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1.
Zoo Biol ; 41(5): 439-447, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2173491

ABSTRACT

Emerging conservation psychology literature shows that there is a strong link between positive attachment to a workplace and the performance of pro-environmental behaviors by employees at work. The present study explores the validity of a pilot survey based in previous literature that explores these constructs to determine whether a relationship between the two exists among zoo and aquarium professionals. The survey was distributed to employees of the Wildlife Conservation Society's city zoos-Prospect Park, Central Park, and Queens Zoos-during the first year of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. Two of the survey scales used had a high internal consistency and data from these responses informed this case study to show that there is a weak, positive correlation between workplace attachment (WPA) and self-reported frequency of performance of pro-environmental behaviors (PEBs) among the respondents. Isolating the responses by department revealed that staff working in Operations departments (1) exhibit lower frequencies of PEB than those in Education and Animal departments and (2) have a very strong, positive correlation between WPA and PEB. The results suggest that zoo and aquarium employees who are positively attached to their workplace are more likely to perform PEBs, especially those working in Operations departments. These findings help support that workplace practices seeking to increase WPA could increase the performance of PEBs at work by all employees.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Conservation of Natural Resources , Animals , Animals, Zoo , Conservation of Natural Resources/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , Workplace
2.
JMIR Public Health Surveill ; 7(6): e27917, 2021 06 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2197909

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The United States of America has the highest global number of COVID-19 cases and deaths, which may be due in part to delays and inconsistencies in implementing public health and social measures (PHSMs). OBJECTIVE: In this descriptive analysis, we analyzed the epidemiological evidence for the impact of PHSMs on COVID-19 transmission in the United States and compared these data to those for 10 other countries of varying income levels, population sizes, and geographies. METHODS: We compared PHSM implementation timing and stringency against COVID-19 daily case counts in the United States and against those in Canada, China, Ethiopia, Japan, Kazakhstan, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea, Vietnam, and Zimbabwe from January 1 to November 25, 2020. We descriptively analyzed the impact of border closures, contact tracing, household confinement, mandated face masks, quarantine and isolation, school closures, limited gatherings, and states of emergency on COVID-19 case counts. We also compared the relationship between global socioeconomic indicators and national pandemic trajectories across the 11 countries. PHSMs and case count data were derived from various surveillance systems, including the Health Intervention Tracking for COVID-19 database, the World Health Organization PHSM database, and the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control. RESULTS: Implementing a specific package of 4 PHSMs (quarantine and isolation, school closures, household confinement, and the limiting of social gatherings) early and stringently was observed to coincide with lower case counts and transmission durations in Vietnam, Zimbabwe, New Zealand, South Korea, Ethiopia, and Kazakhstan. In contrast, the United States implemented few PHSMs stringently or early and did not use this successful package. Across the 11 countries, national income positively correlated (r=0.624) with cumulative COVID-19 incidence. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that early implementation, consistent execution, adequate duration, and high adherence to PHSMs represent key factors of reducing the spread of COVID-19. Although national income may be related to COVID-19 progression, a country's wealth appears to be less important in controlling the pandemic and more important in taking rapid, centralized, and consistent public health action.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Global Health/statistics & numerical data , Public Health/legislation & jurisprudence , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Databases, Factual , Humans , Physical Distancing , Quarantine , Schools/organization & administration , United States/epidemiology , Workplace/organization & administration
3.
Front Public Health ; 10: 918784, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2154834

