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1.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(21)2021 Oct 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1488616

ABSTRACT

After almost two years from its first evidence, the COVID-19 pandemic continues to afflict people worldwide, highlighting the need for multiple antiviral strategies. SARS-CoV-2 main protease (Mpro/3CLpro) is a recognized promising target for the development of effective drugs. Because single target inhibition might not be sufficient to block SARS-CoV-2 infection and replication, multi enzymatic-based therapies may provide a better strategy. Here we present a structural and biochemical characterization of the binding mode of MG-132 to both the main protease of SARS-CoV-2, and to the human Cathepsin-L, suggesting thus an interesting scaffold for the development of double-inhibitors. X-ray diffraction data show that MG-132 well fits into the Mpro active site, forming a covalent bond with Cys145 independently from reducing agents and crystallization conditions. Docking of MG-132 into Cathepsin-L well-matches with a covalent binding to the catalytic cysteine. Accordingly, MG-132 inhibits Cathepsin-L with nanomolar potency and reversibly inhibits Mpro with micromolar potency, but with a prolonged residency time. We compared the apo and MG-132-inhibited structures of Mpro solved in different space groups and we identified a new apo structure that features several similarities with the inhibited ones, offering interesting perspectives for future drug design and in silico efforts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Cathepsin L/drug effects , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/drug effects , Leupeptins/chemistry , Leupeptins/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Catalytic Domain/drug effects , Cathepsin L/chemistry , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/chemistry , Drug Design , Drug Discovery , Humans , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Peptidomimetics , Protein Binding , Protein Conformation , Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs , Virus Replication/drug effects , X-Ray Diffraction
2.
Int J Pharm ; 609: 121113, 2021 Nov 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1473322

ABSTRACT

Depression-the global crisis hastened by the coronavirus outbreak, can be efficaciously treated by the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Cyclodextrin (CD) inclusion complexation is a method of choice for reducing side effects and improving bioavailability of drugs. Here, we investigate in-depth the ß-CD encapsulation of sertraline (STL) HCl (1) and fluoxetine (FXT) HCl (2) by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and DFT complete-geometry optimization, in comparison to the reported complex of paroxetine (PXT) base. X-ray analysis unveiled the 2:2 ß-CD-STL/FXT complexes with two drug molecules inserting their halogen-containing aromatic ring in the ß-CD dimeric cavity, which are stabilized by the interplay of intermolecular O2-H⋯N1-H⋯O3 H-bonds, C3/C5-H⋯π and halogen⋯halogen interactions. Similarly, the 1:1 ß-CD-tricyclic-antidepressant (TCA) complexes have an exclusive inclusion mode of the aromatic ring, which is maintained by C3/C5-H⋯π interactions. By contrast, the 2:1 ß-CD-PXT complex has a total inclusion that is stabilized by host-guest O6-H⋯N1-H⋯O5 H-bonds and C3-H⋯π interactions. The inherent stabilization energies of 1 and 2 evaluated using DFT calculation suggested that the improved thermodynamic stabilities via CD encapsulation facilitates the reduction of drug side effects. Moreover, the SSRI conformational flexibilities are thoroughly discussed for understanding of their pharmacoactivity.


Subject(s)
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors , beta-Cyclodextrins , Crystallography, X-Ray , Density Functional Theory , X-Ray Diffraction
3.
ACS Appl Mater Interfaces ; 13(40): 47996-48008, 2021 Oct 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440455

ABSTRACT

Use of masks is a primary tool to prevent the spread of the novel COVID-19 virus resulting from unintentional close contact with infected individuals. However, detailed characterization of the chemical properties and physical structure of common mask materials is lacking in the current literature. In this study, a series of commercial masks and potential mask materials, including 3M Particulate Respirator 8210 N95, a material provided by Oak Ridge National Laboratory Carbon Fiber Technology Facility (ORNL/CFTF), and a Filti Face Mask Material, were characterized by a suite of techniques, including scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Wetting properties of the mask materials were quantified by measurements of contact angle with a saliva substitute. Mask pass-through experiments were performed using a dispersed metal oxide nanoparticle suspension to model the SARS-CoV-2 virus, with quantification via spatially resolved X-ray fluorescence mapping. Notably, all mask materials tested provided a strong barrier against respiratory droplet breakthrough. The comparisons and characterizations provided in this study provide useful information when evaluating mask materials for respiratory protection.


