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1.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 74, 2022 01 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1622229

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Despite widespread COVID-19 vaccination programs, there is an ongoing need for targeted disease prevention and control efforts in high-risk occupational settings. This study aimed to develop, pilot, and validate an instrument for surveying occupational COVID-19 infection prevention and control (IPC) measures available to workers in diverse geographic and occupational settings. METHODS: A 44-item online survey was developed in English and validated for face and content validity according to literature review, expert consultation, and pre-testing. The survey was translated and piloted with 890 workers from diverse industries in Canada, Ireland, Argentina, Poland, Nigeria, China, the US, and the UK. Odds ratios generated from univariable, and multivariable logistic regression assessed differences in 'feeling protected at work' according to gender, age, occupation, country of residence, professional role, and vaccination status. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was conducted, and internal consistency reliability verified with Cronbach's alpha. Hypothesis testing using two-sample t-tests verified construct validity (i.e., discriminant validity, known-groups technique), and criterion validity. RESULTS: After adjustment for occupational sector, characteristics associated with feeling protected at work included being male (AOR = 1.88; 95% CI = 1.18,2.99), being over 55 (AOR = 2.17; 95% CI = 1.25,3.77) and working in a managerial position (AOR = 3.1; 95% CI = 1.99,4.83). EFA revealed nine key IPC domains relating to: environmental adjustments, testing and surveillance, education, costs incurred, restricted movements, physical distancing, masking, isolation strategies, and areas for improvement. Each domain showed sufficient internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's alpha ≥0.60). Hypothesis testing revealed differences in survey responses by country and occupational sector, confirming construct validity (p < 0.001), criterion validity (p = 0.04), and discriminant validity (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The online survey, developed in English to identify the COVID-19 protective measures used in diverse workplace settings, showed strong face validity, content validity, internal consistency, criterion validity, and construct validity. Translations in Chinese, Spanish, French, Polish, and Hindi demonstrated adaptability of the survey for use in international working environments. The multi-lingual tool can be used by decision makers in the distribution of IPC resources, and to guide occupational safety and health (OSH) recommendations for preventing COVID-19 and future infectious disease outbreaks.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Workplace , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , Male , Psychometrics , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
2.
BMJ Open ; 11(12): e057021, 2021 12 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1596640

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic was making a huge impact on Europe's healthcare systems in the spring of 2020, and most predictive models concurred that pandemic waves were in the offing. Most studies adopted a pathogenic approach to the subject; few used a salutogenic approach. These showed, however, that nurses can retain their health despite a pandemic by mobilising generalised resistance resources. Our study aims to understand how nurses working in Switzerland's hospitals protected their health and workplace well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic by investigating the moderating effects of the health resources they mobilised against the stressors inherent to the situation. The study aims to explore and describe the stressors and the resources nurses used to remain healthy during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHOD AND ANALYSIS: We will use a concurrent mixed-methods panel design with qualitative analyses ancillary to quantitative analyses. Quantitative data will be collected using electronic questionnaires at four time points over 2 years. Qualitative data will be collected using focus groups. Nurses from Switzerland's two main linguistic regions who had direct, indirect or no contact with patients with COVID-19 will be invited to participate. The a priori sample size will be at least 3631 participants at T0 and 1852 at T4. Longitudinal structural equation modelling and knowledge mapping will be used to analyse quantitative and qualitative data, respectively. The results derived from the two data types will then be compared and discussed using a side-by-side approach to determine whether they agree or disagree and how they complement each other to achieve our aims. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Nurses will receive an electronic informed consent form. The data collected will be stored on a secure server at the authors' institution. This research project was approved by the Human Research Ethics Committee of the Canton of Vaud (2020-02845).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Protective Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Report , Switzerland/epidemiology , Workplace
3.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(1)2021 Dec 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580835