ABSTRACT

The impact of two years of the COVID-19 pandemic on the relationship between employers and employees are explored, including changing employee sensibilities with respect to future employment, work-life balance, remote and flexible work, and the great resignation. Lasting work changes induced by the pandemic expand employee empowerment and demand for greater work flexibility. Flexibility no longer provides employers a unique selling point and hiring/retention competitiveness - it has become an expected standard. Evolving workplace expectations are tied to realizations of the value of work within the broader context of employees' lives, changing business culture across many industries. Demand for increased work/employment individualization and personalization overlaps unprecedented personalization of and power of mobile technologies. Human-centered employee management in the post-COVID-19 era will become imperative, with many opportunities for employers to enable greater impact in employee wellness and health promotion driven by deploying compelling virtual-remote engagement and behavioral change technologies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Occupational Health , COVID-19/epidemiology , Employment , Humans , Pandemics , Workplace
4.
Rev Med Suisse ; 18(803): 2096-2100, 2022 Nov 09.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2146917

ABSTRACT

Repetitive screening in enterprises was one of the measures recommended in Switzerland in the fight against COVID-19. In the canton of Vaud, 70 companies participated in the program, 73 % of which were small and medium-sized enterprises. The SARS-CoV-2 positivity rate was 0.07 % out of 70'105 tests performed. The impossibility of teleworking and the reduction of transmission were the main motivations for joining the program. The facilitating elements were the availability of the Cantonal Medical Office, the existence of a starter kit and the support of the hierarchy within the companies. The main obstacles were the arrival of vaccination, the multiplicity of screening providers and the workload. The program was a pragmatic action tool for companies rather than a population-based strategy.


Le dépistage en entreprise était une des mesures de lutte contre l'épidémie de Covid-19 promues par la Confédération. Dans le canton de Vaud, 70 entreprises ont participé au programme, dont 73 % de petites et moyennes entreprises. Le taux de positivité au SARS-CoV-2 a été de 0,07 % sur 70 105 tests réalisés. L'impossibilité du télétravail et la réduction de la transmission ont été les principales motivations d'adhésion. Les éléments facilitateurs ont été la disponibilité de l'Office du médecin cantonal, l'existence d'un starter kit et le soutien de la hiérarchie au sein des entreprises. Les freins principaux ont été l'arrivée de la vaccination, la multiplicité des prestataires de dépistage et la charge de travail. Le programme a représenté un outil d'action pragmatique pour les entreprises plutôt qu'une stratégie à visée populationnelle.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Workplace , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Mass Screening , Vaccination , Switzerland/epidemiology
5.
Rural Remote Health ; 22(3): 6751, 2022 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2146087

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19), caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has become a global pandemic, giving rise to a serious global health threat. Many countries including Greece have seen a two-wave pattern of reported cases, with a first wave in spring and a second in autumn of 2020. METHODS: A cross-sectional seroprevalence study was designed to measure the prevalence of IgG antibodies with a quantitative SARS-CoV-2 IgG lab-based serology test, chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay, against novel coronavirus in rural areas in Greece after the second pandemic wave. The study was conducted on 29 January 2021 in a rural semi-closed area, the municipality of Deskati, prefecture of western Macedonia in Greece after the second pandemic wave. RESULTS: Sixty-nine participants were included in this study. The present study demonstrated a high prevalence of COVID-19 infection (31 of 69 total participants; 45%) and those who were working in the public sector were at higher risk of COVID-19 infection in comparison to their counterparts in private sector (p=0.05364), (relative risk 2.64; 95% confidence interval 1.001-7.086). CONCLUSION: The study presents data showing a high prevalence of herd immunity for COVID-19 in a semi-closed area in Greece. These findings might help to understand the characteristics of this second wave, the behaviour and danger of SARS-CoV-2 in rural areas in Greece and Europe generally.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Greece/epidemiology , Humans , Immunoglobulin G , Prevalence , Rural Population , SARS-CoV-2 , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Workplace
6.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(21)2022 Oct 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2143002

ABSTRACT

This Special Issue of the IJERPH examines various psychosocial factors that influence the health of workers in contemporary workplaces [...].


