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1.
J Orthop Surg Res ; 16(1): 736, 2021 Dec 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1639192

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Prior studies have assessed provider knowledge and factors associated with opioid misuse; similar studies evaluating patient knowledge are lacking. The purpose of this study was to assess the degree of understanding regarding opioid use in orthopaedic trauma patients. We also sought to determine the demographic factors and clinical and personal experiences associated with level of understanding. METHODS: One hundred and sixty-six adult orthopaedic trauma surgery patients across two clinical sites of an academic institution participated in an internet-based survey (2352 invited, 7.1% response rate). Demographic, clinical, and personal experience variables, as well as perceptions surrounding opioid use were collected. Relationships between patient characteristics and opioid perceptions were identified using univariate and multivariable logistic regressions. Alpha = 0.05. RESULTS: Excellent recognition (> 85% correct) of common opioids, side effects, withdrawal symptoms, and disposal methods was demonstrated by 29%, 10%, 30%, and 2.4% of patients; poor recognition (< 55%) by 11%, 56%, 33%, and 52% of patients, respectively. Compared with white patients, non-white patients had 7.8 times greater odds (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.9-31) of perceiving addiction discrepancy (p = 0.004). Employed patients with higher education levels were less likely to have excellent understanding of side effects (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 0.06, 95% CI 0.006-0.56; p = 0.01) and to understand that dependence can occur within 2 weeks (aOR 0.28, 95% CI 0.09-0.86; p = 0.03) than unemployed patients. Patients in the second least disadvantaged ADI quartile were more knowledgeable about side effects (aOR 8.8, 95% CI 1.7-46) and withdrawal symptoms (aOR 2.7, 95% CI 1.0-7.2; p = 0.046) than those in the least disadvantaged quartile. Patients who knew someone who was dependent or overdosed on opioids were less likely to perceive addiction discrepancy (aOR 0.24, 95% CI 0.07-0.76; p = 0.02) as well as more likely to have excellent knowledge of withdrawal symptoms (aOR 2.6, 95% CI 1.1-6.5, p = 0.03) and to understand that dependence can develop within 2 weeks (aOR 3.8, 95% CI 1.5-9.8, p = 0.005). CONCLUSIONS: Level of understanding regarding opioid use is low among orthopaedic trauma surgery patients. Clinical and personal experiences with opioids, in addition to demographics, should be emphasized in the clinical history.


Subject(s)
Analgesics, Opioid/therapeutic use , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Orthopedic Procedures/adverse effects , Pain, Postoperative/drug therapy , Wounds and Injuries/surgery , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Analgesics, Opioid/adverse effects , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Opioid-Related Disorders , Young Adult
2.
Chirurgia (Bucur) ; 116(6): 643-644, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1598469

