Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 26
Filter
1.
Am J Trop Med Hyg ; 106(6): 1589-1592, 2022 06 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1903692

ABSTRACT

The United Nations has declared Yemen as the world's worst humanitarian crisis with 21 million people in need of humanitarian assistance. Due to the convergence of severe economic instability exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic, stifling war, and spiking food prices, the Yemeni people are at the brink of famine with women and children especially malnourished. Desperate to feed their families, civilians are forced to resort to begging, participate in child marriages, or plunge into debt. An inflated currency has significantly diminished the purchasing power of the Yemeni population, and COVID-19 restrictions have made acquisition of food and essential commodity imports arduous. Immediate action by global and local governments is essential to prevent the deaths of thousands of people in the wake of severe food scarcity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Child , Female , Food Insecurity , Food Supply , Humans , Pandemics , Yemen/epidemiology
2.
West J Emerg Med ; 23(2): 276-284, 2022 Feb 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1737293

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Much of Yemen's infrastructure and healthcare system has been destroyed by the ongoing civil war that began in late 2014. This has created a dire situation that has led to food insecurity, water shortages, uncontrolled outbreaks of infectious disease and further failings within the healthcare system. This has greatly impacted the practice of emergency medicine (EM), and is now compounded by the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) global pandemic. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review of the current state of emergency and disaster medicine in Yemen, followed by unstructured qualitative interviews with EM workers, performed by either direct discussion or via phone calls, to capture their lived experience, observations on and perceptions of the challenges facing EM in Yemen. We summarize and present our findings in this paper. RESULTS: Emergency medical services (EMS) in Yemen are severely depleted. Across the country as a whole, there are only 10 healthcare workers for every 10,000 people - less than half of the WHO benchmark for basic health coverage - and only five physicians, less than one third the world average; 18% of the country's 333 districts have no qualified physicians at all. Ambulances and basic medical equipment are in short supply. As a result of the ongoing war, only 50% of the 5056 pre-war hospitals and health facilities are functional. In June 2020, Yemen recorded a 27% mortality rate of Yemenis who were confirmed to have COVID-19, more than five times the global average and among the highest in the world at that time. CONCLUSION: In recent years, serious efforts to develop an advanced EM presence in Yemen and cultivate improvements in EMS have been stymied or have failed outright due to the ongoing challenges. Yemen's chronically under-resourced healthcare sector is ill-equipped to deal with the additional strain of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emergency Medical Services , Emergency Medicine , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Yemen/epidemiology
3.
BMJ Open ; 12(1): e047868, 2022 01 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1605902

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has led to a global crisis, creating an unprecedented situation, which has taken the world by storm, overshadowing on all life' aspects and having a significant impact on the health systems of most countries. In this study, the delivery of health services is investigated both before and during the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic at public hospitals in Yemen to assess the impact of COVID-19 on the utilisation of health services. METHOD: Data collected from 127 hospitals in Yemen were reviewed using the DHIS2 system. The data represented 3 months before the outbreak of COVID-19 between January and March 2020 and during the outbreak of COVID-19 outbreak between April and June 2020. The results were then compared with the same period in 2019. The utilisation pattern of healthcare services during the period of investigation was compiled and analysed by applying a generalised estimating equation (GEE) to examine the effects of the COVID-19 outbreak in Yemen. The data collected from the targeted hospitals included information related to consultations, surgeries, deliveries, C-sections and penta-3rd dose immunisation. RESULTS: The trendline of health services used during the pandemic showed a gradual decline beginning from April 2020 for consultations, surgeries and penta-3rd dose utilisation. The GEE model revealed a significant effect (p<0.05) during the outbreak compared with preoutbreak in the consultation services (B=-1,343.9; 95% CI -1,767.2 to -920.6; χ2=38.718), surgeries (B=-54.98; 95% CI -79.13 to -30.83, χ2=19.911) and penta-3rd dose (B=-24.47; 95% CI -30.56 to -18.38 and χ2=62.010). As for deliveries and C-sections, the results were shown to be statistically non-significant. CONCLUSION: The impact of COVID-19 on continuity of health services delivery in Yemen has been distinct and profound, where the study revealed that the number of the consultations, surgeries and number of vaccinated children have been declined during the COVID-19 pandemic, likely due to the partially lockdown measures taken and fear of being infected. However, the deliveries and C-section services remained nearly in the same level and did not affect by the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Child , Communicable Disease Control , Health Services , Hospitals, Public , Humans , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Yemen/epidemiology
4.
Int J Infect Dis ; 115: 239-244, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587627