Subject(s)
Filtration , Masks , Materials Testing/methods , N95 Respirators , COVID-19/prevention & control , Metal Nanoparticles/chemistry , Microscopy, Electron, Scanning , Photoelectron Spectroscopy , Polyesters/chemistry , Polypropylenes/chemistry , Porosity , SARS-CoV-2 , Spectrum Analysis, Raman , Wettability , X-Ray Diffraction
4.
J Phys Chem Lett ; 12(39): 9557-9563, 2021 Oct 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1439482

ABSTRACT

Lipid-enveloped viruses, such as Ebola, influenza, or coronaviruses, are a major threat to human health. Ethanol is an efficient disinfectant that is widely used to inactivate these viruses and prevent their transmission. However, the interactions between ethanol and enveloped viruses leading to their inactivation are not yet fully understood. This study demonstrates the link between ethanol-induced viral inactivation and the nanostructural and chemical transformations of the model virus Phi6, an 85 nm diameter lipid-enveloped bacterial virus that is commonly used as surrogate for human pathogenic viruses. The virus morphology was investigated using small-angle X-ray scattering and dynamic light scattering and was related to its infectivity. The Phi6's surface chemistry was characterized by cryogenic X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and the modifications in protein structure were assessed by circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy. Ethanol-triggered structural modifications were found in the lipid envelope, detaching from the protein capsid and forming coexisting nanostructures.


Subject(s)
Bacteriophage phi 6/chemistry , Ethanol/pharmacology , Virus Inactivation/drug effects , Bacteriophage phi 6/drug effects , Bacteriophage phi 6/ultrastructure , Capsid Proteins/chemistry , Capsid Proteins/metabolism , Circular Dichroism , Dynamic Light Scattering , Ethanol/chemistry , Microscopy, Electron, Transmission , Photoelectron Spectroscopy , Scattering, Small Angle , X-Ray Diffraction
5.
Biophys J ; 120(15): 3152-3165, 2021 08 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1385180

ABSTRACT

The replication transcription complex (RTC) from the virus SARS-CoV-2 is responsible for recognizing and processing RNA for two principal purposes. The RTC copies viral RNA for propagation into new virus and for ribosomal transcription of viral proteins. To accomplish these activities, the RTC mechanism must also conform to a large number of imperatives, including RNA over DNA base recognition, basepairing, distinguishing viral and host RNA, production of mRNA that conforms to host ribosome conventions, interfacing with error checking machinery, and evading host immune responses. In addition, the RTC will discontinuously transcribe specific sections of viral RNA to amplify certain proteins over others. Central to SARS-CoV-2 viability, the RTC is therefore dynamic and sophisticated. We have conducted a systematic structural investigation of three components that make up the RTC: Nsp7, Nsp8, and Nsp12 (also known as RNA-dependent RNA polymerase). We have solved high-resolution crystal structures of the Nsp7/8 complex, providing insight into the interaction between the proteins. We have used small-angle x-ray and neutron solution scattering (SAXS and SANS) on each component individually as pairs and higher-order complexes and with and without RNA. Using size exclusion chromatography and multiangle light scattering-coupled SAXS, we defined which combination of components forms transient or stable complexes. We used contrast-matching to mask specific complex-forming components to test whether components change conformation upon complexation. Altogether, we find that individual Nsp7, Nsp8, and Nsp12 structures vary based on whether other proteins in their complex are present. Combining our crystal structure, atomic coordinates reported elsewhere, SAXS, SANS, and other biophysical techniques, we provide greater insight into the RTC assembly, mechanism, and potential avenues for disruption of the complex and its functions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Humans , Models, Molecular , RNA, Viral/genetics , Scattering, Small Angle , Viral Nonstructural Proteins , Virus Replication , X-Ray Diffraction
6.
Molecules ; 26(17)2021 Aug 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1374471