ABSTRACT

According to the UEMS (Union Europeene des Medicins Specialises) Section of surgery Board of Surgery, "Emergency Surgery" can be defined "as surgery that is required to deal with an acute threat to life, organ, limb or tissue caused by external trauma, acute disease process, acute exacerbation of a chronic disease process, or complication of a surgical or other interventional procedure". Performance of emergency surgery require complex and varied skills and abilities to achieve procedures from different fields of surgery: abdominal, urologic, thoracic, vascular, soft tissue, skeletal) within an interval of 24 hours (1). In U.S., since 2008, Acute Care Surgery concept was introduced, and nowadays is an evolving specialty with three essential components- trauma, critical care and emergency surgery (2). In UK there is an increasing subspecialisation within general surgery over the last ten years. More recently, there has been an increase in focus on emergency general surgery (3,4). This may not come as a surprise given the fact that trafic crashes kill 1.2 million people annually around the world (3242 people/day) and 90% are in middle and low income countries. In US trauma is the leading cause of death in persons up to 40 years. Optimal care for emergency surgical patients is one of the major challenges for every healthcare system worldwide. An emergency surgery mai intervene during the daily schedule of elective interventions and create pressure on both the organisation and costs (5). Since it's birth, in 2007, the Romanian Society for Emergency Surgery and Trauma was involved in supporting the development of practice in emergency surgery in Romania by many actions: each year, during biannual National Congres and National Conference of the Romanian Society of Surgery 2 sessions were dedicated to emergency surgery, with invited foreign speakers; oragnisation of European Congres of Emergency and Trauma Surgery in 2017 in Bucharest, 1 tematic issue of Chirurgia Journal dedicated to surgery of the cirrhotic patients. This tematic isssue includes varia subjects from emergency surgery in valuable articles. The management of open abdomen management are depicted by Anastasiu et al, in a review summarizing definition, classification, indications, methods of temporary abdominal closure and fascial closure, and enterocutanous fistula. Turculet et al, perfomed a review of the litterature to describe the main advantages and disadvantages of the trauma systems in Europe and to present the last concepts regarding the management of the polytrauma patients and the newest sets of measures to prevent car crashes in European Union. A rare case of small bowel hemangioma with hemoperitoneum mimicking trauma is described by Iordache et al, with a review of the litterature. The series of reviews ends with an interesting article for daily practice in emergency hospitals about the diagnostic and therapeutic peculiarities in abdominal trauma associated with spinal cord injurie by Grigorean et al. Abdominal trauma is addressed in 7 original papers. The definitive surgery for liver trauma in tertiary HPB center, the nonoperative treatment of abdominal trauma involving liver and spleen, the timing of splenic interventional radiology, the management of colon trauma at a level II trauma, challenges raised by the retroperitoneal hematoma in abdominal trauma, predicition of evolution of patients with abdominal trauma using the usual biological parameters, and clinico-pathological correlations in the acute surgical abdomen in the pre and post COVID-19 pandemic period are presented, analysed and discussed in papers coming from specialized surgical units from Fundeni Clinical Institute, Emergency Clinical Hospital Bucharest, Emergency University Hospital of Bucharest, "Bagdasar-Arseni" Clinical Emergency Hospital, "St. Pantelimon" Clinical Emergency Hospital, Clinical County Emergency Hospitals of Craiova and Tg-Mures. The surgical technique of intraomental splenic implant and an attempt of reassessement is presented in a paper by Beuran et al. We hope that this tematic issue will be an interesting and very useful lecture for our readers and bring useful informations for those involved in emergency surgery.


Subject(s)
Emergency Medical Services , Wounds and Injuries , COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics , Wounds and Injuries/surgery
3.
Pediatr Surg Int ; 37(10): 1409-1414, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1310561

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The disruptive effects on society and medical systems due to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic are substantial and far-reaching. The effect of the pandemic on the quantity and quality of pediatric traumas is unclear and has a direct bearing on how scarce hospital resources should be allocated in a pandemic situation. METHODS: A retrospective review of the trauma registry was performed for trauma activations in the years 2018 through 2020 during the months of March, April, and May. Demographic and injury specific datapoints were compared across calendar years. RESULTS: There were 111, 100, and 52 trauma activations during the study interval in 2018, 2019, and 2020, respectively. There were fewer highest severity level activations in 2020 compared to 2018 and 2019 (1 vs 5 and 9; p < 0.01). The median Injury Severity Score was 5 in 2020 compared to 4 in both 2018 and 2019 (p < 0.01). More patients went directly to the operating room in 2020 compared to prior years (21.2% vs 8% and 6.1%; p < 0.01). There were fewer discharges from the emergency department (ED) (12.1% vs 36.6% and 32.7%). No increase in the number of child abuse reports and investigations was noted. There was no difference in the proportion of blunt versus penetrating trauma between years (p = 0.57). No pedestrians were struck by automobiles in 2020 compared to 12 and 14 in 2018 and 2019. However, there were a greater proportion of injuries from falls during 2020 compared to prior years. CONCLUSIONS: There were fewer trauma activations during the peak of the COVID pandemic compared to prior years. Due to the decrease in trauma volume during the peak of the pandemic, hospital resources could potentially be reallocated toward areas of greater need. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: IV; Retrospective cohort study using historical controls.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Care Team/organization & administration , Pediatrics , Trauma Centers/organization & administration , Wounds and Injuries/classification , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Humans , New York/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Trauma Centers/statistics & numerical data , Wounds and Injuries/surgery
5.
Jt Dis Relat Surg ; 32(2): 333-339, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1279004