Subject(s)
Occupational Health , Workplace , Humans , Workplace/psychology
7.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(12)2022 06 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2142782

ABSTRACT

Research indicates that while nurses are aware of the benefits of physical activity (PA), their adherence to PA is low. The results of workplace interventions that increase PA are inconsistent. The study aim was identification the sociodemographic, professional, and incentive factors influencing nurses' PA and investigation its relationship with the level of PA that they report. This study was based on observational cross-sectional research conducted among professionally active nurses working in a clinical setting (n = 350). The self-reported questionnaire was used to collect sociodemographic and employment data and motivators and barriers of participating in PA. The level of PA was assessed using International Physical Activity Questionnaire. The analysis revealed significant differences in the Total Physical Activity Score (TPAS) depending on the variables related to professional activity (working in a management position: p = 0.015; workplace: p = 0.01; shift type: p ≤ 0.002). Cluster analysis revealed that the most important statement in the group division about motivation was fear of the pain occurring after exercise. Nurses who were more motivated to be active showed a higher level of leisure-time PA than less motivated nurses. The recommendation of PA in the nursing population should be focused on increasing the leisure time PA, ensuring the appropriate time to recovery, and compliance with the principles of work ergonomics to prevent musculoskeletal disorders.


Subject(s)
Exercise , Motivation , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Self Report , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workplace
8.
BMJ Open Qual ; 11(4)2022 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2137812

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To introduce the Community Resiliency Model (CRM) as mental well-being support for healthcare workers working through the height of the COVID-19 pandemic. DESIGN: Randomised controlled trial with a no treatment control group. SETTING: Two large urban health systems in the Southern United States between October 2020 and June 2021. PARTICIPANTS: Eligible participants were currently employed as healthcare workers within the participating healthcare systems. 275 employees registered and consented electronically in response to email invitations. 253 participants completed the baseline survey necessary to be randomised and included in analyses. INTERVENTION: Participants were assigned 1:1 to the control or intervention group at the time of registration. Intervention participants were then invited to 1-hour virtual CRM class teaching skills to increase somatic awareness in the context of self and other care. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Self-reported data were collected rating somatic awareness, well-being, symptoms of stress, work engagement and interprofessional teamwork. RESULTS: Baseline data on the total sample of 275 (53% nurses) revealed higher symptoms of stress and lower well-being than the general population. The intervention participants who attended a CRM class (56) provided follow-up survey data at 1 week (44) and 3 months (36). Significant improvement for the intervention group at 3 months was reported for the well-being measures (WHO-5, p<0.0087, d=0.66; Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-Being Scale, p<0.0004, d=0.66), teamwork measure (p≤0.0002, d=0.41) and stress (Secondary Traumatic Stress Scale, p=0.0058, d=46). CONCLUSION: Baseline results indicate mental health is a concern for healthcare workers. Post intervention findings suggest that CRM is a practical approach to support well-being for healthcare workers during a crisis such as this pandemic. The simple tools that comprise the model can serve as a starting point for or complement self-care strategies to enhance individual resilience and buffer the effects of working in an increasingly stressful work environment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , United States , Pandemics , Health Personnel , Mental Health , Workplace
9.
J Occup Health ; 64(1): e12373, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2127497

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The present study examined the relationship between health culture evaluated by the Health and Productivity Survey Sheets and the implementation status of infection control measures against COVID-19 in the workplace. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study using the corporate data (2518 companies) collected for the purpose of selecting the excellent company of health and productivity management by the Japanese government. The explanatory variable was the overall evaluation score, and the outcome was whether or not infection control measures against COVID-19 in the workplace. We used logistic regression analysis and calculated the odds ratio adjusted for the industry sector, the corporation size, and the operating profit ratio by the overall evaluation score category. RESULTS: The odds ratio of all infection control measurements in the workplace increased as the evaluation score increased. CONCLUSIONS: This study revealed a new finding that the presence of a healthy culture in the workplace will lead to the appropriate implementation of infection control measures during a pandemic. The company's ordinary commitment to employee health will be effective even in times of health crisis, such as during the outbreak of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Occupational Health , Humans , Workplace , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Organizational Culture
10.
BMC Med ; 20(1): 452, 2022 Nov 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2139290

