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1.
Stud Health Technol Inform ; 294: 780-784, 2022 May 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1865442

ABSTRACT

Prescribing skills are a crucial competency in medical practice considering the increasing numbers of medications available and the increasingly complex patients with multiple diseases faced in clinical practice. Medical students need to become proficient in these skills during training, as required by medical licensing colleges. Not only is teaching the fundamentals of safe and cost-effective prescribing to medical students challenging but evaluating their prescribing skills by faculty members is difficult and time consuming. The COVID-19 pandemic has accelerated the interest in clinically relevant online exams, including automated assessment of short answer style questions. The goal of this project was to design a software to automate the assessment of learners' prescriptions written during low stakes formative assessments. After establishing the components of a legal prescription with multiple medications, and identifying the sources of errors in prescribing and prescribing assessment, we designed and validated an architecture and developed a prototype for automated parsing of learner prescriptions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Drug Prescriptions , Humans , Prescriptions , Software , Writing
2.
Psychoanal Q ; 91(1): 5-38, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1852659

ABSTRACT

A pandemic's reach is broad, deep, layered-both as an infectious agent and as the psychological force that will be explored by the author in this paper. The disorder it creates and the sorrow it leaves in its wake can be found in traces of its existence that remain in written works generated in the time after the pandemic is thought to be over. The author draws from creative texts by imaginative writers and Freud written in the period after the 1918-1920 pandemic. This paper is intended to create an experience in reading that introduces ways in which we can look for the influence of the COVID-19 pandemic in our own writing.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Humans , Imagination , Writing
3.
Front Public Health ; 9: 727064, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775850

ABSTRACT

Increasing the number of racially and ethnically underrepresented students who pursue scientific graduate studies in programs focusing on science and aging offers an opportunity to increase the number of aging specialists while simultaneously promoting diversity in the research labor market and supporting new ideas. This case study aims to better understand how students participating in an academic preparatory program experience a writing class contextualized within (1) students' writing background and (2) students' future ambitions related to science and aging. The individually-tailored writing class was taught as a critical component of a comprehensive educational program that targets underrepresented racial and ethnic minority undergraduate students who are interested in pursuing scientific graduate studies in fields related to aging. The researchers conducted semi-structured qualitative interviews with students (n = 4) enrolled in the 24-month fellowship training program, which included participation in the writing course during the summer prior to their senior year of undergraduate education. All participants were young adult college students who identified as Black or African American and female. Using thematic coding, statements about professional writing skills were divided into four primary themes: (1) prior experiences, (2) class experiences, (3) future goals and ambitions, and (4) structural considerations. These themes suggest potential implications for effective interventions aimed to advance the writing skills and academic and career readiness of racially and ethnically diverse students entering fields of science and aging.


Subject(s)
Career Choice , Education, Graduate , Students , Writing , African Americans/psychology , African Americans/statistics & numerical data , Aging , /statistics & numerical data , Cultural Diversity , Female , Humans , Minority Groups/psychology , Minority Groups/statistics & numerical data , Science/education , Students/psychology , Students/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
4.
6.
J Prof Nurs ; 38: 97-103, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1591877

ABSTRACT

Publishing is a measure of faculty performance, yet barriers often include getting started, time management, and difficulty finishing. Manuscript submissions also lack deadlines, which creates additional challenges. Writing accountability groups (WAGs) are associated with increased faculty writing productivity. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of WAGs, including the process, participants, writing productivity outcomes, benefits, challenges, and unintended consequences. To maintain our writing progress during the COVID-19 pandemic, we moved our WAG sessions to a virtual platform. Our WAG protocol (both face-to-face and virtual) is shared to help other faculty members or doctoral students implement writing accountability groups. We also advocate for hybrid WAG sessions to promote attendance. In addition to facilitation of scholarly writing and improved writing habits, our WAG created opportunities for scholarly communication and networking with colleagues.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Faculty , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Responsibility , Writing
7.
Cogn Emot ; 36(1): 9-22, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1585562