ABSTRACT

The emergence of COVID-19 continues to pose severe threats to global public health. The pandemic has infected over 171 million people and claimed more than 3.5 million lives to date. We investigated the binding potential of antiviral cyanobacterial proteins including cyanovirin-N, scytovirin and phycocyanin with fundamental proteins involved in attachment and replication of SARS-CoV-2. Cyanovirin-N displayed the highest binding energy scores (-16.8 ± 0.02 kcal/mol, -12.3 ± 0.03 kcal/mol and -13.4 ± 0.02 kcal/mol, respectively) with the spike protein, the main protease (Mpro) and the papainlike protease (PLpro) of SARS-CoV-2. Cyanovirin-N was observed to interact with the crucial residues involved in the attachment of the human ACE2 receptor. Analysis of the binding affinities calculated employing the molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) approach revealed that all forms of energy, except the polar solvation energy, favourably contributed to the interactions of cyanovirin-N with the viral proteins. With particular emphasis on cyanovirin-N, the current work presents evidence for the potential inhibition of SARS-CoV-2 by cyanobacterial proteins, and offers the opportunity for in vitro and in vivo experiments to deploy the cyanobacterial proteins as valuable therapeutics against COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Bacterial Proteins/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Coronavirus Protease Inhibitors/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Bacterial Proteins/therapeutic use , Bacterial Proteins/ultrastructure , COVID-19/virology , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/antagonists & inhibitors , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/metabolism , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/ultrastructure , Coronavirus Papain-Like Proteases/antagonists & inhibitors , Coronavirus Papain-Like Proteases/metabolism , Coronavirus Papain-Like Proteases/ultrastructure , Coronavirus Protease Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Coronavirus Protease Inhibitors/ultrastructure , Humans , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Protein Binding , Protein Interaction Mapping , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/antagonists & inhibitors , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/ultrastructure , X-Ray Diffraction
7.
J Synchrotron Radiat ; 28(Pt 4): 1237-1244, 2021 Jul 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1334330

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic, synchrotron beamlines were forced to limit user access. Performing routine measurements became a challenge. At the Life Science X-ray Scattering (LiX) beamline, new instrumentation and mail-in protocols have been developed to remove the access barrier to solution scattering measurements. Our efforts took advantage of existing instrumentation and coincided with the larger effort at NSLS-II to support remote measurements. Given the limited staff-user interaction for mail-in measurements, additional software tools have been developed to ensure data quality, to automate the adjustments in data processing, as users would otherwise rely on the experience of the beamline staff, and produce a summary of the initial assessments of the data. This report describes the details of these developments.


Subject(s)
Scattering, Small Angle , Solutions/radiation effects , Synchrotrons/instrumentation , X-Ray Diffraction/instrumentation , Buffers , COVID-19 , Data Collection , Datasets as Topic , Electronic Data Processing , Pandemics , Robotics , SARS-CoV-2 , Software , Specimen Handling , Water
8.
Biophys J ; 120(15): 3152-3165, 2021 08 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1316407

ABSTRACT

The replication transcription complex (RTC) from the virus SARS-CoV-2 is responsible for recognizing and processing RNA for two principal purposes. The RTC copies viral RNA for propagation into new virus and for ribosomal transcription of viral proteins. To accomplish these activities, the RTC mechanism must also conform to a large number of imperatives, including RNA over DNA base recognition, basepairing, distinguishing viral and host RNA, production of mRNA that conforms to host ribosome conventions, interfacing with error checking machinery, and evading host immune responses. In addition, the RTC will discontinuously transcribe specific sections of viral RNA to amplify certain proteins over others. Central to SARS-CoV-2 viability, the RTC is therefore dynamic and sophisticated. We have conducted a systematic structural investigation of three components that make up the RTC: Nsp7, Nsp8, and Nsp12 (also known as RNA-dependent RNA polymerase). We have solved high-resolution crystal structures of the Nsp7/8 complex, providing insight into the interaction between the proteins. We have used small-angle x-ray and neutron solution scattering (SAXS and SANS) on each component individually as pairs and higher-order complexes and with and without RNA. Using size exclusion chromatography and multiangle light scattering-coupled SAXS, we defined which combination of components forms transient or stable complexes. We used contrast-matching to mask specific complex-forming components to test whether components change conformation upon complexation. Altogether, we find that individual Nsp7, Nsp8, and Nsp12 structures vary based on whether other proteins in their complex are present. Combining our crystal structure, atomic coordinates reported elsewhere, SAXS, SANS, and other biophysical techniques, we provide greater insight into the RTC assembly, mechanism, and potential avenues for disruption of the complex and its functions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Humans , Models, Molecular , RNA, Viral/genetics , Scattering, Small Angle , Viral Nonstructural Proteins , Virus Replication , X-Ray Diffraction
9.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(13)2021 Jul 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1304670