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Diagnostic testing has been pivotal in detecting SARS-CoV-2 infections and reducing transmission through the isolation of positive cases. We quantified the value of implementing frequent, rapid antigen (RA) testing in the workplace to identify screening programs that are cost-effective. METHODS: To project the number of cases, hospitalizations, and deaths under alternative screening programs, we adapted an agent-based model of COVID-19 transmission and parameterized it with the demographics of Ontario, Canada, incorporating vaccination and waning of immunity. Taking into account healthcare costs and productivity losses associated with each program, we calculated the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) with quality-adjusted life year (QALY) as the measure of effect. Considering RT-PCR testing of only severe cases as the baseline scenario, we estimated the incremental net monetary benefits (iNMB) of the screening programs with varying durations and initiation times, as well as different booster coverages of working adults. RESULTS: Assuming a willingness-to-pay threshold of CDN$30,000 per QALY loss averted, twice weekly workplace screening was cost-effective only if the program started early during a surge. In most scenarios, the iNMB of RA screening without a confirmatory RT-PCR or RA test was comparable or higher than the iNMB for programs with a confirmatory test for RA-positive cases. When the program started early with a duration of at least 16 weeks and no confirmatory testing, the iNMB exceeded CDN$1.1 million per 100,000 population. Increasing booster coverage of working adults improved the iNMB of RA screening. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that frequent RA testing starting very early in a surge, without a confirmatory test, is a preferred screening program for the detection of asymptomatic infections in workplaces.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Workplace , Adult , Humans , Cost-Benefit Analysis , COVID-19/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Ontario
11.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 2154, 2022 Nov 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2139235

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The Covid-19 pandemic has brought significant changes to the way people work and there are several reasons to believe that working from home will become more common in the future. Yet more knowledge is needed on whether the effectiveness of leadership differs if the work is performed remotely compared to on-site work. PURPOSE: The aim of this study is to examine the place of work as a moderator for the effectiveness of leadership on employee well-being. METHOD: A survey was answered by 364 white-collar workers, employed by a larger Swedish municipality, who because of the covid-19-pandemic were offered to work from home. RESULTS: The employees working in their regular office perceived having more sufficient work equipment. No other differences were found in the investigated variables. Supportive leadership was associated with all investigated well-being variables in the hypothesised directions. Place of work did not moderate the relationship between Support leadership and the investigated well-being outcomes (Job satisfaction, Stress, General well-being). CONCLUSION: This study shows that there are few differences between employees working from home or working on-site during the Covid-19 pandemic. The supportive leadership of the closest manager seem to be important for well-being regardless of the worksite.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Leadership , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Job Satisfaction , Workplace
12.
J Occup Environ Med ; 64(11): 970-975, 2022 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2121725

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: In this study, we aimed to describe the effect of working from home on work conditions and private life by analyzing reported changes in different work-related factors. METHODS: We used descriptive analyses on cross-sectional data of 4985 people aged 20 to 67 years from Stockholm, Sweden collected in 2021. The prevalence of reported changes for factors related to work and private life was analyzed by degree of work from home and stratified by age, sex, and educational level. RESULTS: Participants who worked from home reported increased opportunities to structure the workday and combine work and private life, while at the same time experiencing increased isolation from the workplace. More females reported increased workload, whereas younger adults reported more changes overall. CONCLUSIONS: Working from home was related to experiencing both positive and negative changes in work conditions and private life.