ABSTRACT

The current paper used a preregistered set of language dimensions to indicate how scientists psychologically managed the COVID-19 pandemic and its effects. Study 1 evaluated over 1.8 million preprints from arXiv.org and assessed how papers written during the COVID-19 pandemic reflected patterns of psychological trauma and emotional upheaval compared to those written before the pandemic. The data suggest papers written during the pandemic contained more affect and more cognitive processing terms to indicate writers working through a crisis than papers written before the pandemic. Study 2 (N = 74,744 published PLoS One papers) observed consistent emotion results, though cognitive processing patterns were inconsistent. Papers written specifically about COVID-19 contained more emotion than those not written about COVID-19. Finally, Study 3 (N = 361,189 published papers) replicated the Study 2 emotion results across more diverse journals and observed papers written during the pandemic contained a greater rate of cognitive processing terms, but a lower rate of analytic thinking, than papers written before the pandemic. These data suggest emotional upheavals are associated with psychological correlates reflected in the language of scientists at scale. Implications for psychology of language research and trauma are discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Psychological Trauma , Emotions , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Writing
8.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(1)2021 12 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580807

ABSTRACT

Because of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, the learning style of graduate students has changed considerably, making them more susceptible to psychological problems. This study aimed to explore the mediating roles of thesis writing and anxiety between course support (including course-arrangement, course-assessment, and course-learning), academic support (including academic exchange with colleges, tutors and schoolmates) and depression. There were 3137 graduate students investigated by self-developed Graduate Students' Academic Affected Questionnaire, Self-Rating Anxiety Scale and Self-Rating Depression Scale. The results showed that (1) 82% of graduate students reported their course support, academic support and thesis writing were affected to varying degrees; (2) course support and academic support correlated with thesis writing, anxiety and depression (p < 0.001); (3) the mediation model fitted well, the mediating effect of anxiety between academic support and depression was significant (ß = 0.086, SE = 0.02, p < 0.001), the serial multiple mediating effects of thesis writing and anxiety between academic support and depression were significant (ß = 0.02, SE = 0.008, p = 0.013) and the serial multiple mediating effects of thesis writing and anxiety between course support and depression were also found to be significant (ß = 0.014, SE = 0.006, p = 0.014).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Anxiety/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Students , Writing
9.
J Am Geriatr Soc ; 70(3): 669-676, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1557816

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) global outbreak allowed a natural experiment to observe how older adults changed social patterns and how it affected their emotional well-being. We studied the frequency and modes of social contact and their effects on older adults' mood before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. DESIGN: Phone-based surveys were administered weekly before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. SETTING: Participants were recruited from Portland, Oregon, and Detroit, Michigan. PARTICIPANTS: Older adults ≥75 years old (n = 155, age = 81.0 ± 4.5, 72.3% women) were included in a randomized controlled trial, the Internet-Based Conversational Engagement Clinical Trial (I-CONECT). MEASUREMENTS: Low mood was self-reported as feeling downhearted or blue for three or more days in the past week. Social contact was self-reported by the amount of time spent in interactions, with whom (family, friends, others), and via which modes (in-person, phone/video call, text/email/letter). RESULTS: A total of 5525 weeks of data were derived from 155 participants. Before the COVID-19 pandemic, average social interaction time spent in-person, on phone/video call, and via text/email/letter was 406, 141, and 68 min/week, respectively. During the COVID-19 pandemic, time spent in-person was reduced by 135 min/week, while time spent via phone/video call and writing increased by 33 and 26 mins/week, respectively. In-person family contact was associated with less low mood regardless of the pandemic (odds ratio = 0.92, p < 0.05). There was a COVID-19 × text/email/letter with friends interaction (odds ratio = 0.77, p = 0.03), suggesting that during the COVID-19 pandemic, an increase of 1 h of writing with friends per week was associated with a 23% decrease in the likelihood of experiencing low mood. CONCLUSION: The lost in-person time relating to COVID-19 restrictions tended to be partially compensated for with increased calls and writing time, although overall social interaction time decreased. During the COVID-19 pandemic, at least two types of social interactions (writing to friends and in-person family time) showed promise for mitigating low mood for older adults with limited social resources.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Mood Disorders/psychology , Social Isolation/psychology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Michigan/epidemiology , Mood Disorders/epidemiology , Oregon/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telephone , Writing
11.
EMBO Rep ; 22(11): e54050, 2021 11 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518829

ABSTRACT

Should scientists indulge their fantasies by writing fiction?