ABSTRACT

Silk fibroin (SF) has attracted much attention due to its high, tunable mechanical strength and excellent biocompatibility. Imparting the ability to respond to external stimuli can further enhance its scope of application. In order to imbue stimuli-responsive behavior in silk fibroin, we propose a new conjugated material, namely cationic SF (CSF) obtained by chemical modification of silk fibroin with ε-Poly-(L-lysine) (ε-PLL). This pH-responsive CSF hydrogel was prepared by enzymatic crosslinking using horseradish peroxidase and H2O2. Zeta potential measurements and SDS-PAGE gel electrophoresis show successful synthesis, with an increase in isoelectric point from 4.1 to 8.6. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) results show that the modification does not affect the crystalline structure of SF. Most importantly, the synthesized CSF hydrogel has an excellent pH response. At 10 wt.% ε-PLL, a significant change in swelling with pH is observed. We further demonstrate that the hydrogel can be glucose-responsive by the addition of glucose oxidase (GOx). At high glucose concentration (400 mg/dL), the swelling of CSF/GOx hydrogel is as high as 345 ± 16%, while swelling in 200 mg/dL, 100 mg/dL and 0 mg/dL glucose solutions is 237 ± 12%, 163 ± 12% and 98 ± 15%, respectively. This shows the responsive swelling of CSF/GOx hydrogels to glucose, thus providing sufficient conditions for rapid drug release. Together with the versatility and biological properties of fibroin, such stimuli-responsive silk hydrogels have great potential in intelligent drug delivery, as soft matter substrates for enzymatic reactions and in other biomedical applications.


Subject(s)
Drug Delivery Systems/methods , Fibroins/chemistry , Glucose/metabolism , Hydrogels/chemical synthesis , Biocompatible Materials/chemistry , Drug Liberation , Fibroins/metabolism , Glucose/chemistry , Horseradish Peroxidase/chemistry , Hydrogen Peroxide/chemistry , Hydrogen-Ion Concentration , Polylysine/chemistry , Silk/chemistry , Spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared/methods , X-Ray Diffraction
10.
Molecules ; 26(12)2021 Jun 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1282534

ABSTRACT

Multi-drug resistant pathogens are a rising danger for the future of mankind. Iodine (I2) is a centuries-old microbicide, but leads to skin discoloration, irritation, and uncontrolled iodine release. Plants rich in phytochemicals have a long history in basic health care. Aloe Vera Barbadensis Miller (AV) and Salvia officinalis L. (Sage) are effectively utilized against different ailments. Previously, we investigated the antimicrobial activities of smart triiodides and iodinated AV hybrids. In this work, we combined iodine with Sage extracts and pure AV gel with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as an encapsulating and stabilizing agent. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis), Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS), microstructural analysis by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and X-Ray-Diffraction (XRD) analysis verified the composition of AV-PVP-Sage-I2. Antimicrobial properties were investigated by disc diffusion method against 10 reference microbial strains in comparison to gentamicin and nystatin. We impregnated surgical sutures with our biohybrid and tested their inhibitory effects. AV-PVP-Sage-I2 showed excellent to intermediate antimicrobial activity in discs and sutures. The iodine within the polymeric biomaterial AV-PVP-Sage-I2 and the synergistic action of the two plant extracts enhanced the microbial inhibition. Our compound has potential for use as an antifungal agent, disinfectant and coating material on sutures to prevent surgical site infections.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents/chemistry , Anti-Bacterial Agents/chemical synthesis , Aloe/chemistry , Antifungal Agents/chemistry , Gentamicins/chemistry , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Microscopy, Electron, Scanning/methods , Nystatin/chemistry , Plant Extracts/chemistry , Povidone/chemistry , Salvia/chemistry , Salvia officinalis/chemistry , Spectrometry, X-Ray Emission/methods , Spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared/methods , X-Ray Diffraction/methods
11.
J Phys Chem Lett ; 12(23): 5608-5615, 2021 Jun 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1263456