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In Yemen, initial surveillance of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) focused primarily on patients with symptoms or severe disease. The full spectrum of the disease remains unclear. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first seroprevalence study performed in Yemen. METHODS: This cross-sectional investigation included 2001 participants from all age groups from four districts in Aden, southern Yemen. A multi-stage sampling method was used. Data were collected using a well-structured questionnaire, and blood samples were taken. Healgen COVID-19 IgG/IgM Rapid Diagnostic Test (RDT) Cassettes were used in all participants. All positive RDTs and 14% of negative RDTs underwent enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) testing (WANTAI SARS-CoV-2 Ab ELISA Kit) for confirmation. RESULTS: In total, 549 of 2001 participants were RDT positive and confirmed by ELISA, giving a prevalence of COVID-19 of 27.4%. The prevalence of immunoglobulin G was 25%. The prevalence of asymptomatic COVID-19 in the entire study group was 7.9%. The highest prevalence was observed in Al-Mansurah district (33.4%). Regarding sociodemographic factors, the prevalence of COVID-19 was significantly higher among females, housewives and subjects with a history of contact with a COVID-19 patient: 32%, 31% and 39%, respectively. CONCLUSION: This study found high prevalence of COVID-19 in the study population. Household transmission was common.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Antibodies, Viral , Cross-Sectional Studies , Diagnostic Tests, Routine , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin M , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Yemen/epidemiology
5.
Front Public Health ; 9: 688119, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1562382

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 pandemic has underscored the need for a well-trained public health workforce to save lives through timely outbreaks detection and response. In Yemen, a country that is entering its seventh year of a protracted war, the ongoing conflict severely limited the country's capacity to implement effective preparedness and response measures to outbreaks including COVID-19. There are growing concerns that the virus may be circulating within communities undetected and unmitigated especially as underreporting continues in some areas of the country due to a lack of testing facilities, delays in seeking treatment, stigma, difficulty accessing treatment centers, the perceived risks of seeking care or for political issues. The Yemen Field Epidemiology Training Program (FETP) was launched in 2011 to address the shortage of a skilled public health workforce, with the objective of strengthening capacity in field epidemiology. Thus, events of public health importance can be detected and investigated in a timely and effective manner. During the COVID-19 pandemic, the Yemen FETP's response has been instrumental through participating in country-level coordination, planning, monitoring, and developing guidelines/standard operating procedures and strengthening surveillance capacities, outbreak investigations, contact tracing, case management, infection prevention, and control, risk communication, and research. As the third wave is circulating with a steeper upward curve than the previous ones with possible new variants, the country will not be able to deal with a surge of cases as secondary care is extremely crippled. Since COVID-19 prevention and control are the only option available to reduce its grave impact on morbidity and mortality, health partners should support the Yemen FETP to strengthen the health system's response to future epidemics. One important lesson learned from the COVID-19 pandemic, especially in the Yemen context and applicable to developing and war-torn countries, is that access to outside experts becomes limited, therefore, it is crucial to invest in building national expertise to provide timely, cost-effective, and sustainable services that are culturally appropriate. It is also essential to build such expertise at the governorate and district levels, as they are normally the first respondents, and to provide them with the necessary tools for immediate response in order to overcome the disastrous delays.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics , Public Health , SARS-CoV-2 , Yemen/epidemiology
6.
JMIR Public Health Surveill ; 7(7): e27621, 2021 07 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1505428

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The national severe acute respiratory illness (SARI) surveillance system in Yemen was established in 2010 to monitor SARI occurrence in humans and provide a foundation for detecting SARI outbreaks. OBJECTIVE: To ensure that the objectives of national surveillance are being met, this study aimed to examine the level of usefulness and the performance of the SARI surveillance system in Yemen. METHODS: The updated Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines were used for the purposes of our evaluation. Related documents and reports were reviewed. Data were collected from 4 central-level managers and stakeholders and from 10 focal points at 4 sentinel sites by using a semistructured questionnaire. For each attribute, percent scores were calculated and ranked as follows: very poor (≤20%), poor (20%-40%), average (40%-60%), good (60%-80%), and excellent (>80%). RESULTS: As rated by the evaluators, the SARI surveillance system achieved its objectives. The system's flexibility (percent score: 86%) and acceptability (percent score: 82%) were rated as "excellent," and simplicity (percent score: 74%) and stability (percent score: 75%) were rated as "good." The percent score for timeliness was 23% in 2018, which indicated poor timeliness. The overall data quality percent score of the SARI system was 98.5%. Despite its many strengths, the SARI system has some weaknesses. For example, it depends on irregular external financial support. CONCLUSIONS: The SARI surveillance system was useful in estimating morbidity and mortality, monitoring the trends of the disease, and promoting research for informing prevention and control measures. The overall performance of the SARI surveillance system was good. We recommend expanding the system by promoting private health facilities' (eg, private hospitals and private health centers) engagement in SARI surveillance, establishing an electronic database at central and peripheral sites, and providing the National Central Public Health Laboratory with the reagents needed for disease confirmation.