Subject(s)
Workload , Workplace , Adult , Female , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , Sweden/epidemiology
13.
Front Public Health ; 10: 1002927, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2119878

ABSTRACT

Background: Research is lacking on the long-term influence of workplace factors on the mental health of health care workers during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: We distributed two online surveys to health care workers between May and October 2020 (T1) and between February and April 2021 (T2). Perceived stress, coronavirus-related risks, and workplace factors were measured via self-report questionnaires at both time points. We conducted hierarchical linear regression to investigate the predictive factors for high stress. Results: A total of 2,110 participants from seven countries and 4,240 participants from nine countries were enrolled at T1 and T2, respectively. Among them, 612 participated in both surveys. We called this cohort T1 + T2. High stress was reported in 53.8 and 61.6% of participants at T1 and T2, respectively. In cohort T1 + T2, compared with the baseline, the level of stress rose significantly (6.0 ± 2.9 vs. 6.4 ± 3.1), as did health/safety in the workplace (3.9 ± 0.8 vs. 4.2 ± 0.7). Unfortunately, we did not detect any significant difference concerning support in the workplace. Among all factors at baseline, being older than 35 [ß (95% CI) = -0.92 (-1.45, -0.40)], support [-0.80 (-1.29, -0.32)], and health/safety in the workplace [-0.33 (-0.65, -0.01)] were independent protective factors, while a positive history of mental disorders [0.81 (0.26, 1.37)] and rejection in private life [0.86 (0.48, 1.25)] were risk factors for high stress at T2. Conclusion: To relieve the high stress of health care workers, organizational-level approaches should be implemented, especially measures designed to enhance support, health/safety in the workplace, and to reduce the rejection of the public.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Workplace , Humans , Follow-Up Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Health Personnel
14.
Front Public Health ; 10: 963315, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2119862

ABSTRACT

Background: Work environment characteristics have an important impact on organizational wellbeing in health care facilities. In the Apulia Region, a new COVID-19 hospital was planned, designated and built in a few weeks for the treatment of patients infected with SARS-CoV-2. To our knowledge, this hospital, together with "Fiera Hospital" in Milan, are two of the few buildings worldwide that have been converted into new health care facilities with intensive care center units to treat COVID-19 patients, and this is the first study assessing organizational wellbeing in a newly designated COVID-19 hospital. Aims: To detect and assess the strong points, criticality, and perceptions of wellbeing/discomfort of health care workers engaged in the management of the current health emergency. Method: The study was conducted on 188 health care workers, with the "Multidimensional Organizational Health Questionnaire." Results: We found an overall positive level of organizational wellbeing. The more positive dimensions were "Collaboration between colleagues," "Organizational efficiency" and "Room Comfort." Conflict situations in the workplace were poorly perceived. A very low rate of absenteeism from work was also observed. Conclusions: Our results show the effectiveness of the organizational model adopted in the management of the COVID-19 hospital, especially in view of the work and emotional overload of the personnel called to face the epidemiological emergency on the frontline, which did not adversely affect the psychophysical conditions of the workers. The success of this model is related to the coexistence of all levels of care required during any type of health emergency in a single structure, paying particular attention to the architectural, functional, and procedural aspects of health care and to the so-called "humanization" of care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Hospitals , Workplace , Health Personnel
15.
Nursing ; 52(12): 34-39, 2022 Dec 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2116488

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The COVID-19 pandemic has forced immediate change and hopefully for the better. Navigating through this new world of care delivery warrants developing new maps to reach a new and acceptable normal. This article outlines urgent issues and necessary steps for measurable change, in nursing practice and work environments by 2030.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Nursing , Workplace
16.
Work ; 73(3): 809-818, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2116426

