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1.
Exp Neurol ; 365: 114409, 2023 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2291951

ABSTRACT

Microphysiological systems (MPS) are 2D or 3D multicellular constructs able to mimic tissue microenvironments. The latest models encompass a range of techniques, including co-culturing of various cell types, utilization of scaffolds and extracellular matrix materials, perfusion systems, 3D culture methods, 3D bioprinting, organ-on-a-chip technology, and examination of tissue structures. Several human brain 3D cultures or brain MPS (BMPS) have emerged in the last decade. These organoids or spheroids are 3D culture systems derived from induced pluripotent cells or embryonic stem cells that contain neuronal and glial populations and recapitulate structural and physiological aspects of the human brain. BMPS have been introduced recently in the study and modeling of neuroinfectious diseases and have proven to be useful in establishing neurotropism of viral infections, cell-pathogen interactions needed for infection, assessing cytopathological effects, genomic and proteomic profiles, and screening therapeutic compounds. Here we review the different methodologies of organoids used in neuroinfectious diseases including spheroids, guided and unguided protocols as well as microglia and blood-brain barrier containing models, their specific applications, and limitations. The review provides an overview of the models existing for specific infections including Zika, Dengue, JC virus, Japanese encephalitis, measles, herpes, SARS-CoV2, and influenza viruses among others, and provide useful concepts in the modeling of disease and antiviral agent screening.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells , Zika Virus Infection , Zika Virus , Humans , Microphysiological Systems , Proteomics , RNA, Viral , COVID-19/pathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Brain , Zika Virus Infection/pathology , Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells/physiology
2.
Viruses ; 14(3)2022 03 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1760845

ABSTRACT

Pathogenesis of viral infections of the central nervous system (CNS) is poorly understood, and this is partly due to the limitations of currently used preclinical models. Brain organoid models can overcome some of these limitations, as they are generated from human derived stem cells, differentiated in three dimensions (3D), and can mimic human neurodevelopmental characteristics. Therefore, brain organoids have been increasingly used as brain models in research on various viruses, such as Zika virus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, human cytomegalovirus, and herpes simplex virus. Brain organoids allow for the study of viral tropism, the effect of infection on organoid function, size, and cytoarchitecture, as well as innate immune response; therefore, they provide valuable insight into the pathogenesis of neurotropic viral infections and testing of antivirals in a physiological model. In this review, we summarize the results of studies on viral CNS infection in brain organoids, and we demonstrate the broad application and benefits of using a human 3D model in virology research. At the same time, we describe the limitations of the studies in brain organoids, such as the heterogeneity in organoid generation protocols and age at infection, which result in differences in results between studies, as well as the lack of microglia and a blood brain barrier.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Central Nervous System Viral Diseases , Zika Virus Infection , Zika Virus , Blood-Brain Barrier , Brain/pathology , Humans , Organoids , Zika Virus Infection/pathology
3.
Front Immunol ; 13: 826091, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1731778

ABSTRACT

Neural stem cells (NSCs) are multipotent stem cells that reside in the fetal and adult mammalian brain, which can self-renew and differentiate into neurons and supporting cells. Intrinsic and extrinsic cues, from cells in the local niche and from distant sites, stringently orchestrates the self-renewal and differentiation competence of NSCs. Ample evidence supports the important role of NSCs in neuroplasticity, aging, disease, and repair of the nervous system. Indeed, activation of NSCs or their transplantation into injured areas of the central nervous system can lead to regeneration in animal models. Viral invasion of NSCs can negatively affect neurogenesis and synaptogenesis, with consequent cell death, impairment of cell cycle progression, early differentiation, which cause neural progenitors depletion in the cortical layer of the brain. Herein, we will review the current understanding of Zika virus (ZIKV) infection of the fetal brain and the NSCs, which are the preferential population targeted by ZIKV. Furthermore, the potential neurotropic properties of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), which may cause direct neurological damage, will be discussed.


