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1.
Hong Kong Med J ; 28(2): 188-190, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1918129
2.
Front Public Health ; 10: 883113, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1903226

ABSTRACT

Background: Safety concerns are one of the most common reasons for COVID-19 vaccination refusal. In the field of plastic and reconstructive surgery, whether COVID-19 vaccination influences wound healing and scar formation is worthy of special attention. Methods: In this study, patients with adult trauma with subcutaneous sutures placed by a single plastic surgeon in a single center were included. The vaccination interval was defined as the interval between the last dose of the COVID-19 vaccine and when surgical sutures were introduced. The patients were categorized by vaccination interval into three groups of <1, 1-3, and ≥3 months. Wound healing and scar formation were rated according to the Wound Assessment Inventory (WAI) and Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale (POSAS) in the groups at 7 days and after a 3-month follow-up. Results: All total and individual scores of WAI and POSAS were not significantly different among the groups. Conclusion: No differences in wound healing and scar formation were observed in patients with different COVID-19 vaccination intervals. Thus, it is not necessary to postpone COVID-19 vaccination, as the vaccine does not affect wound healing and scar formation in patients undergoing surgery. This study aimed to eliminate concerns and hesitancy in receiving the COVID-19 vaccine.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cicatrix , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Cicatrix/pathology , Cicatrix/prevention & control , Humans , Vaccination , Wound Healing
3.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(10)2022 05 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1855635

ABSTRACT

With the spread of COVID-19 worldwide, various travel restrictions are becoming a significant trigger for anxiety. Although healing products could relieve anxiety, few scholars have proposed a practical design strategy. Therefore, we offer a design strategy for healing products that includes three phases: preparation, analysis, and verification. In Phase 1, 20 people with moderate or high anxiety are invited to rate 100 samples. Then, FCM is used to obtain representative samples. In Phase 2, a three-layer diagram (incl. the upper, middle, and lower layers) of healing products is obtained using the evaluation grid method. Subsequently, the middle layer is considered evaluation criteria. Additionally, 18 items in the lower layer are considered design guidelines. In Phase 3, we invite two teams to develop innovative designs based on design guidelines and personal experience, generating four alternatives. Finally, four alternatives and four healing commodities are evaluated using grey relation analysis and perceptual questionnaires. The consistency of both evaluations could confirm the validity of the evaluation criteria. The alternatives generated based on the design guidelines are better than other alternatives, demonstrating the effectiveness of the design guidelines. The design strategy is beneficial for developing and evaluating healing products to alleviate people's anxiety during COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Anxiety , Anxiety Disorders , Humans , Travel , Wound Healing
4.
Wound Repair Regen ; 30(2): 190-197, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1854206

ABSTRACT

Preventing recurrent pressure ulcers is an important challenge in healthcare. One of the reasons for the high rate of recurrent pressure ulcers is the lack of assessment methods for their early detection. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the thermographic characteristics of the healed area and to consider the predictive validity of thermographic images for recurrent pressure ulcers within a 2-week period. This observational study was conducted at a long-term care facility in Japan between July 2017 and February 2019 among patients whose pressure ulcers had healed. Thermographic images of the healed area were recorded once a week until recurrence or until the end of the study. We enrolled 30 participants, among whom 8 developed recurrent pressure ulcers. The generalised estimation equation revealed that the thermographic finding of increased temperature at the healed area compared to that of the surrounding skin was significantly associated with recurrent pressure ulcers (odds ratio: 101.13, 95% confidence interval: 3.60-2840.77, p = .007); the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, positive likelihood ratio and negative likelihood ratio for recurrent pressure ulcers within 2 weeks were 0.80, 0.94, 0.62, 0.97, 12.9 and 0.2, respectively. Our thermographic findings revealed that the temperature of the healed area was higher than that of the surrounding skin; this could be a useful predictor of pressure ulcer recurrence within 2 weeks, even in the absence of macroscopic changes.