ABSTRACT

Papain-like protease (PLpro) from SARS-CoV-2 plays essential roles in the replication cycle of the virus. In particular, it preferentially interacts with and cleaves human interferon-stimulated gene 15 (hISG15) to suppress the innate immune response of the host. We used small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering combined with computational techniques to study the mechanism of interaction of SARS-CoV-2 PLpro with hISG15. We showed that hISG15 undergoes a transition from an extended to a compact state after binding to PLpro, a conformation that has not been previously observed in complexes of SARS-CoV-2 PLpro with ISG15 from other species. Furthermore, computational analysis showed significant conformational flexibility in the ISG15 N-terminal domain, suggesting that it is weakly bound to PLpro and supports a binding mechanism that is dominated by the C-terminal ISG15 domain. This study fundamentally improves our understanding of the SARS-CoV-2 deISGylation complex that will help guide development of COVID-19 therapeutics targeting this complex.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Papain-Like Proteases/chemistry , Coronavirus Papain-Like Proteases/metabolism , Cytokines/chemistry , Cytokines/metabolism , Interferons/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Ubiquitins/chemistry , Ubiquitins/metabolism , Coronavirus Papain-Like Proteases/genetics , Cytokines/genetics , Humans , Neutron Diffraction , Protein Conformation , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Scattering, Small Angle , Ubiquitins/genetics , X-Ray Diffraction
12.
Inorg Chem ; 60(9): 6585-6599, 2021 May 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1195597

ABSTRACT

Silver vanadate nanorods (ß-AgVO3) with silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) decorated on the surface of the rods were synthesized by using simple hydrothermal technique and later anchored onto nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide (N-rGO) to make a novel nanocomposite. Experimental analyses were carried out to identify the electronic configuration by X-ray diffraction analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis, which revealed monoclinic patterns of the C12/m1 space group with Wulff construction forming beta silver vanadate (ß-AgVO3) crystals with optical density and phase transformations. Ag nucleation showed consistent results with metallic formation and electronic changes occurring in [AgO5] and [AgO3] clusters. Transmission electron microscopy and field-emission scanning electron microscopy with elemental mapping and EDX analysis of the morphology reveals the nanorod structure for ß-AgVO3 with AgNPs on the surface and sheets for N-rGO. Additionally, a novel electrochemical sensor is constructed by using Ag/AgVO3/N-rGO on screen-printed carbon paste electrodes for the detection of antiviral drug levofloxacin (LEV) which is used as a primary antibiotic in controlling COVID-19. Using differential pulse voltammetry, LEV is determined with a low detection limit of 0.00792 nm for a linear range of 0.09-671 µM with an ultrahigh sensitivity of 152.19 µA µM-1 cm-2. Furthermore, modified electrode performance is tested by real-time monitoring using biological and river samples.


Subject(s)
Dielectric Spectroscopy/instrumentation , Dielectric Spectroscopy/methods , Levofloxacin/analysis , Nanocomposites/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/analysis , Antiviral Agents/blood , Antiviral Agents/urine , Carbon/chemistry , Electrodes , Graphite/chemistry , Humans , Levofloxacin/blood , Levofloxacin/urine , Limit of Detection , Metal Nanoparticles/chemistry , Microscopy, Electron, Transmission , Nanotubes/chemistry , Photoelectron Spectroscopy , Silver/chemistry , Silver Compounds/chemistry , Spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared , Spectrum Analysis, Raman , Tablets , Vanadates/chemistry , X-Ray Diffraction
13.
EMBO J ; 40(11): e102277, 2021 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1194823