Subject(s)
Brain/virology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Neurogenesis/physiology , Neurons/virology , Zika Virus Infection/pathology , Zika Virus Infection/virology , Animals , Humans , Neural Stem Cells/virology
4.
ChemMedChem ; 16(23): 3548-3552, 2021 12 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1400781

ABSTRACT

Over half a century since the description of the first antiviral drug, "old" re-emerging viruses and "new" emerging viruses still represent a serious threat to global health. Their high mutation rate and rapid selection of resistance toward common antiviral drugs, together with the increasing number of co-infections, make the war against viruses quite challenging. Herein we report a host-targeted approach, based on the inhibition of the lipid kinase PI4KIIIß, as a promising strategy for inhibiting the replication of multiple viruses hijacking this protein. We show that bithiazole inhibitors of PI4KIIIß block the replication of human rhinoviruses (hRV), Zika virus (ZIKV) and SARS-CoV-2 at low micromolar and sub-micromolar concentrations. However, while the anti-hRV/ZIKV activity can be directly linked to PI4KIIIß inhibition, the role of PI4KIIIß in SARS-CoV-2 entry/replication is debated.


Subject(s)
1-Phosphatidylinositol 4-Kinase/antagonists & inhibitors , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Enzyme Inhibitors/chemistry , Rhinovirus/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Thiazoles/chemistry , Virus Replication/drug effects , Zika Virus/physiology , 1-Phosphatidylinositol 4-Kinase/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Cell Line , Drug Stability , Enzyme Inhibitors/metabolism , Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Thiazoles/metabolism , Zika Virus/isolation & purification , Zika Virus Infection/pathology
5.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(3)2021 Jan 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389389

ABSTRACT

A high-throughput drug screen identifies potentially promising therapeutics for clinical trials. However, limitations that persist in current disease modeling with limited physiological relevancy of human patients skew drug responses, hamper translation of clinical efficacy, and contribute to high clinical attritions. The emergence of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology revolutionizes the paradigm of drug discovery. In particular, iPSC-based three-dimensional (3D) tissue engineering that appears as a promising vehicle of in vitro disease modeling provides more sophisticated tissue architectures and micro-environmental cues than a traditional two-dimensional (2D) culture. Here we discuss 3D based organoids/spheroids that construct the advanced modeling with evolved structural complexity, which propels drug discovery by exhibiting more human specific and diverse pathologies that are not perceived in 2D or animal models. We will then focus on various central nerve system (CNS) disease modeling using human iPSCs, leading to uncovering disease pathogenesis that guides the development of therapeutic strategies. Finally, we will address new opportunities of iPSC-assisted drug discovery with multi-disciplinary approaches from bioengineering to Omics technology. Despite technological challenges, iPSC-derived cytoarchitectures through interactions of diverse cell types mimic patients' CNS and serve as a platform for therapeutic development and personalized precision medicine.


Subject(s)
Central Nervous System Diseases/drug therapy , Drug Discovery/methods , Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells/cytology , Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells/drug effects , Tissue Engineering/methods , Animals , COVID-19/pathology , Central Nervous System Diseases/pathology , Drug Discovery/instrumentation , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical/instrumentation , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical/methods , Humans , Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells/pathology , Lab-On-A-Chip Devices , Organoids/cytology , Organoids/drug effects , Organoids/pathology , Tissue Engineering/instrumentation , Zika Virus Infection/drug therapy , Zika Virus Infection/pathology , COVID-19 Drug Treatment
6.
Viruses ; 13(8)2021 08 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1376994

ABSTRACT

Viral infection is a global public health threat causing millions of deaths. A suitable small animal model is essential for viral pathogenesis and host response studies that could be used in antiviral and vaccine development. The tree shrew (Tupaia belangeri or Tupaia belangeri chinenesis), a squirrel-like non-primate small mammal in the Tupaiidae family, has been reported to be susceptible to important human viral pathogens, including hepatitis viruses (e.g., HBV, HCV), respiratory viruses (influenza viruses, SARS-CoV-2, human adenovirus B), arboviruses (Zika virus and dengue virus), and other viruses (e.g., herpes simplex virus, etc.). The pathogenesis of these viruses is not fully understood due to the lack of an economically feasible suitable small animal model mimicking natural infection of human diseases. The tree shrew model significantly contributes towards a better understanding of the infection and pathogenesis of these important human pathogens, highlighting its potential to be used as a viable viral infection model of human viruses. Therefore, in this review, we summarize updates regarding human viral infection in the tree shrew model, which highlights the potential of the tree shrew to be utilized for human viral infection and pathogenesis studies.