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of the novel coronavirus-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on the operational trends in the orthopedic surgery department of a tertiary referral center. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A total of 305 orthopedic surgical procedures in 245 patients (136 males, 109 females; mean age: 34±26.6 years; range, 0 to 91 years) between March 16th and June 27th, 2020 were retrospectively analyzed. The same period of the year before including 860 procedures in 783 patients (364 males, 419 females; mean age: 33.6±25.8 years; range, 0 to 95 years) was also reviewed as a pre-pandemic control group. Patient demographics, surgical indications, COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test status, method of anesthesia, surgical subspecialties (trauma, sports, etc.), trauma mechanisms, and surgical priorities were evaluated. The pandemic and the pre-pandemic periods were compared. RESULTS: The rate of elective surgeries decreased compared to the previous year, and priority C type surgeries had the highest frequency (42.5%). Orthopedic trauma was the leading subspecialty with 91 (29.8%) cases and had a higher share, compared to the pre-pandemic period (17.0%). Hip fractures (18.7%) were the most common cause of trauma surgery, and simple falls (42.3%) composed the largest group of trauma mechanisms, which was similar to the pre-pandemic period (hip fractures, 13.6%; simple falls, 42.5%). The distribution of surgical urgency levels and subspecialties differed significantly between the pre-pandemic and pandemic periods (p<0.001). Post-hoc analysis of subspecialty distribution revealed a significant decrease in arthroplasty (p=0.002) and hand surgery (p<0.001), and a significant increase in trauma (p<0.001) and the "other" category (p<0.001). CONCLUSION: Our experience in a tertiary referral center illustrated a shift toward performing emergent and urgent surgeries, when the severity of the outbreak increased. Prioritizing surgical urgencies during the outbreak changed the orthopedic surgery practice with an emphasis on trauma and oncology surgeries. Hip fractures were the most common cause of trauma surgery, and simple falls composed the largest group of trauma mechanisms.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia/methods , COVID-19 , Elective Surgical Procedures , Hip Fractures , Musculoskeletal Diseases , Orthopedic Procedures , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Elective Surgical Procedures/methods , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Female , Hip Fractures/epidemiology , Hip Fractures/surgery , Humans , Male , Musculoskeletal Diseases/epidemiology , Musculoskeletal Diseases/etiology , Musculoskeletal Diseases/surgery , Orthopedic Procedures/methods , Orthopedic Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Tertiary Care Centers/statistics & numerical data , Turkey/epidemiology , Wounds and Injuries/epidemiology , Wounds and Injuries/surgery
7.
BJS Open ; 5(3)2021 05 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1238182

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has had a major impact on healthcare in many countries. This study assessed the effect of a nationwide lockdown in France on admissions for acute surgical conditions and the subsequent impact on postoperative mortality. METHODS: This was an observational analytical study, evaluating data from a national discharge database that collected all discharge reports from any hospital in France. All adult patients admitted through the emergency department and requiring a surgical treatment between 17 March and 11 May 2020, and the equivalent period in 2019 were included. The primary outcome was the change in number of hospital admissions for acute surgical conditions. Mortality was assessed in the matched population, and stratified by region. RESULTS: During the lockdown period, 57 589 consecutive patients were admitted for acute surgical conditions, representing a decrease of 20.9 per cent compared with the 2019 cohort. Significant differences between regions were observed: the decrease was 15.6, 17.2, and 26.8 per cent for low-, intermediate- and high-prevalence regions respectively. The mortality rate was 1.92 per cent during the lockdown period and 1.81 per cent in 2019. In high-prevalence zones, mortality was significantly increased (odds ratio 1.22, 95 per cent c.i. 1.06 to 1.40). CONCLUSION: A marked decrease in hospital admissions for surgical emergencies was observed during the lockdown period, with increased mortality in regions with a higher prevalence of COVID-19 infection. Health authorities should use these findings to preserve quality of care and deliver appropriate messages to the population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Patient Admission/statistics & numerical data , Surgical Procedures, Operative/statistics & numerical data , Acute Disease , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Digestive System Diseases/surgery , Emergencies , Female , France/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Admission/trends , SARS-CoV-2 , Surgical Procedures, Operative/mortality , Urinary Calculi/surgery , Wounds and Injuries/surgery
8.
Ann R Coll Surg Engl ; 103(6): 390-394, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1223791