ABSTRACT

Background: COVIDApp is a platform created for management of COVID-19 in the workplace. Methods: COVIDApp was designed and implemented for the follow-up of 253 workers from seven companies in Catalonia. The assessment was based on two actions: first, the early detection and management of close contacts and potential cases of COVID-19, and second, the rapid remote activation of protocols. The main objectives of this strategy were to minimize the risk of transmission of COVID-19 infection in the work area through a new real-time communication channel and to avoid unnecessary sick leave. The parameters reported daily by workers were close contact with COVID cases and signs and/or symptoms of COVID-19. Results: Data were recorded between 1 May and 30 November 2020. A total of 765 alerts were activated by 76 workers: 127 green alarms (16.6%), 301 orange alarms (39.3%), and 337 red alarms (44.1%). Of all the red alarms activated, 274 (81.3%) were activated for symptoms potentially associated with COVID-19, and 63 (18.7%) for reporting close contact with COVID-19 cases. Only eight workers (3.1%) presented symptoms associated with COVID-19 infection. All of these workers underwent RT-PCR tests, which yielded negative results for SARS-CoV2. Three workers were considered to have had a risk contact with COVID-19 cases; only 1 (0.4%) asymptomatic worker had a positive RT-PCR test result, requiring the activation of protocols, isolation, and contact tracing. Conclusions: COVIDApp contributes to the early detection and rapid activation of protocols in the workplace, thus limiting the risk of spreading the virus and reducing the economic impact caused by COVID-19 in the productive sector. The platform shows the progression of infection in real time and can help design new strategies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Humans , Pandemics , RNA, Viral , SARS-CoV-2 , Workplace
4.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(1)2021 12 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580769

ABSTRACT

This multi-group path analysis study investigated the effects of verbal abuse (suspicion of infection and disrespect) on difficulties in work performance according to the workplace quarantine measures of visiting nurses during the COVID-19 pandemic. A total of 262 visiting nurses in Korea completed the online questionnaire between 10 October and 30 November 2020, and their data were included in the final analysis. The study found that experiences of verbal abuse mediated fear and anxiety to affect difficulties in work performance. In the path model of the group with a high level of workplace quarantine measures, experiences of verbal abuse (suspicion of infection and disrespect) did not directly affect fear. The opposite was true for the group with low levels of workplace quarantine measures. The implications for the field are that the following is required: heightened awareness of verbal abuse; workplace quarantine policies; and mental health management systems and intervention programs to detect the early fear and anxiety of visiting nurses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses, Community Health , Work Performance , Humans , Pandemics , Quarantine , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workplace
5.
J Occup Health ; 63(1): e12309, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1579078

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: With the COVID-19 pandemic, the idea of universal mask wearing to prevent infecting others when one becomes infected has prevailed among people. In general, any workplace is not exempt and workers are required to wear a mask while working at the sites. OBJECTIVES: This study aims to integrate information to assist workers to select effective protectors for the prevention of droplet infection even at workplaces without occupational health personnel. METHODS: A total of 94 studies were included in this study: 91 studies were identified in MEDLINE, which was used for the literature search, and an additional three studies were identified from other information sources. The studies were checked to eliminate duplication and narrowed down to 31 based on the titles and abstracts. The contents of the 31 studies were read through and then 19 studies were extracted for careful reading. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Regarding the protectors used at workplaces, it was suggested that (1) workers continue to use respiratory protectors as needed at sites where respiratory protectors such as an N95 respirator had to be used even before the spread of COVID-19 and (2) wear surgical masks, multi-layer cloth masks, or hybrid fabric masks made of several types of fabrics that are recommended in terms of preventing dissemination of droplets and protecting against inhalation of droplets, selected according to the working conditions, taking account of air permeability, breathability, and durability.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Masks/standards , Occupational Health , Workplace , Health Personnel , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
6.
J Occup Health ; 63(1): e12308, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1589270

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: We examined the association between perceived organizational support (POS) and COVID-19 vaccination intention as well as the influence of the implementation of workplace infection prevention measures. METHODS: We analyzed data from an Internet survey of workers aged 20-65 years conducted in December 2020, during a period of widespread COVID-19 infection in Japan. RESULTS: Of the 23 846 participants in this survey, 1958 (8%) reported very high POS. In the group with very high POS, 836 (43%) workers wanted the COVID-19 vaccination; in contrast 1382 (36%) workers in the group with very low POS wanted the vaccination. POS was associated with COVID-19 vaccination intention (odds ratio [OR] = 1.11). The OR decreased after additional adjustment for the number of workplace infection control measures (OR = 1.06). In the analysis with POS as a categorical variable, very high POS was associated with COVID-19 vaccination intention (reference: very low POS) (OR = 1.34). The OR decreased after additional adjustment for the number of workplace infection control measures (OR = 1.17). High POS was associated with COVID-19 vaccination intention (OR = 1.17) but not with vaccination intention after additional adjustment for the number of workplace infection control measures (OR = 1.05). CONCLUSIONS: High POS during the COVID-19 pandemic increased employees' vaccination intention. The relationship between POS and vaccination intention was strongly influenced by implementation of workplace infection prevention measures. Implementing appropriate workplace infection prevention measures in the event of an emerging infectious disease outbreak may influence the vaccination behavior of employees, which may contribute to the acquisition of herd immunity in the community.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , Intention , Organizational Culture , Vaccination , Workplace , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vaccination/psychology , Workplace/organization & administration , Workplace/psychology , Young Adult
7.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0260208, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575897