Subject(s)
Sentinel Surveillance , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/epidemiology , Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. , Disease Outbreaks , Humans , United States , Yemen/epidemiology
7.
PLoS One ; 16(10): e0248325, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496338

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since the beginning of the COVID-19 outbreak, many pharmaceutical companies have been racing to develop a safe and effective COVID-19 vaccine. Simultaneously, rumors and misinformation about COVID-19 are still widely spreading. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the prevalence of COVID-19 misinformation among the Yemeni population and its association with vaccine acceptance and perceptions. METHODS: A cross-sectional online survey was conducted in four major cities in Yemen. The constructed questionnaire consisted of four main sections (sociodemographic data, misinformation, perceptions (perceived susceptibility, severity, and worry), and vaccination acceptance evaluation). Subject recruitment and data collection were conducted online utilizing social websites and using the snowball sampling technique. Descriptive and inferential analyses were performed using SPSS version 27. RESULTS: The total number of respondents was 484. Over 60% of them were males and had a university education. More than half had less than 100$ monthly income and were khat chewers, while only 18% were smokers. Misinformation prevalence ranged from 8.9% to 38.9%, depending on the statement being asked. Men, university education, higher income, employment, and living in urban areas were associated with a lower misinformation level (p <0.05). Statistically significant association (p <0.05) between university education, living in urban areas, and being employed with perceived susceptibility were observed. The acceptance rate was 61.2% for free vaccines, but it decreased to 43% if they had to purchase it. Females, respondents with lower monthly income, and those who believed that pharmaceutical companies made the virus for financial gains were more likely to reject the vaccination (p <0.05). CONCLUSION: The study revealed that the acceptance rate to take a vaccine was suboptimal and significantly affected by gender, misinformation, cost, and income. Furthermore, being female, non-university educated, low-income, and living in rural areas were associated with higher susceptibility to misinformation about COVID-19. These findings show a clear link between misinformation susceptibility and willingness to vaccinate. Focused awareness campaigns to decrease misinformation and emphasize the vaccination's safety and efficacy might be fundamental before initiating any mass vaccination in Yemen.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disease Outbreaks , Vaccination Refusal , Vaccination , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Communication , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Disease Outbreaks/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Male , Socioeconomic Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vaccination/psychology , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , Vaccination Refusal/psychology , Vaccination Refusal/statistics & numerical data , Yemen/epidemiology
8.
Global Health ; 17(1): 83, 2021 07 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1388780

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Yemen has been left in shambles and almost destroyed by its devastating civil war, and is now having to deal with the spread of coronavirus. The Yemeni people have been are left to fend for themselves and faced many problems such as hunger, the ongoing war, infections, diseases and lack of equipment even before the COVID-19 pandemic. All together it is a humanitarian crisis. Only around 50% of the hospitals and healthcare facilities are in full working condition, and even those that are functioning are operating at nowhere near full potential. Healthcare staff and facilities lack necessary essential equipment and money. CONCLUSION: As, sadly, is common in conflict-affected regions, the violence has brought with it a secondary disaster of infectious disease outbreaks. Yemen is not only battling COVID-19 amid a catastrophic war, but also has to deal with other diseases such as cholera, diphtheria and measles. A number of key measures are needed to support the current efforts against this deadly epidemic and its potential subsequent waves as well as to prevent further epidemics in Yemen.