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic is the most serious health crisis of our time. Global public measures have been enacted to try to prevent healthcare systems from being overwhelmed. The trauma and orthopaedic (T&O) community has overcome challenges in order to continue to deliver acute trauma care to patients and plan for challenges ahead. This review explores the lessons learnt, the priorities and the controversies that the T&O community has faced during the crisis. Historically, the experience of major incidents in T&O has focused on mass casualty events. The current pandemic requires a different approach to resource management in order to create a long-term, system-sustaining model of care alongside a move towards resource balancing and facilitation. Significant limitations in theatre access, anaesthetists and bed capacity have necessitated adaptation. Strategic changes to trauma networks and risk mitigation allowed for ongoing surgical treatment of trauma. Outpatient care was reformed with the uptake of technology. The return to elective surgery requires careful planning, restructuring of elective pathways and risk management. Despite the hope that mass vaccination will lift the pressure on bed capacity and on bleak economic forecasts, the orthopaedic community must readjust its focus to meet the challenge of huge backlogs in elective caseloads before looking to the future with a robust strategy of integrated resilient pathways. The pandemic will provide the impetus for research that defines essential interventions and facilitates the implementation of strategies to overcome current barriers and to prepare for future crises.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Priorities , Orthopedic Procedures , Wounds and Injuries/surgery , Ambulatory Surgical Procedures , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Delivery of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Health Priorities/organization & administration , Health Priorities/standards , Humans , Orthopedic Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Traumatology/organization & administration , Traumatology/standards
9.
Eur J Trauma Emerg Surg ; 47(3): 665-675, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1195138

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: In Dec 2019, COVID-19 was first recognized and led to a worldwide pandemic. The German government implemented a shutdown in Mar 2020, affecting outpatient and hospital care. The aim of the present article was to evaluate the impact of the COVID-19 shutdown on patient volumes and surgical procedures of a Level I trauma center in Germany. METHODS: All emergency patients were recorded retrospectively during the shutdown and compared to a calendar-matched control period (CTRL). Total emergency patient contacts including trauma mechanisms, injury patterns and operation numbers were recorded including absolute numbers, incidence proportions and risk ratios. RESULTS: During the shutdown period, we observed a decrease of emergency patient cases (417) compared to CTRL (575), a decrease of elective cases (42 vs. 13) and of the total number of operations (397 vs. 325). Incidence proportions of emergency operations increased from 8.2 to 12.2% (shutdown) and elective surgical cases decreased (11.1 vs. 4.3%). As we observed a decrease for most trauma mechanisms and injury patterns, we found an increasing incidence proportion for severe open fractures. Household-related injuries were reported with an increasing incidence proportion from 26.8 to 47.5% (shutdown). We found an increasing tendency of trauma and injuries related to psychological disorders. CONCLUSION: This analysis shows a decrease of total patient numbers in an emergency department of a Level I trauma center and a decrease of the total number of operations during the shutdown period. Concurrently, we observed an increase of severe open fractures and emergency operations. Furthermore, trauma mechanism changed with less traffic, work and sports-related accidents.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Infection Control/methods , Surgical Procedures, Operative , Trauma Centers , Wounds and Injuries , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Emergencies/epidemiology , Emergency Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Female , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Incidence , Male , Organizational Innovation , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Surgical Procedures, Operative/methods , Surgical Procedures, Operative/statistics & numerical data , Trauma Centers/organization & administration , Trauma Centers/statistics & numerical data , Trauma Severity Indices , Wounds and Injuries/diagnosis , Wounds and Injuries/epidemiology , Wounds and Injuries/etiology , Wounds and Injuries/surgery
10.
J Clin Neurosci ; 88: 128-134, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1176834