ABSTRACT

Medical personnel working in emergency rooms (ER) are at increased risk of mental health problems and suicidality. There is increasing evidence that mindfulness-based interventions can improve burnout and other mental health outcomes in health care providers. In contrast, few longitudinal prospective studies have examined protective functions of dispositional mindfulness in this population. The objective of this study was to examine whether mindfulness prospectively predicts anxiety, depression, and social impairment in a sample of emergency care professionals. The authors administered online surveys to ER personnel prior to work in ER, and at 3 and 6 months follow up. Participants were 190 ER personnel (73% residents, 16% medical students, 11% nurses). Linear mixed effects regression was used to model longitudinal 3-month and 6-month follow up of depression, anxiety, and social impairment. Predictors included time-varying contemporaneous work stressors, perceived social support at work and life events, and baseline dispositional mindfulness, demographics, and workplace characteristics. Mindfulness indexed when starting ER work predicted less depression, anxiety, and social impairment 6 months later. Mindfulness remained a strong predictor of mental health outcomes after controlling for time-varying stressful events in emergency care, negative life events, and social support at work. Mindfulness moderated the adverse impact of poor social support at work on depression. To our knowledge, this is the first longitudinal study to show that mindfulness prospectively and robustly predicts anxiety, depression, and social impairment. Results support the role of mindfulness as a potential resilience factor in at-risk health care providers.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/pathology , Depression/pathology , Health Personnel/psychology , Mindfulness/methods , Adult , Emergency Medical Services , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Occupational Stress , Social Support , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workplace
8.
J Nurs Adm ; 52(1): 57-66, 2022 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575154

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to explore relationships between organizational factors and moral injury among healthcare workers and the impact of perceptions of their leaders and organizations during COVID-19. BACKGROUND: COVID-19 placed healthcare workers at risk for moral injury, which often involves feeling betrayed by people with authority and can impact workplace culture. METHODS: Secondary data from a Web-based survey of mid-Atlantic healthcare workers were analyzed using mixed methods. Data were synthesized using the Reina Trust & Betrayal Model. RESULTS: Fifty-five percent (n = 328/595) of respondents wrote comments. Forty-one percent (n = 134/328) of commenters had moral injury scores of 36 or higher. Three themes emerged: organizational infrastructure, support from leaders, and palliative care involvement. Respondents outlined organizational remedies, which were organized into 5 domains. CONCLUSIONS: Findings suggest healthcare workers feel trust was breached by their organizations' leaders during COVID-19. Further study is needed to understand intersections between organizational factors and moral injury to enhance trust within healthcare organizations.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Health Personnel/organization & administration , Health Personnel/psychology , Mental Health , Morals , Workplace , Adult , Humans , Workplace/organization & administration , Workplace/psychology
9.
J Prev Med Hyg ; 62(3): E605-E612, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574664

ABSTRACT

Introduction: COVID-19 pandemic has placed the entire world, including Malaysia in a state of fear. The rising burden on healthcare facilities has put healthcare workers consistently at risk of healthcare-associated infection. We sought to identify determinants of preventive practice against COVID-19 at work among primary healthcare professionals in Sabah, Malaysia. Method: This was a cross-sectional study involving healthcare workers of the Penampang and Putatan districts of Sabah, Malaysia. A total of 167 health professionals from primary healthcare settings took part in this study via a self-administered questionnaire from November 2020 until January 2021. Independent t-test and Analysis of Variance were used to determine differences in preventive practice for categorical independent variables. Pearson product-moment correlation was applied to assess the relationship between Job Satisfaction, burnout, and preventive practice. Subsequently, predictors of preventive practice at work among healthcare workers in Sabah were identified through Binomial Logistic Regression. Results: The prevalence of good preventive practice among health professionals at work was 71.3%. There was no difference in preventive practice between professions. Almost all participants reported having good personal protective equipment compliance and hand hygiene practice at work. Marital status (AOR = 4.170, 95% CI = 1.787, 9.733; p = 0.001), average sleep hours (AOR = 1.775, 95% CI = 1.144, 2.754; p = 0.01), and pandemic-related burnout (AOR = 0.905, 95% CI = 0.847, 0.967; p = 0.003) were identified as significant predictors of preventive practice at primary healthcare facilities. Conclusions: The outcome of this study is beneficial to the healthcare organization. It can serve as a useful guide to tackle issues related to poor preventive practice against COVID-19 at work for health professionals.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Personnel , Humans , Malaysia/epidemiology , Primary Health Care , SARS-CoV-2 , Workplace
10.
J Infect Dev Ctries ; 15(11): 1603-1606, 2021 11 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1572701