Subject(s)
Pressure Ulcer , Humans , Pressure Ulcer/diagnosis , Skin , Temperature , Thermography , Wound Healing
5.
Surgery ; 171(5): 1422-1426, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1829571

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To determine the impact of COVID-19 infection in patients with chronic limb-threatening ischemia, mainly the limb salvage estimates rate and the overall survival. METHODS: This was a retrospective, consecutive cohort study of chronic limb-threatening ischemia in patients with COVID-19 infection. RESULTS: Overall, 35 patients with chronic limb-threatening ischemia and COVID-19 infection were evaluated. The mean age of the patients was 72.51 years, and most of them were male (60%), with arterial hypertension (85.7%), followed by diabetes mellitus (80%) and tobacco user (71.4%). There was a higher prevalence of wound, ischemia and foot infection (WIfI) classification 4 with 58.8% and Rutherford grade 5 (74.3%). The factors related to overall mortality rate were: D-dimer >1,000 mg/dL (hazard ratio = 22.7, P < .001, confidence interval = 10.49-26.52), respiratory symptoms (hazard ratio = 16.6, P < .001, confidence interval = 9.87-20.90), chest computed tomography compromising higher than 50% of the pulmonary tract (hazard ratio = 16,0, P < .001, confidence interval = 10.41-20.55), acute kidney failure (hazard ratio = 21.58, P < .001, confidence interval = 16.5-30.5), chronic kidney disease (hazard ratio = 4.4, P = .036, confidence interval = 1.45-10.1), therapeutic anticoagulation (hazard ratio = 8.37, P = .004, confidence interval = 1.35-8.45), and WIfI classification (hazard ratio = 5.28, P = .022, confidence interval = 1.34-10.01). The following were related to limb loss: D-dimer >1,000 mg/mL (hazard ratio = 5.47, P = .02, confidence interval = 1.94-10.52), respiratory symptoms (hazard ratio = 5.42, P = .02, confidence interval = 1.87-10.90), and WIfI classification (hazard ratio = 4.44, P = .035, confidence interval = 1.34-8.01). CONCLUSION: This study concluded that COVID-19 has a catastrophic impact among patients with chronic limb-threatening ischemia. The main factors related to overall mortality were D-dimer >1,000 mg/dL, respiratory symptoms, chest computed tomography compromising higher than 50% of the pulmonary tract, acute kidney failure, chronic kidney disease, therapeutic anticoagulation, and WIfI classification. The factors related to limb loss were WIfI classification, D-dimer >1,000 mg/mL and respiratory symptoms.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Peripheral Arterial Disease , Wound Infection , Aged , Amputation , Anticoagulants , COVID-19/complications , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Ischemia/surgery , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Limb Salvage , Male , Peripheral Arterial Disease/surgery , Predictive Value of Tests , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome , Wound Healing , Wound Infection/diagnosis , Wound Infection/surgery
6.
Circ Res ; 130(9): 1286-1288, 2022 Apr 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1816966

Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Wound Healing
7.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(8)2022 04 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1809863

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although patients with venous leg ulcers are involved in ulcer management, little is known about why and how these patients self-treat their ulcers without direct supervision by health professionals. Yet patients' knowledge of ulcer management can be important for achieving ulcer closure and/or preventing recurrence. This study thus investigates the effects of an educational intervention on knowledge of self-care among patients with venous leg ulcers, mainly on wound dressing practice, compression therapy, physical activity and nutrition. METHODS AND PARTICIPANTS: This research was conducted in three outpatient hospitals in central Croatia. An educational brochure was made and distributed to patients; patients were surveyed about caring for venous leg ulcers before the brochure was distributed and after 3 months. RESULTS: In total, 208 patients were involved in the study: 112 in the experimental group and 96 in the control group. The educational intervention increased awareness of compression therapy, knowledge of recurrence prevention, appropriate lifestyle habits, and warning signs related to venous leg ulcers. CONCLUSIONS: Patient education on illness and self-care is necessary to achieve positive effects in self-care knowledge. In this study, patients learned how to change dressings, learned how to improve their lifestyle, and were empowered to deal with their illness.


Subject(s)
Self Care , Varicose Ulcer , Bandages , Humans , Ulcer , Varicose Ulcer/therapy , Wound Healing
8.
Molecules ; 27(6)2022 Mar 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1763048

ABSTRACT

The utilization of fermented foods with health-promoting properties is becoming more popular around the world. Consequently, kefir, a fermented milk beverage made from kefir grains, was shown in numerous studies to be a probiotic product providing significant health benefits. Herein, we assessed the antibacterial and antifungal potential of kefir against a variety of pathogenic bacteria and fungi. This study also showed the effectiveness of kefir in healing wounds in human gastric epithelial cells (GES-1) by (80.78%) compared with control (55.75%) within 48 h. The quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) results of kefir-treated HCV- or HBV- infected cells found that 200 µg/mL of kefir can eliminate 92.36% of HCV and 75.71% of HBV relative to the untreated infected cells, whereas 800 µg/mL (the highest concentration) completely eradicated HCV and HBV. Moreover, the estimated IC50 values of kefir, at which HCV and HBV were eradicated by 50%, were 63.84 ± 5.81 µg/mL and 224.02 ± 14.36 µg/mL, correspondingly. Kefir can significantly suppress the elevation of TNF-α and upregulate IL-10 and INF-γ in both treated HCV- and HBV-infected cells. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of kefir revealed the presence of numerous active metabolites which mainly contribute to the antimicrobial, antiviral, and immunomodulatory activities. This study demonstrated, for the first time, the anti-HBV efficacy of kefir while also illustrating the immunomodulatory impact in the treated HBV-infected cells. Accordingly, kefir represents a potent antiviral agent against both viral hepatitis C and B, as well as having antimicrobial and wound healing potential.