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: It is important to determine nurses' levels of knowledge, health-protective practices for work and social life, and mental health states at the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic to combat the pandemic and minimize further problems. OBJECTIVES: To determine the relationships between knowledge levels, health-protective practices, and anxiety among nurses during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: This cross-sectional study was carried out with the online participation of 605 nurses in Turkey. The researchers prepared a questionnaire form to evaluate the participants' knowledge of COVID-19 and their awareness and health-protective behaviours in work and social life. The mental health statuses of the participants were assessed with the Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD-7) questionnaire. RESULTS: Most of the participants (87.8%) had high levels of knowledge of COVID-19, while 28.8% had severe levels of anxiety disorder. The use of alcohol-based hand disinfectants (88.2%) and the use of N95 or N99 masks (88.5%) were the least frequently practiced protective behaviours at work, while in social life, a healthy and balanced diet (61.6%), social distancing (72.8%), and paying attention to one's sleep pattern (77.3%) were the least frequently practiced protective behaviours. Older age (41-50 years), higher education (master's degree) and having a work experience of 10 years or more were determined to increase the knowledge levels of the participants about COVID-19 (p < 0.001). Anxiety levels were higher in those with a history of mental illness (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Determining the knowledge levels, health-protective practices, and anxiety levels of nurses who are struggling in the frontlines in the field of health during the pandemic period can make a great contribution to the management of different current epidemics and pandemics and future ones by showing the areas in which nurses need to be empowered.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Workplace/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Anxiety/psychology , Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology
17.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(22)2022 Nov 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2116274

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has severely accelerated the transformation and rapid organisational change in the workplace. The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the hotel industry will not fade in a short time, and the long-term coexistence with the COVID-19 pandemic pressure is a real dilemma for the hotel industry. The topic of How to create employee positive workplace outcomes (task performance and innovative work behaviour) during the COVID-19 pandemic has garnered increasing interest in both practical and academic fields. Leaders play a critical role in influencing employee workplace outcomes, yet few studies have explored the predicting role of health-promoting leadership. Drawing upon the conservation of resources (COR) theory, this study aims to examine the employability mediator effect and workplace civility as the moderator effect in the relationship between health-promoting leadership and employee-positive workplace outcomes (task performance and innovative work behaviour). We conducted a two-wave survey of 421 participants from the hotel industry in China and formulated a series of hypotheses that were tested with structural equation modelling. The results showed that health-promoting leadership has a significant positive effect on employees' employability (ß = 0.479, p < 0.001), task performance (ß = 0.250, p < 0.001), and innovative work behaviour (ß = 0.446, p < 0.001). Employability has a significant positive effect on task performance (ß = 0.438, p < 0.001) and innovative work behaviour (ß = 0.296, p < 0.001). This study makes certain contributions to the extant hotel industry employees' positive workplace outcomes literature by attending to the healthy leadership styles that promote employability during the COVID-19 pandemic, and its novel point is to evaluate the workplace civility moderating effect between the above model. It also provides practical insight that mutual transformation in workplace relationships inspire those positive outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Workplace , Humans , Leadership , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Creativity
18.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(22)2022 Nov 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2116203

ABSTRACT

There is widespread recognition that the world of work is changing, and agreement is growing that the occupational safety and health (OSH) field must change to contribute to the protection of workers now and in the future. Discourse on the evolution of OSH has been active for many decades, but formalized support of an expanded focus for OSH has greatly increased over the past 20 years. Development of approaches such as the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)'s Total Worker Health® concept and the World Health Organization (WHO)'s Healthy Workplace Framework are concrete examples of how OSH can incorporate a new focus with a wider view. In 2019, NIOSH initiated a multi-year effort to explore an expanded focus for OSH. This paper is a report on the outputs of a three-year cooperative agreement between NIOSH and The University of Texas School of Public Health, which led to subject matter expert workshops in 2020 and an international conference of global interest groups in 2021. This article traces the background of these meetings and identifies and assesses the lessons learned. It also reviews ten thematic topics that emerged from the meetings: worker health inequalities; training new OSH professionals; future OSH research and practice; tools to measure well-being of workers; psychosocial hazards and adverse mental health effects; skilling, upskilling and improving job quality; socioeconomic influences; climate change; COVID-19 pandemic influences; and strategic foresight. Cross-cutting these themes is the need for systems and transdisciplinary thinking and operationalization of the concept of well-being to prepare the OSH field for the work of the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Occupational Health , United States , Humans , Occupational Health/education , Pandemics/prevention & control , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Workplace , Public Health
19.
BMC Psychol ; 10(1): 265, 2022 Nov 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2115819

