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1.
Inflamm Bowel Dis ; 27(Supplement_2): S25-S32, 2021 Nov 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1522203

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients with Crohn's disease (CD) undergo frequent endoscopic procedures, with visualization of the gastrointestinal mucosa central to treatment decision-making. Subsequently, a noninvasive alternative to optical colonoscopy (OC) would be welcomed. One such technology is capsule endoscopy, including the PillCam COLON 2 (PCC2), though research validating its use in ileocolonic CD is limited. This study aims to compare PCC2 with ileocolonoscopy (OC) in assessing mucosal CD through use of a standardized scoring system. METHODS: At an Australian tertiary hospital, same-day PCC2 and ileocolonoscopy results of 47 CD patients, with known nonstricturing disease, were prospectively collected and analyzed for correlation and agreement. Deidentified recordings were reported by a single expert gastroenterologist. Mucosal disease was quantified using the Simple Endoscopic Score for Crohn's Disease (SES-CD). The SES-CD results of paired endoscopic modalities were compared in total per bowel segment and per SES-CD variable. RESULTS: Of 47 PCC2 recordings, 68% were complete, fully assessing terminal ileum to rectum, and OC was complete in 89%. Correlation (r) between total SES-CD scores was strongest in the terminal ileum (r = 0.77, P < .001), with the SES-CD variable of "ulcer detection" showing the strongest agreement. The PCC2 (vs OC) identified additional ulcers in the terminal ileum; ascending, transverse, and descending colon; and rectum; scores were 5 (1), 5 (3), 1 (1), 2 (1), and 2 (2), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The PCC2 shows promise in assessing ileocolonic mucosa, especially in proximal bowel segments, with greater reach of visualization in the small bowel. Given the resource and safety considerations raised by the Coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, capsule endoscopy has particular significance.This article aims to contribute to the limited body of research surrounding the validity of capsule endoscopy technology in assessing ileocolonic mucosa in Crohn's Disease patients. In doing so, an alternative option for patients enduring frequent endoscopies is given potential.


Subject(s)
Capsule Endoscopy/methods , Colon/diagnostic imaging , Colonoscopy/methods , Crohn Disease/diagnostic imaging , Intestinal Mucosa/diagnostic imaging , Ulcer/diagnostic imaging , Wound Healing , Australia , COVID-19 , Capsule Endoscopes , Colon/drug effects , Humans , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , Intestinal Mucosa/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Treatment Outcome , Ulcer/drug therapy , Wound Healing/drug effects , Wound Healing/physiology
2.
Adv Skin Wound Care ; 34(10): 517-524, 2021 Oct 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1429312

ABSTRACT

GENERAL PURPOSE: To present a scoping review of preclinical and clinical trial evidence supporting the efficacy and/or safety of major alternative wound care agents to summarize their effects on validated elements of wound bed preparation and wound management paradigms. TARGET AUDIENCE: This continuing education activity is intended for physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, and nurses with an interest in skin and wound care. LEARNING OBJECTIVES/OUTCOMES: After participating in this educational activity, the participant will:1. Differentiate the effectiveness of the topical wound care agents included in this review.2. Compare the preventive efficacy of intravenous agents administered to trauma and surgical patients.3. Select the effectiveness of products in this review that are left in place after surgical procedures.4. Identify an oral agent that can be helpful in mitigating the effects of COVID-19.


Effective wound healing is achieved by well-timed host, cell, and environment interactions involving hemostasis, inflammation, formation of repaired dermal structures, and epithelialization, followed by months to years of scar remodeling. Globally, various natural or synthetic agents or dressings are used to optimize wound environments, prolong drug release, aid in fluid absorption, provide favorable healing environments, and act as a mechanical barrier against wound trauma. In this scoping review of evidence from the PubMed and clinicaltrials.gov databases, authors examined clinical study evidence supporting the efficacy and safety of selected phytochemicals, vehicles, polymers, and animal products considered "naturally derived" or "alternative" wound interventions to provide a summary of preclinical evidence. Agents with the most clinical evidence were honey, alginates, polyurethane, gelatin, and dextran. Practice implications are described in the context of the TIMERS clinical paradigm.