Subject(s)
Kefir , Probiotics , Anti-Bacterial Agents/analysis , Antifungal Agents/analysis , Humans , Kefir/analysis , Wound Healing
9.
J Dent Res ; 101(9): 1015-1024, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1752997

ABSTRACT

Oral tissue regeneration following chronic diseases and injuries is limited by the natural endogenous wound-healing process. Current regenerative approaches implement exogenous systems, including stem cells, scaffolds, growth factors, and plasmid DNA/viral vectors, that induce variable clinical outcomes. An innovative approach that is safe, effective, and inexpensive is needed. The lipid nanoparticle-encapsulated nucleoside-modified messenger RNA (mRNA) platform has proven to be a successful vaccine modality against coronavirus disease 2019, demonstrating safety and high efficacy in humans. The same fundamental technology platform could be applied to facilitate the development of mRNA-based regenerative therapy. While the platform has not yet been studied in the field of oral tissue regeneration, mRNA therapeutics encoding growth factors have been evaluated and demonstrated promising findings in various models of soft and hard tissue regeneration such as myocardial infarction, diabetic wound healing, and calvarial and femoral bone defects. Because restoration of both soft and hard tissues is crucial to oral tissue physiology, this new therapeutic modality may help to overcome challenges associated with the reconstruction of the unique and complex architecture of oral tissues. This review discusses mRNA therapeutics with an emphasis on findings and lessons in different regenerative animal models, and it speculates how we can apply mRNA-based platforms for oral tissue regeneration.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Tissue Engineering , Animals , Bone Regeneration/genetics , Humans , Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins , Liposomes , Nanoparticles , RNA, Messenger , Technology , Wound Healing/genetics
11.
Sci Adv ; 8(7): eabl6242, 2022 02 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1714333

ABSTRACT

Large segmental osseous defects heal poorly. Recombinant, human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) is used clinically to promote bone healing, but it is applied at very high doses that cause adverse side effects and raise costs while providing only incremental benefit. We describe a previously unexplored, alternative approach to bone regeneration using chemically modified messenger RNA (cmRNA). An optimized cmRNA encoding BMP-2 was delivered to critical-sized femoral osteotomies in rats. The cmRNA remained orthotopically localized and generated BMP locally for several days. Defects healed at doses ≥25 µg of BMP-2 cmRNA. By 4 weeks, all animals treated with 50 µg of BMP-2 cmRNA had bridged bone defects without forming the massive callus seen with rhBMP-2. Moreover, such defects recovered normal mechanical strength quicker and initiated bone remodeling faster. cmRNA regenerated bone via endochondral ossification, whereas rhBMP-2 drove intramembranous osteogenesis; cmRNA provides an innovative, safe, and highly translatable technology for bone healing.


Subject(s)
Bone Morphogenetic Protein 2 , Bone Regeneration , Animals , Bone Morphogenetic Protein 2/genetics , Bone Morphogenetic Protein 2/pharmacology , Femur , Osteogenesis , RNA, Messenger/genetics , Rats , Recombinant Proteins/pharmacology , Wound Healing
12.
Wound Repair Regen ; 30(2): 156-171, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1673326

ABSTRACT

The Wound Healing Foundation (WHF) recognised a need for an unbiased consensus on the best treatment of chronic wounds. A panel of 13 experts were invited to a virtual meeting which took place on 27 March 2021. The proceedings were organised in the sub-sections diagnosis, debridement, infection control, dressings, grafting, pain management, oxygen treatment, outcomes and future needs. Eighty percent or better concurrence among the panellists was considered a consensus. A large number of critical questions were discussed and agreed upon. Important takeaways included that wound care needs to be simplified to a point that it can be delivered by the patient or the patient's family. Another one was that telemonitoring, which has proved very useful during the COVID-19 pandemic, can help reduce the frequency of interventions by a visiting nurse or a wound care center. Defining patient expectations is critical to designing a successful treatment. Patient outcomes might include wound specific outcomes such as time to heal, wound size reduction, as well as improvement in quality of life. For those patients with expectations of healing, an aggressive approach to achieve that goal is recommended. When healing is not an expectation, such as in patients receiving palliative wound care, outcomes might include pain reduction, exudate management, odour management and/or other quality of life benefits to wound care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Wound Healing , COVID-19/therapy , Consensus , Humans , Pandemics , Quality of Life
13.
J Christ Nurs ; 39(1): 5, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1597894