ABSTRACT

The ongoing outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) demonstrates the continuous threat of emerging coronaviruses (CoVs) to public health. SARS-CoV-2 and SARS-CoV share an otherwise non-conserved part of non-structural protein 3 (Nsp3), therefore named as "SARS-unique domain" (SUD). We previously found a yeast-2-hybrid screen interaction of the SARS-CoV SUD with human poly(A)-binding protein (PABP)-interacting protein 1 (Paip1), a stimulator of protein translation. Here, we validate SARS-CoV SUD:Paip1 interaction by size-exclusion chromatography, split-yellow fluorescent protein, and co-immunoprecipitation assays, and confirm such interaction also between the corresponding domain of SARS-CoV-2 and Paip1. The three-dimensional structure of the N-terminal domain of SARS-CoV SUD ("macrodomain II", Mac2) in complex with the middle domain of Paip1, determined by X-ray crystallography and small-angle X-ray scattering, provides insights into the structural determinants of the complex formation. In cellulo, SUD enhances synthesis of viral but not host proteins via binding to Paip1 in pBAC-SARS-CoV replicon-transfected cells. We propose a possible mechanism for stimulation of viral translation by the SUD of SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Papain-Like Proteases/metabolism , Gene Expression Regulation, Viral , Peptide Initiation Factors/metabolism , RNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism , SARS Virus/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism , Amino Acid Sequence , Bacterial Proteins , Chromatography, Gel , Coronavirus Papain-Like Proteases/chemistry , Crystallography, X-Ray , Genes, Reporter , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Immunoprecipitation , Luminescent Proteins , Models, Molecular , Peptide Initiation Factors/chemistry , Protein Binding , Protein Biosynthesis , Protein Conformation , Protein Domains , Protein Interaction Mapping , RNA, Viral/genetics , RNA-Binding Proteins/chemistry , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/chemistry , Recombinant Fusion Proteins/chemistry , Recombinant Fusion Proteins/metabolism , Ribosome Subunits/metabolism , SARS Virus/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Scattering, Small Angle , Sequence Alignment , Sequence Homology, Amino Acid , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/chemistry , X-Ray Diffraction
14.
Int J Nanomedicine ; 16: 2689-2702, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1186650

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic is requesting highly effective protective personnel equipment, mainly for healthcare professionals. However, the current demand has exceeded the supply chain and, consequently, shortage of essential medical materials, such as surgical masks. Due to these alarming limitations, it is crucial to develop effective means of disinfection, reusing, and thereby applying antimicrobial shielding protection to the clinical supplies. Purpose: Therefore, in this work, we developed a novel, economical, and straightforward approach to promote antimicrobial activity to surgical masks by impregnating silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). Methods: Our strategy consisted of fabricating a new alcohol disinfectant formulation combining special surfactants and AgNPs, which is demonstrated to be extensively effective against a broad number of microbial surrogates of SARS-CoV-2. Results: The present nano-formula reported a superior microbial reduction of 99.999% against a wide number of microorganisms. Furthermore, the enveloped H5N1 virus was wholly inactivated after 15 min of disinfection. Far more attractive, the current method for reusing surgical masks did not show outcomes of detrimental amendments, suggesting that the protocol does not alter the filtration effectiveness. Conclusion: The nano-disinfectant provides a valuable strategy for effective decontamination, reuse, and even antimicrobial promotion to surgical masks for frontline clinical personnel.


Subject(s)
Anti-Infective Agents/pharmacology , Disinfectants/pharmacology , Masks , Metal Nanoparticles/chemistry , Silver/pharmacology , Animals , Anti-Infective Agents/administration & dosage , Anti-Infective Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Chick Embryo , Disinfectants/administration & dosage , Disinfectants/chemistry , Disinfection/methods , Dynamic Light Scattering , Equipment Reuse , Humans , Influenza A Virus, H5N1 Subtype/drug effects , Masks/virology , Metal Nanoparticles/administration & dosage , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Silver/chemistry , Spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared , Textiles , X-Ray Diffraction
15.
Carbohydr Polym ; 264: 118011, 2021 Jul 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1172080