Subject(s)
Dermatologic Agents/therapeutic use , Skin Care/methods , Wound Healing/physiology , Wounds and Injuries/therapy , Anti-Infective Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/epidemiology , Disease Management , Humans
3.
Biomed Res Int ; 2021: 5554500, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1263956

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We aimed to evaluate the advantages of preoperative digital design of skin flaps to repair fingertip defects during the COVID-19 pandemic. We combined digital design with a 3D-printed model of the affected finger for preoperative communication with fingertip defect patients under observation in a buffer ward. METHODS: From December 2019 to January 2021, we obtained data from 25 cases of 30 fingertip defects in 15 males and 10 females, aged 20-65 years old (mean 35 ± 5 years). All cases were treated by digitally designing preoperative fingertip defect flaps combined with a 3D-printed model. Preoperative 3D Systems Sense scanning was routinely performed, 3-matic 12.0 was used to measure the fingertip defect area ranging from 1.5 cm × 3.5 cm to 2.0 cm × 5.0 cm, and the skin flap was designed. The flap area was 1.6 cm × 3.6 cm to 2.1 cm × 5.1 cm. CURA 15.02.1 was used to set parameters, and the 3D model of the affected finger was printed prior to the operation. Full-thickness skin grafts were taken from donor areas for repair. RESULTS: No vascular crises occurred in any of the 25 cases, and all flaps survived. The postoperative follow-up occurred over 3-12 months. All patients were evaluated 3 months after operation according to the trial standard of hand function evaluation of the Chinese Hand Surgery Society. The results showed that 20 cases had excellent outcomes (80%), four cases had good outcomes (16%), and one case had a fair outcome (4%). The excellent and good rate was 96%. CONCLUSIONS: During the COVID-19 epidemic, fingertip defects were treated with preoperative digital design of fingertip defect flaps combined with 3D printing. Precision design saves surgery time and improves the success rate of surgery and the survival rates of skin flaps. In addition, 3D model simulations improve preoperative communication efficiency, and the personalized design improves patient satisfaction.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Finger Injuries/surgery , Fingers/surgery , Pandemics , Preoperative Care/methods , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/methods , Skin Transplantation/methods , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/psychology , China/epidemiology , Female , Graft Survival , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Models, Anatomic , Printing, Three-Dimensional/instrumentation , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/psychology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Skin Transplantation/psychology , Surgical Flaps/blood supply , Surgical Flaps/innervation , Treatment Outcome , Wound Healing/physiology
4.
J Wound Care ; 30(Sup4): S42-S52, 2021 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1187162

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Management of chronic wounds remains one of the major challenges for health professionals and patients. An evidence-based decision is important to ensure that patients are receiving the best treatment proven to reduce healing time and improve outcomes, including economic benefits and patients' health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Due to recent restrictions because of the COVID-19 pandemic, including closure of wound care centres within hospitals and a drop in patient volume, chronic wound management needs simple-to-use dressings which are still effective and evidence-based solutions. This systematic review was conducted to identify the clinical evidence available on a sucrose octasulfate dressing (TLC-NOSF, UrgoStart dressing range, Laboratoires Urgo, France) to explore its efficacy in the management of chronic wounds, particularly lower limb ulcers, diabetic foot ulcers and pressure ulcers. METHOD: A literature search of PubMed, Cochrane Library and Google Scholar was conducted based on the PICO model (patient/population, intervention, comparison and outcomes) to retrieve publications of different levels of evidence in order to evaluate outcomes of the use of TLC-NOSF dressings. RESULTS: A total of 21 publications of different levels, ranging from double-blind randomised control trials to case reports, involving over 12,000 patients, were identified through PubMed, with a further eight publications through Google Scholar and two publications through Cochrane Library. A total of seven results were omitted due to the lack of relevance or repetition. CONCLUSION: All the evidence provided suggest that these dressings provide clinicians with an evidence-based option for the management of chronic wounds; that the TLC-NOSF dressings are beneficial in promoting the healing process, reducing healing times, enhancing patients' HRQoL, and in allowing a more cost-effective procedure.


Subject(s)
Bandages, Hydrocolloid , Chronic Disease/therapy , Diabetic Foot/therapy , Pressure Ulcer/therapy , Sucrose/analogs & derivatives , Sucrose/therapeutic use , Wound Healing/physiology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Double-Blind Method , Female , France , Humans , Male , Middle Aged
5.
Respir Res ; 22(1): 38, 2021 Feb 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1067230

ABSTRACT

Pulmonary fibrosis has been identified as a main factor leading to pulmonary dysfunction and poor quality of life in post-recovery Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) survivor's consequent to SARS-Cov-2 infection. Thus there is an urgent medical need for identification of readily available biomarkers that in patients with SARS-Cov-2 infection are able to; (1) identify patients in most need of medical care prior to admittance to an intensive care unit (ICU), and; (2) identify patients post-infection at risk of developing persistent fibrosis of lungs with subsequent impaired quality of life and increased morbidity and mortality. An intense amount of research have focused on wound healing and Extracellular Matrix (ECM) remodelling of the lungs related to lung function decline in pulmonary fibrosis (PF). A range of non-invasive serological biomarkers, reflecting tissue remodelling, and fibrosis have been shown to predict risk of acute exacerbations, lung function decline and mortality in PF and other interstitial lung diseases (Sand et al. in Respir Res 19:82, 2018). We suggest that lessons learned from such PF studies of the pathological processes leading to lung function decline could be used to better identify patients infected with SARS-Co-V2 at most risk of acute deterioration or persistent fibrotic damage of the lung and could consequently be used to guide treatment decisions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Extracellular Matrix/metabolism , Pulmonary Fibrosis/metabolism , Wound Healing/physiology , Animals , Biomarkers/metabolism , COVID-19/diagnosis , Humans , Lung/metabolism , Pulmonary Fibrosis/diagnosis
6.
Drug Deliv Transl Res ; 11(4): 1340-1351, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1047033