Subject(s)
Wound Healing , Humans
14.
J Am Med Dir Assoc ; 23(4): 660-665.e5, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1565581

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of COVID-19-related disruptions on care continuity and outcomes of chronic wounds. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Electronic medical records for 152,225 chronic wounds from a network of 488 wound care clinics in 45 US states and the District of Columbia. METHODS: Wound and patient characteristics, the number of chronic wounds newly seen at the clinics, and 12-week healing rates were compared between the first 2 quarters of 2019 and 2020. Multivariable regression models were constructed to evaluate whether the pandemic was associated with a statistically significant change in the probability of 12-week wound healing after risk adjustment. RESULTS: During the pandemic, wound and patient characteristics did not change compared to the previous year. Case volume dropped as much as 40% in April 2020 but returned to the previous year's level by June. No systematic changes in measures of care continuity were observed. Unadjusted 12-week healing rates remained stable at 0.502 in 2019 and 0.503 in 2020. Likewise, risk-adjusted 12-week healing rates were 0.504 and 0.505 in 2019 and 2020, respectively, but the difference was not statistically significant. States with stricter lockdowns saw a greater decline in case volume. However, the pandemic was not associated with a statistically significant change in the probability of 12-week wound healing in most states. The percentage of wounds with 1 or more telehealth visits increased from 0.14% in 2019 to 1.04% in 2020. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: Despite COVID-19-related disruptions, our results suggest that wound care clinics maintained standards of care and outcomes for patients who sought care. This positive result should not detract from the problem that the number of new wounds seen at the clinics dropped sharply. Further research should evaluate outcomes in patients with unattended chronic wounds.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Outpatients , Retrospective Studies , Wound Healing
15.
Bioorg Chem ; 119: 105550, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1561636

ABSTRACT

Infectious diseases caused by new or unknown bacteria and viruses, such as anthrax, cholera, tuberculosis and even COVID-19, are a major threat to humanity. Thus, the development of new synthetic compounds with efficient antimicrobial activity is a necessity. Herein, rationally designed novel multifunctional cationic alternating copolymers were directly synthesized through a step-growth polymerization reaction using a bivalent electrophilic cross-linker containing disulfide bonds and a diamine heterocyclic ring. To optimize the activity of these alternating copolymers, several different diamines and cross-linkers were explored to find the highest antibacterial effects. The synthesized nanopolymers not only displayed good to excellent antibacterial activity as judged by minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) against Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Escherichia coli, but also reduced the number of biofilm cells even at low concentrations, without killing mammalian cells. Furthermore, in vivo experiments using infected burn wounds in mice demonstrated good antibacterial activity and stimulated wound healing, without causing systemic inflammation. These findings suggest that the multifunctional cationic nanopolymers have potential as a novel antibacterial agent for eradication of multidrug resistant bacterial infections.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology , Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/pharmacology , Biofilms/drug effects , Cations/pharmacology , Polymers/pharmacology , Wound Healing/drug effects , Amines/chemistry , Animals , Bacteria/drug effects , Bacterial Infections/drug therapy , Bacterial Infections/etiology , Burns/complications , COVID-19 , Cell Survival/drug effects , Cross-Linking Reagents , Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial/drug effects , HEK293 Cells/drug effects , Humans , Mice , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Polymers/chemistry
16.
J Wound Care ; 30(9): 751-762, 2021 Sep 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1542999

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Lower limb ulceration is a common cause of suffering in patients and its management poses a significant burden on the NHS, with venous leg ulcers (VLUs) being the most common hard-to-heal wound in the UK. It is estimated that over one million patients in the UK have lower limb ulceration, of which 560,000 were categorised as VLUs, with a cost burden of over £3 billion each year. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this service evaluation was to assess the effects of implementing a self-care delivery model on clinical outcomes with the intention of limiting face-to-face health professional contact to one appointment every 6 weeks. METHOD: A suitability assessment was conducted and a cohort of patients were moved to a self-care delivery model. Patient data were collected, anonymised and independently analysed, comparing time to healing against data on file from a previous report. RESULTS: This highlighted that, in 84 of the 95 patients selected, the VLUs had healed by week 24 on the pathway, a further 10 patients' VLUs had healed by week 42 and only one remaining patient reached 42 weeks without healing. CONCLUSION: These results support the hypothesis that patients with VLUs can self-care and deliver clinical effectiveness. It is recommended that all services explore the possibility of introducing a self-care model for VLU care.