ABSTRACT

Early COVID-19-targeted legislations reduced public activity and elective surgery such that local neurosurgical care greatly focused on emergent needs. This study examines neurosurgical trauma patients' dispositions through two neighboring trauma centers to inform resource allocation. We conducted a retrospective review of the trauma registries for two Level 1 Trauma Centers in Santa Clara County, one academic and one community center, between February 1st and April 15th, 2018-2020. Events before a quarantine, implemented on March 16th, 2020, and events from 2018 to 19 were used for reference. Encounters were characterized by injuries, services, procedures, and disposition. Categorical variables were analyzed by the χ2 test, proportions of variables by z-score test, and non-parametric variables by Fisher's exact test. A total of 1,336 traumas were identified, with 31% from the academic center and 69% from the community center. During the post-policy period, relative to matching periods in years prior, there was a decrease in number of TBI and spinal fractures (24% versus 41%, p < 0.001) and neurosurgical consults (27% versus 39%, p < 0.003), but not in number of neurosurgical admissions or procedures. There were no changes in frequency of neurosurgery consults among total traumas, patients triaged to critical care services, or patients discharged to temporary rehabilitation services. Neurosurgical services were similarly rendered between the academic and community hospitals. This study describes neurosurgical trauma management in a suburban healthcare network immediately following restrictive quarantine during a moderate COVID-19 outbreak. Our data shows that neurosurgery remains a resource-intensive subspeciality, even during restrictive periods when overall trauma volume is decreased.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neurosurgery/trends , Pandemics , Quarantine , Trauma Centers/trends , Academic Medical Centers , Adult , Brain Injuries, Traumatic/epidemiology , Brain Injuries, Traumatic/surgery , California/epidemiology , Child , Community Health Centers , Female , Humans , Male , Neurosurgery/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , Spinal Cord Injuries/epidemiology , Spinal Cord Injuries/surgery , Trauma Centers/statistics & numerical data , Wounds and Injuries/surgery , Wounds and Injuries/therapy
11.
Acta Orthop ; 91(5): 556-561, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1153041

ABSTRACT

Background and purpose - The COVID-19 pandemic has been recognized as an unprecedented global health crisis. This is the first observational study to evaluate its impact on the orthopedic workload in a London level 1 trauma center (i.e., a major trauma center [MTC]) before (2019) and during (2020) the "golden month" post-COVID-19 lockdown.Patients and methods - We performed a longitudinal observational prevalence study of both acute orthopedic trauma referrals, operative and anesthetic casemix for the first "golden" month from March 17, 2020. We compared the data with the same period in 2019. Statistical analyses included median (median absolute deviation), risk and odds ratios, as well as Fisher's exact test to calculate the statistical significance, set at p ≤ 0.05.Results - Acute trauma referrals in the post-COVID period were almost halved compared with 2019, with similar distribution between pediatric and adult patients, requiring a significant 19% more admissions (RR 1.3, OR 2.6, p = 0.003). Hip fractures and polytrauma cases accounted for an additional 11% of the modal number of injuries in 2020, but with 19% reduction in isolated limb injuries that were modal in 2019. Total operative cases fell by a third during the COVID-19 outbreak. There was a decrease of 14% (RR 0.85, OR 0.20, p = 0.006) in aerosol-generating anesthetic techniques used.Interpretation - The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic has led to a decline in the number of acute trauma referrals, admissions (but increased risk and odds ratio), operations, and aerosolizing anesthetic procedures since implementing social distancing and lockdown measures during the "golden month."


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Musculoskeletal System/injuries , Workload/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , London , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Referral and Consultation/statistics & numerical data , Trauma Centers/statistics & numerical data , Wounds and Injuries/epidemiology , Wounds and Injuries/surgery , Young Adult
13.
BMJ Open ; 11(3): e045598, 2021 03 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1115144