ABSTRACT

Infectious diseases, such as the coronavirus disease-19, SARS virus, Ebola virus, and AIDS, threaten the health of human beings globally. New viruses, drug-resistant bacteria, and fungi continue to challenge the human efficacious drug bank. Researchers have developed a variety of new antiviral and antibacterial drugs in response to the infectious disease crisis. Meanwhile, the development of functional materials has also improved therapeutic outcomes. As a natural material, chitosan possesses good biocompatibility, bioactivity, and biosafety. It has been proven that the cooperation between chitosan and traditional medicine greatly improves the ability of anti-infection. This review summarized the application and design considerations of chitosan-composed systems for the treatment of infectious diseases, looking forward to providing the idea of infectious disease therapy.


Subject(s)
Anti-Infective Agents/administration & dosage , Biocompatible Materials/administration & dosage , COVID-19/drug therapy , Chitosan/administration & dosage , Communicable Diseases/drug therapy , Animals , Anti-Bacterial Agents/administration & dosage , Anti-Bacterial Agents/immunology , Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacokinetics , Anti-Infective Agents/immunology , Anti-Infective Agents/pharmacokinetics , Bandages/microbiology , Biocompatible Materials/pharmacokinetics , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/metabolism , Chitosan/immunology , Chitosan/pharmacokinetics , Communicable Diseases/immunology , Communicable Diseases/metabolism , Humans , Wound Healing/drug effects , Wound Healing/physiology
7.
Int J Mol Sci ; 21(22)2020 Nov 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-917002

ABSTRACT

Pro-inflammatory cytokines like interleukin-1ß (IL-1ß) are upregulated during early responses to tissue damage and are expected to transiently compromise the mechanical microenvironment. Fibroblasts are key regulators of tissue mechanics in the lungs and other organs. However, the effects of IL-1ß on fibroblast mechanics and functions remain unclear. Here we treated human pulmonary fibroblasts from control donors with IL-1ß and used Atomic Force Microscopy to unveil that IL-1ß significantly reduces the stiffness of fibroblasts concomitantly with a downregulation of filamentous actin (F-actin) and alpha-smooth muscle (α-SMA). Likewise, COL1A1 mRNA was reduced, whereas that of collagenases MMP1 and MMP2 were upregulated, favoring a reduction of type-I collagen. These mechanobiology changes were functionally associated with reduced proliferation and enhanced migration upon IL-1ß stimulation, which could facilitate lung repair by drawing fibroblasts to sites of tissue damage. Our observations reveal that IL-1ß may reduce local tissue rigidity by acting both intracellularly and extracellularly through the downregulation of fibroblast contractility and type I collagen deposition, respectively. These IL-1ß-dependent mechanical effects may enhance lung repair further by locally increasing pulmonary tissue compliance to preserve normal lung distension and function. Moreover, our results support that IL-1ß provides innate anti-fibrotic protection that may be relevant during the early stages of lung repair.


Subject(s)
Interleukin-1beta/physiology , Lung/physiology , Actins/metabolism , Adolescent , Adult , Biomechanical Phenomena , Cell Movement/drug effects , Cell Movement/physiology , Cell Proliferation/drug effects , Cell Proliferation/physiology , Cells, Cultured , Collagen Type I/genetics , Collagen Type I/metabolism , Collagen Type III/genetics , Collagen Type III/metabolism , Cyclooxygenase 2/metabolism , Elasticity/drug effects , Elasticity/physiology , Female , Fibroblasts/cytology , Fibroblasts/drug effects , Fibroblasts/physiology , Humans , Interleukin-1beta/pharmacology , Lung/cytology , Lung/drug effects , Male , Microscopy, Atomic Force , RNA, Messenger/genetics , RNA, Messenger/metabolism , Regeneration/genetics , Regeneration/physiology , Wound Healing/drug effects , Wound Healing/genetics , Wound Healing/physiology , Young Adult
8.
J Int Med Res ; 48(7): 300060520939746, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-690568