Subject(s)
Armed Conflicts , COVID-19/epidemiology , Relief Work , Humans , Yemen/epidemiology
10.
Front Public Health ; 9: 667364, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1285357

ABSTRACT

Background: Since the Arab uprising in 2011, Libya, Syria and Yemen have gone through major internal armed conflicts. This resulted in large numbers of deaths, injuries, and population displacements, with collapse of the healthcare systems. Furthermore, the situation was complicated by the emergence of COVID-19 as a global pandemic, which made the populations of these countries struggle under unusual conditions to deal with both the pandemic and the ongoing wars. This study aimed to determine the impact of the armed conflicts on the epidemiology of the novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) within these war-torn countries and highlight the strategies needed to combat the spread of the pandemic and its consequences. Methods: Official and public data concerning the dynamics of the armed conflicts and the spread of SARS-COV-2 in Libya, Syria and Yemen were collected from all available sources, starting from the emergence of COVID-19 in each country until the end of December 2020. Datasets were analyzed by a set of statistical techniques and the weekly resolved data were used to probe the link between the intensity levels of the conflict and the prevalence of COVID-19. Results: The data indicated that there was an increase in the intensity of the violence at an early stage from March to August 2020, when it approximately doubled in the three countries, particularly in Libya. During that period, few cases of COVID-19 were reported, ranging from 5 to 53 cases/day. From September to December 2020, a significant decline in the intensity of the armed conflicts was accompanied by steep upsurges in the rate of COVID-19 cases, which reached up to 500 cases/day. The accumulative cases vary from one country to another during the armed conflict. The highest cumulative number of cases were reported in Libya, Syria and Yemen. Conclusions: Our analysis demonstrates that the armed conflict provided an opportunity for SARS-CoV-2 to spread. The early weeks of the pandemic coincided with the most intense period of the armed conflicts, and few cases were officially reported. This indicates undercounting and hidden spread during the early stage of the pandemic. The pandemic then spread dramatically as the armed conflict declined, reaching its greatest spread by December 2020. Full-blown transmission of the COVID-19 pandemic in these countries is expected. Therefore, urgent national and international strategies should be implemented to combat the pandemic and its consequences.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Armed Conflicts , Humans , Libya/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Syria/epidemiology , Yemen/epidemiology
11.
Int J Infect Dis ; 106: 79-82, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1279593

ABSTRACT

The first case of COVID-19 in Yemen was confirmed on 10 April 2020. Having faced with a six-year long conflict that has destroyed half of its healthcare facilities and displaced millions, predictions of infections and mortality in Yemen suggested a looming healthcare catastrophe. Difficulty in implementing coordinated lockdowns and preventive measures due to the daily labor working nature of the majority of the population, provided the perfect breeding ground for the SARS-CoV-2 virus. However, official figures of infections and mortality are very low and there have not been confirmed reports of excess mortality. This could indicate that Yemen is silently marching towards forced herd immunity. Seroprevalence studies will provide useful insight into the COVID-19 transmission trajectory in Yemen, which can serve as a guide in planning vaccine distribution strategies and allocating the limited funds wisely.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/mortality , Health Resources/supply & distribution , Immunity, Herd , Armed Conflicts , COVID-19/immunology , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Yemen/epidemiology
12.
Lancet ; 397(10291): 2247, 2021 06 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1263394
13.
BMJ Glob Health ; 6(3)2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1148158

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The burden of COVID-19 in low-income and conflict-affected countries remains unclear, largely reflecting low testing rates. In parts of Yemen, reports indicated a peak in hospital admissions and burials during May-June 2020. To estimate excess mortality during the epidemic period, we quantified activity across all identifiable cemeteries within Aden governorate (population approximately 1 million) by analysing very high-resolution satellite imagery and compared estimates to Civil Registry office records. METHODS: After identifying active cemeteries through remote and ground information, we applied geospatial analysis techniques to manually identify new grave plots and measure changes in burial surface area over a period from July 2016 to September 2020. After imputing missing grave counts using surface area data, we used alternative approaches, including simple interpolation and a generalised additive mixed growth model, to predict both actual and counterfactual (no epidemic) burial rates by cemetery and across the governorate during the most likely period of COVID-19 excess mortality (from 1 April 2020) and thereby compute excess burials. We also analysed death notifications to the Civil Registry office over the same period. RESULTS: We collected 78 observations from 11 cemeteries. In all but one, a peak in daily burial rates was evident from April to July 2020. Interpolation and mixed model methods estimated ≈1500 excess burials up to 6 July, and 2120 up to 19 September, corresponding to a peak weekly increase of 230% from the counterfactual. Satellite imagery estimates were generally lower than Civil Registry data, which indicated a peak 1823 deaths in May alone. However, both sources suggested the epidemic had waned by September 2020. DISCUSSION: To our knowledge, this is the first instance of satellite imagery being used for population mortality estimation. Findings suggest a substantial, under-ascertained impact of COVID-19 in this urban Yemeni governorate and are broadly in line with previous mathematical modelling predictions, though our method cannot distinguish direct from indirect virus deaths. Satellite imagery burial analysis appears a promising novel approach for monitoring epidemics and other crisis impacts, particularly where ground data are difficult to collect.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Cemeteries , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Satellite Imagery , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Registries , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Yemen/epidemiology
14.
OMICS ; 24(12): 685-687, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1117408