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Many healthcare facilities in low-income and middle-income countries are inadequately resourced and may lack optimal organisation and governance, especially concerning surgical health systems. COVID-19 has the potential to decimate these already strained surgical healthcare services unless health systems take stringent measures to protect healthcare workers (HCWs) from viral exposure and ensure the continuity of specialised care for patients. The objective of this broad evidence synthesis is to identify and summarise the available literature regarding the efficacy of different personal protective equipment (PPE) in reducing the risk of COVID-19 infection in health personnel caring for patients undergoing trauma surgery in low-resource environments. METHODS: We will conduct several searches in the L·OVE (Living OVerview of Evidence) platform for COVID-19, a system that performs automated regular searches in PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and over 30 other sources. The search results will be presented according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses flow diagram. This review will preferentially consider systematic reviews of experimental and quasi-experimental studies, as well as individual studies of such designs, evaluating the effect of different PPE on the risk of COVID-19 infection in HCWs involved in emergency trauma surgery. Critical appraisal of eligible studies for methodological quality will be conducted. Data will be extracted using the standardised data extraction tool in Covidence. Studies will, when possible, be pooled in a statistical meta-analysis using JBI SUMARI. The Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation approach for grading the certainty of evidence will be followed and a summary of findings will be created. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethical approval is not required for this review. The plan for dissemination is to publish review findings in a peer-reviewed journal and present findings at high-level conferences that engage the most pertinent stakeholders. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42020198267.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Emergency Treatment , Health Personnel , Personal Protective Equipment , Review Literature as Topic , Wounds and Injuries/surgery , Controlled Clinical Trials as Topic , Humans , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Pandemics , Surgery Department, Hospital , Systematic Reviews as Topic
14.
Isr Med Assoc J ; 23(2): 71-75, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1085835

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) crisis has affected how hospitals work and has had an effect on orthopedic surgery. OBJECTIVES: To compare patient management and low-energy and high-energy trauma treatment at two orthopedic trauma units during the COVID-19 crisis and to clarify resource demands and preparedness in orthopedic clinics during the state of emergency caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: This retrospective study was conducted at two orthopedic trauma units from 14 March 2019 to 14 April 2019 and from 14 March 2020 to 14 April 2020. RESULTS: The proportion of patients admitted in the multi-trauma orthopedic unit decreased by one-third, the mean time interval from admission to surgery significantly decreased, and the number of surgeries and mean length of stay in hospital decreased in 2020 compared to the same test period in 2019. In the orthopedic trauma unit, the number of patients and surgeries also decreased. CONCLUSIONS: Our study highlights changes in orthopedic injury characteristics in two orthopedic units during the COVID-19 crisis in Latvia and compares these changes to data from the same time period one year earlier.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Orthopedic Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Trauma Centers/statistics & numerical data , Wounds and Injuries/surgery , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Latvia , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Musculoskeletal System/injuries , Musculoskeletal System/surgery , Retrospective Studies , Time Factors , Young Adult
15.
World Neurosurg ; 148: e172-e181, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1078227

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The institution-wide response of the University of California San Diego Health system to the 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic was founded on rapid development of in-house testing capacity, optimization of personal protective equipment usage, expansion of intensive care unit capacity, development of analytic dashboards for monitoring of institutional status, and implementation of an operating room (OR) triage plan that postponed nonessential/elective procedures. We analyzed the impact of this triage plan on the only academic neurosurgery center in San Diego County, California, USA. METHODS: We conducted a de-identified retrospective review of all operative cases and procedures performed by the Department of Neurosurgery from November 24, 2019, through July 6, 2020, a 226-day period. Statistical analysis involved 2-sample z tests assessing daily case totals over the 113-day periods before and after implementation of the OR triage plan on March 16, 2020. RESULTS: The neurosurgical service performed 1429 surgical and interventional radiologic procedures over the study period. There was no statistically significant difference in mean number of daily total cases in the pre-versus post-OR triage plan periods (6.9 vs. 5.8 mean daily cases; 1-tail P = 0.050, 2-tail P = 0.101), a trend reflected by nearly every category of neurosurgical cases. CONCLUSIONS: During the COVID-19 pandemic, the University of California San Diego Department of Neurosurgery maintained an operative volume that was only modestly diminished and continued to meet the essential neurosurgical needs of a large population. Lessons from our experience can guide other departments as they triage neurosurgical cases to meet community needs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospitals, University/organization & administration , Neurosurgery/organization & administration , Neurosurgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Academic Medical Centers/organization & administration , Brain Neoplasms/surgery , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , COVID-19 Serological Testing , California/epidemiology , Cerebrospinal Fluid Shunts/statistics & numerical data , Elective Surgical Procedures , Endovascular Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Hospital Bed Capacity , Hospital Departments/organization & administration , Humans , Infection Control , Information Dissemination/methods , Intensive Care Units , Laboratories, Hospital , Multi-Institutional Systems , Operating Rooms , Organizational Policy , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , SARS-CoV-2 , Surge Capacity , Triage , Vascular Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Ventilators, Mechanical/supply & distribution , Wounds and Injuries/surgery
16.
Ann R Coll Surg Engl ; 103(2): 114-119, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1073077