ABSTRACT

During phase 2 of the COVID-19 pandemic in a Mexican City, informal street vendors (cases) and formal employees (controls) were interviewed. A total of 82.6% of street vendors preferred to expose themselves to the coronavirus than to stop working, compared with 18.4% of formal employees (adjusted OR = 19.4, 95%CI: 4.6-81.7, p < 0.001). Street vendors had 7 times less fear of dying from coronavirus (adjusted OR = 0.14, 95% CI: 0.03-0.5, p = 0.005) and showed a 16-times greater lack of real concern for the increase in cases in their community than the formal employees (adjusted OR = 0.06, 95% CI: 0.01-0.3, p = 0.002). Street vendors were the group with the poorest adherence to household and work area containment measures that continued to be in contact with others. The corresponding authorities must plan specific strategies that allow street vendors to survive economically, while at the same time, protecting community health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Behavior , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Workplace , Adult , COVID-19/transmission , Female , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Male , Mexico/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Poverty
11.
Tohoku J Exp Med ; 255(4): 283-289, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1572184

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has spread throughout the world. Poor mental health has been reported among healthcare professionals responding to COVID-19. However, no study has examined the impact of COVID-19-related workplace bullying or patient aggression on the mental health of healthcare professionals during the COVID-19 outbreak. This study examined the prevalence of COVID-19-related workplace bullying and patient aggression and its association with psychological distress among healthcare professionals during the COVID-19 outbreak in Japan. This was a cross-sectional study conducted from May 22 to 26, 2020, inviting participants (n = 1,421) from an online survey of full-time employees. We limited the sample to healthcare professionals for further analyses. Using an online self-report questionnaire, workplace bullying and patient aggression related to COVID-19 was measured using nine items with dichotomous response options. Psychological distress was measured using the Japanese version of Brief Job Stress Questionnaire. Among 1,032 participants (72.6%) who completed the survey, 111 healthcare professionals were identified. Among them, 19 participants (17.1%) had experienced any COVID-19-related workplace bullying or patient aggression: 11 participants (9.9%) had experienced any workplace bullying and 12 participants (10.8%) had experienced any patient aggression. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that any bullying or patient aggression related to COVID-19 significantly correlated with psychological distress. It was suggested that a non-negligible proportion of participants experienced workplace bullying or patient aggression related to COVID-19. Preventing and reducing workplace bullying and patient aggression may be effective in improving mental health of healthcare professionals during the COVID-19 outbreak.


Subject(s)
Aggression/psychology , Bullying , COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Occupational Stress/complications , Psychological Distress , Workplace/psychology , Adult , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Occupational Stress/psychology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology
12.
J Health Organ Manag ; ahead-of-print(ahead-of-print)2021 May 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1561834

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Workplace silence impedes productivity, job satisfaction and retention, key issues for the hospital workforce worldwide. It can have a negative effect on patient outcomes and safety and human resources in healthcare organisations. This study aims to examine factors that influence workplace silence among hospital doctors in Ireland. DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: A national, cross-sectional, online survey of hospital doctors in Ireland was conducted in October-November 2019; 1,070 hospital doctors responded. This paper focuses on responses to the question "If you had concerns about your working conditions, would you raise them?". In total, 227 hospital doctor respondents (25%) stated that they would not raise concerns about their working conditions. Qualitative thematic analysis was carried out on free-text responses to explore why these doctors choose to opt for silence regarding their working conditions. FINDINGS: Reputational risk, lack of energy and time, a perceived inability to effect change and cultural norms all discourage doctors from raising concerns about working conditions. Apathy arose as change to working conditions was perceived as highly unlikely. In turn, this had scope to lead to neglect and exit. Voice was seen as risky for some respondents, who feared that complaining could damage their career prospects and workplace relationships. ORIGINALITY/VALUE: This study highlights the systemic, cultural and practical issues that pressure hospital doctors in Ireland to opt for silence around working conditions. It adds to the literature on workplace silence and voice within the medical profession and provides a framework for comparative analysis of doctors' silence and voice in other settings.