ABSTRACT

Veklury™ by Gilead Sciences, Inc., containing antiviral drug, remdesivir (REM) has received emergency authorization in the USA and in Europe for COVID-19 therapy. Here, for the first time, we describe details of the non-covalent, host-guest type interaction between REM and the solubilizing excipient, sulfobutylether-beta-cyclodextrin (SBECD) that results in significant solubility enhancement. Complete amorphousness of the cyclodextrin-enabled REM formulation was demonstrated by X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis, Raman chemical mapping and electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy. The use of solubilizing carbohydrate resulted in a 300-fold improvement of the aqueous solubility of REM, and enhanced dissolution rate of the drug enabling the preparation of stable infusion solutions for therapy. 2D ROESY NMR spectroscopy provided information on the nature of REM-excipient interaction and indicated the presence of inclusion phenomenon and the electrostatic attraction between anionic SBECD and nitrogen-containing REM in aqueous solution.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Excipients/chemistry , beta-Cyclodextrins/chemistry , Adenosine Monophosphate/chemistry , Alanine/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , COVID-19/drug therapy , Calorimetry, Differential Scanning , Freeze Drying/methods , Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy , Microscopy, Electron, Scanning , Molecular Docking Simulation , Nanofibers/chemistry , Powders , Solubility , Spectrum Analysis, Raman , X-Ray Diffraction
16.
ACS Appl Mater Interfaces ; 13(14): 16084-16096, 2021 Apr 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1164786

ABSTRACT

As COVID-19 exemplifies, respiratory diseases transmitted through aerosols or droplets are global threats to public health, and respiratory protection measures are essential first lines of infection prevention and control. However, common face masks are single use and can cause cross-infection due to the accumulated infectious pathogens. We developed salt-based formulations to coat membrane fibers to fabricate antimicrobial filters. Here, we report a mechanistic study on salt-induced pathogen inactivation. The salt recrystallization following aerosol exposure was characterized over time on sodium chloride (NaCl), potassium sulfate (K2SO4), and potassium chloride (KCl) powders and coatings, which revealed that NaCl and KCl start to recrystallize within 5 min and K2SO4 within 15 min. The inactivation kinetics observed for the H1N1 influenza virus and Klebsiella pneumoniae matched the salt recrystallization well, which was identified as the main destabilizing mechanism. Additionally, the salt-coated filters were prepared with different methods (with and without a vacuum process), which led to salt coatings with different morphologies for diverse applications. Finally, the salt-coated filters caused a loss of pathogen viability independent of transmission mode (aerosols or droplets), against both DI water and artificial saliva suspensions. Overall, these findings increase our understanding of the salt-recrystallization-based technology to develop highly versatile antimicrobial filters.


Subject(s)
Filtration/instrumentation , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/drug effects , Klebsiella pneumoniae/drug effects , Masks , Potassium Chloride/chemistry , Sodium Chloride/chemistry , Sulfates/chemistry , Aerosols , Air Filters , Crystallization , Kinetics , Membranes, Artificial , Polypropylenes , Powders , Respiratory Protective Devices , Temperature , X-Ray Diffraction
17.
Mol Pharm ; 18(5): 1970-1984, 2021 05 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1164785

ABSTRACT

Physicochemical properties, in particular solubility and the associated bioavailability, are key factors in determining efficacy of poorly water-soluble drugs, which constitute 40% of new drugs in the market, and improving them is an important challenge for modern pharmacy. A recent strategy to achieve this goal is formation of stable co-amorphous solid dispersions with co-formers of low molecular weight. Here, the amorphization strategy was applied for low-soluble anti-hypertensive valsartan (VAL), an angiotensin II receptor blocker, and nicotinamide, which exhibits lung- and cardio-protective effects. Through interactions with the renin-angiotensin-aldosteron system, VAL may be used to treat both hypertension and the current pandemic coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 infection. Using mechanochemical and liquid- and solid-state approaches, solvated co-amorphous solid dispersions of VAL with nicotinamide were obtained. They were characterized by spectroscopic, thermal, and X-ray analyses. The density functional theory, quantum theory of atoms in molecules, and non-covalent interaction index calculations revealed the presence of two types of hydrogen bonds between VAL and NIC (i.e., N-H···O and O-H···O). One of them had a partially covalent character, which caused conformational changes in the flexible VAL molecule, restricting contribution of the tetrazolyl N-H donor and thus limiting the possibility of co-crystal formation. The recognized VAL/NIC1- and VAL/NIC2-type heterodimeric interactions were responsible for the excellent durability of the solid compositions and up to 24-fold better solubility than VAL alone. The synthesized dispersions constitute a new class of dually acting drugs, containing an active pharmaceutical ingredient (VAL) and supporting nutraceutical (nicotinamide).