Subject(s)
Writing
12.
Work ; 70(1): 1, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1468321

Subject(s)
Thinking , Writing , Humans
13.
IEEE Trans Neural Netw Learn Syst ; 32(9): 3786-3797, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1348109

ABSTRACT

Medical imaging technologies, including computed tomography (CT) or chest X-Ray (CXR), are largely employed to facilitate the diagnosis of the COVID-19. Since manual report writing is usually too time-consuming, a more intelligent auxiliary medical system that could generate medical reports automatically and immediately is urgently needed. In this article, we propose to use the medical visual language BERT (Medical-VLBERT) model to identify the abnormality on the COVID-19 scans and generate the medical report automatically based on the detected lesion regions. To produce more accurate medical reports and minimize the visual-and-linguistic differences, this model adopts an alternate learning strategy with two procedures that are knowledge pretraining and transferring. To be more precise, the knowledge pretraining procedure is to memorize the knowledge from medical texts, while the transferring procedure is to utilize the acquired knowledge for professional medical sentences generations through observations of medical images. In practice, for automatic medical report generation on the COVID-19 cases, we constructed a dataset of 368 medical findings in Chinese and 1104 chest CT scans from The First Affiliated Hospital of Jinan University, Guangzhou, China, and The Fifth Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Zhuhai, China. Besides, to alleviate the insufficiency of the COVID-19 training samples, our model was first trained on the large-scale Chinese CX-CHR dataset and then transferred to the COVID-19 CT dataset for further fine-tuning. The experimental results showed that Medical-VLBERT achieved state-of-the-art performances on terminology prediction and report generation with the Chinese COVID-19 CT dataset and the CX-CHR dataset. The Chinese COVID-19 CT dataset is available at https://covid19ct.github.io/.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Machine Learning , Research Report/standards , Algorithms , Artificial Intelligence , China , Humans , Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted , Terminology as Topic , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Transfer, Psychology , Writing
15.
Complement Ther Clin Pract ; 45: 101460, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1330737

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND & PURPOSE: The COVID-19 pandemic has negatively impacted mental health in the general population. In this trial, our objective was to assess whether a 6-week expressive writing intervention improves resilience in a sample from the general population in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic. MATERIALS & METHODS: This 6-week trial was conducted online. Eligible participants (n=63) were a sample of adults who self-identified as having been significantly affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. PRIMARY OUTCOME: Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC). SECONDARY OUTCOMES: Perceived Stress Scale - 10-Item (PSS-10); Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale - Revised (CESD-R); Post-Traumatic Growth Inventory (PTGI). RESULTS: Resilience measures (CD-RISC) increased from baseline (66.6 ± 14.9) to immediately post-intervention (73.0 ± 12.4; p=0.014; Cohen's d =0.31), and at a 1- month follow-up (72.9 ± 13.6; p=0.024; Cohen's d =0.28). Across the same timepoints, perceived stress scores (PSS-10) decreased from baseline (21.8 ± 6.6) to immediately post-intervention (18.3 ± 7.0; p=0.008; Cohen's d =0.41), and at the 1- month follow-up to (16.8 ± 6.7; p=0.0002; Cohen's d =0.56). Depression symptoms (CESD-R) decreased from baseline (23.3 ± 15.3) at 6 weeks (17.8 ± 15.4; p=0.058; Cohen's d =0.22), and 10 weeks (15.5 ± 12.7; p=0.004; Cohen's d =0.38). Posttraumatic growth (PTGI) increased from baseline (41.7 ± 23.4) at 6 weeks (55.8 ± 26.4; p=0.004; Cohen's d =0.44), and at the 1-month follow-up (55.9 ± 29.3; p=0.008; Cohen's d =0.49). CONCLUSION: An online expressive writing intervention was effective at improving resilience in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic. NCT#: NCT04589104.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Feasibility Studies , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Writing
16.
PLoS One ; 16(7): e0254501, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1305579