Subject(s)
Leg Ulcer , Varicose Ulcer , Cost-Benefit Analysis , Humans , Leg Ulcer/therapy , Self Care , Varicose Ulcer/therapy , Wound Healing
17.
Inflamm Bowel Dis ; 27(Supplement_2): S25-S32, 2021 Nov 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1522203

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients with Crohn's disease (CD) undergo frequent endoscopic procedures, with visualization of the gastrointestinal mucosa central to treatment decision-making. Subsequently, a noninvasive alternative to optical colonoscopy (OC) would be welcomed. One such technology is capsule endoscopy, including the PillCam COLON 2 (PCC2), though research validating its use in ileocolonic CD is limited. This study aims to compare PCC2 with ileocolonoscopy (OC) in assessing mucosal CD through use of a standardized scoring system. METHODS: At an Australian tertiary hospital, same-day PCC2 and ileocolonoscopy results of 47 CD patients, with known nonstricturing disease, were prospectively collected and analyzed for correlation and agreement. Deidentified recordings were reported by a single expert gastroenterologist. Mucosal disease was quantified using the Simple Endoscopic Score for Crohn's Disease (SES-CD). The SES-CD results of paired endoscopic modalities were compared in total per bowel segment and per SES-CD variable. RESULTS: Of 47 PCC2 recordings, 68% were complete, fully assessing terminal ileum to rectum, and OC was complete in 89%. Correlation (r) between total SES-CD scores was strongest in the terminal ileum (r = 0.77, P < .001), with the SES-CD variable of "ulcer detection" showing the strongest agreement. The PCC2 (vs OC) identified additional ulcers in the terminal ileum; ascending, transverse, and descending colon; and rectum; scores were 5 (1), 5 (3), 1 (1), 2 (1), and 2 (2), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The PCC2 shows promise in assessing ileocolonic mucosa, especially in proximal bowel segments, with greater reach of visualization in the small bowel. Given the resource and safety considerations raised by the Coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, capsule endoscopy has particular significance.This article aims to contribute to the limited body of research surrounding the validity of capsule endoscopy technology in assessing ileocolonic mucosa in Crohn's Disease patients. In doing so, an alternative option for patients enduring frequent endoscopies is given potential.


Subject(s)
Capsule Endoscopy/methods , Colon/diagnostic imaging , Colonoscopy/methods , Crohn Disease/diagnostic imaging , Intestinal Mucosa/diagnostic imaging , Ulcer/diagnostic imaging , Wound Healing , Australia , COVID-19 , Capsule Endoscopes , Colon/drug effects , Humans , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , Intestinal Mucosa/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Treatment Outcome , Ulcer/drug therapy , Wound Healing/drug effects , Wound Healing/physiology
18.
Br J Community Nurs ; 26(Sup6): S5, 2021 Jun 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1527032
20.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 21723, 2021 11 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1503978

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus with intact infectivity attached to PPE surfaces pose significant threat to the spread of COVID-19. We tested the hypothesis that an electroceutical fabric, generating weak potential difference of 0.5 V, disrupts the infectivity of coronavirus upon contact by destabilizing the electrokinetic properties of the virion. Porcine respiratory coronavirus AR310 particles (105) were placed in direct contact with the fabric for 1 or 5 min. Following one minute of contact, zeta potential of the porcine coronavirus was significantly lowered indicating destabilization of its electrokinetic properties. Size-distribution plot showed appearance of aggregation of the virus. Testing of the cytopathic effects of the virus showed eradication of infectivity as quantitatively assessed by PI-calcein and MTT cell viability tests. This work provides the rationale to consider the studied electroceutical fabric, or other materials with comparable property, as material of choice for the development of PPE in the fight against COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Electrochemistry/methods , Textiles , Animals , Anti-Infective Agents , Body Fluids , Cell Line , Cell Survival , Fluoresceins , Humans , Hydrogen Peroxide , Kinetics , Nanoparticles , Propidium , SARS-CoV-2 , Swine , Temperature , Tetrazolium Salts , Thiazoles , Virion , Wound Healing
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