Subject(s)
Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers/chemistry , Antihypertensive Agents/chemistry , COVID-19/drug therapy , Chemistry, Pharmaceutical/methods , Drug Carriers/chemistry , Niacinamide/chemistry , Valsartan/chemistry , Antihypertensive Agents/chemical synthesis , Biological Availability , Calorimetry, Differential Scanning , Drug Compounding , Humans , Hydrogen Bonding , Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy , Microscopy, Electron, Scanning , Quantum Theory , Solubility , Spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared , X-Ray Diffraction
18.
J Aerosol Med Pulm Drug Deliv ; 34(1): 20-31, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066217

ABSTRACT

Background: Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) is one of the repurposed drugs proposed for the treatment of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). However, all the published clinical trials involve oral administration of the drug, although the disease is primarily a respiratory one. Direct inhaled delivery could reduce the side effects associated with oral use and ensure a high concentration of the drug in the lungs. In this study, inhalable HCQ powders were prepared and characterized for potential COVID-19 therapy. Methods: Hydroxychloroquine sulfate (HCQ-sul) was jet milled (JM) followed by conditioning by storage at different relative humidities (43%, 53%, 58%, and 75% RHs) for 7 days. The solid-state properties, including particle morphology and size distribution, crystallinity, and vapor moisture profiles of HCQ-sul samples, were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, laser diffraction, X-ray powder diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, and dynamic water vapor sorption. The aerosol performance of the HCQ-sul powders was assessed using a medium-high resistance Osmohaler coupling to a next-generation impactor (NGI) at a flow rate of 60 L/min. Results: The jet-milled powder showed a volume median diameter of 1.7 µm (span 1.5) and retained the same crystalline form as the raw HCQ-sul. A small amount of amorphous materials was present in the jet-milled HCQ-sul, which was convertible to the stable, crystalline state after conditioning at 53%, 58%, and 75% RH. The recovered fine particle fraction (FPF)recovered and the emitted fine particle fraction (FPFemitted) of the HCQ-sul sample immediately after jet milling and the samples after conditioning at 43%, 53%, and 58% RH were similar at ∼43% and 61%, respectively. In contrast, the sample having conditioned at 75%RH showed lower corresponding values at 33% and 26% respectively, due to the formation of solid bridges caused by excessive moisture. Conclusion: Inhalable crystalline powders of HCQ-sul were successfully prepared, which can be used for clinical testing as a potential inhaled COVID-19 treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Hydroxychloroquine/administration & dosage , SARS-CoV-2 , Administration, Inhalation , Calorimetry, Differential Scanning , Humans , Particle Size , Powders , X-Ray Diffraction
19.
ACS Appl Mater Interfaces ; 13(5): 5919-5928, 2021 Feb 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1042382

ABSTRACT

The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has created a need for coatings that reduce infection from SARS-CoV-2 via surfaces. Such a coating could be used on common touch surfaces (e.g., door handles and railings) to reduce both disease transmission and fear of touching objects. Herein, we describe the design, fabrication, and testing of a cupric oxide anti-SARS-CoV-2 coating. Rapid loss of infectivity is an important design criterion, so a porous hydrophilic coating was created to allow rapid infiltration of aqueous solutions into the coating where diffusion distances to the cupric oxide surface are short and the surface area is large. The coating was deposited onto glass from a dispersion of cuprous oxide in ethanol and then thermally treated at 700 °C for 2 h to produce a CuO coating that is ≈30 µm thick. The heat treatment oxidized the cuprous oxide to cupric oxide and sintered the particles into a robust film. The SARS-CoV-2 infectivity from the CuO film was reduced by 99.8% in 30 min and 99.9% in 1 h compared to that from glass. The coating remained hydrophilic for at least 5 months, and there was no significant change in the cross-hatch test of robustness after exposure to 70% ethanol or 3 wt % bleach.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , Copper/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Animals , Chlorocebus aethiops , Humans , Photoelectron Spectroscopy , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Surface Properties , Vero Cells , Virus Inactivation/drug effects , X-Ray Diffraction
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