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Two randomized controlled experiments investigated if writing a narrative text about a fictional person who shows disapproved of behavior in the Covid-19 pandemic influenced empathy, perspective-taking, attitude, and attribution of causes regarding that person's behavior. METHODS: In both studies, a fictional scenario was described, and participants answered questions regarding empathy, perspective-taking, attitude, and attribution regarding a fictional person's disapproved of behavior (pre-post-measurement). Participants were randomly assigned to one of two conditions. In the experimental condition, they wrote a narrative text about the fictional person. In the control condition, they wrote about an unrelated topic. RESULTS: We found that writing a narrative text increased empathy more strongly than writing about an unrelated topic; Study 1: p = 0.004, part.η2 = 0.06, Study 2: p < .001, part.η2 = 0.19. This did not apply to perspective-taking; Study 1: p = 0.415; Study 2: p = 0.074. We also found that writing a narrative text about a fictional person resulted in a more positive attitude toward this person; Study 1: p = 0.005, part.η2 = 0.06; Study 2: p<0.001, part.η2 = 0.10. Finally, in Study 2 we found that participants who wrote a narrative text attributed the person's behavior to internal causes to a lesser degree; p = 0.007, part.η2 = 0.05. CONCLUSION: Our findings indicate that empathy and attitude are positively modifiable through narrative writing tasks. Empathy training could potentially prevent discrimination related to Covid-19. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The studies presented in this article were pre-registered on the pre-registration platform AsPredicted (aspredicted.org) before we began data collection; registration numbers and URL: #44754 https://aspredicted.org/vx37t.pdf (Study 1), and #44753 https://aspredicted.org/ig7kq.pdf (Study 2).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Empathy , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Narration , Writing , Humans
17.
J Contin Educ Nurs ; 52(7): 313-318, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1295974

ABSTRACT

Productive scholarly writing is important for succeeding in graduate nursing programs such as thesis-and practice-based master's or doctoral degrees. Nurses pursuing graduate-level programs are expected to produce high-level scholarly writing manuscripts. However, writing typically is an independent and isolating endeavor. This article describes a student-led writing group ("Sit Down & Write!") that was adapted from the "Shut Up & Write!" (SUAW) structure. Five strategies were incorporated to meet the unique needs of graduate nursing students and foster productivity: (a) provide space for diverse groups of nursing students to participate, (b) offer flexible scheduling, (c) accommodate a flexible group structure, (d) host longer sessions, and (e) allow time to discuss writing goals. Overall, Sit Down and Write! provided a community of productive writing support. Future adaptations may consider providing a virtual option so sessions are accessible to students who are unable to join in-person. [J Contin Educ Nurs. 2021;52(7):313-318.].


Subject(s)
Education, Nursing, Graduate , Students, Nursing , Humans , Writing
18.
J Am Assoc Nurse Pract ; 33(6): 416-418, 2021 Jun 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1254909

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has had a significant impact on the lives of nurses. To capture these experiences, the AANP history committee sponsored a writing contest. The stories, essays, and poems were heartfelt and ranged from personal experiences to future implications. One essay entitled "The Five Stages of COVID Grief: One Nurse Practitioner's Coronavirus Story," captured the essence of the time and is applicable to all nurses as we continue our journey and document our legacy. Using the framework of COVID Grief, this article seeks to outline the shared experience and range of emotions represented in the writing contest submissions. Through this lens, the Year of the Nurse and the toll of coronavirus can be framed by the emotions of disbelief, bitterness, guilt, fear and anxiety, and resilience.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Fear/psychology , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Occupational Stress/psychology , Adaptation, Psychological , Anecdotes as Topic , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/nursing , Humans , Nurses/psychology , Resilience, Psychological , Writing
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20.
Clin Teach ; 18(2): 174-179, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1166302
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