ABSTRACT

As the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is impacting on the entire planet, field notes from resource-limited settings are increasingly relevant, both instrumentally and normatively, due to codependency of world populations in the struggle against the pandemic. Yemen is an apt and timely example to illustrate the social and political determinants of planetary health and the ways in which they impact on health care and dignity of people in times of crisis as well as during elective medical care. Importantly, many local communities have deep knowledge of various plant resources that can be evaluated with guidance of the omics systems science. The planetary society would be well poised to build resilience against future pandemics and ecological crises by harnessing local and global expertise in plant omics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Plant Preparations/therapeutic use , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Global Health , Herbal Medicine/methods , Humans , Planets , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Yemen/epidemiology
17.
J Infect Dev Ctries ; 14(12): 1374-1379, 2020 12 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1000366

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Coronavirus infectious disease 2019 (COVID-19) is currently one of the most important public health crises affecting the global human population. It continues to spread widely, as the world still lacks specific treatments and a vaccine for the virus. The scenario of COVID-19 in Yemen seems obscure due to the lack of adequate data, therefore, we developed an electronic questionnaire and distributed it online among Yemeni people. The aim of this study was to understand the COVID-19 epidemiological situation in Yemen better since there is currently limited published data and limited availability of COVID-19 testing. METHODOLOGY: A 34-question web-based survey was distributed on social media outlets targeting people in Yemen. Data aggregation, analysis, and visualization were performed using Tableau and Microsoft Excel. RESULTS: 2,341 individuals reported symptoms concerning for COVID-19 infection, with 25.4% reporting a chronic medical condition. Diabetes, hypertension, asthma, and immune deficiency were associated with increased severity of the disease, while obesity, cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, and liver disease were not. Only 37 individuals (1.6%) had a confirmatory COVID-19 PCR test. The presence of high fever, dyspnea, chest pain, and dysphagia were symptoms that tended to be correlated to worse clinical outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides some important information about the early overspread of COVID-19 within the Yemeni community in May, June, and July of 2020. It shows that online questionnaires may help in collecting data about pandemics in resource-limited countries where testing availability is limited.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Surveys and Questionnaires , Adult , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , Comorbidity , Female , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Severity of Illness Index , Social Media , Yemen/epidemiology , Young Adult
18.
PLoS One ; 15(12): e0243962, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-971906

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19) represents a difficult challenge and could have devastating consequences for the healthcare system and healthcare workers in war-torn countries with poor healthcare facilities such as Yemen. Our study aimed to evaluate the knowledge, preparedness, counselling practices of healthcare workers regarding COVID-19, and the perceived barriers to adequately prevent and control COVID-19 in Yemen. METHODS: Healthcare workers (HCWs) from major healthcare facilities participated in this cross-sectional study. A self-administered questionnaire comprising of five main domains (demographics, knowledge, self-preparedness, counselling practice, perceived barriers) was distributed among HCWs after obtaining informed consent. A convenient sampling technique was used. Descriptive and inferential analyses were applied using SPSS software. RESULTS: A total of 1000 participants were initially targeted to participate in the study with 514 (51.4%) responding, of which 55.3% were female. Physicians and nurses constituted the largest proportion of participants, with 39.5% and 33.3%, respectively. The median scores for knowledge, self-preparedness, and counselling practice were 8 (out of 9), 9 (out of 15), and 25 (out of 30), respectively. The physician group showed a statistically significant association with better knowledge compared to the nurse group only, P<0.001. Males had higher preparedness scores than females, p<0.001. Also, the intensive care unit (ICU) and emergency departments presented a statistically significant difference by which the participants from these departments were more prepared compared to the others (e.g. outpatients, paediatrics and surgery) with P < 0.0001. The lack of awareness among the general population about COVID-19 preventive measures was perceived as the most common barrier for the adequate prevention and control of COVID-19 in Yemen (89.1%). CONCLUSION: The major highlight of this study is that HCWs have, overall, good knowledge, suboptimal preparedness, and adequate counselling practices prior to the outbreak of COVID-19 in Yemen, despite the high number of perceived barriers. However, urgent action and interventions are needed to improve the preparedness of HCWs to manage COVID-19. The perceived barriers also need to be fully addressed by the local healthcare authorities and international organisations working in Yemen for adequate prevention and control measures to be in place in managing COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Armed Conflicts , Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19 , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Health Personnel , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Yemen/epidemiology
19.
PLoS One ; 15(10): e0241260, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-895071