Subject(s)
Disease Models, Animal , Tupaia , Virus Diseases , Adenoviridae Infections/immunology , Adenoviridae Infections/virology , Animals , COVID-19/virology , Dengue/immunology , Dengue/pathology , Dengue/virology , HIV Infections/virology , Hepatitis B/immunology , Hepatitis B/virology , Hepatitis C/immunology , Hepatitis C/pathology , Hepatitis C/virology , Herpes Simplex/pathology , Herpes Simplex/virology , Humans , Influenza, Human/immunology , Influenza, Human/virology , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/immunology , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/virology , Zika Virus Infection/immunology , Zika Virus Infection/pathology , Zika Virus Infection/virology
8.
J Immunol ; 205(11): 3083-3094, 2020 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-902734

ABSTRACT

Vertical transmission of the Zika virus (ZIKV) causes severe fetal defects, but the exact pathogenic mechanism is unclear. We identified up to a 10,480-fold higher expression of viral attachment factors AXL, GAS6, and PROS1 and a 3880-fold increase in ZIKV infectiousness/propagation in human term decidual stromal cells versus trophoblasts. Moreover, levels of viral attachment factors and ZIKV are significantly increased, whereas expression of innate immune response genes are significantly decreased, in human first trimester versus term decidual cells. ZIKV-infected decidual cell supernatants increased cytotrophoblasts infection up to 252-fold compared with directly infected cytotrophoblasts. Tizoxanide treatment efficiently inhibited Zika infection in both maternal and fetal cells. We conclude that ZIKV permissiveness, as well as innate immune responsiveness of human decidual cells, are gestational age dependent, and decidual cells augment ZIKV infection of primary human cytotrophoblast cultures, which are otherwise ZIKV resistant. Human decidual cells may act as reservoirs for trimester-dependent placental transmission of ZIKV, accounting for the higher Zika infection susceptibility and more severe fetal sequelae observed in early versus late pregnancy. Moreover, tizoxanide is a promising agent in preventing perinatal Zika transmission as well as other RNA viruses such as coronavirus.


Subject(s)
Decidua , Gestational Age , Immunity, Innate , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Zika Virus Infection , Zika Virus/immunology , Animals , Chlorocebus aethiops , Decidua/immunology , Decidua/pathology , Decidua/virology , Female , Humans , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/immunology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/pathology , Trophoblasts , Vero Cells , Zika Virus Infection/immunology , Zika Virus Infection/pathology , Zika Virus Infection/transmission
9.
Sci Adv ; 6(35): eaba7910, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-760200

ABSTRACT

Targeting a universal host protein exploited by most viruses would be a game-changing strategy that offers broad-spectrum solution and rapid pandemic control including the current COVID-19. Here, we found a common YxxØ-motif of multiple viruses that exploits host AP2M1 for intracellular trafficking. A library chemical, N-(p-amylcinnamoyl)anthranilic acid (ACA), was identified to interrupt AP2M1-virus interaction and exhibit potent antiviral efficacy against a number of viruses in vitro and in vivo, including the influenza A viruses (IAVs), Zika virus (ZIKV), human immunodeficiency virus, and coronaviruses including MERS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2. YxxØ mutation, AP2M1 depletion, or disruption by ACA causes incorrect localization of viral proteins, which is exemplified by the failure of nuclear import of IAV nucleoprotein and diminished endoplasmic reticulum localization of ZIKV-NS3 and enterovirus-A71-2C proteins, thereby suppressing viral replication. Our study reveals an evolutionarily conserved mechanism of protein-protein interaction between host and virus that can serve as a broad-spectrum antiviral target.


Subject(s)
Adaptor Proteins, Vesicular Transport/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Cinnamates/pharmacology , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , HIV Infections/drug therapy , Influenza, Human/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , ortho-Aminobenzoates/pharmacology , A549 Cells , Animals , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Binding Sites/genetics , COVID-19 , Cell Line, Tumor , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Dogs , HEK293 Cells , HIV Infections/pathology , HIV-1/drug effects , Host-Pathogen Interactions/drug effects , Humans , Influenza A virus/drug effects , Influenza, Human/pathology , Madin Darby Canine Kidney Cells , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mice, Knockout , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/drug effects , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Protein Binding/genetics , Protein Transport/drug effects , RNA, Viral/genetics , Receptor, Interferon alpha-beta/genetics , SARS-CoV-2 , Transforming Growth Factor beta1/metabolism , Vero Cells , Virus Replication/drug effects , Zika Virus/drug effects , Zika Virus Infection/pathology
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