Subject(s)
Physicians , Workplace , Attitude of Health Personnel , Cross-Sectional Studies , Hospitals , Humans , Ireland
13.
BMC Public Health ; 21(1): 1951, 2021 10 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1560679

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This paper is an empirical investigation that examines a path model linking COVID-19 perceptions to organisational citizenship behaviour (OCBs) via three mediators: job insecurity, burnout, and job satisfaction. The research examines the path model invariance spanning Generations X, Y, and Z. Three countries in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) were the focus of the study. METHODS: The data was collected from a sample of employees in service companies (n = 578). We used a Partial Least Square Structural Equation Modelling (PLS-SEM) to analyse the data. RESULTS: Our findings reveal that COVID-19 perceptions positively predict job insecurity, which positively impacts burnout levels. Burnout negatively predicts job satisfaction. The findings established that job satisfaction positively predicts OCBs. The mediation analysis determined that job insecurity, burnout and job satisfaction convey the indirect effects of COVID-19 perceptions onto OCBs. Finally, our hypothesised model is non-equivalent across Generations X, Y and Z. In that regard, our multi-group analysis revealed that the indirect effects of COVID-19 perceptions on OCBs were only valid amongst younger generations, i.e., Generation Y and Generation Z. Specifically, younger generations are substantially more vulnerable to the indirect effects of COVID-19 perceptions on their engagement in OCBs than Generation X whose job satisfaction blocks the effects of COVID-19 perceptions on OCBs. CONCLUSIONS: The present study extends our knowledge of workplace generational differences in responding to the perceptions of crises or pandemics. It offers evidence that suggests that burnout, job attitudes and organisational outcomes change differently across generations in pandemic times.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Perception , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workplace
15.
Nurs Adm Q ; 46(1): 5-18, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1550626

ABSTRACT

Work cultures supportive of wellness and shorter shift length have been associated with better mental/physical health outcomes in nurses, but how the coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) pandemic impacted such outcomes is not known. This study's aims were to (1) describe the mental/physical health, well-being, and healthy lifestyle behaviors of nurses during the pandemic; (2) explore the pandemic's impact on their health and healthy lifestyle behaviors; and (3) determine the associations of perceived workplace wellness support and shift length with nurses' health, well-being, and healthy lifestyle behaviors. A cross-sectional descriptive design was used with 264 nurses associated with Trusted Health. Nurses completed a survey containing valid and reliable scales measuring depression, anxiety, burnout and quality of life, perceived wellness culture, and healthy lifestyle behaviors. Results indicated that more than 50% of nurses had worsening mental/physical health relating to the pandemic. Compared with nurses whose workplaces provided little/no wellness support, nurses with workplaces that supported their wellness were 3 to 9 times as likely to have better mental/physical health, no/little stress, no burnout, and high quality of life. Nurses who worked longer shifts had poorer health outcomes. These findings indicate that workplace wellness support and shorter shifts positively impacted nurse mental/physical health and professional quality of life amidst the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Cross-Sectional Studies , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Life Style , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workplace
16.
Ind Health ; 59(5): 318-324, 2021 Oct 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1547178

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is around the world. We attempt to apply three-step method in ISO/IEC Guide 51: 2014 to COVID-19 infection control in the workplace. The results show that the COVID-19 infection control measures include the eradication of the virus, the destruction of infectivity, the detoxification and weakening and the elimination of opportunities for infection as "Inherently Safe Design Measures", the avoidance of contact as "Safeguarding and Complementary Protective Measures" and the reduction of contact and the avoidance of seriousness as "Information for Use". Among these specific measures, the New Normal, especially in the manufacturing industries, would be "telecommuting" and "unmanned workplaces", which are part of the elimination of opportunities for infection, and "changes in flow lines" and "changes in airflow", which are part of the avoidance of contact. Where "telecommuting" and "unmanned workplaces" are feasible, they should be implemented as much as possible, and where they are not, attempts should be made to minimize human-to-human contact by "changes in flow lines". In addition, in the area of "changes in airflow", there are high expectations for future research on how to establish a ventilation design for COVID-19, in which but also the source would be workers themselves, not only combustible gases and toxic gases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Infection Control/organization & administration , Occupational Health/standards , Workplace/organization & administration , Global Health , Humans , Infection Control/standards , Manufacturing and Industrial Facilities/standards , SARS-CoV-2 , Teleworking , Ventilation/standards , Workplace/standards
17.
Health Rep ; 32(11): 16-27, 2021 11 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1524859