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 infection is a serious global concern. Increased morbidity and mortality is associated with older age, male gender, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and smoking. As COVID-19 spreads from coastal borders, both state to state and country to country, our understanding of its pathophysiology has evolved. Age and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) play especially important roles in COVID-19 progression. T2DM is an age-related disease associated with metabolic syndrome, obesity, insulin resistance (hyperinsulinemia), hyperlipidemia, hypertension, hyperglycemia, and endothelial activation and dysfunction. This review evaluates the relationships and intersection between endothelial cell activation and dysfunction in T2DM and COVID-19. COVID-19 induces multiple injuries of the terminal bronchioles and alveolar blood-gas barrier and associated ultrastructural tissue remodeling. COVID-19 may unmask multiple vulnerabilities associated with T2DM including damage to the endothelial glycocalyx and multiple end-organ macro and microvascular diseases. Unmasking existing vulnerabilities in diabetic patients with COVID-19 is important. Globally, we must come together to better understand why T2DM is associated with increased COVID-19 morbidity and mortality.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/physiopathology , Endothelial Cells/physiology , Metabolic Syndrome/complications , Metabolic Syndrome/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Animals , Blood-Air Barrier/pathology , Blood-Air Barrier/physiopathology , Bronchioles/pathology , Bronchioles/physiopathology , COVID-19 , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Drug Repositioning , Endothelial Cells/pathology , Humans , Metabolic Syndrome/epidemiology , Models, Biological , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pulmonary Alveoli/physiology , Pulmonary Alveoli/physiopathology , Rats , SARS-CoV-2 , Wound Healing/physiology
9.
Adv Skin Wound Care ; 33(8): 410-417, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-671109

ABSTRACT

Telemedicine use in the field of wound care had been increasing in popularity when the novel coronavirus 2019 paralyzed the globe in early 2020. To combat the constraints of healthcare delivery during this time, the use of telemedicine has been further expanded. Although many limitations of telemedicine are still being untangled, the benefits of virtual care are being realized in both inpatient and outpatient settings. In this article, the advantages and disadvantages of telemedicine are discussed through two case examples that highlight the promise of implementation during and beyond the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pressure Ulcer/therapy , Surgical Wound Dehiscence/surgery , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Wound Healing/physiology , Adult , Aged , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Female , Humans , Male , Outpatients/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pressure Ulcer/diagnosis , Quality Improvement , Risk Assessment , Surgical Wound Dehiscence/diagnosis , Treatment Outcome
10.
J Wound Care ; 29(6): 312-320, 2020 Jun 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-595654

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Pressure ulcers (PUs) involve the destruction of skin and underlying tissue due to prolonged pressure and shear forces. These ulcers are painful and significantly reduce a person's quality of life. PUs are also expensive to manage and impact negatively on the achievement of cost-effective, efficient care delivery. METHOD: Prone positioning is a postural therapy that aims to enhance respiratory function through increasing oxygenation levels. In contemporary clinical practice, ventilation in the prone position is indicated for patients with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. However, despite its advantages in terms of respiratory function, several studies have examined complications of prone position ventilation and have identified PUs (facial PUs as well as PUs on other weight-bearing areas of the body) as a frequent complication in patients who are already in a precarious medical situation. International data suggest that up to 57% of patients nursed in the prone position develop a PU. The aim of this clinical review is to identify and review evidence-based recommendations developed to facilitate the selection and application of preventive interventions aimed at reducing PU development in patients ventilated in the prone position. Given the current COVID-19 crisis, this review is timely as intensive care unit (ICU) patients with COVID-19 require ventilation in the prone position at a level that is disproportionate to the general intensive care population. Up to 28% of patients admitted to the ICU with confirmed infection due to severe COVID-19 are cared for in the prone position. The scope of this review is limited to adult individuals only. RESULTS: The skin assessment should be undertaken before proning and following positioning the patient back into the supine position. Although it is essential to keep the skin clean and moisturised, using pH-balanced cleansers, there is inconsistency in terms of the evidence to support the type of moisturiser. Use of positioning devices in addition to repositioning is recommended to offload pressure points on the face and body. Further, using dressings such as hydrocolloids, transparent film and silicone may be of benefit in decreasing facial skin breakdown. CONCLUSION: Given the importance of PU prevention in this cohort of patients, adopting a focused prevention strategy, including skin assessment and care, offloading and pressure redistribution, and dressings for prevention may contribute to a reduction in the incidence and prevalence of these largely preventable wounds.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Pressure Ulcer/prevention & control , Prone Position , Wound Healing/physiology , Adult , Aged , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Critical Care/methods , Emergencies , Evidence-Based Medicine , Female , Hospital Costs , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Patient Positioning , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pressure Ulcer/economics , Pressure Ulcer/therapy
11.
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