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Non-injury-related factors have been extensively studied in major trauma and have been shown to have a significant impact on patient outcomes. Mental illness and associated medication use has been proven to have a negative effect on bone health and fracture healing. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We collated data retrospectively from the records of orthopaedic inpatients in a non-COVID and COVID period. We analysed demographic data, referral and admission numbers, orthopaedic injuries, surgery performed and patient comorbidities, including psychiatric history. RESULTS: There were 824 orthopaedic referrals and 358 admissions (six/day) in the non-COVID period, with 38/358 (10.6%) admissions having a psychiatric diagnosis and 30/358 (8.4%) also having a fracture. This was compared with 473 referrals and 195 admissions (three/day) in the COVID period, with 73/195 (37.4%) admissions having a documented psychiatric diagnosis and 47/195 (24.1%) having a fracture. DISCUSSION: There was a reduction in the number of admissions and referrals during the pandemic, but a simultaneous three-fold rise in admissions with a psychiatric diagnosis. The proportion of patients with both a fracture and a psychiatric diagnosis more than doubled and the number of patients presenting due to a traumatic suicide attempt almost tripled. CONCLUSION: While total numbers using the orthopaedic service decreased, the impact of the pandemic and lockdown disproportionately affects those with mental health problems, a group already at higher risk of poorer functional outcomes and non-union. It is imperative that adequate support is in place for patients with vulnerable mental health during these periods, particularly as we look towards a potential 'second wave' of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Fractures, Bone/epidemiology , Hospitalization/trends , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Referral and Consultation/trends , Suicide, Attempted/trends , Adult , Alcoholism/epidemiology , Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Depressive Disorder/epidemiology , Female , Foreign Bodies/epidemiology , Foreign Bodies/surgery , Fractures, Bone/surgery , Humans , Joint Dislocations/epidemiology , Joint Dislocations/surgery , London/epidemiology , Male , Mental Disorders/drug therapy , Orthopedic Procedures , Psychotropic Drugs/therapeutic use , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Soft Tissue Injuries/epidemiology , Soft Tissue Injuries/surgery , Substance-Related Disorders/epidemiology , Wounds and Injuries/epidemiology , Wounds and Injuries/surgery
17.
Eur J Trauma Emerg Surg ; 47(3): 637-645, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1070810

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The global pandemic caused by SARS-CoV-2 has impacted population health and care delivery worldwide. As information emerges regarding the impact of "lockdown measures" and changes to clinical practice worldwide; there is no comparative information emerging from the United Kingdom with regard to major trauma. METHODS: This observational study from a UK Major Trauma Centre matched a cohort of patients admitted during a 10-week period of the SARS-CoV-2-pandemic (09/03/2020-18/05/2020) to a historical cohort of patients admitted during a similar time period in 2019 (11/03/2019-20/05/2019). Differences in demographics, Clinical Frailty Scale, SARS-CoV-2 status, mechanism of injury and injury severity were compared using Fisher's exact and Chi-squared tests. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses examined the associated factors that predicted 30-days mortality. RESULTS: A total of 642 patients were included, with 405 in the 2019 and 237 in the 2020 cohorts, respectively. 4/237(1.69%) of patients in the 2020 cohort tested positive for SARS-CoV-2. There was a 41.5% decrease in the number of trauma admissions in 2020. This cohort was older (median 46 vs 40 years), had more comorbidities and were frail (p < 0.0015). There was a significant difference in mechanism of injury with a decrease in vehicle related trauma, but an increase in falls. There was a twofold increased risk of mortality in the 2020 cohort which in adjusted multivariable models, was explained by injury severity and frailty. A positive SARS-CoV-2 status was not significantly associated with increased mortality when adjusted for other variables. CONCLUSION: Patients admitted during the COVID-19 pandemic were older, frailer, more co-morbid and had an associated increased risk of mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Infection Control , Surgical Procedures, Operative/statistics & numerical data , Wounds and Injuries , Accidental Falls/statistics & numerical data , Accidents, Traffic/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/organization & administration , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Trauma Severity Indices , United Kingdom/epidemiology , Wounds and Injuries/classification , Wounds and Injuries/epidemiology , Wounds and Injuries/etiology , Wounds and Injuries/surgery
18.
Surgeon ; 19(5): e256-e264, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-989270