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Yemen was one of the last countries in the world to declare the first case of the pandemic, on 10 April 2020. Fear and concerns of catastrophic outcomes of the epidemic in Yemen were immediately raised, as the country is facing a complex humanitarian crisis. The purpose of this report is to describe the epidemiological situation in Yemen during the first 2 months of the SARS-CoV-2 epidemic. METHODS: We analyzed the epidemiological data from 18 February to 05 June 2020, including the 2 months before the confirmation of the first case. We included in our analysis the data from 10 out of 23 governorates of Yemen, located in southern and eastern part of the country. RESULTS: A total of 469 laboratory confirmed, 552 probable and 55 suspected cases with onset of symptoms between 18 February and 5 June 2020 were reported through the surveillance system. The median age among confirmed cases was 46 years (range: 1-90 years), and 75% of the confirmed cases were male. A total of 111 deaths were reported among those with confirmed infection. The mean age among those who died was 53 years (range: 14-88 years), with 63% of deaths (n = 70) occurring in individuals under the age 60 years. A total of 268 individuals with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection were hospitalized (57%), among whom there were 95 in-hospital deaths. CONCLUSIONS: The surveillance strategy implemented in the first 2 months of the SARS CoV 2 in the southern and eastern governorates of Yemen, captured mainly severe cases. The mild and moderate cases were not self-reported to the health facilities and surveillance system due to limited resources, stigma, and other barriers. The mortality appeared to be higher in individuals aged under 60 years, and most fatalities occurred in individuals who were in critical condition when they reached the health facilities. It is unclear whether the presence of other acute comorbidities contributed to the high death rate among SARS-CoV-2 cases. The findings only include the southern and eastern part of the country, which is home to 31% of the total population of Yemen, as the data from the northern part of the country was inaccessible for analysis. This makes our results not generalizable to the rest of the country.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Child , Child, Preschool , Comorbidity , Contact Tracing , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Epidemiological Monitoring , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , SARS-CoV-2 , Yemen/epidemiology , Young Adult
20.
BMC Public Health ; 20(1): 1541, 2020 Oct 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-868551

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The growing incidence of coronavirus (COVID-19) continues to cause fear, anxiety, and panic amongst the community, especially for healthcare providers (HCPs), as the most vulnerable group at risk of contracting this new SARS-CoV-2 infection. To protect and enhance the ability of HCPs to perform their role in responding to COVID-19, healthcare authorities must help to alleviate the level of stress and anxiety amongst HCPs and the community. This will improve the knowledge, attitude and practice towards COVID-19, especially for HCPs. In addition, authorities need to comply in treating this virus by implementing control measures and other precautions. This study explores the knowledge, attitude, anxiety, and preventive behaviours among Yemeni HCPs towards COVID-19. METHODS: A descriptive, web-based-cross-sectional study was conducted among 1231 Yemeni HCPs. The COVID-19 related questionnaire was designed using Google forms where the responses were coded and analysed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software package (IBM SPSS), version 22.0. Descriptive statistics and Pearson's correlation coefficient test were also employed in this study. A p-value of < 0.05 with a 95% confidence interval was considered as statistically significant. The data collection phase commenced on 22nd April 2020, at 6 pm and finished on 26th April 2020 at 11 am. RESULTS: The results indicated that from the 1231 HCPs participating in this study, 61.6% were male, and 67% were aged between 20 and 30 years with a mean age of 29.29 ± 6.75. Most (86%) held a bachelor's degree or above having at least 10 years of work experience or less (88.1%). However, while 57.1% of the respondents obtained their information via social networks and news media, a further 60.0% had never attended lectures/discussions about COVID-19. The results further revealed that the majority of respondents had adequate knowledge, optimistic attitude, moderate level of anxiety, and high-performance in preventive behaviours, 69.8, 85.10%, 51.0 and 87.70%, respectively, towards COVID-19. CONCLUSION: Although the Yemeni HCPs exhibited an adequate level of knowledge, optimistic attitude, moderate level of anxiety, and high-performance in preventive behaviours toward COVID-19, the results highlighted gaps, particularly in their knowledge and attitude towards COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Health Personnel/psychology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Adult , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Yemen/epidemiology , Young Adult
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL