objective is to gain insight and a body of knowledge toward reducing nurses' cognitive burden going forward.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/nursing , Safety Management , Adult , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Female , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Male , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Task Performance and Analysis , Workload/psychology , Workplace Violence/prevention & control , Workplace Violence/psychology
4.
Indian J Med Ethics ; VI(1): 1-5, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1257354

ABSTRACT

Violence against medical professionals and destruction of hospital property by frustrated patients and their relatives occur frequently in India (1) and in other countries (2, 3). However, harassment of healthcare workers by the police has, so far, not been an issue in the Indian healthcare system. Now, cases of harassment of medical professionals by the police have emerged during the Covid-19 pandemic. Ironically, both doctors and police personnel have been considered "frontline heroes" against the pandemic in India. We present some cases of such attacks.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Patients/psychology , Police/psychology , Workplace Violence/psychology , Adult , Female , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Humans , India , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Police/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Workplace Violence/statistics & numerical data
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