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To review the clinical outcomes of all patients undergoing emergency orthopaedic trauma surgery at a UK major trauma centre during the first 6 weeks of the COVID-19 related lockdown. METHODS: A retrospective review was performed of all patients who underwent emergency orthopaedic trauma surgery at a single urban major trauma centre over the first six-week period of national lockdown. Demographics, co-morbidities, injuries, injury severity scores, surgery, COVID-19 status, complications and mortalities were analysed. RESULTS: A total of 76 patients were included for review who underwent multiple procedures. Significant co-morbidity was present in 72%. The overall COVID-19 infection rate of the study population at any time was 22%. Sub-group analysis indicated 13% had active COVID-19 at the time of surgery. Only 4% of patients developed COVID-19 post surgery with no mortalities in this sub-group. The overall mortality rate was 4%. The overall complication rate was 14%. However mortality and complications rates were higher if the patients had active COVID-19 at surgery, if they were over 70 years and had sustained life-threatening injuries. CONCLUSION: The overall survival rate for patients undergoing emergency orthopaedic trauma surgery during the COVID-19 peak was 96%. The rate of any complication was more significant in those presenting with active COVID-19 infections who had sustained potentially life threatening injuries and were over 70 years of age. Conversely those without active COVID-19 infection and who lacked significant co-morbidities experienced a lower complication and mortality rate.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Infection Control , Orthopedic Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Trauma Centers , Wounds and Injuries/surgery , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome , United Kingdom , Wounds and Injuries/complications , Wounds and Injuries/epidemiology
19.
J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg ; 74(6): 1161-1172, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-971003

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The safety of surgery during and after the coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is paramount. Early reports of excessive perioperative mortality in COVID-positive patients promoted the widespread avoidance of operations. However, cancelling or delaying operations for cancer, trauma, or functional restitution has resulted in increased morbidity and mortality. METHODS: A national multicentre cohort study of all major reconstructive operations carried out over a 12-week period of the 'COVID-19 surge' in the United Kingdom and Ireland was performed. Primary outcome was 30-day mortality and secondary outcome measures were major complications (Clavien-Dindo grade ≥3) and COVID-19 status of patients and healthcare professionals before and after surgery. RESULTS: A total of 418 patients underwent major reconstructive surgery with a mean operating time of 7.5 hours and 12 days' inpatient stay. Cancer (59.8%) and trauma (29.4%) were the most common indications. COVID-19 infection was present in 4.5% of patients. The 30-day post-operative mortality was 0.2%, reflecting the death of one patient who was COVID-negative. Overall complication rate was 20.8%. COVID status did not correlate with major or minor complications. Eight healthcare professionals developed post-operative COVID-19 infection, seven of which occurred within the first three weeks. CONCLUSIONS: Major reconstructive operations performed during the COVID-19 crisis have been mostly urgent cases involving all surgical specialties. This cohort is a surrogate for all major operations across all surgical specialties. Patient safety and surgical outcomes have been the same as in the pre-COVID era. With adequate precautions, major reconstructive surgery is safe for patients and staff. This study helps counsel patients of COVID-19 risks in the perioperative period.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Postoperative Complications , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/adverse effects , Aged , COVID-19/transmission , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional , Ireland/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/surgery , Personnel, Hospital , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , United Kingdom/epidemiology , Wounds and Injuries/surgery
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