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There are important information gaps concerning the prevalence and distribution of infection control practices (ICPs) within workplaces continuing to operate during the COVID-19 pandemic. DATA AND METHODS: To address these gaps, this paper examines the prevalence of workplace ICPs among employed respondents to Statistics Canada's Labour Force Survey in the months of July, August and September 2020 (n = 53,316). The article also seeks to identify sociodemographic, occupational and workplace factors associated with the level and type of workplace ICPs. ICPs included the reorganization of the workplace to allow for physical distancing, increased access to hand sanitizer or handwashing facilities, enhanced cleaning protocols and access to personal protective equipment. Multivariable regression models were used to examine the number of ICPs in place and the absence of specific ICPs. RESULTS: Generally high levels of reported protections among workers (15% of the sample had three ICPs and 72% had four or more ICPs) were observed. However, certain subgroups of workers were less likely to have ICPs in place. These included workers who were male; those with lower levels of education, shorter job tenure, or non-permanent work; and those working in the agricultural, construction, transportation and warehousing, and education industries. INTERPRETATION: In a large sample of Canadian employees, generally high levels of workplace ICPs to reduce the transmission of COVID-19 were observed. Groups with lower levels of ICPs included workers at the start of their employment, workers with low levels of education, and certain industry groups.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Workplace , Canada/epidemiology , Humans , Infection Control , Male , Pandemics , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(21)2021 10 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1512292

ABSTRACT

Activity-based workplaces (ABW) have been implemented in many organizations to offer office flexibility and decrease facility costs. Evaluations of the ABW implementation process are rare. The study aimed to examine the ABW relocation process of two offices in a Swedish governmental agency and to explore factors that influence the implementation process and satisfaction with it. Qualitative or quantitative data were collected on process variables (context, recruitment, reach, dose delivered, dose received, satisfaction), barriers and facilitators to the process were explored in focus group interviews, and immediate outcomes (perceived knowledge, understanding office rules, satisfying information and support) were measured by questionnaire before and after the relocation. The evaluation showed that recruitment was unsatisfactory and reach insufficient-and participation in activities was thus low for both offices. However, intended changes improved. Unclear aims of ABW, lack of manager support and, lack of communication were some of the reported barriers to participation, while a well-planned process, work groups, and program activities were facilitators. Thus, to increase satisfaction with the relocation, our results suggest that recruitment should be thoroughly planned, taking these factors into account to increase participation. This knowledge may be useful for planning and designing successful ABW relocations and evaluations.


Subject(s)
Personal Satisfaction , Workplace , Focus Groups , Organizations , Surveys and Questionnaires
20.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(21)2021 10 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1512278

ABSTRACT

Total Worker Health® (TWH), an initiative of the U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, is defined as policies, programs, and practices that integrate protection from work-related health and safety hazards by promoting efforts that advance worker well-being. Interventions that apply the TWH paradigm improve workplace health more rapidly than wellness programs alone. Evidence of the barriers and facilitators to the adoption, implementation, and long-term maintenance of TWH programs is limited. Dissemination and implementation (D&I) science, the study of methods and strategies for bridging the gap between public health research and practice, can help address these system-, setting-, and worker-level factors to increase the uptake, impact, and sustainment of TWH activities. The purpose of this paper is to draw upon a synthesis of existing D&I science literature to provide TWH researchers and practitioners with: (1) an overview of D&I science; (2) a plain language explanation of key concepts in D&I science; (3) a case study example of moving a TWH intervention down the research-to-practice pipeline; and (4) a discussion of future opportunities for conducting D&I science in complex and dynamic workplace settings to increase worker safety, health, and well-being.


Subject(s)
Occupational Health , Health Promotion , Implementation Science , Public Health , Workplace
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