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 remains a public health burden that has caused global economic crises, jeopardizing health, jobs, and livelihoods of millions of people around the globe. Several efforts have been made by several countries by implementing several health strategies to attenuate the spread of the pandemic. Although several studies indicated effects of COVID-19 on mental health and its associated factors, very little is known about the underlying mechanism of job insecurity, depression, anxiety, and stress in Bangladesh. Therefore, this study determined the prevalence of job insecurity and depression, anxiety, stress as well as the association between job insecurity, mental health outcomes also contributing determinants amongst humanitarian workers during the COVID-19 pandemic in Bangladesh. METHODS: We conducted a web-based cross-sectional study among 445 humanitarian workers during the COVID-19 pandemic in six sub-districts of Cox's bazar district of Bangladesh between April and May 2021. The questionnaire was composed of socio-demographic, lifestyle and work related factors. Psychometric instruments like job insecurity scale and depression, anxiety also stress scale (DASS-21) were employed to assess the level of job insecurity and mental health outcomes (depression, anxiety and stress). STATA software version 14 was employed to perform statistical analyses. RESULTS: The prevalence of job insecurity was 42%. The odds of job insecurity was higher in Kutubdia and Pekua (AOR = 3.1, 95% CI 1.36, 7.22) Teknaf (AOR = 2.9, 95% CI 1.33, 6.41), the impact of dissatisfaction on salary (AOR = 2.3, 95% CI 1.49, 3.58) was evident with job insecurity. The prevalence of moderate to severe depression, anxiety and stress among humanitarian worker were (26%, 7%), (25%, 10%) and (15%, 7%) respectively. Further, the region of work, being female, marital status, work environment, and salary dissatisfaction were contributing factors for poor mental health outcomes. Those with job insecurity were almost 3 times more likely to experience depression (AOR = 2.7, 95% CI 1.85, 4.04), anxiety (AOR = 2.6, 95% CI 1.76, 3.71) and stress (AOR: 2.8; 95% CI 1.89, 4.26), respectively. CONCLUSION: Our findings highlight that job security remains essential to help tackle the severity of depression, anxiety and stress in humanitarian workers. The results reflected the critical importance of local and international NGOs addressing poor mental health conditions of their employees to prevent mental health outbreaks.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Male , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Mental Health , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , Workplace
20.
Curationis ; 45(1): e1-e8, 2022 Oct 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2110406

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND:  It is critical for intensive care unit (ICU) nurses to develop resilient coping strategies to cope with workplace adversities. The coping strategies will mitigate the development of maladaptive psychological disorders prone to working in a stressful environment. OBJECTIVES:  The aim of this study is to analyse previous literature conducted on strategies that enhance resilience in ICU nurses to cope with workplace adversities beyond the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. The study was conducted by examining all available global literature in the context of the aim of the study. METHOD:  An integrative literature review was chosen for the study. Purposive sampling method was used to select the relevant databases to answer the review question, namely Google Scholar, EBSCOhost, Medline and Nursing/Academic Edition. The search terms used were 'strategies', 'resilience', 'intensive care unit nurses', 'coping', 'workplace adversities', 'beyond COVID-19' and post 'COVID-19'. RESULTS:  Three themes emerged from the study, namely promoting personal attributes, effective relational support and active psychological support. CONCLUSION:  Enhancing resilience among ICU nurses requires both intentional individualised care from the ICU nurses and a systematic approach by nursing management that will meet the psychological needs of ICU nurses when working in a stressful ICU environment.Contribution: The findings of the review have highlighted specific strategies of improving resilience in ICU nurses, which can ultimately create a safe working environment in the ICU.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Resilience, Psychological , Humans , Workplace/psychology , Adaptation, Psychological , Intensive Care Units
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